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Response of the muscles in the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during the Active Straight Leg Raise in women with and without pelvic girdle pain: An experimental study
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
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2016 (English)In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 35, 49-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Abstract [en]

Background: The relationship between activation of the stabilizing muscles of the lumbopelvic region during the Active Straight Leg Raise test and pelvic girdle pain remains unknown. Therefore, the aim was to examine automatic contractions in relation to pre-activation in the muscles of the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during leg lifts, performed as the Active Straight Leg Raise test, in women with and without persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain. Methods: Sixteen women with pelvic girdle pain and eleven pain-free women performed contralateral and ipsilateral leg lifts, while surface electromyographic activity was recorded from the pelvic floor and unilaterally from the lower lateral abdominal wall. As participants performed leg lifts onset time was calculated as the time from increased muscle activity to leg lift initiation. Findings: No significant differences were observed between the groups during the contralateral leg lift. During the subsequent ipsilateral leg lift, pre-activation in the pelvic floor muscles was observed in 36% of women with pelvic girdle pain and in 91% of pain-free women (P = 0.01). Compared to pain-free women, women with pelvic girdle pain also showed significantly later onset time in both the pelvic floor muscles (P = 0.01) and the muscles of the lower lateral abdominal wall (P amp;lt; 0.01). Interpretation: We suggest that disturbed motor activation patterns influence womens ability to stabilize the pelvis during leg lifts. This could be linked to provocation of pain during repeated movements. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD , 2016. Vol. 35, 49-55 p.
Keyword [en]
Chronic pelvic pain; Electromyography; Joint instability; Low back pain; Pelvic pain; Post-partum
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Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130297DOI: 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2016.04.007ISI: 000378366900008PubMedID: 27128765OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-130297DiVA: diva2:950501
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [521-2019-3578]; Linkoping University, Sweden

Available from: 2016-07-31 Created: 2016-07-28 Last updated: 2017-05-07Bibliographically approved

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Sjödahl, JennyGutke, AnnelieGhaffari, GhazalehStrömberg, TomasÖberg, Birgitta
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Division of PhysiotherapyFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDepartment of Biomedical EngineeringFaculty of Science & EngineeringBiomedical Instrumentation
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