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Decline in Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate After Acute Kidney Injury: A Surrogate Endpoint?
John Hopkins University.
John Hopkins University.
John Hopkins University.
John Hopkins University.
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2015 (English)In: ASN (American Society of Nephrology), 2015, Vol. 26Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Often a transient condition, acute kidney injury (AKI) is not currently accepted as an endpoint for drug registration trials by the US FDA. We sought to determine whether an intermediate-term change in eGFR after AKI has a sufficiently strong relationship with subsequent ESRD to serve as an alternative endpoint in clinical trials of AKI preventionand/or treatment.

Methods: We evaluated 161,185 US veterans who underwent major surgery between2004-2011. Post-surgical AKI was defined by the KDIGO creatinine criteria;decline in eGFR was calculated from pre-hospitalization value to two time-points post-discharge (60-days, 90-days) and related to ESRD and mortality using Cox proportional hazards regression.

Results: In-hospital mortality varied by AKI status, ranging from 1% for patients without AKI to 35% for those with dialysis-requiring AKI. An eGFR decline of ³30% at 60-days was relatively frequent: 2.5%, 9.7%, 17.2%, and 28.6% in those with no AKI, Stage 1 AKI, Stage 2 AKI, and Stage 3 AKI, respectively. There was a graded relationship between eGFR decline at 60-days and risk of ESRD in persons both with and without AKI (Figure). Compared to stable eGFR/no in-hospital AKI, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of ESRD associated with a 30% decline at 60-days after AKI was 6.42 (95% CI: 4.8-8.7). Risks for mortality associated with eGFR decline were smaller: the HR for 30% decline 60-days after in-hospital AKI was 1.59 (95% CI: 1.46-1.73). Risk relationships were similar at 90-days.

Conclusions: A 30% decline in eGFR from pre-hospitalization baseline to 60-days or 90-days after an episode of AKI may be an acceptable surrogate endpoint in trials of AKI prevention and/or treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 26
National Category
Clinical Medicine Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122513OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-122513DiVA: diva2:867804
Conference
ASN (American Society of Nephrology) American society of nephrology kidney week 2015
Available from: 2015-11-06 Created: 2015-11-06 Last updated: 2015-11-13

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Szabó, Zoltán
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Division of Cardiovascular MedicineFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDepartment of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery
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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
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  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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