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Adolescents and self-taken sexual images: A review of the literature
University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
2016 (English)In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 55, no part B, 706-716 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) PublishedText
Abstract [en]

Despite increasing public interest and concern about young peoples involvement in the self-production of sexual images (or sexting), there remains a dearth of research into their reasons for making and sending images, the processes involved, and the consequences arising from their experiences. This article reviews the motivational, lifestyle and personality factors influencing adolescent sexting practices and explores the research evidence within the wider context of debates around contemporary social and visual media cultures and gender. A systematic search of databases was conducted and eighty-eight records were identified for inclusion in the review. The findings reveal that sexting is remarkably varied in terms of context, meaning and intention, with the potential for consensual and non-consensual aspects of the activity. Whilst sexting can be a means of flirting or enhancing a sexual relationship, it can highlight potential vulnerabilities to victimisation or to participation in risky sexual practices. Sexting is also inextricably linked to social expectations of gendered sexual behaviours, with females often deriving less satisfaction from their experiences and being perceived more negatively by their peers. Further research linking adolescent motivations, well-being, relationships and lifestyles with the broader socio-cultural and media landscape will ultimately help drive understanding about the subject forward. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD , 2016. Vol. 55, no part B, 706-716 p.
Keyword [en]
Sexting; Adolescence; Motivations; Gender; Social and Visual Media; Cyberbullying
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124455DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2015.10.003ISI: 000367755500013OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-124455DiVA: diva2:899855
Note

Funding Agencies|European Safer Internet Programme [SI-2012-KEP-411207]

Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2016-02-10

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Jonsson, LindaSvedin, Carl Göran
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Division of Neuro and Inflammation ScienceFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDepartment of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping
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Computers in human behavior
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