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Stepped Care Versus Direct Face-to-Face Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder and Panic Disorder: A Randomized Effectiveness Trial
Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway; Stockholm University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4753-6745
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2016 (English)In: Behavior Therapy, ISSN 0005-7894, E-ISSN 1878-1888, Vol. 47, no 2, 166-183 p.Article in journal (Refereed) PublishedText
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) stepped care model (psychoeducation, guided Internet treatment, and face-toface CBT) compared with direct face-to-face (FtF) CBT. Patients with panic disorder or social anxiety disorder were randomized to either stepped care (n = 85) or direct FtF CBT (n = 88). Recovery was defined as meeting two of the following three criteria: loss of diagnosis, below cut-off for self-reported symptoms, and functional improvement. No significant differences in intention -to-treat recovery rates were identified between stepped care (40.0%) and direct FtF CBT (43.2%). The majority of the patients who recovered in the stepped care did so at the less therapist-demanding steps (26/34, 76.5%). Moderate to large within -groups effect sizes were identified at posttreatment and 1-year follow-up. The attrition rates were high: 41.2% in the stepped care condition and 27.3% in the direct FtF CBT condition. These findings indicate that the outcome of a stepped care model for anxiety disorders is comparable to that of direct FtF CBT. The rates of improvement at the two less therapist-demanding steps indicate that stepped care models might be useful for increasing patients access to evidence-based psychological treatments for anxiety disorders. However, attrition in the stepped care condition was high, and research regarding the factors that can improve adherence should be prioritized.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016. Vol. 47, no 2, 166-183 p.
Keyword [en]
stepped care; effectiveness; social anxiety disorder; panic disorder
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Basic Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127442DOI: 10.1016/j.beth.2015.10.004ISI: 000372665700003PubMedID: 26956650OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-127442DiVA: diva2:925252
Note

Funding Agencies|Assessment and Treatment Anxiety in Children and Adults

Available from: 2016-05-01 Created: 2016-04-26 Last updated: 2016-05-03Bibliographically approved

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