liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Single-point but not tonic cuff pressure pain sensitivity is associated with level of physical fitness: a study of non-athletic healthy subjects
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4385-428X
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2530-4126
2015 (English)Data set (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Exercise is often used for pain rehabilitation but the link between physical activity level and pain sensitivity is still not fully understood. Pressure pain sensitivity to cuff algometry and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) were evaluated in highly active men (n=22), normally active men (n=26), highly active women (n=27) and normally active women (n=23) based on the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire. Cuff pressure pain sensitivity was assessed at the arm and lower leg. The subjects scored the pain intensity on an electronic Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) during ten minutes with 25 kPa constant cuff pressure and two minutes with zero pressure. The maximal VAS score and area under the VAS-curve were extracted. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were recorded by manual pressure algometry on the ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle before, during and after the tonic arm stimulation.

Tonic cuff stimulation of the arm and leg resulted in higher VAS peak scores in women compared with men (p<0.04). In all groups the PPTs were reduced during and after the cuff stimulation compared with baseline (p=0.001). PPT were higher in men compared with women (p=0.03) and higher in highly physical active compared with normal active (p=0.048). 

Besides the well-known gender difference in pressure pain sensitivity this study demonstrates  that a high physical fitness degree in non-athletic subjects is associated with increased pressure pain thresholds but does not affect cuff pressure pain sensitivity in healthy people.

Place, publisher, year
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015.
Keyword [en]
Pain assessment, Cuff algometry, Tonic muscle pressure sensitivity, Experimental pain
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111796OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-111796DiVA: diva2:971927
Available from: 2016-09-19 Created: 2016-09-19 Last updated: 2016-09-21Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

Reserach data for the article Single-point but not tonic cuff pressure pain sensitivity is associated with level of physical fitness: a study of non-athletic healthy subjects(358 kB)2 downloads
File information
File name DATASET01.pdfFile size 358 kBChecksum SHA-512
5fb4fe57e5f6377e030bddd21dede8183cf262ada948c62b20e36680bec8470d46e9360f9b02a4fc498c3f8f17721d53efe3719d626b8b9d29f347ac5fe55561
Type datasetMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lemming, DagBörsbo, BjörnSjörs, Anna
By organisation
Division of Community MedicineFaculty of Health SciencesPain and Rehabilitation CenterDepartment of Medical and Health Sciences
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and EpidemiologyClinical Medicine
Lemming, D., Börsbo, B., Sjörs, A., Lind, E.-B., Arendt-Nielsen, L., Graven-Nielsen, T. & Gerdle, B. (2015). Single-point but not tonic cuff pressure pain sensitivity is associated with level of physical fitness: a study of non-athletic healthy subjects. PLoS ONE, 10(5), Article ID e0125432.

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Total: 79 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link