liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Childhood burns in Sulaimaniyah province, Iraqi Kurdistan: A prospective study of admissions and outpatients
Sulaimani Polytech University, Iraq.
University of Nottingham, England.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
2015 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 41, no 2, 394-400 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: While it is globally observed that young children are at a higher risk of burn injuries, little is known about childhood burns in Iraqi Kurdistan. This study was undertaken to describe the epidemiology of burns amongst pre-school children in this region. Methods: A prospective study was undertaken from November 2007 to November 2008 involving all children aged 0-5 years attending the burns centre in Sulaimaniyah province for a new burn injury whether treated as an outpatient or admitted to hospital. Results: 1,122 children attended the bums centre of whom 944 (84%) were interviewed (male 53%, female 47%). Mean age was 1.9 years with children aged 1 year comprising 32% and those aged 2 years comprising 21% of the sample. The incidence of bums was 1044/100,000 person-years (1030 in females and 1057 in males). Mechanisms of injury included scalds (80%), contact burns (12%) flames (6%) and other mechanisms (2%). Almost 97% of burns occurred at home including 43% in the kitchen. Winter was the commonest season (36%) followed by autumn (24%). There were 3 peak times of injury during the day corresponding to meal times. The majority of bums were caused by hot water (44%) and tea (20%) and the most common equipment/products responsible were tea utensils (41%). There were 237 admissions with an admission rate of 95 per 100,000 person-years. Scald injuries accounted for most admissions (84%). Median total body surface area affected by the burn or scald (TBSA) was 11% and median hospital stay was 7 days. In-hospital mortality was 8%. Mortality rate was 4% when TBSA was less than= 25%, and 100% when TBSA was over 50%. Conclusion: Burn incidence is high in young children especially those aged 1-2 years. Preventive interventions targeted at families with young children and focusing on home safety measures could be effective in reducing childhood burns.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD , 2015. Vol. 41, no 2, 394-400 p.
Keyword [en]
Burns; Scalds; Children; Iraqi Kurdistan; Epidemiology
National Category
Basic Medicine
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116819DOI: 10.1016/j.burns.2014.07.008ISI: 000350089800027PubMedID: 25440849OAI: diva2:800756
Available from: 2015-04-07 Created: 2015-04-07 Last updated: 2015-04-07

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Al-Windi, Ahmad
By organisation
Division of Community MedicineFaculty of Health Sciences
In the same journal
Basic Medicine

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 35 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link