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Boxing for biodiversity: a long-term follow up of an artificial dead wood environment
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
2015 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Today many saproxylic species are threatened because of habitat decline in Europe. Hollow trees represent a great part of the habitats that saproxylic species use. Since hollows takes a long time to develop, management actions are needed to prevent the extinction of saproxylic species. The aim of this study was to investigate the succession of saproxylic beetle species in artificial habitats in the form of wooden boxes. Wooden boxes were filled with a potential substrate and placed at different distances (0-1800 m) from oak hollow hot spots. In addition to the start mixture, four different additional substrates were added. In total, 4510 specimens of 114 saproxylic beetle species were sampled in 43 boxes over ten years. The specimens of tree-hollow species, wood rot species and nest species increased with 38% from the fourth to the final year but species richness decline from 47 to 29, respectively. A dead hen had a tendency for attracting more species but the small effect of different added substrates diminished over the years and had no significant effect on species richness after ten years. There was a higher similarity in species richness after ten years between the boxes and real hollow oaks. In conclusion, the artificial habitat developed into a more hollow like environment, with fewer but more abundant wood mould specialists, during ten years. This study clearly shows that the wooden boxes are used as habitats for saproxylic species as the boxes seems to develop into a more hollow-like habitat with time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. , 27 p.
Keyword [en]
Artificial habitats, saproxylic beetles, wood mould boxes, hollow trees, succession
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119742ISRN: LiTH-IFM-Ex--15/3006--SEOAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-119742DiVA: diva2:826651
Subject / course
Biology
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2015-06-26 Created: 2015-06-25 Last updated: 2015-09-23Bibliographically approved

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Ecology

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf