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Role of illness in male professional football: not a major contributor to time loss
Norwegian School Sport Science, Norway.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. (Football research group)
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. (Football research group)
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. (Football research group)
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2016 (English)In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 11, 699-702 p.Article in journal (Refereed) PublishedText
Abstract [en]

Background There are limited data on the nature, type and incidence of illness in football. Previous studies indicate that gastrointestinal and respiratory tract illnesses are most common. Aim To describe the incidence and burden of illness in male professional football. Methods Over the 4-year study period, 2011-2014, 73 professional football teams in Europe participated, with a total of 1 261 367 player-days recorded. All time-loss illnesses were recorded by the medical staff of each club. A recordable illness episode was any physical or psychological symptom (not related to injury) that resulted in the player being unable to participate fully in training or match play. Results A total of 1914 illness episodes were recorded. The illness incidence was 1.5 per 1000 player-days, meaning that, on average, a player experienced an illness episode every second season, with a median of 3 days absence per illness episode. Severe illness (absence amp;gt;4 weeks) constituted 2% of all illnesses. Respiratory tract illness was the most common (58%), followed by gastrointestinal illness (38%). Respiratory tract illness, gastrointestinal illness and cardiovascular illness caused the highest illness burden. Conclusions The illness incidence among male professional football players is low compared with the injury incidence. We found that the highest illness burden was caused by illness to the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and cardiovascular system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP , 2016. Vol. 50, no 11, 699-702 p.
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129668DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2015-095921ISI: 000376761700017PubMedID: 27034126OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-129668DiVA: diva2:942192
Note

Funding Agencies|UEFA; Swedish Football Association; Football Association Premier League Limited; Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports; Royal Norwegian Ministry of Culture and Church Affairs; South-Eastern Norway Regional Health Authority; IOC; Norwegian Olympic Committee & Confederation of Sport; Norsk Tipping AS

Available from: 2016-06-23 Created: 2016-06-23 Last updated: 2016-07-01

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Kristensson, KarolinaWaldén, MarkusBengtsson, HåkanEkstrand, JanHägglund, Martin
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Division of Community MedicineFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDivision of Physiotherapy
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British Journal of Sports Medicine
Sport and Fitness Sciences

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