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Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-1
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
University of Malaya, Malaysia.
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 195, no 4, 1698-1704 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFN gamma and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association of Immunologists , 2015. Vol. 195, no 4, 1698-1704 p.
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121313DOI: 10.4049/jimmunol.1500618ISI: 000360013200039PubMedID: 26157174OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-121313DiVA: diva2:854135
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council; Swedish Physicians against AIDS Research Foundation [AI52731]; Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency/Swedish Agency for Research Cooperation with Developing Countries-Special Assistant; VINNMER for Vinnova; Linkoping University Hospital Research Fund; central regional agreement on medical training and clinical research (CALF) between Ostergotland County Council and Linkoping University; Swedish Society of Medicine; High Impact Research; University of Malaya [UM.C.625/1/HIR/139]

Available from: 2015-09-16 Created: 2015-09-14 Last updated: 2016-08-19

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Ellegård, RadaCrisci, ElisaNyström, SofiaHinkula, JormaLarsson, Marie
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Division of Microbiology and Molecular MedicineFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDepartment of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine
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Journal of Immunology
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