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Visual search strategies of children with and without autism spectrum disorders during an embedded figures task
School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University of of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia.
School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, CHIRI, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia.
School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University of of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia; School of Education and Communication, Institute of Disability Research, Jönköping University, Sweden.
School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University of of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia.
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2014 (English)In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 8, no 5, 463-471 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Individuals with ASD often demonstrate superior performance on embedded figures tasks (EFTs). We investigated visual scanning behaviour in children with ASD during an EFT in an attempt replicating a previous study examining differences in visual search behaviour. Twenty-three children with, and 31 children without an ASD were shown 16 items from the Figure-Ground subtest of the TVPS-3 while wearing an eye tracker. Children with ASD exhibited fewer fixations, and less time per fixation, on the target figure. Accuracy was similar between the two groups. There were no other noteworthy differences between children with and without ASD. Differences in visual scanning patterns in the presence of typical behavioural performance suggest that any purported differences in processing style may not be detrimental to cognitive performance and further refinement of the current methodology may lead to support for a purported advantageous cognitive style. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier , 2014. Vol. 8, no 5, 463-471 p.
Keyword [en]
ASD; Embedded figures test; Eye tracking; Visual search
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116390DOI: 10.1016/j.rasd.2014.01.006ISI: 000335107200002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84894052212OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-116390DiVA: diva2:798856
Available from: 2015-03-27 Created: 2015-03-26 Last updated: 2017-12-04

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Falkmer, Torbjörn

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