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Domestication and tameness: brain geneexpression in red junglefowl selected for less fear of humans suggests effects on reproduction and immunology
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5508-4465
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1262-4585
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2329-2635
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2016 (English)In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, no 3, 160033Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The domestication of animals has generated a set of phenotypicmodifications, affecting behaviour, appearance, physiologyand reproduction, which are consistent across a range ofspecies. We hypothesized that some of these phenotypes couldhave evolved because of genetic correlation to tameness,an essential trait for successful domestication. Starting froman outbred population of red junglefowl, ancestor of alldomestic chickens, we selected birds for either high or lowfear of humans for five generations. Birds from the fifthselected generation (S5) showed a divergent pattern of growthand reproduction, where low fear chickens grew larger andproduced larger offspring. To examine underlying geneticmechanisms, we used microarrays to study gene expressionin thalamus/hypothalamus, a brain region involved in fearand stress, in both the parental generation and the S5. Whileparents of the selection lines did not show any differentiallyexpressed genes, there were a total of 33 genes with adjustedp-values below 0.1 in S5. These were mainly related to spermfunction,immunological functions, with only a few known tobe relevant to behaviour. Hence, five generations of divergentselection for fear of humans produced changes in hypothalamicgene expression profiles related to pathways associated withmale reproduction and to immunology. This may be linked to the effects seen on growth and size of offspring. These results support the hypothesis thatdomesticated phenotypes may evolve because of correlated effects related to reduced fear of humans.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society Publishing , 2016. no 3, 160033
Keyword [en]
artificial selection, gene expression, microarray, chicken, fearfulness
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130501DOI: 10.1098/rsos.160033ISI: 000384411000002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-130501DiVA: diva2:952057
Note

Funding agencies:  Research council Formas; Vetenskapsradet; ERC [322206]

Available from: 2016-08-11 Created: 2016-08-11 Last updated: 2017-11-28
In thesis
1. Chicken domestication: Effects of tameness on brain gene expression and DNA methylation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chicken domestication: Effects of tameness on brain gene expression and DNA methylation
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Domestication greatly increases phenotypic variation in a short time span, with selection for a single phenotype and a plethora of associated phenotypic changes as an outcome of the process. The domestication process influences the underlying genomic architecture of a species, and the success and speed of the process is likely influenced by it. The main aims of my thesis was to study how domestication affects the brain of chickens: specifically changes in morphology, gene expression, and DNA methylation. Differences in gene expression and DNA methylation between White Leghorn and Red Junglefowl chickens were mapped, and inheritance of these patterns were quantified, indicating a faithful transmission of breed-specific epigenetic markers. Selection on the behavioral trait fearfulness, generated high and low fearful lines of Red Junglefowl. Both the parental population and the fifth selected generation were used for the analyses in this thesis. One experiment studied morphological changes in the brain and other vital organs, and found that relative total brain size increased in high fearful birds, as a consequence of an increase in cerebral hemisphere size in high fearful birds and not in low fearful birds. Also, the relative heart, liver, spleen and testis size increased in high fearful birds, indicating correlated morphological changes with selection for fearfulness. Two additional experiments examined differential gene expression in the hypothalamus and the anterior cerebral hemisphere. The hypothalamus differed in expression of genes with reproductive and immunological functions, whilst the cerebral hemisphere differed in expression of genes related to social behaviors and neurological functions especially those upregulated in low fearful birds.  These results indicate the occurrence of tissue- and species-specific changes in gene expression as overlap with other domestication events were nearly nonexistent. A fourth experiment sought to associate the change in fear levels and gene expression differences with DNA methylation. Chromosomal regions with differential DNA methylation between high and low fearful birds were identified, and genes in these regions had annotated functions relevant to phenotypic differences between the selection lines. This thesis is the first to study the genetic alterations of domestication using the wild ancestor of an already domesticated species to repeat the domestication process selecting against fear of humans. The findings corroborate results from previous comparisons of wild and domestic animals, and further support the theory that rigorous selection for a behavioral trait can cause a cascade of genetic and epigenetic changes facilitating the domestication of a population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016. 41 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 1796
National Category
Genetics Evolutionary Biology Developmental Biology Medical Genetics Other Biological Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132379 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-132379 (DOI)9789176856697 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-12-14, Planck, Fysikhuset, Campus Valla, Linköping, 09:15 (English)
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Supervisors
Available from: 2016-11-18 Created: 2016-11-04 Last updated: 2016-11-30Bibliographically approved

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Bélteky, JohanAgnvall, BeatrixJohnsson, MartinWright, DominicJensen, Per

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