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  • 1.
    A Atlasov, Kirill
    et al.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Phys Nanostruct, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland .
    Felici, Marco
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Phys Nanostruct, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland .
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gallo, Pascal
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Phys Nanostruct, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland .
    Rudra, Alok
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Phys Nanostruct, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland .
    Dwir, Benjamin
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Phys Nanostruct, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland .
    Kapon, Eli
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Phys Nanostruct, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland .
    1D photonic band formation and photon localization in finite-size photonic-crystal waveguides2010In: OPTICS EXPRESS, ISSN 1094-4087, Vol. 18, no 1, 117-122 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A transition from discrete optical modes to 1D photonic bands is experimentally observed and numerically studied in planar photonic-crystal (PhC) L-N microcavities of length N. For increasing N the confined modes progressively acquire a well-defined momentum, eventually reconstructing the band dispersion of the corresponding waveguide. Furthermore, photon localization due to disorder is observed experimentally in the membrane PhCs using spatially resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Implications on single-photon sources and transfer lines based on quasi-1D PhC structures are discussed.

  • 2.
    A Herrera, I
    et al.
    Norwegian University Science and Technology NTNU.
    Woltjer, Rogier
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, CSELAB - Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems.
    Comparing a multi-linear (STEP) and systemic (FRAM) method for accident analysis2010In: RELIABILITY ENGINEERING and SYSTEM SAFETY, ISSN 0951-8320, Vol. 95, no 12, 1269-1275 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accident models and analysis methods affect what accident investigators look for, which contributory factors are found, and which recommendations are issued. This paper contrasts the Sequentially Timed Events Plotting (STEP) method and the Functional Resonance Analysis Method (FRAM) for accident analysis and modelling. The main issue addressed in this paper is the comparison of the established multi-linear method STEP with the new systemic method FRAM and which new insights the latter provides for accident analysis in comparison to the former established multi-linear method. Since STEP and FRAM are based on a different understandings of the nature of accidents, the comparison of the methods focuses on what we can learn from both methods, how, when, and why to apply them. The main finding is that STEP helps to illustrate what happened, involving which actors at what time, whereas FRAM illustrates the dynamic interactions within socio-technical systems and lets the analyst understand the how and why by describing non-linear dependencies, performance conditions, variability, and their resonance across functions.

  • 3.
    A Hulten, Maj
    et al.
    University Warwick, Warwick Med Sch, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands England .
    Patel, Suketu
    University Warwick, Department Biol Science, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands England .
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Iwarsson, Erik
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Department Mol Med and Surg, Clin Genet Unit, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden .
    On the origin of the maternal age effect in trisomy 21 Down syndrome: the Oocyte Mosaicism Selection model2010In: Reproduction, ISSN 1470-1626, Vol. 139, no 1, 1-9 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have recently documented that trisomy 21 mosaicism is common in human foetal ovaries. On the basis of this observation we propose that the maternal age effect in Down syndrome (DS) is caused by the differential behaviour of trisomy 21 in relation to disomy 21 oocytes during development from foetal life until ovulation in adulthood. in particular, we suggest that trisomy 21 oocytes, lagging behind those that are disomic, may escape the timed pruning of the seven million in foetal life to the 300-400 finally selected for ovulation. The net effect of this preferential elimination will be an accumulation of trisomy 21 oocytes in the ovarian reserve of older women. We here highlight the implications of this Oocyte Mosaicism Selection (OMS) model with respect to the prevalent view that the maternal age effect is complex, dependent on many different biological and environmental factors. We examine conclusions drawn from recent large-scale studies in families, tracing DNA markers along the length of chromosome 21q between parents and DS children, in comparison to the OMS model. We conclude that these family linkage data are equally compatible with the maternal age effect originating from the accumulation of trisomy 21 oocytes with advancing maternal age. One relatively straightforward way to get to grips with what is actually going on in this regard would be to compare incidence of trisomy 21 oocytes (and their pairing configurations) in foetal ovaries with that in oocytes at the meiosis I stage from adult women.

  • 4.
    A. Sani, Negar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics.
    M-PSK and M-QAM Modulation/Demodulation of UWB Signal Using Six-Port Correlator2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays high speed and high data rate communication are highly demanded. Consequently, wideband and high frequency transmitter and receivers should be designed. New transmitters and receivers should also have low power consumption, simple design and low manufacturing price in order to fulfill manufacturers’ requests for mass production. Having all above specifications, six-port correlator is a proper choice to be used as modulator and demodulator in transmitters and receivers.

    In this thesis the six-port correlator is introduced, modeled and simulated using Advanced Design System (ADS) software. A simple six-port transmitter/receiver system with a line of sight link is modeled and analyzed in BER, path length and noise terms. The modulation in this system is QAM, frequency is 7.5 GHz and symbol rate is 500 Msymbol/s.

    Furthermore two methods are proposed for high frequency and high symbol rate M-PSK and M-QAM modulation using six-port correlator. The 7.5 GHz modulators are modeled and simulated in ADS. Data streams generated by pseudo random bit generator with 1 GHz bandwidth are applied to modulators. Common source field effect transistors (FETs) with zero bias are used as controllable impedance termination to apply baseband data to modulator. Both modulators show good performance in M-PSK and M-QAM modulation.

  • 5.
    Aaboen, Lise
    NTNU, Trondheim.
    BATON-CHANGING ON EGGSHELLS – TRANSFERRING SUPPLIER RELATIONSHIPS WHEN MOVING PRODUCTION2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production transfers are a result of outsourcing and offshoring decisions. Though, because of

    the strategic focus of the outsourcing literature have not the operational issues of how

    relationship development between sender, receiver and raw material been fully depicted. The

    purpose of the present paper is to explore relationship development connected to transfer of

    raw material supplies responsibility during transfer of production. To fulfil the purpose, four

    different production transfers were studied: three from Sweden to China, Romania and

    Hungary respectively and one transfer from Holland to Sweden. We can see that the

    dependence and power shifts gradually between the sender and the receiver and the

    relationship between them sets the arena for what relationship is developed between the

    receiver and the raw material suppliers. Furthermore, short social distances can over bridge

    cultural and technological distances to some extent, because it motivates to take the

    relationship into a more developed state.

  • 6.
    Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Economics and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The relationship development aspect of production transfer2016In: Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, ISSN 1478-4092, E-ISSN 1873-6505, Vol. 22, no 1, 53-65 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production transfers are a result of outsourcing and offshoring decisions. Because of the strategic focus of the outsourcing literature, the operational issues of relationship development between sender and receiver and its impact on the transfer progress have not been fully depicted. The purpose of the present paper is to explore relationship development during production transfer. To fulfil this purpose, we studied three different production transfers and derived four propositions for further testing. Our main conclusions included that dependence and power gradually shift between the sender and the receiver and that the relationship between them sets the arena for what types of relationships can be developed between the receiver and the suppliers. Furthermore, short social distances can bridge cultural and technological distances to some extent, because it motivates the actors to bring their relationship into a more developed state. Finally, we noticed that the headquarters’ involvement can work both as an inhibitor as well as a converter.

  • 7.
    Aafjes-van Doorn, Katie
    et al.
    Adelphi University, NY 21402 USA; University of Oxford, England.
    Lilliengren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Cooper, Angela
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Macdonald, James
    Headington Psychotherapy, England.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Patients Affective Processes Within Initial Experiential Dynamic Therapy Sessions2017In: Psychotherapy, ISSN 0033-3204, E-ISSN 1939-1536, Vol. 54, no 2, 175-183 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has indicated that patients in-session experience of previously avoided affects may be important for effective psychotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate patients in-session levels of affect experiencing in relation to their corresponding levels of insight, motivation, and inhibitory affects in initial Experiential Dynamic Therapy (EDT) sessions. Four hundred sixty-six 10-min video segments from 31 initial sessions were rated using the Achievement of Therapeutic Objectives Scale. A series of multilevel growth models, controlling for between-therapist variability, were estimated to predict patients adaptive affect experiencing (Activating Affects) across session segments. In line with our expectations, higher within-person levels of Insight and Motivation related to higher levels of Activating Affects per segment. Contrary to expectations, however, lower levels of Inhibition were not associated with higher levels of Activating Affects. Further, using a time-lagged model, we did not find that the levels of Insight, Motivation, or Inhibition during one session segment predicted Activating Affects in the next, possibly indicating that 10-min segments may be suboptimal for testing temporal relationships in affective processes. Our results suggest that, to intensify patients immediate affect experiencing in initial EDT sessions, therapists should focus on increasing insight into defensive patterns and, in particular, motivation to give them up. Future research should examine the impact of specific inhibitory affects more closely, as well as between-therapist variability in patients in-session adaptive affect experiencing.

  • 8.
    Aagaard, Kirsten
    et al.
    VIA University College, Denmark.
    Andersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Halttunen, Timo
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Hansen, Brian Benjamin
    VIA University College, Denmark.
    Nistrup, Ulla
    VIA University College, Denmark.
    Quality in Validation of Prior Learning: Experiences in researching the practice of the Nordic Model for Quality in Validation of Prior Learning2017In: The Learner at the Centre: Validation of Prior Learning strengthens lifelong learning for all / [ed] Ruud Duvekot, Dermot Coughlan and Kirsten Aagaard, Houten/Aarhus: European Centre Valuation of Prior Learning/ VIA University College , 2017, 89-102 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents findings from a study of quality work in validation (recognition of prior learning) in three cases in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden. The quality work is based on a Nordic model for quality in validation and the study has an interactive approach.

  • 9.
    Aagaard, Lise
    et al.
    University of So Denmark, Denmark FKL Research Centre Qual Medical Use, Denmark Danish Pharmacovigilance Research Project DANPREP, Denmark .
    Strandell, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Melskens, Lars
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Petersen, Paw S. G.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Holme Hansen, Ebba
    FKL Research Centre Qual Medical Use, Denmark Danish Pharmacovigilance Research Project DANPREP, Denmark University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Global Patterns of Adverse Drug Reactions Over a Decade Analyses of Spontaneous Reports to VigiBase (TM)2012In: Drug Safety, ISSN 0114-5916, E-ISSN 1179-1942, Vol. 35, no 12, 1171-1182 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although systems to collect information about suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were established in many countries and by the WHO in the 1960s, few studies have examined reported ADRs related to national income. Objective: The aim of the study was to characterize ADRs reported to the WHO-ADR database, VigiBase (TM), and to relate data to national income. Methods: We analysed ADR reports submitted to VigiBase (TM) from 2000 to 2009 with respect to reporting rate, age and sex of patient, type, seriousness and medications. Reports were also analysed with respect to national income level, classified in accordance with the World Bank definition: low, lower-middle, upper-middle and high. Results: We analysed 1 359 067 ADR reports including 3 013 074 ADRs. Overall, 16% of reports were serious and 60% were reported for females. High-income countries had the highest ADR reporting rates (range 3-613 reports/million inhabitants/year) and low-income countries the lowest (range 0-21). Distribution of ADRs across income groups with respect to age group, seriousness and sex was non-significant. Overall, the majority of ADRs were reported for nervous system medications, followed by cardiovascular medicines. Low-income countries reported relatively more ADRs for antiinfectives for systemic use than high-income countries, and high-income countries reported more ADRs for antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents than lower-income groups. Conclusion: This study showed that high-income countries had the highest ADR reporting rates and low-income countries the lowest, with large variations across countries in each group. Significant differences in ADR reporting rates were only found for ADRs of the type skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders and for the therapeutic groups antiinfectives for systemic use and antineoplastic and immunomodulation agents. To strengthen ADR reporting rates, especially in low-income countries, more research is needed about the impact of organizational structures and economic resources of national pharmacovigilance centres and ADR reporting practices on the large variations in ADR reporting rates within income groups.

  • 10.
    Aagard Nielsen, Kurt
    et al.
    Roskilde Universitet, Denmark.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology . Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Action Research and Interactive Research: Beyond pratice and theory2006Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Aagard Nielsen, Kurt
    et al.
    Roskilde Universitet.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life.
    How to Learn Action Research2006In: Action Research and Interactive Research: beyond practice and theory / [ed] Kurt Aagaard Nielsen and Lennart Svensson, Hamburg: Shaker Verlag , 2006, 389-398 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Aakumiah, Prince Osei
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Water Management and Health in Ghana: Caes Study - Kumasi2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There have been multiple cases of drinking water related diseases in Ghana, particularly the cities. Kumasi, the second largest city is recording high figures of drinking water related diseases. The Ghana water and sewage company is supposed to provide adequate safe drinking water to the people. However, the company has failed to provide this service effectively. Various reasons have been given by the company on its inability to perform efficiently. Meanwhile the government decided lately to privatise water in the cities to facilitate access to quality water through what is called “FULL COST RECOVERY”. This attracted a lot of international companies to Ghana but this has also generated protest and demonstrations. The argument is that these foreign companies are basically profit oriented and considering the fact that most of the affected people are very poor, suggesting they cannot afford it.

    The study is aimed at finding out the relationship between water management and health in the study area and how effective water management through full community participation could help provide adequate safe drinking water. The study was a non-interventional descriptive type using both qualitative and quantitative methods. It was conducted in Kumasi, the second largest city in Ghana. A total of 100 residents from the communities was selected through systematic sampling and interviewed. This includes 86 local residents and 14 key informer interviews. The study also relied on observation as well as some selected literature.

    The results confirmed that drinking water related diseases is on the increase with the most affected people being the poor living in shanty and informal areas of the city. It was also found that most people in the city are willing to render any services to provide safe drinking water. But in relative terms, most of these people are very poor with high percentage of illiterates and may only contribute if there is a good relation and trust among all. It however appears that community participation is a good option for the city provided that stakeholders are made to play effective roles.

  • 13.
    Aalberg, L
    et al.
    National Bureau of Investigation, Finland.
    Andersson, K
    Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science.
    Bertler, C
    Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science.
    Cole, MD
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow.
    Finnon, Y
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow.
    Huizer, H
    Netherlands Forensic Institute.
    Jalava, K
    National Bureau of Investigation, Finland.
    Kaa, E
    Aarhus Universitet.
    Lock, E
    Université de Lausanne.
    Lopes, A
    Laboratorio Policia Cientifica, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Poortman-van der Maar, A
    Netherlands Forensic Institute.
    Sippola, E
    National Bureau of Investigation, Finland.
    Dahlén, Johan
    Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science.
    Development of a harmonised method for the profiling of amphetamines: II. Stability of impurities in organic solvents2005In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 149, no 03-Feb, 231-241 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focused on the stability of 22 amphetamine impurities dissolved in six organic solvents: isooctane, toluene, ethanol, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and diethyl ether. The aim was to find the most inert, and thereby most suitable, solvent for amphetamine profiling. Mixtures of the impurities were prepared in the different solvents, and changes in the concentrations of the individual compounds over-time were monitored by gas chromatographic analysis after 0, 4, 12, 24, 48, and 96 h. Isooctane and toluene provided the most inert conditions, although, a few of the impurities were insufficiently stable in these two solvents. The present experiments were performed as a part of the development of a harmonised method for profiling of amphetamine. The results can be used to support the choice of organic solvents for sample preparation. They also provide information about the stability of the impurities that are found in profiles of illicit amphetamine. This is essential due to the fact, that unstable compounds can have a negative influence on the comparison of profiles.

  • 14.
    Aalberg, Laura
    et al.
    National Bureau of Investigation, P.O. Box 285, FIN-01301 Vantaa, Finland.
    Andersson, Kjell
    Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science, SKL, SE-581 94 Linköping, Sweden.
    Bertler, Christina
    Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science, SKL, SE-581 94 Linköping, Sweden.
    Borén, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Analytical Chemistry .
    Cole, Michael D.
    Forensic Science Unit, University of Strathclyde, 204 George Street, Glasgow, UK.
    Dahlén, Johan
    Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science, SKL, SE-581 94 Linköping, Sweden.
    Finnon, Yvonne
    Forensic Science Unit, University of Strathclyde, 204 George Street, Glasgow, UK.
    Huizer, Henk
    Netherlands Forensic Institute, Volmerlaan 17, 2288 GD Rijswijk, The Netherlands.
    Jalava, Kajsa
    National Bureau of Investigation, P.O. Box 285, FIN-01301 Vantaa, Finland.
    Kaa, Elisabet
    Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Aarhus, Skovagervej 2, DK-8240 Risskov, Denmark.
    Lock, Eric
    Netherlands Forensic Institute, Volmerlaan 17, 2288 GD Rijswijk, The Netherlands/Institut de Police Scientifique, University of Lausanne, Batiment de Chimie, CH-1015 Lausanne-Dorigny, Switzerland.
    Lopes, Alvaro
    Laboratorio de Policia Cientifica, Policia Judiciaria, Rua Gomes Freire 174, 1169-007 Lisbon, Portugal.
    Poortman-van-der Meer, Anneke
    Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Aarhus, Skovagervej 2, DK-8240 Risskov, Denmark.
    Sippola, Erkki
    National Bureau of Investigation, P.O. Box 285, FIN-01301 Vantaa, Finland.
    Development of a harmonised method for the profiling of amphetamines: I. Synthesis of standards and compilation of analytical data2005In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 149, no 2-3, 219-229 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reference material was synthesised for 21 substances that are frequently present as synthetic impurities, i.e. by-products, in illicitly produced amphetamine. Each of these substances is a typical by-product for at least one of the three approaches most often used to synthesise amphetamine, namely, the Leuckart, the reductive amination of benzyl methyl ketone, and the nitrostyrene routes. A large body of data on the substances was recorded, including the following: mass spectra, ultraviolet spectra, Fourier transform infrared spectra, infrared spectra in gas phase, and 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. © 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Aaltio, Iiris
    et al.
    School of Economics and Business University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Kyrö, PaulaHelsinki School of Economics, Finland.Sundin, ElisabethLinköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Women, Entrepreneurship and Social Capital: A Dialogue and Construction2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book explores social capital as the multiple relationships between gender, management and entrepreneurship. Human resources are the social capital of a firm and business life, based on trust as well as on expertise, values and cultural diversity. This calls for cross-cultural knowledge and an understanding of gender issues and individual differences in the social capital of the firm and society. The dialogue between women entrepreneurship and social capital theory and research has its special place among other women entrepreneurship books, the number of which has lately increased. It strengthens still in some respect the fragmented voice of women entrepreneurship research by providing a landscape of women entrepreneurs as creators of, and created by, social capital. It indicates how women entrepreneurs appear to have a special position in forming, developing and reorganizing the social capital in the business world. In its eleven chapters, twenty-six researchers representing a variety of disciplines from different parts of the world are presenting findings on diverse aspects of the dialogue between women entrepreneurship and social capital. As a consequence the central concepts, social capital, entrepreneurship and gender, are given a variety of meanings. Women entrepreneurs and business owners regardless of their cultural context, branch and education provide interesting ideas to the global debate on equality and social capital.

  • 16.
    Aalto, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaworski, M
    Gustavsson, M
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurosurgery UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of Betainterferon treatment in Multiple Sclerosis Studied by Quantitative 1H MRS2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Aalto, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sjoewall, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Davidsson, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Brain magnetic resonance imaging does not contribute to the diagnosis of chronic neuroborreliosis2007In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 48, no 7, 755-762 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Borrelia infections, especially chronic neuroborreliosis ( NB), may cause considerable diagnostic problems. This diagnosis is based on symptoms and findings in the cerebrospinal fluid but is not always conclusive. Purpose: To evaluate brain magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI) in chronic NB, to compare the findings with healthy controls, and to correlate MRI findings with disease duration. Material and Methods: Sixteen well- characterized patients with chronic NB and 16 matched controls were examined in a 1.5T scanner with a standard head coil. T1- ( with and without gadolinium), T2-, and diffusion- weighted imaging plus fluid- attenuated inversion recovery ( FLAIR) imaging were used. Results: White matter lesions and lesions in the basal ganglia were seen in 12 patients and 10 controls ( no significant difference). Subependymal lesions were detected in patients down to the age of 25 and in the controls down to the age of 43. The number of lesions was correlated to age both in patients ( rho=0.83, P < 0.01) and in controls ( rho=0.61, P < 0.05), but not to the duration of disease. Most lesions were detected with FLAIR, but many also with T2- weighted imaging. Conclusion: A number of MRI findings were detected in patients with chronic NB, although the findings were unspecific when compared with matched controls and did not correlate with disease duration. However, subependymal lesions may constitute a potential finding in chronic NB.

  • 18.
    Aalto Hagman, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration.
    Sonde, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration.
    Innovation Crowdsourcing: Exploring the Use of an Innovation Intermediary2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: With the Open Innovation paradigm come new hopes for innovating companies. The ability to tap a global network of experts can, at least in theory, have a significant impact on an organization’s competitive strength. Before such a ‘network of experts’ can be used to its full potential however, a number of challenges related to knowledge markets seem to need solutions. About 10 years ago however, we could witness the entry of a new breed of company – calling themselves innovation intermediaries. These companies are built to profit from delivering the usefulness of knowledge networks to client (Seeker) companies. Though the use of such networks and markets have so far been uncommon outside of high-tech fields they are now starting to be seen used by companies in more mature environments.Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to examine the collaboration between SCA (a large Swedish corporation) and the innovation intermediary InnoCentive in order to create a better understanding of what kind of benefits can be derived from the use of an innovation intermediary, and how these benefits are best utilized. We also set out to identify relevant limitations of innomediary use and to seek to better understand how using an innomediary can fit a client company’s higher-order activities such as exploration and exploitation.Completion and Results: Our findings include that SCA are using InnoCentive mainly as a tool to solve highly specific problems and/or problems with a low degree of complexity that they encounter in their everyday activities. The challenges related to knowledge markets, we find, are avoided by keeping problem complexity low and problem modularity high for the problems sent out to the network. In addition, InnoCentive’s business model seems to eliminate costly negotiations between Seekers and Solvers. Using this kind of ‘market solution’ however, we argue, will put bounds on the usefulness of the network and makes it mainly suited as a tool for improving an organization’s exploitation capacity.

  • 19.
    Aaltonen, Kristina E.
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Rosendahl, Ann H.
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Malmstrom, Per
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hartman, Linda
    Lund University, Sweden; Regional Cancer Centre South, Sweden.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Association between insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) negativity and poor prognosis in a cohort of women with primary breast cancer2014In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 14, no 794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Resistance towards endocrine therapy is a great concern in breast cancer treatment and may partly be explained by the activation of compensatory signaling pathways. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) signaling pathway was activated or deregulated in breast cancer patients and to explore if any of the markers were prognostic, with or without adjuvant tamoxifen. This signaling pathway has been suggested to cause estrogen independent cell growth and thus contribute to resistance to endocrine treatment in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. Methods: The protein expression of IGF1R, phosphorylated Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (p-mTOR) and phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein (p-S6rp) were investigated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays in two patient cohorts. Cohort I (N = 264) consisted of mainly postmenopausal women with stage II breast cancer treated with tamoxifen for 2 years irrespective of ER status. Cohort II (N = 206) consisted of mainly medically untreated, premenopausal patients with node-negative breast cancer. Distant disease-free survival (DDFS) at 5 years was used as end-point for survival analyses. Results: We found that lower IGF1R expression was associated with worse prognosis for tamoxifen treated, postmenopausal women (HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.52 - 0.94, p = 0.016). The effect was seen mainly in ER-negative patients where the prognostic effect was retained after adjustment for other prognostic markers (adjusted HR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.29 - 0.82, p = 0.007). Expression of IGF1R was associated with ER positivity (p less than 0.001) in the same patient cohort. Conclusions: Our results support previous studies indicating that IGF1R positivity reflects a well differentiated tumor with low metastatic capacity. An association between lack of IGF1R expression and worse prognosis was mainly seen in the ER-negative part of Cohort I. The lack of co-activation of downstream markers (p-mTOR and p-S6rp) in the IGF1R pathway suggested that the prognostic effect was not due to complete activation of this pathway. Thus, no evidence could be found for a compensatory function of IGF1R signaling in the investigated cohorts.

  • 20.
    Aamand Grabau, Dorthe
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Bendahl, Par-Ola
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden .
    The prevalence of immunohistochemically determined oestrogen receptor positivity in primary breast cancer is dependent on the choice of antibody and method of heat-induced epitope retrieval - prognostic implications?2013In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 52, no 8, 1657-1666 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Oestrogen receptor (ER) status is important for the choice of systemic treatment of breast cancer patients. However, most data from randomised trials on the effect of adjuvant endocrine therapy according to ER status are based on the cytosol methods. Comparisons with immunohistochemical methods have given similar results. The aim of the present study was to examine whether different ER antibodies and heat-induced epitope retrieval (HIER) methods influence the prevalence of ER-positivity in primary breast cancer. Material and methods. This study is based on patients included in a clinical trial designed to compare the effect of two years of adjuvant tamoxifen versus no adjuvant systemic treatment in premenopausal women. From 1986 to 1991, 564 patients from two study centres in Sweden were enrolled and randomised. Patients were randomised independently of ER status. In the present study, ER status was assessed on tissue microarrays with the three different ER antibody/HIER combinations: 1D5 in citrate pH 6 (n = 390), SP1 in Tris pH 9 (n = 390) and PharmDx in citrate pH 6 (n = 361). Results. At cut-offs of 1% and 10%, respectively, the prevalence of ER-positivity was higher with SP1 (75% and 72%) compared with 1D5 (68% and 66%) and PharmDx (66% and 62%). At these cut-offs, patients in the discordant groups (SP1-positive and 1D5-negative) seem to have a prognosis intermediate between those of the double-positive and double-negative groups. Comparison with the ER status determined by the cytosol-based methods in the discordant group also showed an intermediate pattern. The repeatability was good for all antibodies and cut-offs, with overall agreement andgt;= 93%. Conclusion. The present study shows that the choice of antibody and HIER method influences the prevalence of ER-positivity. We suggest that this be taken into consideration when choosing a cut-off for clinical decision making.

  • 21.
    Aamir, Syed Ahmed
    Linköping University. Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    A 65nm, Low Voltage, Fully Differential, SC Programmable Gain Amplifier for Video AFE2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Due to rapid growth of home entertainment consumer market, video technology has been continuously pushed to deliver sharper pictures with higher resolution. This has brought about stringent requirements on the video analog front end, which often coupled with the low power and low voltage regulations had to deal with short channel effects of the deep submicron CMOS processes.

    This thesis presents the design of a fully differential programmable gain amplifier, as a subcircuit of a larger video digitizing IC designed at division of Electronic Systems. The switched capacitor architecture of the PGA does not only buffer the signal, but performs compensation for the sync-tip of analog video signal.

    The pseudo differential OTA eliminates tail current source and maintains high signal swing and has efficient common mode feedforward mechanism. When coupled with a similar stage provides inherent common moode feedback without using an additional SC-CMFB block.

    The PGA has been implemented using a 65 nm digital CMOS process. Expected difficulties in a 1.2 V OTA design make themselves evident in 65 nm, which is why cascaded OTA structures were inevitable for attaining gain specification of 60 dB. Nested Miller compensation with a pole shifting source follower, stabilizes the multipole system. The final circuit attains up to 200 MHz bandwidth and maintains high output swing of 0.85 V. High slew rate and good common mode and power supply rejection are observed. Noise requirements require careful design of input differential stage. Although output source follower stabilized the system, it reduces significant bandwidth and adds to second order non-linearity.

  • 22.
    Aamir, Syed Ahmed
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Electronics System. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wikner, J Jacob
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Electronics System. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A 1.2-V pseudo-differential OTA with common-mode feedforward in 65-nm CMOS2010In: 17th IEEE International Conference on Electronics, Circuits, and Systems., www.ieee.org , 2010, 29-32 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, we describe the implementation of a 1. 2-V pseudo-differential operational transconductance amplifier (OTA) with common-mode feedforward (CMFF) and inher­ent common-mode feedback (CMFB) in a 65-nm, digital CMOS process. The OTA architecture provides an inher­ent CMFB when cascaded OTA structures are utilized andthis work has studied a cascaded amplifier consisting of fourstages. Due to the low-gain using core 65-nm circuit de­vices, the overall gain must be distributed on all four stages to acquire a gain of more than 60 dB, while maintaining a-3-dB bandwidth of 200 MHz. To achieve high gain, we propose using a modified, positive-feedback, cross-coupled input differential stage. The modified OTA achieves a high output swing of ± 0.85 V due to only two stacked transistors, 88 dB DC gain and a third-order harmonic of -60 dB for 800 mVpp at 30 MHz. Further on, in a capacitive buffer configuration, we achieve a high slew rate of 1240 V/µS, -3-dB bandwidth of 509 MHz, signal-to-noise ratio of 63 dB while consuming 10.4 mW power.

  • 23.
    Aamir, Syed Ahmed
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Electronics System. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wikner, J Jacob
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Electronics System. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A 500-MHz low-voltage programmable gain amplifier for HD video in 65-nm CMOS2010In: Proceedings of 28th IEEE Norchip Conference., NORCHIP'10, Tampere: www.ieee.org , 2010, 1-4 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes the implementation of a 1.2-V programmable gain amplifier (PGA) for high-definition (HD) video digitizers in a 65-nm digital CMOS process. The “pseudo” switched-capacitor (SC) PGA architecture buffers the video signal, without switching, during the active video. The SC circuitry is used for setup of DC operating point during horizontal and vertical blanking periods. Additionally, it compensates for the `sync-tip' of analog video signals to an equal blanking level for increased dynamic range to the digitizer following the PGA. The operational transconductance amplifier (OTA) employed as main amplifier in the PGA is a pseudo-differential, positive-feedback input stage architecture with a common-mode feedforward (CMFF) technique. The common-mode feedback (CMFB) is provided once two OTAs are cascaded. Schematic-level simulation results show that the OTA maintains a -3-dB bandwidth of 550 MHz, while keeping the distortion HD3 at -60 dB for a 30-MHz, 850 mVpp high definition video signal. The 88 dB DC gain is distributed among four OTA stages and the overall, combined PGA achieves a signal-to-noise ratio of 63 dB. Due to only two stacked transistors, it achieves high output swing of ±0.85 V, 1240 V/μs slew rate while consuming 10.4 mW power.

  • 24.
    Aanaes, K
    et al.
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Rasmussen, N
    Rigshosp, Denmark Statens Serum Institute, Denmark .
    Pressler, T
    Rigshosp, Denmark Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Johansen, H K
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Lindberg, U
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Hoiby, N
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Carlsson, M
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Wieslander, J
    EuroDiagnostica AB, Sweden .
    Buchwald, C
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Extensive Endoscopic Image-Guided Sinus Surgery Decreases BPI-ANCA in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 76, no 6, 573-579 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) directed against bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) are common in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and serum levels are correlated with lung colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the severity of lung damage. The production of BPI-ANCA may be due to the costimulation of BPI when mounting an immune response against P. aeruginosa. The effect of surgery aiming to eradicate bacteria and infected tissue on BPI-ANCA levels is sparsely described. A cohort of patients with CF were included: 53 patients having extensive image-guided sinus surgery (EIGSS) with topical postoperative antibiotic treatment, 131 non-operated controls and 36 who had double lung transplantation (LTX). In all 219 patients, serum samples before and after surgery or at similar intervals were analysed for IgG and IgA BPI-ANCA. The EIGSS group showed a highly significant decrease in both IgA and IgG BPI-ANCA levels compared with their own preoperative values and control group values (P andlt; 0.0010.02). The LTX patients also showed a highly significant decrease in both IgA and IgG BPI-ANCA levels (P andlt; 0.001). EIGSS and LTX decrease IgA and IgG BPI-ANCA levels in patients with CF, indicating that extensive removal of infected tissue influences the pathogenic process of autoantibody production. The results shown herein are in favour of applying EIGSS in selected patients with CF and for using BPI-ANCA as a surrogate marker for guiding further therapeutic interventions.

  • 25.
    Aarao, J
    et al.
    University of South Australia.
    Bradshaw-Hajek, B H
    University of South Australia.
    Miklavcic, Stan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ward, D A
    University of South Australia.
    Numerical implementation of the EDEM for modified Helmholtz BVPs on annular domains2011In: JOURNAL OF COMPUTATIONAL AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS, ISSN 0377-0427, Vol. 235, no 5, 1342-1353 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent paper by the current authors a new methodology called the Extended-Domain-Eigenfunction-Method (EDEM) was proposed for solving elliptic boundary value problems on annular-like domains. In this paper we present and investigate one possible numerical algorithm to implement the EDEM. This algorithm is used to solve modified Helmholtz BVPs on annular-like domains. Two examples of annular-like domains are studied. The results and performance are compared with those of the well-known boundary element method (BEM). The high accuracy of the EDEM solutions and the superior efficiency of the EDEM over the BEM, make EDEM an excellent alternate candidate to use in the animation industry, where speed is a predominant requirement, and by the scientific community where accuracy is the paramount objective.

  • 26.
    Aarao, J
    et al.
    University of South Australia.
    Bradshaw-Hajek, B H
    University of South Australia.
    Miklavcic, Stan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ward, D A
    University of South Australia.
    The extended-domain-eigenfunction method for solving elliptic boundary value problems with annular domains2010In: JOURNAL OF PHYSICS A-MATHEMATICAL AND THEORETICAL, ISSN 1751-8113, Vol. 43, no 18, 185202- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Standard analytical solutions to elliptic boundary value problems on asymmetric domains are rarely, if ever, obtainable. In this paper, we propose a solution technique wherein we embed the original domain into one with simple boundaries where the classical eigenfunction solution approach can be used. The solution in the larger domain, when restricted to the original domain, is then the solution of the original boundary value problem. We call this the extended-domain-eigenfunction method. To illustrate the methods strength and scope, we apply it to Laplaces equation on an annular-like domain.

  • 27.
    Aarao, J
    et al.
    University of S Australia, Australia .
    Miklavcic, Stan J.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ward, D A.
    University of S Australia, Australia .
    Extended-domain-eigenfunction method (EDEM): a study of ill posedness and regularization2013In: Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical, ISSN 1751-8113, Vol. 46, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extended-domain-eigenfunction method (EDEM) proposed for solving elliptic boundary value problems on annular-like domains requires an inversion process. The procedure thus represents an ill-posed problem, whose numerical solution involves an ill-conditioned system of equations. In this paper, the ill-posed nature of EDEM is studied and numerical solutions based on regularization schemes are considered. It is shown that the EDEM solution methodology lends itself naturally to a formulation in terms of the well-known iterative Landweber method and the more general and faster converging semi-iterative regularization schemes. Theoretical details and numerical results of the regularization schemes are presented for the case of the two-dimensional Laplace operator on annular domains.

  • 28.
    Aardal, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ann-Charlotté, Holm
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cortisol in Saliva: Reference Ranges and Relation to Cortisol in Serum1995In: European Journal of Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Biochemistry, ISSN 0939-4974, Vol. 33, 927-932 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to establish morning and evening reference ranges for cortisol in saliva. Another objective was to compare the concentrations of the mainly free cortisol in saliva to those of total cortisol in serum as determined with a commercial radioimmunoassay. The concentrations were determined in matched samples of saliva and serum collected at 8am and 10pm from 197 healthy volunteers. The saliva samples were stable for at least 7 days at room temperature and for 9 months at —20 °C. Reference ranges, the central 95%, were estimated to 3.5—27.0 nmol/1 at 8 am and < 6.0 nmol/1 at 10 pm. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was below 5% and total CV below 10%. The relation between the cortisol concentrations in serum and saliva was nonlinear with r = 0.86 for serum concentrations < 450 nmol/1 and r = 0.44 for serum concentrations ^ 450 nmol/1. In conclusion, the satisfactory precision of the analysis and the simple non-invasive sampling procedure suggest that saliva may be used for cortisol measurements in situations where blood sampling is difficult to perform.

  • 29.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Salivary cortisol and posttraumatic stress reactions: methodological and applied studies before and after trauma2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of psychotraumatology has its roots in ancient history. During the past decades, the surveillance of the psychobiological background of reactions to and consequences of traumatic stress has made great progress and the complexity of the human stress response system stands out. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis activity, modulated by various neuroimmunological substances, seems to play a major role in the stress response. However, there are still inconsistencies in explanations of relationships between biological and psychological changes following traumatic stress. Moreover, the matter of predictive factors for the development of posttraumatic morbidity is still in a speculative phase.

    The aims of the present thesis were to further develop a commercial serum cortisol radioimmunoassay (RIA) for determination of cortisol in saliva and to test its reliability, specificity and sensitivity as a biochemical assay. The saliva sampling procedures and sample storage stability were also to be tested. Further issues were to investigate determinations of salivary cortisol and serum prolactin in relation to selfratings of posttraumatic psychological distress and general psychological health. Possible predictive and concurrent validity of salivary cortisol as a biochemical marker for posttraumatic psychological distress were to be tested.

    Cortisol is present in saliva mainly in non-protein form, representing the free, biologically active fraction of the total plasma cortisol concentration. In a first phase of the present thesis, the commercial serum cortisol RIA was modified for determination of cortisol in saliva. The relation between salivary and serum cortisol concentrations was tested. Reference ranges at 8 AM and 10 PM for the salivary cortisol assay were established from 195 healthy subjects. Salivary cortisol concentrations were tested in relation to serum cortisol in estimating adrenocortical function during endocrine dynamic function tests in 37 patients and 13 healthy controls. In testing salivary cortisol as a marker for stress for fieldwork use, a screening study was performed on 66 male rescue workers. Salivary cortisol at 8 AM and 10 PM and serum prolactin were determined and general psychological health and posttraumatic psychological distress were estimated with the self-rating scales General Health Questionnaire, Impact of Event Scale and Posttraumatic Symptom Scale. These scales were used in the second phase of the thesis. Three applied follow-up studies were performed with sampling of salivary cortisol and self-ratings: (a) a study of 31 UN-soldiers five days, two and nine months after a mine accident; (b) a study of 145 UN-soldiers before, at return, and two and six month after a six month mission. (c) a study of 101 UN-soldiers six and twelve months after a six month mission with severe combat exposure.

    The results from the present thesis indicate that the modified method of salivary cortisol determination possesses sufficient precision, accuracy, sample storage stability and procedural advantages for laboratory, clinical and field application. Moreover, it possesses moderate predictive information and moderate to high concurrent validity as a biochemical marker for posttraumatic psychological distress.

    List of papers
    1. Cortisol in Saliva: Reference Ranges and Relation to Cortisol in Serum
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cortisol in Saliva: Reference Ranges and Relation to Cortisol in Serum
    1995 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Biochemistry, ISSN 0939-4974, Vol. 33, 927-932 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to establish morning and evening reference ranges for cortisol in saliva. Another objective was to compare the concentrations of the mainly free cortisol in saliva to those of total cortisol in serum as determined with a commercial radioimmunoassay. The concentrations were determined in matched samples of saliva and serum collected at 8am and 10pm from 197 healthy volunteers. The saliva samples were stable for at least 7 days at room temperature and for 9 months at —20 °C. Reference ranges, the central 95%, were estimated to 3.5—27.0 nmol/1 at 8 am and < 6.0 nmol/1 at 10 pm. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was below 5% and total CV below 10%. The relation between the cortisol concentrations in serum and saliva was nonlinear with r = 0.86 for serum concentrations < 450 nmol/1 and r = 0.44 for serum concentrations ^ 450 nmol/1. In conclusion, the satisfactory precision of the analysis and the simple non-invasive sampling procedure suggest that saliva may be used for cortisol measurements in situations where blood sampling is difficult to perform.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80129 (URN)10.1515/cclm.1995.33.12.927 (DOI)
    Available from: 2012-08-21 Created: 2012-08-21 Last updated: 2012-08-21Bibliographically approved
    2. Salivary cortisol: an alternative to serum cortisol determinations in dynamic function tests
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Salivary cortisol: an alternative to serum cortisol determinations in dynamic function tests
    1998 (English)In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, Vol. 36, no 4, 215-222 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Salivary cortisol was measured as an alternative to serum cortisol as a marker for adrenocortical function following insulin tolerance test, corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation and adreno-corticotrophic hormone stimulation. During insulin tolerance test and corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation adreno-corticotrophic hormone was also measured. The tests were performed on healthy control subjects as well as on patients under investigation for various disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (insulin tolerance test: 3 controls on two occasions and 14 patients; corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation: 4 controls and 18 patients; adreno-corticotrophic hormone stimulation: 6 controls and 10 patients). Five patients underwent both insulin tolerance test and corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation. Using criteria for adequate cortisol response in serum, the patients were classified as good or poor responders. In 42 of the 45 tests performed the same conclusion as to cortisol status was drawn when based on serum and salivary cortisol responses. In healthy subjects and good responders the mean cortisol relative increase was greater in saliva than in serum in all three tests (p < 0.05). Characteristic of the results for the insulin tolerance test was a significant initial mean decrease (p < 0.05), not found in serum, and the highest observed salivary cortisol value was delayed for at least 30 minutes compared to that in serum. Plasma adreno-corticotrophic hormone correlated significantly with the cortisol concentrations determined 15 minutes later in serum (r = 0.54–0.64) and in saliva (r = 0.76–0.85). The more pronounced cortisol response in saliva than in serum and its closer correlation with adreno-corticotrophic hormone offer advantages over serum cortisol, suggesting salivary cortisol measurement may be used as an alternative parameter in dynamic endocrine tets.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80133 (URN)10.1515/CCLM.1998.037 (DOI)
    Available from: 2012-08-21 Created: 2012-08-21 Last updated: 2012-10-24Bibliographically approved
    3. Salivary cortisol and serum prolactin in relation to stress rating scales in a group of rescue workers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Salivary cortisol and serum prolactin in relation to stress rating scales in a group of rescue workers
    1999 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 46, no 6, 850-855 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rescue service personnel are often exposed to traumatic events as part of their occupation, and higher prevalence rates of psychiatric illness have been found among this group.

    Methods: In 65 rescue workers, salivary cortisol at 8 am and 10 pm and serum prolactin at 8 am were related to the psychiatric self-rating scale General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) measuring psychiatric health, and the Impact of Events Scale (IES) and Post Traumatic Symptom Scale (PTSS) measuring posttraumatic symptoms.

    Results: Seventeen percent of the study population scored above the GHQ-28 cut-off limit but none scored beyond the cut-off limit in the IES and PTSS questionnaires. Salivary cortisol concentration at 10 pm correlated with statistical significance to anxiety (p < .005) and depressive symptoms (p < .01) measured with GHQ-28, as well as to posttraumatic symptoms, with avoidance behavior measured with IES (p < .01) and PTSS (p < .005). Two of the rescue workers were followed over time with the same sampling procedure after a major rescue commission.

    Conclusions: The correlation between evening salivary cortisol and anxiety, depressiveness, and posttraumatic avoidance symptoms indicates that these parameters can be used in screening and follow-up after traumatic stress events.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24816 (URN)10.1016/S0006-3223(98)00381-3 (DOI)9214 (Local ID)9214 (Archive number)9214 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2012-08-21Bibliographically approved
    4. Salivary cortisol, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and general health in the acute phase and during 9-month follow-up
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Salivary cortisol, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and general health in the acute phase and during 9-month follow-up
    2001 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 50, no 12, 986-993 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Because traumatic events are unpredictable, there are few studies of psychobiological states immediately following such events. Our study aimed to determine the relation of salivary cortisol to psychologic distress immediately after a traumatic event and then during follow-up.

    Methods: Measurement of morning and evening salivary cortisol and ratings of psychologic distress (using the Impact of Events Scale [IES], the Post Traumatic Symptom Scale, and the General Health Questionnaire) were performed with 31 United Nations soldiers at three time points—5 days and 2 and 9 months—following a mine accident in Lebanon.

    Results: Five days after the accident, 15 subjects reported substantial posttraumatic distress according to the IES, as well as significantly lower morning and higher evening cortisol levels compared with the low-impact group. Within 9 months, the posttraumatic distress of the high-impact group was reduced, accompanied by an increase in morning and a decrease in evening cortisol levels. There were significant relationships between evening cortisol and all rating scales at the first and third time points.

    Conclusions: Subclinical posttraumatic stress following an adverse event can be measured biologically via salivary cortisol levels soon after the event.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24817 (URN)10.1016/S0006-3223(01)01253-7 (DOI)9215 (Local ID)9215 (Archive number)9215 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2012-08-21Bibliographically approved
    5. Pre-trauma Salivary Cortisol Levels and General Health Ratings in Relation to Post-trauma Changes in Cortisol and Psychological Distress after UN-service in Bosnia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pre-trauma Salivary Cortisol Levels and General Health Ratings in Relation to Post-trauma Changes in Cortisol and Psychological Distress after UN-service in Bosnia
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The psychobiology of post-traumatic distress is known to some extent, however the pre-trauma psychobiology is not. The aims of the present study were to relate pre- and post-trauma salivary cortisol levels and general health to post-traumatic distress in a Swedish UN-battalion in Bosnia.

    Methods: Salivary 8 AM and I 0 PM cortisol levels and "General Health Questionnaire" ratings were collected from 145 subjects before the six months' mission, at return and two and six months after mission. During follow-up, the ratings were extended by the "Impact of Events Scale" (IES) and "Post Traumatic Symptom Scale".

    Results: Low pre-trauma morning and evening salivary cortisol levels were statistically significantly related to high scores in all rating scales six months after mission and to increasing IES scores during follow-up. Low morning and high evening post-trauma salivary cortisol levels were related to high ratings of psychological distress six months after mission

    Conclusions: Pre-trauma salivary cortisol levels seem to be related to posttrauma psychological distress, however not to the extent that salivary cortisol levels in a simple way could be used for predictive screening.

    Keyword
    Saliva, cortisol, relation to, rating scales, traumatic stress, UN-soldiers
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80134 (URN)
    Available from: 2012-08-21 Created: 2012-08-21 Last updated: 2012-08-21Bibliographically approved
    6. Twelve Months Follow-up of Salivary Cortisol in Relation to Psychological Distress and General Health in Swedish UN-personnel after Severe Combat Exposure during Six Months Mission in Bosnia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Twelve Months Follow-up of Salivary Cortisol in Relation to Psychological Distress and General Health in Swedish UN-personnel after Severe Combat Exposure during Six Months Mission in Bosnia
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Our group has presented evidence of relationships between salivary cortisol levels and psychological distress before, during and after trauma-related stress. The aim of the present study was to confirm the part of evidence of relationships between salivary cortisol and posttraumatic distress and their change over time.

    Methods: Salivary cortisol levels at 8 AM and 10 PM and self-ratings were collected from 106 subjects six and twelve months after a six months UNmission in Bosnia. The rating instruments were the "Impact of Event Scale" (IES), the "Post Traumatic Symptom Scale" and the "General Health Questionnaire".

    Results: Significant statistical interactions were found between changes in mean cortisol levels and IES scores over time. Decreasing evening cortisol levels over time were significantly related to decreasing IES scores and vice versa. Morning cortisol levels showed negative, and evening cortisol positive correlations with all rating scores.

    Conclusions: The evidence from previous studies on trauma related stress, that salivary cortisol is related to the development of posttraumatic stress reactions, the morning cortisol in reverse (negative) direction to that (positive) of evening cortisol, were confirmed.

    Keyword
    Saliva, cortisol, follow-up, relation to, rating scales, traumatic stress, UN-soldiers
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80136 (URN)
    Available from: 2012-08-21 Created: 2012-08-21 Last updated: 2012-08-21Bibliographically approved
  • 30.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Thomas E.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pre-trauma Salivary Cortisol Levels and General Health Ratings in Relation to Post-trauma Changes in Cortisol and Psychological Distress after UN-service in BosniaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The psychobiology of post-traumatic distress is known to some extent, however the pre-trauma psychobiology is not. The aims of the present study were to relate pre- and post-trauma salivary cortisol levels and general health to post-traumatic distress in a Swedish UN-battalion in Bosnia.

    Methods: Salivary 8 AM and I 0 PM cortisol levels and "General Health Questionnaire" ratings were collected from 145 subjects before the six months' mission, at return and two and six months after mission. During follow-up, the ratings were extended by the "Impact of Events Scale" (IES) and "Post Traumatic Symptom Scale".

    Results: Low pre-trauma morning and evening salivary cortisol levels were statistically significantly related to high scores in all rating scales six months after mission and to increasing IES scores during follow-up. Low morning and high evening post-trauma salivary cortisol levels were related to high ratings of psychological distress six months after mission

    Conclusions: Pre-trauma salivary cortisol levels seem to be related to posttrauma psychological distress, however not to the extent that salivary cortisol levels in a simple way could be used for predictive screening.

  • 31.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Thomas E.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Salivary cortisol, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and general health in the acute phase and during 9-month follow-up2001In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 50, no 12, 986-993 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Because traumatic events are unpredictable, there are few studies of psychobiological states immediately following such events. Our study aimed to determine the relation of salivary cortisol to psychologic distress immediately after a traumatic event and then during follow-up.

    Methods: Measurement of morning and evening salivary cortisol and ratings of psychologic distress (using the Impact of Events Scale [IES], the Post Traumatic Symptom Scale, and the General Health Questionnaire) were performed with 31 United Nations soldiers at three time points—5 days and 2 and 9 months—following a mine accident in Lebanon.

    Results: Five days after the accident, 15 subjects reported substantial posttraumatic distress according to the IES, as well as significantly lower morning and higher evening cortisol levels compared with the low-impact group. Within 9 months, the posttraumatic distress of the high-impact group was reduced, accompanied by an increase in morning and a decrease in evening cortisol levels. There were significant relationships between evening cortisol and all rating scales at the first and third time points.

    Conclusions: Subclinical posttraumatic stress following an adverse event can be measured biologically via salivary cortisol levels soon after the event.

  • 32.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Thomas E.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Twelve Months Follow-up of Salivary Cortisol in Relation to Psychological Distress and General Health in Swedish UN-personnel after Severe Combat Exposure during Six Months Mission in BosniaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Our group has presented evidence of relationships between salivary cortisol levels and psychological distress before, during and after trauma-related stress. The aim of the present study was to confirm the part of evidence of relationships between salivary cortisol and posttraumatic distress and their change over time.

    Methods: Salivary cortisol levels at 8 AM and 10 PM and self-ratings were collected from 106 subjects six and twelve months after a six months UNmission in Bosnia. The rating instruments were the "Impact of Event Scale" (IES), the "Post Traumatic Symptom Scale" and the "General Health Questionnaire".

    Results: Significant statistical interactions were found between changes in mean cortisol levels and IES scores over time. Decreasing evening cortisol levels over time were significantly related to decreasing IES scores and vice versa. Morning cortisol levels showed negative, and evening cortisol positive correlations with all rating scores.

    Conclusions: The evidence from previous studies on trauma related stress, that salivary cortisol is related to the development of posttraumatic stress reactions, the morning cortisol in reverse (negative) direction to that (positive) of evening cortisol, were confirmed.

  • 33.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holm, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundin, Tom
    Department of Psychiatry, Uppsala Academic Hospital, Uppsala University, Uppsala (TL), Sweden.
    Salivary cortisol and serum prolactin in relation to stress rating scales in a group of rescue workers1999In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 46, no 6, 850-855 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rescue service personnel are often exposed to traumatic events as part of their occupation, and higher prevalence rates of psychiatric illness have been found among this group.

    Methods: In 65 rescue workers, salivary cortisol at 8 am and 10 pm and serum prolactin at 8 am were related to the psychiatric self-rating scale General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) measuring psychiatric health, and the Impact of Events Scale (IES) and Post Traumatic Symptom Scale (PTSS) measuring posttraumatic symptoms.

    Results: Seventeen percent of the study population scored above the GHQ-28 cut-off limit but none scored beyond the cut-off limit in the IES and PTSS questionnaires. Salivary cortisol concentration at 10 pm correlated with statistical significance to anxiety (p < .005) and depressive symptoms (p < .01) measured with GHQ-28, as well as to posttraumatic symptoms, with avoidance behavior measured with IES (p < .01) and PTSS (p < .005). Two of the rescue workers were followed over time with the same sampling procedure after a major rescue commission.

    Conclusions: The correlation between evening salivary cortisol and anxiety, depressiveness, and posttraumatic avoidance symptoms indicates that these parameters can be used in screening and follow-up after traumatic stress events.

  • 34.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion.
    Holm, AC
    Eriksson, TE
    Lundin, T
    Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Biomed & Surg, Ctr Clin Chem, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Salivary cortisol and posttraumatic stress reactions methodological and applied studies before and after trauma2002In: International Journal of Psychophysiology, ISSN 0167-8760, Vol. 45, no 1-2, 89-89 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlberg, Bengt E.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holm, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Salivary cortisol: an alternative to serum cortisol determinations in dynamic function tests1998In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, Vol. 36, no 4, 215-222 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salivary cortisol was measured as an alternative to serum cortisol as a marker for adrenocortical function following insulin tolerance test, corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation and adreno-corticotrophic hormone stimulation. During insulin tolerance test and corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation adreno-corticotrophic hormone was also measured. The tests were performed on healthy control subjects as well as on patients under investigation for various disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (insulin tolerance test: 3 controls on two occasions and 14 patients; corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation: 4 controls and 18 patients; adreno-corticotrophic hormone stimulation: 6 controls and 10 patients). Five patients underwent both insulin tolerance test and corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation. Using criteria for adequate cortisol response in serum, the patients were classified as good or poor responders. In 42 of the 45 tests performed the same conclusion as to cortisol status was drawn when based on serum and salivary cortisol responses. In healthy subjects and good responders the mean cortisol relative increase was greater in saliva than in serum in all three tests (p < 0.05). Characteristic of the results for the insulin tolerance test was a significant initial mean decrease (p < 0.05), not found in serum, and the highest observed salivary cortisol value was delayed for at least 30 minutes compared to that in serum. Plasma adreno-corticotrophic hormone correlated significantly with the cortisol concentrations determined 15 minutes later in serum (r = 0.54–0.64) and in saliva (r = 0.76–0.85). The more pronounced cortisol response in saliva than in serum and its closer correlation with adreno-corticotrophic hormone offer advantages over serum cortisol, suggesting salivary cortisol measurement may be used as an alternative parameter in dynamic endocrine tets.

  • 36.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Mobäck, Caroline
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Jakobsson, Sandra
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Germany.
    Hoffmann, Johannes J. M. L.
    Abbott GmbH and Co KG, Germany.
    Iron depletion in blood donors - Have extended erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters diagnostic utility?2015In: Transfusion and apheresis science, ISSN 1473-0502, E-ISSN 1878-1683, Vol. 53, no 1, 76-81 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Blood donation is associated with iron depletion, but donor iron status is not usually investigated, as such tests are cumbersome and costly. It would therefore be desirable to have simple, fast and inexpensive tests that give information on a donors risk of developing iron depletion. In a pilot study we investigated whether novel erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters can serve this goal. Methods: In regular blood donors extended red cell parameters were measured using the Abbott CELL-DYN Sapphire hematology analyzer and conventional biochemical tests of iron status. Donors were compared with a regionally matched group of non-donating controls. Results: In the controls, the reference ranges of extended RBC parameters were well comparable to published data. Donors had significantly more microcytic RBC than controls (median 0.9 vs 0.6%), lower serum ferritin concentration (median 43 vs 91 mg/L) and higher soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index (median 1.60 vs 1.27). Overall 18-28% of the donors were iron depleted. Moreover, 3.3% of donors had iron-restricted erythropoiesis. Microcytic RBC and reticulocyte mean cell hemoglobin content predicted iron depletion with 70% and 64% sensitivities and specificities of 72% and 78%, respectively. When combined these two parameters increased the sensitivity to 82%. Conclusions: Our results in Swedish blood donors confirm a high prevalence of iron depletion, despite iron supplementation used by about half of the donors. Microcytic RBC and MCHr appeared to be helpful in identifying iron-depleted donors, who might benefit from iron supplementation. We recommend larger prospective investigations in order to confirm and extend the findings of this pilot study. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 37.
    Aarnio, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kimber, Ellen
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Talent Management & Strategy: Identifying Patterns through a Multiple Case Study2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Exploring the Talent Management literature to understand the importance of Talent Management to strategy and the role the view on talent plays in consideration to Talent Management.

    Purpose

    The purpose of this thesis is to increase the empirical research on Talent Management to enable a creation of a conceptual framework.

    Methodology

    A multiple case study approach was taken, as 11 companies from diverse industries, sizes, backgrounds etc. was studied in order to gain a broader picture on the research topic. Furthermore, qualitative data collection method was used and main source of empirical data was interviews conducted with HR professionals of each case company.

    Findings

    The empirical findings indicated there to be a relationship between the strategy and the view on talent. There was further an indication that this relationship has an effect on the focus of the Talent Management activities. 

  • 38.
    Aarnio, Harri
    et al.
    Abo Akad University.
    Sehati, Parisa
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry.
    Braun, Slawomir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nyman, Mathias
    Abo Akad University.
    de Jong, Michel P
    University of Twente.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Osterbacka, Ronald
    Abo Akad University.
    Spontaneous Charge Transfer and Dipole Formation at the Interface Between P3HT and PCBM2011In: ADVANCED ENERGY MATERIALS, ISSN 1614-6832, Vol. 1, no 5, 792-797 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the pursuit of developing new materials for more efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells, the blend poly (3-hexylthiophene):[ 6,6]-phenyl-C(61)-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) serves as an important model system. The success of the P3HT: PCBM blend comes from efficient charge generation and transport with low recombination. There is not, however, a good microscopic picture of what causes these, hindering the development of new material systems. In this report UV photoelectron spectroscopy measurements on both regiorandom-(rra) and regioregular-(rr) P3HT are presented, and the results are interpreted using the Integer Charge Transfer model. The results suggest that spontaneous charge transfer from P3HT to PCBM occurs after heat treatment of P3HT: PCBM blends. The resulting formation of an interfacial dipole creates an extra barrier at the interface explaining the reduced (non-)geminate recombination with increased charge generation in heat treated rr-P3HT: PCBM blends. Extensive photoinduced absorption measurements using both above-and below-bandgap excitation light are presented, in good agreement with the suggested dipole formation.

  • 39.
    Aarsand, P.A.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Frame switches and identity performances: Alternating between online and offline2008In: Text and Talk, ISSN 1860-7330, Vol. 28, no 2, 147-165 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study problematizes activity frames and participation frameworks (Goffman 1981), exploring how students deploy online (MSN Messenger) and offline activity frames in identity performances. One problem in analyzing participation frameworks and particularly notions of subordinate forms, like crossplay, byplay, and sideplay, is that these concepts require that the analyst can identify one dominant activity. This was not possible in the present data, which consist of video recordings of computer activities in a seventh-grade classroom. It is shown how MSN (online) identities were invoked in subsequent and intermittent face-to-face interaction, a dialogue that started on MSN would continue in face-to-face interaction, and vice versa. This means that frame switches constituted important features of the students' identity work. Similarly, the students employed nicknames or what are here called tags, that is, textual-visual displays of speaker identities, located in the boundary zone between online and offline activities. In the classroom interactions, there was thus not one dominant activity frame, but rather the activities involved borderwork, and more specifically frame switches and a strategic use of tags. © Walter de Gruyter 2008.

  • 40.
    Aarsand, Pål André
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Alternating between online and offline: tags and frame switches as interactional resources2007Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present data are based on an ethnographic study of computer use in everyday interactions in a seventh grade class (of 13-14 year-olds). The data were analysed in terms of activity frames and participation frameworks (Goffman 1981), exploring how students deployed online and offline activity frames in their identity performance. It is shown how MSN (online) identities are invoked in subsequent and intermittent face-to-face interaction; a dialogue can start on MSN and continue in faceto-face interaction, and vice versa. This means that frame switches are important features of the students’ identity work. Similarly, the students employed nicknames or tags, that is, textual-visual displays of ‘speaker’ identities, located in the boundary zone between online and offline activities. In terms of participation frameworks, it is also documented ways in which students engaged in crossplay (Goffman 1981), where a ratified participant communicated with a non-ratified participant. Yet, one problem in analysing participation frameworks and particularly byplay and sideplay (Goffman 1981) is that these concepts require that the analyst can identify one dominant activity. This was not possible in the present data. Instead, the data are primarily analysed in terms of borderwork, that here entails frame switchings, crossplay and a strategic use of tags.

  • 41.
    Aarsand, Pål André
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Around the Screen: Computer activities in children’s everyday lives2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present ethnography documents computer activities in everyday life. The data consist of video recordings, interviews and field notes, documenting (i) 16 students in a seventh grade class in a computer room and other school settings and (ii) 22 children, interacting with siblings, friends and parents in home settings. The thesis is inspired by discourse analytical as well as ethnographic approaches, including notions from Goffman (1974, 1981), e.g. those of activity frame and participation framework, which are applied and discussed.

    The thesis consists of four empirical studies. The first study focuses on students’ illegitimate use, from the school’s point of view, of online chatting in a classroom situation. It is shown that the distinction offline/online is not a static one, rather it is made relevant as part of switches between activity frames, indicating the problems of applying Goffman’s (1981) notions of sideplay, byplay and crossplay to analyses of interactions in which several activity frames are present, rather than one main activity. Moreover, it is shown that online identities, in terms of what is here called tags, that is, visual-textual nicknames, are related to offline phenomena, including local identities as well as contemporary aesthetics. The second study focuses on placement of game consoles as part of family life politics. It is shown that game consoles were mainly located in communal places in the homes. The distinction private/communal was also actualized in the participants’ negotiations about access to game consoles as well as negotiations about what to play, when, and for how long. It is shown that two strategies were used, inclusion and exclusion, for appropriating communal places for computer game activities. The third study focuses on a digital divide in terms of a generational divide with respect to ascribed computer competence, documenting how the children and adults positioned each other as people ‘in the know’ (the children) versus people in apprentice-like positions (the adults). It is shown that this generation gap was deployed as a resource in social interaction by both the children and the adults. The forth study focuses on gaming in family life, showing that gaming was recurrently marked by response cries (Goffman, 1981) and other forms of blurted talk. These forms of communication worked as parts of the architecture of intersubjectivity in gaming (cf. Heritage, 1984), indexing the distinction virtual/‘real’. It is shown how response cries, sound making, singing along and animated talk extended the virtual in that elements of the game became parts of the children’s social interaction around the screen, forming something of an action aesthetic, a type of performative action for securing and displaying joint involvement and collaboration. As a whole, the present studies show how the distinctions master/apprentice, public/private, virtual/real and subject/object are indexicalized and negotiated in computer activities.

    List of papers
    1. Alternating between online and offline: tags and frame switches as interactional resources
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alternating between online and offline: tags and frame switches as interactional resources
    2007 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present data are based on an ethnographic study of computer use in everyday interactions in a seventh grade class (of 13-14 year-olds). The data were analysed in terms of activity frames and participation frameworks (Goffman 1981), exploring how students deployed online and offline activity frames in their identity performance. It is shown how MSN (online) identities are invoked in subsequent and intermittent face-to-face interaction; a dialogue can start on MSN and continue in faceto-face interaction, and vice versa. This means that frame switches are important features of the students’ identity work. Similarly, the students employed nicknames or tags, that is, textual-visual displays of ‘speaker’ identities, located in the boundary zone between online and offline activities. In terms of participation frameworks, it is also documented ways in which students engaged in crossplay (Goffman 1981), where a ratified participant communicated with a non-ratified participant. Yet, one problem in analysing participation frameworks and particularly byplay and sideplay (Goffman 1981) is that these concepts require that the analyst can identify one dominant activity. This was not possible in the present data. Instead, the data are primarily analysed in terms of borderwork, that here entails frame switchings, crossplay and a strategic use of tags.

    Keyword
    participation framework, activity frames, online activities, offline activities, identities, borderwork.
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14501 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-05-14 Created: 2007-05-14 Last updated: 2010-10-11
    2. Gaming and Territorial Negotiations in Family Life
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gaming and Territorial Negotiations in Family Life
    2009 (English)In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 16, no 4, 497-517 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines territorial negotiations concerning gaming, drawing on video recordings of gaming practices in middle-class families. It explores how private vs public gaming space was co-construed by children and parents in front of the screen as well as through conversations about games. Game equipment was generally located in public places in the homes, which can be understood in terms of parents’ surveillance of their children, on the one hand, and actual parental involvement, on the other. Gaming space emerged in the interplay between game location, technology and practices, which blurred any fixed boundaries between public and private, place and space, as well as traditional age hierarchies.

    Keyword
    computer gaming • family politics • parental involvement • place/space • public/private
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14502 (URN)10.1177/0907568209343879 (DOI)
    Note
    Tidigare titel: Computer gaming and territorial negotiations in family life Available from: 2007-05-14 Created: 2007-05-14 Last updated: 2010-07-01
    3. Computer- and Video games in Family Life: The digital divide as a resource in intergenerational interactions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computer- and Video games in Family Life: The digital divide as a resource in intergenerational interactions
    2007 (English)In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, Vol. 14, no 2, 235-256 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this ethnographic study of family life, intergenerational video and computer game activities were videotaped and analysed. Both children and adults invoked the notion of a digital divide, i.e. a generation gap between those who master and do not master digital technology. It is argued that the digital divide was exploited by the children to control the game activities. Conversely, parents and grandparents positioned themselves as less knowledgeable, drawing on a displayed divide as a rhetorical resource for gaining access to playtime with the children. In these intergenerational encounters, the digital divide was thus an interactional resource rather than a problem.

    Keyword
    computer games, digital divide, family, knowledge-relations, participation framework, video games
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14503 (URN)10.1177/0907568207078330 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-05-14 Created: 2007-05-14 Last updated: 2009-04-21
    4. Response cries and other gaming moves: Building intersubjectivity in gaming
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Response cries and other gaming moves: Building intersubjectivity in gaming
    2009 (English)In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, Vol. 41, no 8, 1557-1575 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focuses on the ways in which response cries (Goffman, 1981) are deployed as interactional resources in computer gaming in everyday life. It draws on a large-scale data set of video recordings of the everyday lives of middleclass families. The recordings of gaming between children and between children and parents show that response cries were not arbitrarily located within different phases of gaming (planning, gaming or commenting on gaming). Response cries were primarily used as interactional resources for securing and sustaining joint attention (cf. Goodwin, 1996) during the gaming as such, that is, during periods when the gaming activity was characterized by a relatively high tempo. In gaming between children, response cries co-occurred with their animations of game characters and with sound making, singing along, and code switching in ways that formed something of an action aesthetic, a type of aesthetic that was most clearly seen in gaming between game equals (here: between children). In contrast, response cries were rare during the planning phases and during phases in which the participants primarily engaged in setting up or adjusting the game.

    Keyword
    Computer gaming; Response cries; Intersubjectivity; Everyday life; Action aesthetic
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14504 (URN)10.1016/j.pragma.2007.05.014 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-05-14 Created: 2007-05-14 Last updated: 2010-02-05
  • 42.
    Aarsand, Pål André
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Computer- and Video games in Family Life: The digital divide as a resource in intergenerational interactions2007In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, Vol. 14, no 2, 235-256 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this ethnographic study of family life, intergenerational video and computer game activities were videotaped and analysed. Both children and adults invoked the notion of a digital divide, i.e. a generation gap between those who master and do not master digital technology. It is argued that the digital divide was exploited by the children to control the game activities. Conversely, parents and grandparents positioned themselves as less knowledgeable, drawing on a displayed divide as a rhetorical resource for gaining access to playtime with the children. In these intergenerational encounters, the digital divide was thus an interactional resource rather than a problem.

  • 43.
    Aarsand, Pål André
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Stockholm University .
    Gaming and Territorial Negotiations in Family Life2009In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 16, no 4, 497-517 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines territorial negotiations concerning gaming, drawing on video recordings of gaming practices in middle-class families. It explores how private vs public gaming space was co-construed by children and parents in front of the screen as well as through conversations about games. Game equipment was generally located in public places in the homes, which can be understood in terms of parents’ surveillance of their children, on the one hand, and actual parental involvement, on the other. Gaming space emerged in the interplay between game location, technology and practices, which blurred any fixed boundaries between public and private, place and space, as well as traditional age hierarchies.

  • 44.
    Aarsand, Pål André
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Response cries and other gaming moves: Building intersubjectivity in gaming2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, Vol. 41, no 8, 1557-1575 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focuses on the ways in which response cries (Goffman, 1981) are deployed as interactional resources in computer gaming in everyday life. It draws on a large-scale data set of video recordings of the everyday lives of middleclass families. The recordings of gaming between children and between children and parents show that response cries were not arbitrarily located within different phases of gaming (planning, gaming or commenting on gaming). Response cries were primarily used as interactional resources for securing and sustaining joint attention (cf. Goodwin, 1996) during the gaming as such, that is, during periods when the gaming activity was characterized by a relatively high tempo. In gaming between children, response cries co-occurred with their animations of game characters and with sound making, singing along, and code switching in ways that formed something of an action aesthetic, a type of aesthetic that was most clearly seen in gaming between game equals (here: between children). In contrast, response cries were rare during the planning phases and during phases in which the participants primarily engaged in setting up or adjusting the game.

  • 45.
    Aarts, B.
    et al.
    Netherlands Forensic Institute, Biological Traces and DNA, The Hague, Netherlands.
    Kokshoorn, B.
    Netherlands Forensic Institute, Biological Traces and DNA, The Hague, Netherlands.
    Mc Kenna, L.G.
    Forensic Science Ireland, DNA department, Dublin, Ireland.
    Drotz, W.
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, DNA department, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ansell, Ricky
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Forensic Centre, DNA department, Linköping, Sweden.
    van Oorschot, R.A.
    Office of the Chief Forensic Scientist, Victoria Police Forensic Services Department, Macleod- Victoria, Australia.
    Kloosterman, A.D.
    Netherlands Forensic Institute, Biological Traces and DNA, The Hague, Netherlands.
    DNActivity: International cooperation in activity level interpretation of forensic DNA evidence.2015In: Abstract book, 7th European Academy of Forensic Science, EAFS, Prag, Tjeckien, 2015., 2015, 555- p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Questions posed to expert witnesses by the legal community and the courts are expanding to include not just those relating to source level (i.e. ‘who is the donor of the trace?’) but also those relating to activitity level (i.e. ‘how did the DNA get there?’). The answers to these questions are usually formulated as the probability of the evidence under alternative scenarios. As activity level questions are part of investigative and legal considerations it is of paramount importance that expert witnesses are provided with knowledge and tools to address these questions.

    To answer such questions within a probabilistic framework, empirical data is needed to estimate probabilities of transfer, persistence and recovery of DNA as well as background levels of DNA on everyday objects. There is a paucity of empirical data on these topics, but the number of studies is increasing both through in-house experiments and experimental data published in international scientific journals.

    Laboratories that conduct such studies all use different experimental setups, trace recovery strategies and techniques and DNA analysis systems and equipment. It is essential for the forensic genetics community in general to establish whether the data generated by different labs are in concordance, and can therefore be readily used by the forensic community.

    Moreover, if existing data and data generated from future experiments are made available to the (forensic) community, knowledge is needed on the key factors that underlie potential interlaboratory variation.

    The aims and objectives of this ENFSI Monopoly 2013 project are to conduct a study of methodologies and data from different laboratories and to assess the comparability of the scientific data on transfer, persistence and recovery of DNA. This comparison will allow us to identify key factors that underlie potential variation. This information will be used to setup guidelines to enable sharing and database-storage of relevant scientific

    data. This will improve the ability of forensic scientists and other professionals of the Criminal Justice System to give evidence-based answers to questions that relate to the activity level of the crime under investigation.

  • 46.
    Aasa, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hovbäck, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Det preoperativa informationssamtalets betydelse för patientens delaktighet i sin vård inom kolorektalkirurgi2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: ERAS (Enhanced Recovery After Surgery) är ett standardiserat multimodalt vårdprogram vid elektiv kolorektalkirurgi, som syftar till snabbare återhämtning och kortare vårdtider genom ett tvärprofessionellt samarbete.  En vecka innan planerad operation träffar sjuksköterskan patienten för ett samtal om vårdförloppet.

     

    Syfte: Att identifiera och beskriva patientens upplevelse av sjuksköterskans ERAS- samtal och dess betydelse för patientens delaktighet i sin vård. 

     

    Metod: Datainsamlingen skedde genom kvalitativa intervjuer. Tolv patienter, nio män och tre kvinnor har intervjuats. De ljudinspelade samtalen har transkriberats ordagrant och analyserats med hjälp av tolkande fenomenologisk analys (Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis).

     

    Resultat: Analysarbetet resulterade i fem olika teman; bli sedd, trygghet, tillit, ansvar samt delaktighet. Alla teman relaterar till varandra och illustrerar en positiv och en negativ sida av den upplevda erfarenheten. Tillsammans bildar en helhet av upplevelsen; ERAS- samtalet och dess betydelse för patientens delaktighet.

     

    Konklusion: Resultatet visar att patienterna känner sig sedda under informationssamtalet. Det är viktigt att bekräfta patienten och knyta an mer till informationssamtalet under vårdtiden för att patienterna ska vara delaktiga och ta eget ansvar. Tilliten till vårdpersonalen har betydelse för att patienterna ska känna trygghet. Studien visar att ERAS- samtalet upplevs strukturerat och individuellt men informationen måste följa patienterna under hela vårdtillfället.

  • 47.
    Aasa, Agneta
    et al.
    Kirurgmottagningen, Ryhovs Länssjukhus, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hovbäck, Malin
    Kirurgmottagningen, Ryhovs Länssjukhus, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The importance of preoperative information for patient participation in colorectal surgery care2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 11-12, 1604-1612 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To identify and describe patients' experiences of a preoperative information session with a nurse, as part of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) concept, and its impact on patient participation in their own care.

    Background

    Enhanced recovery after surgery is a standardised, multimodal treatment programme for elective colorectal surgery, leading to faster recovery and shorter hospital stays via interprofessional collaboration. The ERAS concept is initiated for patients a week before surgery when the patient receives detailed information about the care process during a meeting with a nurse.

    Design

    The study is a qualitative interpretive study based on interviews.

    Methods

    Twelve patients, nine men and three women, were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA).

    Results

    The analysis identified and formulated five themes: being seen, security, trust, responsibility and participation. All themes are closely related and illustrate positive and negative sides of the patient's experience. They hang together and form a complete set of experiences: ERAS conversation and its impact on patients' participation.

    Conclusions

    The results show that patients feel confirmed in the ERAS conversation. Healthcare professionals need to be bonding more information call during hospitalisation. It is important to confirm the patient in order for them to participate and take responsibility. Reliance on caregivers is important for patients to feel safe and to participate in their own care. This study shows that the ERAS conversation was experienced as being structured and individually tailored, but the information must apply to the patients throughout the period of care.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    Some shortcomings have been revealed, which should enable improvement in the care of patients. Healthcare professionals need to raise awareness of patients' responsibilities for participation in their own recovery and care. Healthcare professionals and patients need to be aware of each other's responsibilities.

  • 48.
    Aasa, Mikael
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dellborg, Mikael
    Gothenburg University.
    Grip, Lars
    Gothenburg University.
    Herlitz, Johan
    Gothenburg University.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Leif
    Stockholm Prehospital Centre.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Cost and health outcome of primary percutaneous coronary intervention versus thrombolysis in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction-Results of the Swedish Early Decision reperfusion Study (SWEDES) trial2010In: AMERICAN HEART JOURNAL, ISSN 0002-8703, Vol. 160, no 2, 322-328 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background In ST-elevation myocardial infarction, primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has a superior clinical outcome, but it may increase costs in comparison to thrombolysis. The aim of the study was to compare costs, clinical outcome, and quality-adjusted survival between primary PCI and thrombolysis. Methods Patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction were randomized to primary PCI with adjunctive enoxaparin and abciximab (n = 101), or to enoxaparin followed by reteplase (n = 104). Data on the use of health care resources, work loss, and health-related quality of life were collected during a 1-year period. Cost-effectiveness was determined by comparing costs and quality-adjusted survival. The joint distribution of incremental costs and quality-adjusted survival was analyzed using a nonparametric bootstrap approach. Results Clinical outcome did not differ significantly between the groups. Compared with the group treated with thrombolysis, the cost of interventions was higher in the PCI-treated group ($4,602 vs $3,807; P = .047), as well as the cost of drugs ($1,309 vs $1,202; P = .001), whereas the cost of hospitalization was lower ($7,344 vs $9,278; P = .025). The cost of investigations, outpatient care, and loss of production did not differ significantly between the 2 treatment arms. Total cost and quality-adjusted survival were $25,315 and 0.759 vs $27,819 and 0.728 (both not significant) for the primary PCI and thrombolysis groups, respectively. Based on the 1-year follow-up, bootstrap analysis revealed that in 80%, 88%, and 89% of the replications, the cost per health outcome gained for PCI will be andlt;$0, $50,000, and $100,000 respectively. Conclusion In a 1-year perspective, there was a tendency toward lower costs and better health outcome after primary PCI, resulting in costs for PCI in comparison to thrombolysis that will be below the conventional threshold for cost-effectiveness in 88% of bootstrap replications.

  • 49.
    Aase, Audun
    et al.
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway.
    Hajdusek, Ondrej
    Academic Science Czech Republic, Czech Republic.
    Oines, Oivind
    Norwegian Vet Institute, Norway.
    Quarsten, Hanne
    Sorlandet Hospital Health Enterprise, Norway.
    Wilhelmsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Herstad, Tove K.
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway.
    Kjelland, Vivian
    University of Agder, Norway; Sorlandet Hospital Health Enterprise, Norway.
    Sima, Radek
    Academic Science Czech Republic, Czech Republic.
    Jalovecka, Marie
    Academic Science Czech Republic, Czech Republic.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Aaberge, Ingeborg S.
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway.
    Validate or falsify: Lessons learned from a microscopy method claimed to be useful for detecting Borrelia and Babesia organisms in human blood2016In: INFECTIOUS DISEASES, ISSN 2374-4235, Vol. 48, no 6, 411-419 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A modified microscopy protocol (the LM-method) was used to demonstrate what was interpreted as Borrelia spirochetes and later also Babesia sp., in peripheral blood from patients. The method gained much publicity, but was not validated prior to publication, which became the purpose of this study using appropriate scientific methodology, including a control group. Methods Blood from 21 patients previously interpreted as positive for Borrelia and/or Babesia infection by the LM-method and 41 healthy controls without known history of tick bite were collected, blinded and analysed for these pathogens by microscopy in two laboratories by the LM-method and conventional method, respectively, by PCR methods in five laboratories and by serology in one laboratory. Results Microscopy by the LM-method identified structures claimed to be Borrelia- and/or Babesia in 66% of the blood samples of the patient group and in 85% in the healthy control group. Microscopy by the conventional method for Babesia only did not identify Babesia in any samples. PCR analysis detected Borrelia DNA in one sample of the patient group and in eight samples of the control group; whereas Babesia DNA was not detected in any of the blood samples using molecular methods. Conclusions The structures interpreted as Borrelia and Babesia by the LM-method could not be verified by PCR. The method was, thus, falsified. This study underlines the importance of doing proper test validation before new or modified assays are introduced.

  • 50.
    Aaseth, Jan
    et al.
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Appl Science, Norway.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway; Norwegian University of Life Science NMBU, Norway.
    Bjorklund, Geir
    Council Nutr and Environm Med, Norway.
    Hestad, Knut
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Appl Science, Norway.
    Dusek, Petr
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Gen University Hospital Prague, Czech Republic.
    Roos, Per M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; St Goran Hospital, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Treatment strategies in Alzheimers disease: a review with focus on selenium supplementation2016In: Biometals, ISSN 0966-0844, E-ISSN 1572-8773, Vol. 29, no 5, 827-839 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimers disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder presenting one of the biggest healthcare challenges in developed countries. No effective treatment exists. In recent years the main focus of AD research has been on the amyloid hypothesis, which postulates that extracellular precipitates of beta amyloid (A beta) derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) are responsible for the cognitive impairment seen in AD. Treatment strategies have been to reduce A beta production through inhibition of enzymes responsible for its formation, or to promote resolution of existing cerebral A beta plaques. However, these approaches have failed to demonstrate significant cognitive improvements. Intracellular rather than extracellular events may be fundamental in AD pathogenesis. Selenate is a potent inhibitor of tau hyperphosphorylation, a critical step in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles. Some selenium (Se) compounds e.g. selenoprotein P also appear to protect APP against excessive copper and iron deposition. Selenoproteins show anti-inflammatory properties, and protect microtubules in the neuronal cytoskeleton. Optimal function of these selenoenzymes requires higher Se intake than what is common in Europe and also higher intake than traditionally recommended. Supplementary treatment with N-acetylcysteine increases levels of the antioxidative cofactor glutathione and can mediate adjuvant protection. The present review discusses the role of Se in AD treatment and suggests strategies for AD prevention by optimizing selenium intake, in accordance with the metal dysregulation hypothesis. This includes in particular secondary prevention by selenium supplementation to elderly with mild cognitive impairment.

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