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Susceptibility testing breakpoints for Mycobacterium tuberculosis categorize isolates with resistance mutations in gyrA as susceptible to fluoroquinolones: implications for MDR-TB treatment and the definition of XDR-TB.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. The University of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica.
Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden..
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6069-3564
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 333-338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are important in the treatment of MDR-TB and in the definition of XDR-TB. Our objective was to investigate how discrepancies in the phenotypic and genotypic methods for antimicrobial susceptibility testing could affect the interpretation of antimicrobial susceptibility test results.

METHODS: We analysed MICs of ofloxacin and levofloxacin in Middlebrook 7H10 broth (7H10) as well as sequencing of the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA gene and the MTBDRsl assay in 75 resistant isolates, including MDR and XDR strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

RESULTS: Among 75 resistant isolates, 27 had mutations associated with FQ resistance. Among isolates with resistance mutations in gyrA, 26% (seven of 27) were susceptible to levofloxacin and ofloxacin by phenotypic testing at 1 mg/L and 2 mg/L. The most common mutation was in codon 94 and these isolates had significantly increased MICs of levofloxacin (2-8 mg/L) compared with isolates with mutations in codon 90 (0.25-2 mg/L, P < 0.05). The sensitivity and specificity for the MTBDRsl assay compared with gyrA sequencing were 96% and 98%, respectively.

CONCLUSION: Current critical concentrations may classify up to 26% of isolates with gyrA mutations as susceptible to FQs due to a close relationship between susceptible and resistant populations. These results should be considered while improving clinical breakpoints for M. tuberculosis and may have an impact on the definition of XDR-TB.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 71, no 2, p. 333-338
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124557DOI: 10.1093/jac/dkv353ISI: 000372427600008PubMedID: 26538509OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-124557DiVA, id: diva2:900057
Note

Funding agencies: Heart and Lung Foundation; Swedish Society of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (SSAC); Swedish Medical Association; Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation

Available from: 2016-02-03 Created: 2016-02-03 Last updated: 2019-04-24
In thesis
1. Towards individualised treatment of tuberculosis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards individualised treatment of tuberculosis
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Each year, around 10 million of individuals develop active tuberculosis (TB). Worldwide, TB is the leading cause of death from an infectious agent surpassing both malaria and HIV. Current treatment regimens are long and therefore encompass a risk of nonadherence and development of acquired drug-resistance, reflected in the increase of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB. Indeed, this calls for prudent use of existing TB drugs and improvement of TB treatment strategies. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the current drug susceptibility testing (DST) breakpoints for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) of TB treatment and to explore the role of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) for optimising TB treatment.

Drug resistance in M. tuberculosis is expressed over a continuous scale and for some drugs it may be identified as low- and high-level resistance. This has been poorly reflected in currently used binary susceptibility breakpoints for TB drugs. Results from genome sequencing and phenotypic DST of ofloxacin and levofloxacin were compared in study I and current breakpoints were found to misclassify up to 25% of M. tuberculosis isolates with resistance mutations in gyrA as susceptible to fluoroquinolones. This finding may have implications for the classification of XDR-TB, treatment of MDR-TB and the evaluation of fluoroquinolones in clinical studies.

Study II was a prospective cohort study of susceptible TB in Sweden, where drug concentrations of first-line TB drugs were measured along with the susceptibility level of the bacteria defined by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of M. tuberculosis. First-line drug concentrations below the reference range (16-42%) were common and most pronounced for rifampicin (13/31, 42%). An exploratory investigation of PK/PD parameters displayed a wide distribution of ratios between drug exposures and MICs. Rifampicin exhibited higher level of individual fluctuations over time during TB treatment compared with isoniazid. In study III the plasma drug concentrations of rifampicin were compared to the tuberculosis drug activity assay (TDA) and results showed that rifampicin drug levels, but not drug levels of the other first-line drugs, correlated with TDA. Patients with rifampicin drug levels below 8 mg/L had significantly lower median TDA. This finding supports the use of TDA as a potential indicator for low rifampicin exposure in resource-constrained settings without access to drug concentration analysis. The study design in study II has been further developed in study IV, which is a prospective cohort study of MDR-TB in China, where drug exposure will be explored in relation to individual bacterial MIC and measurements of treatment outcome.

In summary, the work in this thesis emphasises the importance of reliable DST of M. tuberculosis and the need to re-evaluate the currently used breakpoints. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) based on drug concentrations and MICs is a useful tool to avoid suboptimal drug exposure and to individualise TB treatments. Such strategies may improve treatment regimens and avoid further development of resistance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2019. p. 94
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1662
National Category
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156494 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-156494 (DOI)9789176851289 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-05-23, Hugo Theorell, Hus 448, Universitetssjukhuset, Linköping, 09:00 (English)
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Available from: 2019-04-24 Created: 2019-04-24 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved

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Niward, KatarinaPaues, JakobSchön, Thomas

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