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Evolution under dietary restriction increases male reproductive performance without survival cost
Monash University, Australia; Uppsala University, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Sweden; Spanish Research Council CSIC, Spain.
Uppsala University, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Sweden.
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2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 283, no 1825, 20152726- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Abstract [en]

Dietary restriction (DR), a reduction in nutrient intake without malnutrition, is the most reproducible way to extend lifespan in a wide range of organisms across the tree of life, yet the evolutionary underpinnings of the DR effect on lifespan are still widely debated. The leading theory suggests that this effect is adaptive and results from reallocation of resources from reproduction to somatic maintenance, in order to survive periods of famine in nature. However, such response would cease to be adaptive when DR is chronic and animals are selected to allocate more resources to reproduction. Nevertheless, chronic DR can also increase the strength of selection resulting in the evolution of more robust genotypes. We evolved Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies on DR, standard and high adult diets in replicate populations with overlapping generations. After approximately 25 generations of experimental evolution, male DR flies had higher fitness than males from standard and high populations. Strikingly, this increase in reproductive success did not come at a cost to survival. Our results suggest that sustained DR selects for more robust male genotypes that are overall better in converting resources into energy, which they allocate mostly to reproduction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC , 2016. Vol. 283, no 1825, 20152726- p.
Keyword [en]
Drosophila melanogaster; nutrition; dietary stress; adaptation
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127788DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.2726ISI: 000374207800007PubMedID: 26911958OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-127788DiVA: diva2:927609
Note

Funding Agencies|Wenner-Gren postdoctoral fellowship; Swedish Research Council; ERC Starting Grant AGINGSEXDIFF

Available from: 2016-05-12 Created: 2016-05-12 Last updated: 2016-06-02

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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