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Performance, proficiency and perceived disturbance in native and non-native languages
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. VU University Medical Center, ENT/audiology.
Linköping University Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Identifying speech in adverse listening conditions requires both native and non-native listeners to cope with decreased intelligibility. The current study examined in four speech reception threshold (SRT) conditions how speech maskers (two-talker babble Swedish, two-talker babble English) and noise maskers (stationary and fluctuating noise) interfered with target speech in Swedish (native language) and English (non-native language). Listening disturbance for each condition was rated on a continuous scale. The participants also performed standardized tests in English proficiency, nonverbal reasoning and working memory capacity; the latter in both Swedish and English. Normal-hearing (n = 23) and hearing-impaired (n = 23) native Swedish listeners participated, age-range between 28 and 65 years.

The SRTs were better for native as compared to non-native speech. In both groups, speech perception performance was lower for the speech than the noise maskers, especially for non-native target speech. The level of English proficiency is important for non-native speech intelligibility in noise. A three-way interaction effect on the subjective rating scores indicated that the hearing loss affects the subjective disturbance of Swedish babble in native and non-native language perception.

Conclusion: Speech perception and subjective disturbance is influenced by a complex interaction between masker types and individual abilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015.
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123279OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-123279DiVA: diva2:879844
Conference
Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2015-12-17

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Kilman, LisaZekveld, AdrianaRönnberg, Jerker
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Disability ResearchFaculty of Arts and SciencesDepartment of Behavioural Sciences and Learning
General Language Studies and Linguistics

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