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Analysis of nanoparticle-protein coronas formed in vitro between nanosized welding particles and nasal lavage proteins.
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Center for Molecular Protein Science, Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
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2016 (English)In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 10, no 2, 226-234 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Welding fumes include agglomerated particles built up of primary nanoparticles. Particles inhaled through the nose will to some extent be deposited in the protein-rich nasal mucosa, and a protein corona will be formed around the particles. The aim was to identify the protein corona formed between nasal lavage proteins and four types of particles with different parameters. Two of the particles were formed and collected during welding and two were manufactured iron oxides. When nasal lavage proteins were added to the particles, differences were observed in the sizes of the aggregates that were formed. Measurements showed that the amount of protein bound to particles correlated with the relative size increase of the aggregates, suggesting that the surface area was associated with the binding capacity. However, differences in aggregate sizes were detected when nasal proteins were added to UFWF and Fe2O3 particles (having similar agglomerated size) suggesting that yet parameters other than size determine the binding. Relative quantitative mass spectrometric and gel-based analyses showed differences in the protein content of the coronas. High-affinity proteins were further assessed for network interactions. Additional experiments showed that the inhibitory function of secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor, a highly abundant nasal protein, was influenced by particle binding suggesting that an understanding of protein function following particle binding is necessary to properly evaluate pathophysiological events. Our results underscore the importance of including particles collected from real working environments when studying the toxic effects of particles because these effects might be mediated by the protein corona.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016. Vol. 10, no 2, 226-234 p.
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122249DOI: 10.3109/17435390.2015.1048324ISI: 000371822800010PubMedID: 26186033OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-122249DiVA: diva2:864182
Note

Funding agencies: AFA Insurance and Forte; medical faculty of Lund University; Nanometer Structure Consortium (nmC) at Lund University

Available from: 2015-10-26 Created: 2015-10-26 Last updated: 2016-05-04

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Karlsson, Helen Marg
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Division of Neuro and Inflammation ScienceFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesOccupational and Environmental Medicine Center
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ReferencesLink to record
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