liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cognitive test performance predicts self-reported hearing aid outcome
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In our previous study (Ng et al., 2013), a group of experienced hearing aid users performed a free recall test (Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall test; SWIR). High performers on the test reported more residual difficulty with hearing aids in challenging listening situations. In the present study, we continued to explore relations between recall performance using a modified SWIR test that was less cognitively demanding (Ng et al., 2015) and self-reported hearing aid outcome. The International Outcome Inventory – Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) and the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ) were administered. Results did not reveal any significant correlations between recall performance and self-reported residual difficulty with hearing aids, possibly because the recall performance of low performers on the modified SWIR test was comparable to that of the high performers on the original test. However, in the present study, SWIR performance was positively correlated with both Speech and Qualities domains of the SSQ. In other words, high performers reported better self-assessed speech understanding ability in various real-life situations. No significant correlations were found in the Spatial domain. High SWIR performers also reported less effort in aided listening. These results suggest that better cognitive performance under less demanding listening conditions indexing speech understanding and listening effort is associated with better self-rated aided listening experience. The modified SWIR test, which resembles real-life listening, can potentially be used to assess hearing aid outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015.
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123284OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-123284DiVA: diva2:881077
Conference
Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2015-12-17

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Rudner, MaryLunner, ThomasRönnberg, Jerker
By organisation
Disability ResearchFaculty of Arts and Sciences
Otorhinolaryngology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Total: 256 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link