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Controls of sediment nitrogen dynamics in tropical coastal lagoons
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Laboratório de Biogeoquímica, Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biologia Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Laboratório de Biogeoquímica, Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biologia Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Departamento de Geoquímica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Laboratório de Limnologia, Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biologia Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Núcleo de Pesquisas em Ecologia E Desenvolvimento Sócio-ambiental de Macaé, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Macaé, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Department of Biology, University of of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark.
2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 5, e0155586- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Abstract [en]

Sediment denitrification rates seem to be lower in tropical environments than in temperate environments. Using the isotope pairing technique, we measured actual denitrification rates in the sediment of tropical coastal lagoons. To explain the low denitrification rates observed at all study sites (amp;lt;5 μmol N2 m-2 h-1 ), we also evaluated potential oxygen (O2 ) consumption, potential nitrification, potential denitrification, potential anammox, and estimated dissimilatory nitrate NO3 ) reduction to ammonium (NH4 + ; DNRA) in the sediment.15NO3 and 15NH4 + conversion was measured in oxic and anoxic slurries from the sediment surface. Sediment potential O2 consumption was used as a proxy for overall mineralization activity. Actual denitrification rates and different potential nitrogen (N) oxidation and reduction processes were significantly correlated with potential O2 consumption. The contribution of potential nitrification to total O2 consumption decreased from contributing 9% at sites with the lowest sediment mineralization rates to less than 0.1% at sites with the highest rates. -3 reduction switched completely from potential denitrification to estimated DNRA. Ammonium oxidation and nitrite NO2 ) reduction by potential anammox contributed up to 3% in sediments with the lowest sediment mineralization rates. The majority of these patterns could be explained by variations in the microbial environments from stable and largely oxic conditions at low sediment mineralization sites to more variable conditions and the prevalences of anaerobic microorganisms at high sediment mineralization sites. Furthermore, the presence of algal and microbial mats on the sediment had a significant effect on all studied processes. We propose a theoretical model based on low and high sediment mineralization rates to explain the growth, activity, and distribution of microorganisms carrying out denitrification and DNRA in sediments that can explain the dominance or coexistence of DNRA and denitrification processes. The results presented here show that the potential activity of anaerobic nitrate-reducing organisms is not dependent on the availability of environmental NO3. © 2016 Enrich-Prast et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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Public Library of Science , 2016. Vol. 11, no 5, e0155586- p.
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Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129246DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0155586PubMedID: 27175907Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84971261506OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-129246DiVA: diva2:936718
Note

Funding Agencies|CAPES, Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior; CNPq, Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior

Available from: 2016-06-14 Created: 2016-06-14 Last updated: 2017-11-28

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