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The psychological factor self-blame predicts overuse injury among top-level Swedish track and field athletes: a 12-month cohort study
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health. (Athletics Research Center)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6049-5402
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. (Athletics Research Center)
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. (Athletics Research Center)
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden. (Athletics Research Center)
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2015 (English)In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 49, no 22, 1472-1477 p.Article in journal (Refereed) PublishedText
Abstract [en]

Background Athletes psychological characteristics are important for understanding sports injury mechanisms. We examined the relevance of psychological factors in an integrated model of overuse injury risk in athletics/track and field. Methods Swedish track and field athletes (n=278) entering a 12-month injury surveillance in March 2009 were also invited to complete a psychological survey. Simple Cox proportional hazards models were compiled for single explanatory variables. We also tested multiple models for 3 explanatory variable groupings: an epidemiological model without psychological variables, a psychological model excluding epidemiological variables and an integrated (combined) model. Results The integrated multiple model included the maladaptive coping behaviour self-blame (p=0.007; HR 1.32; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.61), and an interaction between athlete category and injury history (p<0.001). Youth female (p=0.034; HR 0.51; 95% CI 0.27 to 0.95) and youth male (p=0.047; HR 0.49; 95% CI 0.24 to 0.99) athletes with no severe injury the previous year were at half the risk of sustaining a new injury compared with the reference group. A training load index entered the epidemiological multiple model, but not the integrated model. Conclusions The coping behaviour self-blame replaced training load in an integrated explanatory model of overuse injury risk in athletes. What seemed to be more strongly related to the likelihood of overuse injury was not the athletics load per se, but, rather, the load applied in situations when the athletes body was in need of rest.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP , 2015. Vol. 49, no 22, 1472-1477 p.
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123828DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2015-094622ISI: 000365796900014PubMedID: 26373585OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-123828DiVA: diva2:892875
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Center for Sports Research (CIF) [P2014-0167]

Available from: 2016-01-11 Created: 2016-01-11 Last updated: 2016-04-24Bibliographically approved

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Timpka, ToomasJacobsson, JennyDahlström, ÖrjanEkberg, Joakim
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Division of Community MedicineFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesCenter for Public HealthDisability ResearchFaculty of Arts and SciencesThe Swedish Institute for Disability ResearchDepartment of Medical and Health SciencesLinköping University
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British Journal of Sports Medicine
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