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Proton migration mechanism for the instability of organic field-effect transistors
Technical University of Eindhoven, Netherlands.
Technical University of Eindhoven, Netherlands; Philips Research Labs, Netherlands.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7104-7127
Philips Research Labs, Netherlands.
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2009 (English)In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 95, no 25, 253305Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During prolonged application of a gate bias, organic field-effect transistors show an instability involving a gradual shift of the threshold voltage toward the applied gate bias voltage. We propose a model for this instability in p-type transistors with a silicon-dioxide gate dielectric, based on hole-assisted production of protons in the accumulation layer and their subsequent migration into the gate dielectric. This model explains the much debated role of water and several other hitherto unexplained aspects of the instability of these transistors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Institute of Physics (AIP) , 2009. Vol. 95, no 25, 253305
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118178DOI: 10.1063/1.3275807ISI: 000273037700054OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-118178DiVA: diva2:813519
Note

Funding Agencies|Dutch Technology Foundation; NWO; Ministry of Economic Affairs

Available from: 2015-05-22 Created: 2015-05-22 Last updated: 2015-06-01

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Kemerink, Martijn
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ReferencesLink to record
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