liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Synthesis of titanium-oxide nanoparticles with size and stoichiometry control
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1744-7322
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3767-225X
2015 (English)In: Journal of nanoparticle research, ISSN 1388-0764, E-ISSN 1572-896X, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 353-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ti-O nanoparticles have been synthesized via hollow cathode sputtering in an Ar-O-2 atmosphere using high power pulsing. It is shown that the stoichiometry and the size of the nanoparticles can be varied independently, the former through controlling the O-2 gas flow and the latter by the independent biasing of two separate anodes in the growth zone. Nanoparticles with diameters in the range of 25-75 nm, and with different Ti-O compositions and crystalline phases, have been synthesized.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag (Germany) , 2015. Vol. 17, no 9, p. 353-
Keywords [en]
Titanium dioxide; TiO2; Reactive sputtering; Size control; Composition control; Gas flow sputtering; Aerosols
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121300DOI: 10.1007/s11051-015-3158-3ISI: 000360245300002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-121300DiVA, id: diva2:854346
Note

Funding Agencies|Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation [KAW 2014.0276]; Swedish Research Council via the Linkoping Linneaus Environment LiLi-NFM [2008-6572]

Available from: 2015-09-16 Created: 2015-09-14 Last updated: 2017-12-21
In thesis
1. Titanium oxide nanoparticle production using high power pulsed plasmas
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Titanium oxide nanoparticle production using high power pulsed plasmas
2016 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis covers fundamental aspects of process control when growing titanium oxide nanoparticles in a reactive sputtering process. It covers the influence of oxygen containing gas on the oxidation state of the cathode from which the growth material is ejected, as well as its influence on the particles oxidation state and their nucleation. It was found that a low degree of reactive gases was necessary for nanoparticles of titanium to nucleate. When the oxygen gas was slightly increased, the nanoparticle yield and particle oxygen content increased. A further increase caused a decrease in particle yield which was attributed to a slight oxidation of the cathode. By varying the oxygen flow to the process, it was possible to control the oxygen content of the nanoparticles without fully oxidizing the cathode. Because oxygen containing gases such as residual water vapour has a profound influence on nanoparticle yield and composition, the deposition source was re-engineered to allow for cleaner and thus more stable synthesis conditions.

The size of the nanoparticles has been controlled by two means. The first is to change electrical potentials around the growth zone, which allows for nanoparticle size control in the order of 25-75 nm. This size control does not influence the oxygen content of the nanoparticles. The second means of size control investigated was by increasing the pressure. By doing this, the particle size can be increased from 50 – 250 nm, however the oxygen content also increases with pressure. Different particle morphologies were found by changing the pressure. At low pressures, mostly spherical particles with weak facets were produced. As the pressure increased, the particles got a cubic shape. At higher pressures the cubic particles started to get a fractured surface. At the highest pressure investigated, the fractured surface became poly-crystalline, giving a cauliflower shaped morphology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016. p. 48
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Thesis, ISSN 0280-7971 ; 1748
National Category
Materials Chemistry Chemical Process Engineering Metallurgy and Metallic Materials Other Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128622 (URN)10.3384/lic.diva-128622 (DOI)978-91-7685-766-3 (ISBN)
Presentation
2016-06-16, Planck, Fysikhuset, Campus Valla, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-05-25 Created: 2016-05-25 Last updated: 2016-05-25Bibliographically approved
2. Controlling the growth of nanoparticles produced in a high power pulsed plasma
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Controlling the growth of nanoparticles produced in a high power pulsed plasma
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Nanotechnology can profoundly benefit our health, environment and everyday life. In order to make this a reality, both technological and theoretical advancements of the nanomaterial synthesis methods are needed. A nanoparticle is one of the fundamental building blocks in nanotechnology and this thesis describes the control of the nucleation, growth and oxidation of titanium particles produced in a pulsed plasma. It will be shown that by controlling the process conditions both the composition (oxidationstate) and size of the particles can be varied. The experimental results are supported by theoretical modeling.

If processing conditions are chosen which give a high temperature in the nanoparticle growth environment, oxygen was found to be necessary in order to nucleate the nanoparticles. The two reasons for this are 1: the lower vapor pressure of a titanium oxide cluster compared to a titanium cluster, meaning a lower probability of evaporation, and 2: the ability of a cluster to cool down by ejecting an oxygen atom when an oxygen molecule condenses on its surface. When the oxygen gas flow was slightly increased, the nanoparticle yield and oxidation state increased. A further increase caused a decrease in particle yield which is attributed to a slight oxidation ofthe cathode. By varying the oxygen flow, it was possible to control the oxidation state of the nanoparticles without fully oxidizing the cathode. Pure titanium nanoparticles could not be produced in a high vacuum system because oxygen containing gases such as residual water vapour have a profound influence on nanoparticle yield and composition. In an ultrahigh vacuum system titanium nanoparticles without significantoxygen contamination were produced by reducing the temperature of the growth environment and increasing the pressure of an argon-helium gas mixture within whichthe nanoparticles grew. The dimer formation rate necessary for this is only achievable at higher pressures. After a dimer has formed, it needs to grow by colliding with a titanium atom followed by cooling by collisions with multiple buffer gas atoms. The condensation event heats up the cluster to a temperature much higher than the gas temperature, where it is during a short time susceptible to evaporation. When the clusters’ internal energy has decreased by collisions with the gas to less than the energy required to evaporate a titanium atom, it is temporarily stable until the next condensation event occurs. The temperature difference by which the cluster has to cool down before it is temporarily stable is exactly as many kelvins as the gas temperature.The addition of helium was found to decrease the temperature of the gas, making it possible for nanoparticles of pure titanium to grow. The process window where this is possible was determined and the results presented opens up new possibilities to synthesize particles with a controlled contamination level and deposition rate.The size of the nanoparticles has been controlled by three means. The first is to change the electrical potential around the growth zone, which allows for size (diameter) control in the order of 25 to 75 nm without influencing the oxygen content of the particles. The second means is by increasing the pressure which decreases the ambipolar diffusion rate of the ions resulting in a higher growth material density. By doing this, the particle size can be increased from 50 to 250 nm, however the oxygen content also increases with increasing pressure when this is done in a high vacuum system. The last means of size control was by adding a helium flow to the process where higher flows resulted in smaller nanoparticle sizes.

When changing the pressure in high vacuum, the morphology of the nanoparticles could be controlled. At low pressures, highly faceted near spherical particles were produced. Increasing the pressure caused the formation of cubic particles which appear to ‘fracture’ at higher pressures. At the highest pressure investigated, the particles became poly-crystalline with a cauliflower shape and this morphology was attributed to a lowad atom mobility.

The ability to control the size, morphology and composition of the nanoparticles determines the success of applying the process to manufacture devices. In related work presented in this thesis it is shown that 150-200 nm molybdenum particles with cauliflower morphology were found to scatter light in which made them useful in photovoltaic applications, and the size of titanium dioxide nanoparticles were found to influence the selectivity of graphene based gas sensors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017. p. 69
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 1873
National Category
Other Chemical Engineering Materials Chemistry Metallurgy and Metallic Materials Inorganic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143843 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-143843 (DOI)9789176854662 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-01-10, Planck, Fysikhuset, Campus Valla, Linköping, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-12-21 Created: 2017-12-21 Last updated: 2018-01-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(698 kB)32 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 698 kBChecksum SHA-512
463a35e0ce67e5c30c42b35b45575977a0c1ed37be759c718e76b2a0174ba8dfde1b5c03cf2a19c2cd90f6d652445cb60bff65a69cb5f3c0f66d563c1818090c
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Gunnarsson, RickardHelmersson, UlfPilch, Iris

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gunnarsson, RickardHelmersson, UlfPilch, Iris
By organisation
Plasma and Coating PhysicsFaculty of Science & EngineeringThin Film Physics
In the same journal
Journal of nanoparticle research
Physical Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 32 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 206 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf