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To feel strong in an unfamiliar situation; Patients lived experiences of neurosurgical intensive care. A qualitative study
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1588-135X
2016 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 32, 42-48 p.Article in journal (Refereed) PublishedText
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the lived experiences of conscious patients in neurosurgical intensive care. Method: Data collection was performed by qualitative interviews using an interview guide. Eleven former patients, seven women and four men, were interviewed two to 14 months after discharge. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analysed using an interpretive phenomenological approach. Findings: The analysis revealed three themes: To feel safe in an unfamiliar situation, to experience strains and limitations, and to be confirmed as a human being. These three themes culminated in the essence: To feel strong in an unfamiliar situation. Patients experienced a soothing environment where, despite strains, they felt safe being cared for in a ward with specialised medical treatment. When mental and physical strains decreased during the period of care, they experienced the ability to cope with the simplest tasks as a sign of regained identity. Conclusion: Patients main experience during intensive care was security. Security along with human contact and interaction with staff and next of kin made the patients feel strengthened as human beings in an unfamiliar situation. The fact that the patients were conscious enabled them to understand their situation and to experience security. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD , 2016. Vol. 32, 42-48 p.
Keyword [en]
Interaction; Interpretive phenomenology; Neurosurgical intensive care; Nursing; Security
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124079DOI: 10.1016/j.iccn.2015.08.001ISI: 000366954700006PubMedID: 26552575OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-124079DiVA: diva2:897243
Note

Funding Agencies|Department of Neuro Surgery and Neurosurgical Intensive Care, Linkoping University Hospital; Division of Nursing Science, Department of Medical and Health Sciences Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden

Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2016-01-25

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Nilsson, MariaBerterö, Carina
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Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDepartment of NeurosurgeryDivision of Nursing Science
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