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High physical activity in young children suggests positive effects by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity
1The Biomedical Platform, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
CHILD Research Group, Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
The Biomedical Platform, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 4, 441-450 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physical activity in children is associated with several positive health outcomes such as decreased cardiovascular risk factors, improved lung function, enhanced motor skill development, healthier body composition, and also improved defense against inflammatory diseases. We examined how high physical activity vs a sedentary lifestyle in young children influences the immune response with focus on autoimmunity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, collected from 55 5-year-old children with either high physical activity (n = 14), average physical activity (n = 27), or low physical activity (n = 14), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort, were stimulated with antigens (tetanus toxoid and beta-lactoglobulin) and autoantigens (GAD65 , insulin, HSP60, and IA-2). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), C-peptide and proinsulin were analyzed. Children with high physical activity showed decreased immune activity toward the autoantigens GAD65 (IL-5, P < 0.05), HSP60 and IA-2 (IL-10, P < 0.05) and also low spontaneous pro-inflammatory immune activity (IL-6, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and CCL2 (P < 0.05)) compared with children with an average or low physical activity. High physical activity in young children seems to have positive effects on the immune system by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016. Vol. 26, no 4, 441-450 p.
Keyword [en]
Physical activity, Autoimmunity, Cytokines. Immune response, Young children
National Category
Physiotherapy Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126414DOI: 10.1111/sms.12450ISI: 000373356600009PubMedID: 25892449OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-126414DiVA: diva2:914108
Note

Funding agencies:  Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research [2008-0284]; Swedish Research Council [K2009-70X-21086-01-3]; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Swedish Child Diabetes Foundation; Academy for Health and Care Jonkoping County Council

Available from: 2016-03-23 Created: 2016-03-23 Last updated: 2016-05-01Bibliographically approved

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Carlsson, ELudvigsson, JohnnyHuus, K
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Division of Clinical SciencesFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDepartment of Paediatrics in Linköping
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Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports
PhysiotherapyPublic Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

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