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Seeing the talker’s face improves free recall of speech for young adults with normal hearing but not older adults with hearing loss
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. (Linnaeus Centre HEAD)
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3350-8997
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 59, 590-599 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PurposeSeeing the talker's face improves speech understanding in noise, possibly releasing resources for cognitive processing. We investigated whether it improves free recall of spoken two-digit numbers.

Method Twenty younger adults with normal hearing and 24 older adults with hearing loss listened to and subsequently recalled lists of 13 two-digit numbers, with alternating male and female talkers. Lists were presented in quiet as well as in stationary and speech-like noise at a signal-to-noise ratio giving approximately 90% intelligibility. Amplification compensated for loss of audibility.

Results Seeing the talker's face improved free recall performance for the younger but not the older group. Poorer performance in background noise was contingent on individual differences in working memory capacity. The effect of seeing the talker's face did not differ in quiet and noise.

Conclusions We have argued that the absence of an effect of seeing the talker's face for older adults with hearing loss may be due to modulation of audiovisual integration mechanisms caused by an interaction between task demands and participant characteristics. In particular, we suggest that executive task demands and interindividual executive skills may play a key role in determining the benefit of seeing the talker's face during a speech-based cognitive task

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 59, 590-599 p.
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126019DOI: 10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-15-0014OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-126019DiVA: diva2:911348
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-11 Last updated: 2016-08-25

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Rudner, MaryMishra, SushmitStenfelt, StefanLunner, ThomasRönnberg, Jerker
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Disability ResearchFaculty of Arts and SciencesThe Swedish Institute for Disability ResearchThe Swedish Institute for Disability ResearchDivision of Neuro and Inflammation ScienceFaculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
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Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)General Language Studies and Linguistics

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