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  • 1.
    A. Strumpfer, Johan
    et al.
    University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA; Beckman Institute, Urbana, IL, USA.
    von Castelmur, Eleonore
    Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, IL, USA.
    Franke, Barbara
    Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Barbieri, Sonia
    Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Bogomolovas, Julijus
    Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany.
    Qadota, Hiroshi
    Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Konarv, Petr
    European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Hamburg, Germany.
    Svergun, Dmitri
    European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Hamburg, Germany.
    Labeit, Siegfried
    Department for Integrative Pathophysiology, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany.
    Schulten, Klaus
    University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA Beckman Institute, Urbana, IL, USA.
    Benian, Guy
    Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Mayans, Olga
    Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Stretching of Twitchin Kinase2012In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 102, no 3 Supplement 1, p. 361a-362aArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The giant proteins from the titin family, that form cytoskeletal filaments, have emerged as key mechanotransducers in the sarcomere. These proteins contain a conserved kinase region, which is auto-inhibited by a C-terminal tail domain. The inhibitory tail domain occludes the active sites of the kinases, thus preventing ATP from binding. It was proposed that through application of a force, such as that arising during muscle contraction, the inhibitory tail becomes detached, lifting inhibition. The force-sensing ability of titin kinase was demonstrated in AFM experiments and simulations [Puchner, et al., 2008, PNAS:105, 13385], which showed indeed that mechanical forces can remove the autoinhibitory tail of titin kinase. We report here steered molecular dynamics simulations (SMD) of the very recently resolved crystal structure of twitchin kinase, containing the kinase region and flanking fibronectin and immuniglobulin domains, that show a variant mechanism. Despite the significant structural and sequence similarity to titin kinase, the autoinhibitory tail of twitchin kinase remains in place upon stretching, while the N-terminal lobe of the kinase unfolds. The SMD simulations also show that the detachment and stretching of the linker between fibronectin and kinase regions, and the partial extension of the autoinhibitory tail, are the primary force-response. We postulate that this stretched state, where all structural elements are still intact, may represent the physiologically active state.

  • 2.
    Aakumiah, Prince Osei
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Water Management and Health in Ghana: Caes Study - Kumasi2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There have been multiple cases of drinking water related diseases in Ghana, particularly the cities. Kumasi, the second largest city is recording high figures of drinking water related diseases. The Ghana water and sewage company is supposed to provide adequate safe drinking water to the people. However, the company has failed to provide this service effectively. Various reasons have been given by the company on its inability to perform efficiently. Meanwhile the government decided lately to privatise water in the cities to facilitate access to quality water through what is called “FULL COST RECOVERY”. This attracted a lot of international companies to Ghana but this has also generated protest and demonstrations. The argument is that these foreign companies are basically profit oriented and considering the fact that most of the affected people are very poor, suggesting they cannot afford it.

    The study is aimed at finding out the relationship between water management and health in the study area and how effective water management through full community participation could help provide adequate safe drinking water. The study was a non-interventional descriptive type using both qualitative and quantitative methods. It was conducted in Kumasi, the second largest city in Ghana. A total of 100 residents from the communities was selected through systematic sampling and interviewed. This includes 86 local residents and 14 key informer interviews. The study also relied on observation as well as some selected literature.

    The results confirmed that drinking water related diseases is on the increase with the most affected people being the poor living in shanty and informal areas of the city. It was also found that most people in the city are willing to render any services to provide safe drinking water. But in relative terms, most of these people are very poor with high percentage of illiterates and may only contribute if there is a good relation and trust among all. It however appears that community participation is a good option for the city provided that stakeholders are made to play effective roles.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 3.
    Aalberg, Laura
    et al.
    National Bureau of Investigation, P.O. Box 285, FIN-01301 Vantaa, Finland.
    Andersson, Kjell
    Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science, SKL, SE-581 94 Linköping, Sweden.
    Bertler, Christina
    Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science, SKL, SE-581 94 Linköping, Sweden.
    Borén, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Analytical Chemistry .
    Cole, Michael D.
    Forensic Science Unit, University of Strathclyde, 204 George Street, Glasgow, UK.
    Dahlén, Johan
    Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science, SKL, SE-581 94 Linköping, Sweden.
    Finnon, Yvonne
    Forensic Science Unit, University of Strathclyde, 204 George Street, Glasgow, UK.
    Huizer, Henk
    Netherlands Forensic Institute, Volmerlaan 17, 2288 GD Rijswijk, The Netherlands.
    Jalava, Kajsa
    National Bureau of Investigation, P.O. Box 285, FIN-01301 Vantaa, Finland.
    Kaa, Elisabet
    Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Aarhus, Skovagervej 2, DK-8240 Risskov, Denmark.
    Lock, Eric
    Netherlands Forensic Institute, Volmerlaan 17, 2288 GD Rijswijk, The Netherlands/Institut de Police Scientifique, University of Lausanne, Batiment de Chimie, CH-1015 Lausanne-Dorigny, Switzerland.
    Lopes, Alvaro
    Laboratorio de Policia Cientifica, Policia Judiciaria, Rua Gomes Freire 174, 1169-007 Lisbon, Portugal.
    Poortman-van-der Meer, Anneke
    Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Aarhus, Skovagervej 2, DK-8240 Risskov, Denmark.
    Sippola, Erkki
    National Bureau of Investigation, P.O. Box 285, FIN-01301 Vantaa, Finland.
    Development of a harmonised method for the profiling of amphetamines: I. Synthesis of standards and compilation of analytical data2005In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 149, no 2-3, p. 219-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reference material was synthesised for 21 substances that are frequently present as synthetic impurities, i.e. by-products, in illicitly produced amphetamine. Each of these substances is a typical by-product for at least one of the three approaches most often used to synthesise amphetamine, namely, the Leuckart, the reductive amination of benzyl methyl ketone, and the nitrostyrene routes. A large body of data on the substances was recorded, including the following: mass spectra, ultraviolet spectra, Fourier transform infrared spectra, infrared spectra in gas phase, and 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. © 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Aalberse, Rob C
    et al.
    Amsterdam and Landsteiner Laboratory, Department of Immunopathology, Academic Medical Center, Sanquin Research, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Grüber, Christoph
    Department of Pediatric Pneumology and Immunology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Ljungman, Margaretha
    Health Agency of Sweden, Solna, Sweden.
    Kakat, Suzan
    Department of Pediatric Pneumology and Immunology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Wahn, Ulrich
    Department of Pediatric Pneumology and Immunology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Niggemann, Bodo
    Department of Pediatric Pneumology and Immunology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Further investigations of the IgE response to tetanus and diphtheria following covaccination with acellular rather than cellular Bordetella pertussis2019In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 841-847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    It has previously been shown in an uncontrolled study that the IgE response to vaccine antigens is downregulated by co‐vaccination with cellular Bordetella pertussis vaccine.

    Methods

    In the present study, we compared in a controlled trial the humoral immune response to diphtheria toxoid (D) and tetanus toxoid (T) in relation to co‐vaccinated cellular or acellular B pertussis vaccine. IgE, IgG4, and IgG to D and T were analyzed at 2, 7, and 12 months of age in sera of children vaccinated with D and T (DT, N = 68), cellular (DTPw, N = 68), 2‐ or 5‐component acellular B pertussis vaccine (DTPa2, N = 64; DTPa5, N = 65).

    Results

    One month after vaccination, D‐IgE was detected in 10% sera of DTPw‐vaccinated children, whereas vaccination in the absence of whole‐cell pertussis resulted in 50%‐60% IgE positivity. Six months after vaccination, the IgE antibody levels were found to be more persistent than the IgG antibodies. These diphtheria findings were mirrored by those for tetanus. Only minor differences between vaccine groups were found with regard to D‐IgG and T‐IgG. No immediate‐type allergic reactions were observed.

    Conclusion

    Cellular (but not acellular) B pertussis vaccine downregulates IgE to co‐vaccinated antigens in infants. We assume that the absence of immediate‐type allergic reactions is due to the high levels of IgG antibodies competing with IgE antibodies.

  • 5.
    Aarnio, Linus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Confidence in Release Candidates: Maintaining confidence levels when moving from traditional release management to continuous delivery2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    When shortening release cycles and moving towards continuous delivery, a different approach for quality assurance may be needed than in traditional release management. To allow the transition, all stakeholders must retain a sense of confidence in the quality of release candidates. This thesis proposes a definition for confidence consisting of 30 confidence factors to take into account to ensure confidence from all stakeholders. Confidence factors have been found through interviews with 11 stakeholders, analyzed and categorized using grounded theory analysis. The found factors are grouped into two main categories: Process and Verification Results.

    The thesis additionally contains a literature review of quality measurements and explores how confidence can be expressed in a continuous delivery pipeline. It is found that it is not possible to comprehensively express confidence only with metrics displayable in a pipeline when including only currently well-researched metrics, but with the combination of processes known to be followed in the organization some metrics provide coverage for many of the confidence factors.

    Download full text (pdf)
    thesis_aarnio_2022
  • 6.
    Aaro, Gustav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Roos, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Carlsson, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Toolset for Run-time Dataset Collection of Deep-scene Information2020In: Symposium on Modelling, Analysis, and Simulation of Computer and Telecommunication Systems (MASCOTS), Springer, 2020, p. 224-236Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtual reality (VR) provides many exciting new application opportunities, but also present new challenges. In contrast to 360° videos that only allow a user to select its viewing direction, in fully immersive VR, users can also move around and interact with objects in the virtual world. To most effectively deliver such services it is therefore important to understand how users move around in relation to such objects. In this paper, we present a methodology and software tool for generating run-time datasets capturing a user’s interactions with such 3D environments, evaluate and compare different object identification methods that we implement within the tool, and use datasets collected with the tool to demonstrate example uses. The tool was developed in Unity, easily integrates with existing Unity applications through the use of periodic calls that extracts information about the environment using different ray-casting methods. The software tool and example datasets are made available with this paper. 

  • 7.
    Aasheim, Fanny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gestsson, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Det spelar ingen roll hur du gör det - bara du gör det: Hur ett koncept kan utformas för att uppmana till motion utan att bidra till hälsohets2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10,5 credits / 16 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8. Aavikko, R.
    et al.
    Saarinen, K.
    Magnusson, Björn
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials.
    Clustering of Vacancies in Semi-Insulating SiC Observed with Positron Spectroscopy2006In: Materials Science Forum, Vols. 527-529, 2006, Vol. 527-529, p. 575-578Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9. Aavikko, R.
    et al.
    Saarinen, K.
    Tuomisto, F.
    Magnusson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nguyen, Son Tien
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Clustering of vacancy defects in high-purity semi-insulating SiC2007In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 75, no 8, p. 085208-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Positron lifetime spectroscopy was used to study native vacancy defects in semi-insulating silicon carbide. The material is shown to contain (i) vacancy clusters consisting of four to five missing atoms and (ii) Si-vacancy-related negatively charged defects. The total open volume bound to the clusters anticorrelates with the electrical resistivity in both as-grown and annealed materials. Our results suggest that Si-vacancy-related complexes electrically compensate the as-grown material, but migrate to increase the size of the clusters during annealing, leading to loss of resistivity. © 2007 The American Physical Society.

  • 10.
    Abadias, Gregory
    et al.
    University of Poitiers, France.
    Sarakinos, Kostas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fenker, Martin
    FEM, Germany.
    Kassavetis, Spiros
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Editorial Material: Preface in SURFACE and COATINGS TECHNOLOGY, vol 255, issue , pp2014In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 11.
    Abadias, Gregory
    et al.
    Univ Poitiers, France.
    Sarakinos, Kostas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanoscale engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Patsalas, Panos
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Preface2020In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 404, article id 126450Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 12.
    Abadir Guirgis, Georg
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Lärarperspektiv på riskutbildningen för motorcyklister2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Under det senaste decenniet har det i Sverige blivit allt populärare att åka motorcykel. Enobligatorisk riskutbildning för behörighet A och A1 infördes från och med den 1 november2009. Då riskutbildningen är ny har få utvärderingar gjorts.Denna studie utvärderar riskutbildningen för motorcyklister utifrån trafikskolläraresperspektiv. Målet har varit att sammanställa synpunkter och erfarenheter från lärarna påutbildningen. Ett ytterligare mål har varit att undersöka trafikskollärarnas upplevda effekter avutbildningen på elevers trafikbeteende. Sex semistrukturerade intervjuer med trafikskolläraresamt en observationsstudie på olika trafikskolor genomfördes. Utöver detta genomfördesdeltagande observation av en fortbildning där 15 trafikskollärare deltog. Resultatet frånstudien visar att lärarna anser att behovet av riskutbildningen är stort och attimplementationen av den nya riskutbildningen gått bra. Förutom att elever efter utbildningenrefererar till den, vilket enligt lärarna indikerar att de tagit till sig vad som sagts, märks det nui större utsträckning än tidigare att elever kör lugnare och tänker sig mer för i vissasituationer. Detta påtalades vara ett klart önskvärt resultat.

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    Lärarperspektiv på riskutbildningen för motorcyklister
  • 13.
    Abadir Guirgis, Georg
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mindre energi och rätt tid: Utvärdering av utbildning och träning för lokförare i energieffektiv körning – en simulatorstudie2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    During the 80’s, the first train simulator was introduced in Swedish train driver education and is still the only full scale simulator being used to educate train drivers in Sweden. The reason for this seems to be a lack of educational and economic motives for an expanded usage of simulators within education and training. Energy savings within the railway domain, i.e. energy-efficient driving, is currently a topic for all train operators in Sweden. Some operators already educate their drivers in energy efficient driving and tests of energy efficiency in real traffic has shown a potential energy saving of 16 %, after drivers have completed a theoretical education in energy-efficient driving. Because there were some uncertainties in the data from the tests carried out in real traffic, where conditions and experimental procedures varied between the drivers and it also turned out that education and access to a support system while driving resulted in a small saving in energy (13 %) there was a need to examine the potential savings under controlled conditions. Therefore, a study was conducted using a train simulator. In the simulator, the researcher has full control over the data and conditions are the same for all drivers. The simulator used in the study was developed by VTI (Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute) and modeled after an X50 Regina. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the same theoretical education in energy-efficient driving, in combination with simulator training under ideal conditions, could contribute to the same, or better energy saving compared to the results of the tests from real traffic. Furthermore, the effect of feedback during training with regard to energy savings was also investigated. 24 train driver students were divided into three groups with 8 students in each. Two of these groups completed two sessions (reference and test session) with theoretical education and simulator training between the sessions. The last group (control group) completed two sessions (reference and test session) without education and training between the sessions. The two groups that were given theoretical education conducted their simulator training under two different conditions, where one group trained with feedback (energy consumption and rail gradient) and the other group trained without feedback. It turns out that a theoretical education in energy efficient driving, combined with 30 minutes of simulator training, resulted in a total saving of about 24 % energy for both groups. Also, considering that the control group improved their energy consumption by simply driving the simulator two times (8 % total energy saving), the energy saving was almost equal to the result of the tests in real traffic. Since the results were equal even though the conditions differed, there is reason to investigate how different driving conditions affect the outcome. There is also a need to better understand why education in combination with a support system resulted in a lower energy saving than for those who were only given education during the tests in real traffic, and also why feedback during training in the simulator did not give a detectable effect. Basically, there are many reasons to further investigate how to design simulator training and support systems for train drivers. In addition to the energy savings, the results showed that drivers improved their arrival times i.e. arrive more accurate in relation to the time table. The results suggest that there is great potential for train simulators in the Swedish train driver education, both for training and for evaluating the effects of the training.

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    Mindre energi och rätt tid
  • 14.
    Abafogi, Abdurhaman Teyib
    et al.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Jaewon
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Jinyeop
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Mohammed, Merem Omer
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    van Noort, Danny
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Ljubljana, Slovenia; Univ Ingn and Tecnol UTEC, Peru.
    Park, Sungsu
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea; Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea; Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    3D-Printed Modular Microfluidic Device Enabling Preconcentrating Bacteria and Purifying Bacterial DNA in Blood for Improving the Sensitivity of Molecular Diagnostics2020In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, SENSORS, Vol. 20, no 4, article id 1202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular diagnostics for sepsis is still a challenge due to the presence of compounds that interfere with gene amplification and bacteria at concentrations lower than the limit of detection (LOD). Here, we report on the development of a 3D printed modular microfluidic device (3Dpm mu FD) that preconcentrates bacteria of interest in whole blood and purifies their genomic DNA (gDNA). It is composed of a W-shaped microchannel and a conical microchamber. Bacteria of interest are magnetically captured from blood in the device with antibody conjugated magnetic nanoparticles (Ab-MNPs) at 5 mL/min in the W-shaped microchannel, while purified gDNA of the preconcentrated bacteria is obtained with magnetic silica beads (MSBs) at 2 mL/min in the conical microchamber. The conical microchamber was designed to be connected to the microchannel after the capturing process using a 3D-printed rotary valve to minimize the exposure of the MSBs to interfering compounds in blood. The pretreatment process of spiked blood (2.5 mL) can be effectively completed within about 50 min. With the 3Dpm mu FD, the LOD for the target microorganism Escherichia coli O157:H7 measured by both polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with electrophoresis and quantitative PCR was 10 colony forming unit (CFU) per mL of whole blood. The results suggest that our method lowers the LOD of molecular diagnostics for pathogens in blood by providing bacterial gDNA at high purity and concentration.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Abbas, Muhammad Hassan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Khan, Mati-ur-Rehman
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Correlational Analysis of Drivers Personality Traits and Styles in a Distributed Simulated Driving Environment2007Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis report we conducted research study on driver's behavior in T-Intersections using simulated environment. This report describes and discusses correlation analysis of driver's personality traits and style while driving at T-Intersections.

    The experiments were performed on multi user driving simulator under controlled settings, at Linköping University. A total of forty-eight people participated in the study and were divided into groups of four, all driving in the same simulated world.

    During the experiments participants were asked to fill a series of well-known self-report questionnaires. We evaluated questionnaires to get the insight in driver's personality traits and driving style. The self-report questionnaires consist of Schwartz's configural model of 10 values types and NEO-five factor inventory. Also driver's behavior was studied with the help of questionnaires based on driver's behavior, style, conflict avoidance, time horizon and tolerance of uncertainty. Then these 10 Schwartz's values are correlated with the other questionnaires to give the detail insight of the driving habits and personality traits of the drivers.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 16.
    Abbas, Qaisar
    Uppsala universitet, Avdelningen för teknisk databehandling.
    Weak Boundary and Interface Procedures for Wave and Flow Problems2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, we have analyzed the accuracy and stability aspects of weak boundary and interface conditions (WBCs) for high order finite difference methods on Summations-By-Parts (SBP) form. The numerical technique has been applied to wave propagation and flow problems.

    The advantage of WBCs over strong boundary conditions is that stability of the numerical scheme can be proven. The boundary procedures in the advection-diffusion equation for a boundary layer problem is analyzed. By performing Navier-Stokes calculations, it is shown that most of the conclusions from the model problem carries over to the fully nonlinear case.

    The work was complemented to include the new idea of using WBCs on multiple grid points in a region, where the data is known, instead of at a single point. It was shown that we can achieve high accuracy, an increased rate of convergence to steady-state and non-reflecting boundary conditions by using this approach.

    Using the SBP technique and WBCs, we have worked out how to construct conservative and energy stable hybrid schemes for shocks using two different approaches. In the first method, we combine a high order finite difference scheme with a second order MUSCL scheme. In the second method, a procedure to locally change the order of accuracy of the finite difference schemes is developed. The main purpose is to obtain a higher order accurate scheme in smooth regions and a low order non-oscillatory scheme in the vicinity of shocks.

    Furthermore, we have analyzed the energy stability of the MUSCL scheme, by reformulating the scheme in the framework of SBP and artificial dissipation operators. It was found that many of the standard slope limiters in the MUSCL scheme do not lead to a negative semi-definite dissipation matrix, as required to get pointwise stability.

    Finally, high order simulations of shock diffracting over a convex wall with two facets were performed. The numerical study is done for a range of Reynolds numbers. By monitoring the velocities at the solid wall, it was shown that the computations were resolved in the boundary layer. Schlieren images from the computational results were obtained which displayed new interesting flow features.

  • 17.
    Abbas, Qaisar
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Avdelningen för teknisk databehandling.
    Nordström, Jan
    Uppsala universitet, Avdelningen för teknisk databehandling.
    Weak versus strong no-slip boundary conditions for the Navier-Stokes equations2010In: Engineering Applications of Computational Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 1994-2060, Vol. 4, p. 29-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Abbas, Qaisar
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Avdelningen för teknisk databehandling.
    Nordström, Jan
    Uppsala universitet, Avdelningen för teknisk databehandling.
    Weak versus Strong No-Slip Boundary Conditions for the Navier-Stokes Equations2008In: Proc. 6th South African Conference on Computational and Applied Mechanics, South African Association for Theoretical and Applied Mechanics , 2008, p. 52-62Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Abbas, Qaisar
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Avdelningen för teknisk databehandling.
    van der Weide, Edwin
    Nordström, Jan
    Uppsala universitet, Avdelningen för teknisk databehandling.
    Accurate and stable calculations involving shocks using a new hybrid scheme2009In: Proc. 19th AIAA CFD Conference, AIAA , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Abbas, Qaisar
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Avdelningen för teknisk databehandling.
    van der Weide, Edwin
    Faculty of Engineering Technology, University of Twente, AE Enschede, The Netherlands.
    Nordström, Jan
    Uppsala universitet, Avdelningen för teknisk databehandling.
    Energy Stability of the MUSCL Scheme2010In: Proc. 7th South African Conference on Computational and Applied Mechanics, South African Association for Theoretical and Applied Mechanics , 2010, p. 65:1-8Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Abbas, Qaisar
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Avdelningen för teknisk databehandling.
    van der Weide, Edwin
    Nordström, Jan
    Uppsala universitet, Avdelningen för teknisk databehandling.
    Energy stability of the MUSCL scheme2010In: Numerical Mathematics and Advanced Applications: 2009, Berlin: Springer-Verlag , 2010, p. 61-68Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Abbasi, Mazhar Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The synthesis, characterization and device fabrication of ZnO, NiO and their composite nanostructures2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronics industry has been revolutionized since last few decades because of the fabrication of electronic devices by using nanoscale based materials. But the more innovative feature in the electronic devices is the use of transparent materials, which makes the transparent electronic devices as one of the most interesting research field in nanoscience and nano-technology now a days. In order to have high performance electronic devices based on the wide band gap compound semiconductors, a selection of right transparent material is crucial step. Among all the transparent metal oxides, ZnO is one of the potential candidates due to the ease in the synthesis process, wide bandgap of 3.37 eV, a high exciton binding energy of 60 meV and diverse morphologies. Since p-type ZnO based nanodevices are still difficult to fabricate due to the instability and unreliability of p-type ZnO nanomaterial, therefore several p-type semiconductors are used for the development of p-n junctions. Among those NiO is suitable p-type compound semiconductor to make p-n junction with ZnO because of its wide band gap of 3.7 eV and environment friendly conditions for its synthesis. Keeping these attractive properties of n-type ZnO and p-type NiO, the synthesis of composite nanostructures of these two transparent oxides and fabrication of their electronic devices is presented in this dissertation work.

    I started my work with the synthesis of ZnO nanostructures focusing on the effect of different anions of zinc salts on the morphology and crystallinity of ZnO nanostructures. Then I grow honey-comb like NiO nanostructures on 3D nickel foam and used these nanostructures for the detection of Zinc ion. After that synthesized NiO and ZnO based composite nanostructures and characterized them, having main focus on the luminescence properties of ZnO when decorated with NiO nanostructures. The composite nanostructures of p-type NiO and n-type ZnO showed enhancement in the luminescence properties. Since pn junction is the back bone of electronic devices so working on the designing of band alignment along with the current transport properties of p-type NiO/n-type ZnO composite structures, an attempt was put forwarded to explain the phenomenon of these compound semiconducting materials. Different devices based on these two compound semiconducting materials are fabricated and designed in the present dissertation work, however still more work is required to improve the efficiency of devices like LEDs and UV detectors.

    List of papers
    1. Anions effect on the low temperature growth of ZnO nanostructures
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anions effect on the low temperature growth of ZnO nanostructures
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Vacuum, ISSN 0042-207X, E-ISSN 1879-2715, Vol. 86, no 12, p. 1998-2001Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Seed mediated aqueous chemical growth (ACG) route was used for the growth of ZnO nanostructures on Si substrate in four different growth mediums. The growth medium has shown to affect the morphology and the size of the different nanostructures. We observed that the medium containing zinc nitrate anions yields the nanorods, in a medium containing zinc acetate anions nano-candles are obtained. While in a medium containing zinc chloride anions ZnO nano-discs were obtained and in a medium containing zinc sulfate anions nano-flakes are achieved. Growth in these different mediums has also shown effect on the optical emission characteristics of the different ZnO nanostructures.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2012
    Keywords
    ZnO, Chemical growth, Nanostructures, Optical properties
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-84909 (URN)10.1016/j.vacuum.2012.05.020 (DOI)000308672000041 ()
    Available from: 2012-10-26 Created: 2012-10-26 Last updated: 2024-01-08
    2. Potentiometric Zinc Ion Sensor Based on Honeycomb-Like NiO Nanostructures
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potentiometric Zinc Ion Sensor Based on Honeycomb-Like NiO Nanostructures
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 15424-15437Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this study honeycomb-like NiO nanostructures were grown on nickel foam by a simple hydrothermal growth method. The NiO nanostructures were characterized by field emission electron microscopy (FESEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The characterized NiO nanostructures were uniform, dense and polycrystalline in the crystal phase. In addition to this, the NiO nanostructures were used in the development of a zinc ion sensor electrode by functionalization with the highly selective zinc ion ionophore 12-crown-4. The developed zinc ion sensor electrode has shown a good linear potentiometric response for a wide range of zinc ion concentrations, ranging from 0.001 mM to 100 mM, with sensitivity of 36 mV/decade. The detection limit of the present zinc ion sensor was found to be 0.0005 mM and it also displays a fast response time of less than 10 s. The proposed zinc ion sensor electrode has also shown good reproducibility, repeatability, storage stability and selectivity. The zinc ion sensor based on the functionalized NiO nanostructures was also used as indicator electrode in potentiometric titrations and it has demonstrated an acceptable stoichiometric relationship for the determination of zinc ion in unknown samples. The NiO nanostructures-based zinc ion sensor has potential for analysing zinc ion in various industrial, clinical and other real samples.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    MDPI, 2012
    Keywords
    honeycomb NiO nanostructures, potentiometric response, ion selective electrode, selectivity, selective ionophore
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-86653 (URN)10.3390/s121115424 (DOI)000311429500060 ()
    Available from: 2012-12-20 Created: 2012-12-20 Last updated: 2024-01-08
    3. Decoration of ZnO nanorods with coral reefs like NiO nanostructures by the hydrothermal growth method and their luminescence study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decoration of ZnO nanorods with coral reefs like NiO nanostructures by the hydrothermal growth method and their luminescence study
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 430-440Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Composite nanostructures of coral reefs like p-type NiO on n-type ZnO nanorods have been decorate on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates by the hydrothermal growth. Structural characterization was performed by field emission scanning electron microscopy,  high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. This investigation has shown that the adopted synthesis has led to high crystalline quality nanostructures. Morphological study shows that the coral reefs like nanostructures are densely packed on the ZnO nanorods. Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra for the synthesized composite nanostructures were dominated by a near band gap emission at 380 nm and by a broad interstitial defect related luminescence centered at ~630 nm. Spatially resolved CL images reveal that the luminescence originates mainly from the ZnO nanorods.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    MDPI, 2014
    Keywords
    ZnO nanorods; NiO nanostructure; composite nanostructures; defect states; cathodoluminescent
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103339 (URN)10.3390/ma7010430 (DOI)000336088500030 ()
    Available from: 2014-01-17 Created: 2014-01-17 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
    4. The determination of valence band offset and the current transport properties of the p-NiO/n-ZnO heterojunction
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The determination of valence band offset and the current transport properties of the p-NiO/n-ZnO heterojunction
    Show others...
    2013 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The electron transport in the electronic devices has significant influence on the device performance, thus current transport properties determination is highly demanded for a particular device. Herein, we report the facile hydrothermal growth method based fabrication of p-NiO/n-ZnO heterojunction. The material characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photo electron spectroscopy. These techniques provided the good crystal quality, pure phase of p-NiO and n-ZnO nanostructures respectively. The measured valance band offset of composite nanostructure is 2.25 eV and conduction band offset was found to be 2.58 eV. The current transport properties of the fabricated p-n junction are governed by three different I-V regions. The impedance spectroscopy was used for the determination of the role of grain boundaries at the interface.

    Keywords
    Zinc oxide, nickel oxide, heterojunction, diode, current transport properties
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103340 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-01-17 Created: 2014-01-17 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
    5. Fabrication of UV photo-detector based on coral reef like p-NiO/n-ZnO nanocomposite structures
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fabrication of UV photo-detector based on coral reef like p-NiO/n-ZnO nanocomposite structures
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Materials letters (General ed.), ISSN 0167-577X, E-ISSN 1873-4979, Vol. 108, p. 149-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this research work, a UV photo-detector is fabricated on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrate by exploiting the advantageous features of p-n heterojunctions based on p-NiO and n-ZnO composite nanostructures forming a coral-reef like structures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction results showed uniform morphology and good crystal quality of the synthesised nanostructures respectively. I-V measurements have shown nonlinear and rectifying response of the p-NiO/n-ZnO heterojunction. The proposed photodiode exhibited excellent UV response with acceptable photocurrent generation of about 3.4 mA and the responsivity of 2.27 A/W at -3 biasing voltage.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2013
    Keywords
    p-NiO/n-ZnO composite nanostructures, Photodiode, UV-visible spectrophotometry
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-99403 (URN)10.1016/j.matlet.2013.06.083 (DOI)000324562900038 ()
    Available from: 2013-10-17 Created: 2013-10-17 Last updated: 2024-01-08
    6. The fabrication of white light-emitting diodes using the n-ZnO/NiO/p-GaN heterojunction with enhanced luminescence
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The fabrication of white light-emitting diodes using the n-ZnO/NiO/p-GaN heterojunction with enhanced luminescence
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Nanoscale Research Letters, ISSN 1931-7573, E-ISSN 1556-276X, Vol. 8, no 320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Cheap and efficient white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are of great interest due to the energy crisis all over the world. Herein, we have developed heterojunction LEDs based on the well-aligned ZnO nanorods and nanotubes on the p-type GaN with the insertion of the NiO buffer layer that showed enhancement in the light emission. Scanning electron microscopy have well demonstrated the arrays of the ZnO nanorods and the proper etching into the nanotubes. X-ray diffraction study describes the wurtzite crystal structure array of ZnO nanorods with the involvement of GaN at the (002) peak. The cathodoluminescence spectra represent strong and broad visible emission peaks compared to the UV emission and a weak peak at 425 nm which is originated from GaN. Electroluminescence study has shown highly improved luminescence response for the LEDs fabricated with NiO buffer layer compared to that without NiO layer. Introducing a sandwich-thin layer of NiO between the n-type ZnO and the p-type GaN will possibly block the injection of electrons from the ZnO to the GaN. Moreover, the presence of NiO buffer layer might create the confinement effect.

    Keywords
    White light-emitting diode; ZnO nanorods; Nanotubes; NiO buffer layer
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103341 (URN)10.1186/1556-276X-8-320 (DOI)000331642900001 ()
    Available from: 2014-01-17 Created: 2014-01-17 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
    Download (pdf)
    omslag
  • 23.
    Abbasi, Mazhar Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hussain Ibupoto, Zafar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hussain, Mushtaque
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The fabrication of white light-emitting diodes using the n-ZnO/NiO/p-GaN heterojunction with enhanced luminescence2013In: Nanoscale Research Letters, ISSN 1931-7573, E-ISSN 1556-276X, Vol. 8, no 320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cheap and efficient white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are of great interest due to the energy crisis all over the world. Herein, we have developed heterojunction LEDs based on the well-aligned ZnO nanorods and nanotubes on the p-type GaN with the insertion of the NiO buffer layer that showed enhancement in the light emission. Scanning electron microscopy have well demonstrated the arrays of the ZnO nanorods and the proper etching into the nanotubes. X-ray diffraction study describes the wurtzite crystal structure array of ZnO nanorods with the involvement of GaN at the (002) peak. The cathodoluminescence spectra represent strong and broad visible emission peaks compared to the UV emission and a weak peak at 425 nm which is originated from GaN. Electroluminescence study has shown highly improved luminescence response for the LEDs fabricated with NiO buffer layer compared to that without NiO layer. Introducing a sandwich-thin layer of NiO between the n-type ZnO and the p-type GaN will possibly block the injection of electrons from the ZnO to the GaN. Moreover, the presence of NiO buffer layer might create the confinement effect.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Abbasi, Mazhar Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hussain Ibupoto, Zafar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hussain, Mushtaque
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pozina, Galia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Decoration of ZnO nanorods with coral reefs like NiO nanostructures by the hydrothermal growth method and their luminescence study2014In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 430-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composite nanostructures of coral reefs like p-type NiO on n-type ZnO nanorods have been decorate on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates by the hydrothermal growth. Structural characterization was performed by field emission scanning electron microscopy,  high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. This investigation has shown that the adopted synthesis has led to high crystalline quality nanostructures. Morphological study shows that the coral reefs like nanostructures are densely packed on the ZnO nanorods. Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra for the synthesized composite nanostructures were dominated by a near band gap emission at 380 nm and by a broad interstitial defect related luminescence centered at ~630 nm. Spatially resolved CL images reveal that the luminescence originates mainly from the ZnO nanorods.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Abbasy, Leila
    et al.
    Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Mohammadzadeh, Arezoo
    Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad
    Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Razmi, Nasrin
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Development of a reliable bioanalytical method based on prostate specific antigen trapping on the cavity of molecular imprinted polymer towards sensing of PSA using binding affinity of PSA-MIP receptor: A novel biosensor2020In: Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, ISSN 0731-7085, E-ISSN 1873-264X, Vol. 188, article id 113447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, electrically-conducting poly [Toluidine Blue (PTB)] was applied as artificial receptor. It was organized by molecular imprinting approaches and via electrochemical technique for the sensitive monitoring of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The protein-imprinted PTB was electropolymerized in a pre-formed glutaraldehyde-cysteamine (GA-Cys A) matrix on the surface of gold electrode, which significantly boosted the stability against degradation of the Molecular Imprinted Polymer (MIP) on the surface of pre-modified gold electrode. Moreover, the MIP bio-receptor ability towards protein recognition was explored by some electrochemical techniques. The binding affinity of MIP system was considerably upper than that of non-imprinted polymer (NIP) system, indicating the success of the method in generating imprinted materials that was specifically use to PSA protein. The incubation of the MIP modified electrode in various concentration of PSA (from 1-60 μg/L) resulted in the increase of the Fe (CN)63-/4- redox peak current. The bio-device also showed linear response from 1-60 μg/L and LLOQ of 1 μg/L by using DPV technique, leading to PSA monitoring in clinical samples. The proposed MIP-based biosensor was satisfactorily applied to the determination of PSA in human plasma samples. Therefore, the developed bio-device provides a new approach for sensitive, simple, rapid, and cost-effective monitoring of 1 μg/L of PSA. Notably, this approach could appear as an appropriate candidate for point-of-care (POC) use in clinical and biomedical analyses.

  • 26.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Araya-Ajoy, Yimen G.
    Norwegian Univ Sci and Technol, Norway.
    Mouchet, Alexia
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Moiron, Maria
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Stuber, Erica F.
    Univ Nebraska Lincoln, NE USA.
    Kempenaers, Bart
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Dingemanse, Niels J.
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany; Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany.
    Does perceived predation risk affect patterns of extra-pair paternity? A field experiment in a passerine bird2018In: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 1001-1010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-consumptive predator effects have been shown to influence a wide range of behavioural, life history and morphological traits. Extra-pair reproduction is widespread among socially monogamous birds and may incur predation costs. Consequently, altered rates of extra-pair reproduction are expected in circumstances characterized by increased adult perceived predation risk. In addition, extra-pair reproduction is expected to be most affected for birds with phenotypes that generally increase predation risk (such as more active individuals). In two consecutive years, perceived predation risk was manipulated for great tits Parus major breeding in 12 nest-box plots by broadcasting sounds of their main predator (European sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus; six plots). As a control treatment, sounds of a sympatric, avian non-predator species were broadcast (Eurasian blackbird Turdus merula; six plots). Levels of extra-pair paternity did not differ between plots with different predation risk treatments. Males that moved more in a novel environment (more active or faster exploring) tended to have offspring with fewer partners, but this effect did not vary with predation risk treatment. From an adaptive viewpoint, predation costs associated with extra-pair reproduction may be small and may not outweigh the benefits of extra-pair behaviour. Research on a broader range of taxa with different mating strategies is now needed to confirm the generality of our findings.

  • 27.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Dingemanse, Niels J.
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany.
    Adaptive individual variation in phenological responses to perceived predation levels2019In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 1601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adaptive evolution of timing of breeding (a component of phenology) in response to environmental change requires individual variation in phenotypic plasticity for selection to act upon. A major question is what processes generate this variation. Here we apply multi-year manipulations of perceived predation levels (PPL) in an avian predator-prey system, identifying phenotypic plasticity in phenology as a key component of alternative behavioral strategies with equal fitness payoffs. We show that under low-PPL, faster (versus slower) exploring birds breed late (versus early); the pattern is reversed under high-PPL, with breeding synchrony decreasing in conjunction. Timing of breeding affects reproductive success, yet behavioral types have equal fitness. The existence of alternative behavioral strategies thus explains variation in phenology and plasticity in reproductive behavior, which has implications for evolution in response to anthropogenic change.

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    fulltext
  • 28.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kreshchenko, Anastasia
    Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering Division L5, Department of Mechanical, Aerospace & Civil Engineering, Dalton Nuclear Institute, FSE Research Institutes,The University of Manchester, UK.
    Fernandez Sala, Xavier
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology.
    Petkova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. School of Biological Sciences, Centre for Ecology,Evolution and Behaviour, Royal Holloway University of London, Egham UK.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effects of monoamine manipulations on the personality and gene expression of three-spined sticklebacks2019In: Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0022-0949, E-ISSN 1477-9145, Vol. 222, no 20, article id jeb211888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among-individual behavioral differences (i.e. animal personality) are commonly observed across taxa, although the underlying, causal mechanisms of such differences are poorly understood. Animal personality has been correlated with physiological functions as well as fitness-related traits. Variation in many aspects of monoamine systems, such as metabolite levels and gene polymorphisms, has been linked to behavioral variation. Therefore, here we experimentally investigated the potential role of monoamines in explaining individual variation in personality, using two common pharmaceuticals that respectively alter the levels of serotonin and dopamine in the brain: fluoxetine and ropinirole. We exposed three-spined sticklebacks, a species that shows animal personality, to either chemical alone or to a combination of the two chemicals, for 18 days. During the experiment, fish were assayed at four time points for the following personality traits: exploration, boldness, aggression and sociability. To quantify brain gene expression on short- and longer-term scales, fish were sampled at two time points. Our results show that monoamine manipulations influence fish behavior. Specifically, fish exposed to either fluoxetine or ropinirole were significantly bolder, and fish exposed to the two chemicals together tended to be bolder than control fish. Our monoamine manipulations did not alter the gene expression of monoamine or stress-associated neurotransmitter genes, but control, untreated fish showed covariation between gene expression and behavior. Specifically, exploration and boldness were predicted by genes in the dopaminergic, serotonergic and stress pathways, and sociability was predicted by genes in the dopaminergic and stress pathways. These results add further support to the links between monoaminergic systems and personality, and show that exposure to monoamines can causally alter animal personality.

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    fulltext
  • 29.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kreshchenko, Anastasia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fernandez Sala, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petkova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effects of monoamine manipulations on the personality and gene expression of three-spined sticklebacks2019Data set
    Abstract [en]

    Among-individual behavioral differences (i.e. animal personality) are commonly observed across taxa, although the underlying, causal mechanisms of such differences are poorly understood. Animal personality has been implicated in correlations with physiological functions as well as affecting fitness-related traits. Variation in many aspects of monoamine systems, such as metabolite levels and gene polymorphisms, has been linked to behavioral variation. Therefore, here we investigated the potential role of monoamines in explaining individual variation in personality, using two common pharmaceuticals that respectively alter the levels of serotonin and dopamine in the brain: fluoxetine and ropinirole. We exposed three- spined sticklebacks, a species that shows animal personality, to either chemical alone or to a combination of the two chemicals, for 18 days. During the experiment, fish were assayed at four time points for the following personality traits: exploration, boldness, aggression and sociability. To quantify brain gene expression on short- and longer-term scales, fish were sampled at two time points. Our results show that monoamine manipulations influence fish behavior. Specifically, fish exposed to either fluoxetine or ropinirole were significantly bolder, and fish exposed to the two chemicals together tended to be bolder than control fish. Our monoamine manipulations did not alter the gene expression of monoamine or stress-associated neurotransmitter genes, but control, untreated fish showed covariation between gene expression and behavior. Specifically, exploration and boldness were predicted by genes in the dopaminergic, serotonergic and stress pathways, and sociability was predicted by genes in the dopaminergic and stress pathways. These results add further support to the links between monoaminergic systems and personality, and show that exposure to monoamines can causally alter animal personality.

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    Raw Data
  • 30.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uhrig, Emily J.
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zidar, Josefina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Favati, Anna
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlblom, Josefin
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Winberg, Svante
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The influence of rearing on behavior, brain monoamines and gene expression in three-spined sticklebacks2018Data set
    Abstract [en]
    1. The causes of individual variation in behavior are often not well understood, and potential underlying mechanisms include both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as early environmental, physiological, and genetic differences.
    2. In an exploratory laboratory study, we raised three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) under 4 different environmental conditions (simulated predator environment, complex environment, variable social environment, and control). We investigated how these manipulations related to behavior, brain physiology and gene expression later in life, with focus on brain dopamine and serotonin levels, turnover rates, and gene expression.
    3. The different rearing environments influenced behavior and gene expression, but did not alter monoamine levels or metabolites. Specifically, compared to control fish, fish exposed to a simulated predator environment tended to be less aggressive, more exploratory, and more neophobic; and fish raised in both complex and variable social environments tended to be less neophobic. Exposure to a simulated predator environment tended to lower expression of dopamine receptor DRD4A, a complex environment increased expression of dopamine receptor DRD1B, while a variable social environment tended to increase serotonin receptor 5-HTR2B and increased serotonin transporter SLC6A4A expression. Despite both behavior and gene expression varying with early environment, there was no evidence that gene expression mediated the relationship between early environment and behavior.
    4. Our results confirm that environmental conditions early in life can affect phenotypic variation. However, the mechanistic pathway of the monoaminergic systems translating early environmental variation into observed behavioral responses was not detected.
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    dataset
  • 31.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uhrig, Emily
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zidar, Josefina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Favati, A.
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almberg, J.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlbom, J.
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Winberg, S.
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The Influence of Rearing on Behavior, Brain Monoamines, and Gene Expression in Three-Spined Sticklebacks2018In: Brain, behavior, and evolution, ISSN 0006-8977, E-ISSN 1421-9743, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 201-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The causes of individual variation in behavior are often not well understood, and potential underlying mechanisms include both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as early environmental, physiological, and genetic differences. In an exploratory laboratory study, we raised three-spined sticklebacks <i>(Gasterosteus aculeatus)</i> under 4 different environmental conditions (simulated predator environment, complex environment, variable social environment, and control). We investigated how these manipulations related to behavior, brain physiology, and gene expression later in life, with focus on brain dopamine and serotonin levels, turnover rates, and gene expression. The different rearing environments influenced behavior and gene expression, but did not alter monoamine levels or metabolites. Specifically, compared to control fish, fish exposed to a simulated predator environment tended to be less aggressive, more exploratory, and more neophobic; and fish raised in both complex and variable social environments tended to be less neophobic. Exposure to a simulated predator environment tended to lower expression of dopamine receptor DRD4A, a complex environment increased expression of dopamine receptor DRD1B, while a variable social environment tended to increase serotonin receptor 5-HTR2B and serotonin transporter SLC6A4A expression. Despite both behavior and gene expression varying with early environment, there was no evidence that gene expression mediated the relationship between early environment and behavior. Our results confirm that environmental conditions early in life can affect phenotypic variation. However, the mechanistic pathway of the monoaminergic systems translating early environmental variation into observed behavioral responses was not detected.

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  • 32.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uhrig, Emily
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Southern Oregon Univ, OR 97520 USA.
    Garnham, Laura
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundgren, Kristoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Child, Sarah
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Manchester, England.
    Lovlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Experimental manipulation of monoamine levels alters personality in crickets2018In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 16211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal personality has been described in a range of species with ecological and evolutionary consequences. Factors shaping and maintaining variation in personality are not fully understood, but monoaminergic systems are consistently linked to personality variation. We experimentally explored how personality was influenced by alterations in two key monoamine systems: dopamine and serotonin. This was done using ropinirole and fluoxetine, two common human pharmaceuticals. Using the Mediterranean field cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus), we focused on the personality traits activity, exploration, and aggression, with confirmed repeatability in our study. Dopamine manipulations explained little variation in the personality traits investigated, while serotonin manipulation reduced both activity and aggression. Due to limited previous research, we created a dose-response curve for ropinirole, ranging from concentrations measured in surface waters to human therapeutic doses. No ropinirole dose level strongly influenced cricket personality, suggesting our results did not come from a dose mismatch. Our results indicate that the serotonergic system explains more variation in personality than manipulations of the dopaminergic system. Additionally, they suggest that monoamine systems differ across taxa, and confirm the importance of the mode of action of pharmaceuticals in determining their effects on behaviour.

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  • 33.
    Abd Nikooie Pour, Mina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques.
    Algergawy, Alsayed
    Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany.
    Amardeilh, Florence
    Elzeard.co, Paris, France.
    Amini, Reihaneh
    Data Semantics (DaSe) Laboratory, Kansas State University, USA.
    Fallatah, Omaima
    Information School, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Faria, Daniel
    LASIGE, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal .
    Fundulaki, Irini
    Institute of Computer Science-FORTH, Heraklion, Greece.
    Harrow, Ian
    Pistoia Alliance Inc., USA.
    Hertling, Sven
    University of Mannheim, Germany.
    Hitzler, Pascal
    Data Semantics (DaSe) Laboratory, Kansas State University, USA.
    Huschka, Martin
    Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics, Ernst-Mach-Institut, EMI, Germany.
    Ibanescu, Liliana
    AgroParisTech, UMR MIA-Paris/INRAE, France.
    Jimenez-Ruiz, Ernesto
    City, University of London, UK and Department of Informatics, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Karam, Naouel
    Fraunhofer FOKUS, Berlin, Germany and Institute for Applied Informatics (InfAI), University of Leipzig, Germany.
    Laadhar, Amir
    Department of Computer Science, Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Lambrix, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Li, Huanyu
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Li, Ying
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques.
    Michel, Franck
    University Cote d’Azur, CNRS, Inria, France.
    Nasr, Engy
    Freiburg Galaxy Team, University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Paulheim, Heiko
    University of Mannheim, Germany.
    Pesquita, Catia
    LASIGE, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal .
    Portisch, Jan
    University of Mannheim, Germany.
    Roussey, Catherine
    INRAE Centre Clermont-ARA, laboratoire TSCF, France.
    Saveta, Tzanina
    Institute of Computer Science-FORTH, Heraklion, Greece.
    Shvaiko, Pavel
    Trentino Digitale SpA, Trento, Italy.
    Splendiani, Andrea
    Pistoia Alliance Inc., USA.
    Trojahn, Cassia
    IRIT & Universite Toulouse II, Toulouse, France .
    Vatascinova, Jana
    Prague University of Economics and Business, Czech Republic.
    Yaman, Beyza
    ADAPT Centre, Dublin City University, Ireland.
    Zamazal, Ondrej
    Prague University of Economics and Business, Czech Republic.
    Zhou, Lu
    Data Semantics (DaSe) Laboratory, Kansas State University, USA.
    Results of theOntology Alignment Evaluation Initiative 20212021In: Proceedings of the 16th International Workshop on Ontology Matching: co-located with the 20th International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC 2021) / [ed] Pavel Shvaiko, Jérôme Euzenat, Ernesto Jiménez-Ruiz, Oktie Hassanzadeh, Cássia Trojahn, CEUR Workshop proceedings , 2021, p. 62-108Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Ontology Alignment Evaluation Initiative (OAEI) aims at comparing ontology matching systems on precisely defined test cases. These test cases can be based on ontologies of different levels of complexity and use different evaluation modalities (e.g., blind evaluation, open evaluation, or consensus). The OAEI 2021 campaign offered 13 tracks and was attended by 21 participants.This paper is an overall presentation of that campaign.

  • 34.
    Abd Nikooie Pour, Mina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques.
    Algergawy, Alsayed
    Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany.
    Amini, Reihaneh
    Kansas State University, USA.
    Faria, Daniel
    BioData.pt, INESC-ID, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Fundulaki, Irini
    Institute of Computer Science-FORTH, Heraklion, Greece.
    Harrow, Ian
    Pistoia Alliance Inc., USA.
    Hertling, Sven
    University of Mannheim, Germany.
    Jimenez-Ruiz, Ernesto
    City, University of London, UK, and , University of Oslo, Norway.
    Jonquet, Clement
    LIRMM, University of Montpellier & CNRS, France.
    Karam, Naouel
    Fraunhofer FOKUS, Berlin, Germany.
    Khiat, Abderrahmane
    Fraunhofer IAIS, Sankt Augustin, Germany.
    Laadhar, Amir
    LIRMM, University of Montpellier & CNRS, France.
    Lambrix, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Li, Huanyu
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Li, Ying
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques.
    Hitzler, Pascal
    Kansas State University, USA.
    Paulheim, Heiko
    University of Mannheim, Germany.
    Pesquita, Catia
    Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal.
    Saveta, Tzanina
    Institute of Computer Science-FORTH, Heraklion, Greece.
    Shvaiko, Pavel
    TasLab, Trentino Digitale SpA, Trento, Italy.
    Splendiani, Andrea
    Pistoia Alliance Inc., USA.
    Thieblin, Elodie
    Logilab, France.
    Trojahn, Cassia
    IRIT & Universite Toulouse II, Toulouse, France.
    Vatascinova, Jana
    University of Economics, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Yaman, Beyza
    Dublin City University, Ireland.
    Zamazal, Ondrej
    University of Economics, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Zhou, Lu
    Kansas State University, USA.
    Results of theOntology Alignment Evaluation Initiative 20202020In: Proceedings of the 15th International Workshop on Ontology Matching: co-located with the 19th International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC 2020) / [ed] Pavel Shvaiko, Jérôme Euzenat, Ernesto Jiménez-Ruiz, Oktie Hassanzadeh, Cássia Trojahn, Aachen, Germany: CEUR Workshop proceedings , 2020, p. 92-138Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Ontology Alignment Evaluation Initiative (OAEI) aims at comparing ontology matching systems on precisely defined test cases. These test cases can be based on ontologies of different levels of complexity and use different evaluation modalities (e.g., blind evaluation, open evaluation, or consensus).The OAEI 2020 campaign offered 12 tracks with 36 test cases, and was attended by 19 participants. This paper is an overall presentation of that campaign. 

  • 35.
    Abd Nikooie Pour, Mina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Algergawy, Alsayed
    Heinz Nixdorf Chair for Distributed Information Systems, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany; Chair of Data and Knowledge Engineering, University of Passau, Germany.
    Buche, Patrice
    UMR IATE, INRAE, University of Montpellier, France.
    Castro, Leyla J.
    ZB MED Information Centre for Life Sciences, Germany.
    Chen, Jiaoyan
    Department of Computer Science, The University of Manchester, UK.
    Coulet, Adrien
    Inria Paris, France; Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Inserm, Université Paris Cité, Sorbonne Université, France.
    Cufi, Julien
    UMR IATE, INRAE, University of Montpellier, France.
    Dong, Hang
    Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, UK.
    Fallatah, Omaima
    Department of Data Science, Umm Al-Qura University, Saudi Arabia.
    Faria, Daniel
    INESC-ID / IST, University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Fundulaki, Irini
    Institute of Computer Science-FORTH, Heraklion, Greece.
    Hertling, Sven
    Data and Web Science Group, University of Mannheim, Germany.
    He, Yuan
    Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, UK.
    Horrocks, Ian
    Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, UK.
    Huschka, Martin
    Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics, Ernst-Mach-Institut, EMI, Germany.
    Ibanescu, Liliana
    Université Paris-Saclay, INRAE, AgroParisTech, UMR MIA Paris-Saclay, France.
    Jain, Sarika
    National Institute of Technology Kurukshetra, India.
    Jiménez-Ruiz, Ernesto
    City, University of London, UK; SIRIUS, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Karam, Naouel
    Institute for Applied Informatics, University of Leipzig, Germany.
    Lambrix, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Li, Huanyu
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Li, Ying
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Monnin, Pierre
    University Côte d’Azur, Inria, CNRS, I3S, France.
    Nasr, Engy
    Albert Ludwig University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Paulheim, Heiko
    Data and Web Science Group, University of Mannheim, Germany.
    Pesquita, Catia
    LASIGE, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal.
    Saveta, Tzanina
    Institute of Computer Science-FORTH, Heraklion, Greece.
    Shvaiko, Pavel
    Trentino Digitale SpA, Trento, Italy.
    Sousa, Guilherme
    Institut de Recherche en Informatique de Toulouse, France.
    Trojahn, Cássia
    Institut de Recherche en Informatique de Toulouse, France.
    Vatascinova, Jana
    Prague University of Economics and Business, Czech Republic.
    Wu, Mingfang
    Australian Research Data Commons.
    Yaman, Beyza
    ADAPT Centre, Trinity College Dublin.
    Zamazal, Ondřej
    Prague University of Economics and Business, Czech Republic.
    Zhou, Lu
    Flatfee Corp, USA.
    Results of the Ontology Alignment Evaluation Initiative 20232023In: Proceedings of the 18th International Workshop on Ontology Matching co-located with the 22nd International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC 2023), Athens, Greece, November 7, 2023. / [ed] Pavel Shvaiko, Jérôme Euzenat, Ernesto Jiménez-Ruiz, Oktie Hassanzadeh, Cássia Trojahn, CEUR Workshop Proceedings , 2023, Vol. 3591, p. 97-139Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Abd Nikooie Pour, Mina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques.
    Algergawy, Alsayed
    Heinz Nixdorf Chair for Distributed Information Systems, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany.
    Buche, Patrice
    UMR IATE, INRAE, University of Montpellier, France.
    Castro, Leyla J.
    ZB MED Information Centre for Life Sciences, Germany.
    Chen, Jiaoyan
    Department of Computer Science, The University of Manchester, UK.
    Dong, Hang
    Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, UK.
    Fallatah, Omaima
    Information School, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Faria, Daniel
    University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Fundulaki, Irini
    Institute of Computer Science-FORTH, Heraklion, Greece.
    Hertling, Sven
    Data and Web Science Group, University of Mannheim, Germany.
    He, Yuan
    Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, UK.
    Horrocks, Ian
    Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, UK.
    Huschka, Martin
    Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics, Ernst-Mach-Institut, EMI, Germany.
    Ibanescu, Liliana
    Universite Paris-Saclay, INRAE, AgroParisTech, UMR MIA Paris-Saclay, France.
    Jimenez-Ruiz, Ernesto
    City, University of London, UK & SIRIUS, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Karam, Naouel
    Fraunhofer FOKUS & Institute for Applied Informatics, University of Leipzig, Germany.
    Laadhar, Amir
    University of Stuttgart, Germany.
    Lambrix, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Högskolan i Gävle.
    Li, Huanyu
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Li, Ying
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques.
    Michel, Franck
    University Cote d’Azur, CNRS, Inria.
    Nasr, Engy
    Albert Ludwig University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Paulheim, Heiko
    Data and Web Science Group, University of Mannheim, Germany.
    Pesquita, Catia
    LASIGE, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal.
    Saveta, Tzanina
    Institute of Computer Science-FORTH, Heraklion, Greece.
    Shvaiko, Pavel
    Trentino Digitale SpA, Trento, Italy.
    Trojahn, Cassia
    Institut de Recherche en Informatique de Toulouse, France.
    Verhey, Chantelle
    World Data System, International Technology Office, USA.
    Wu, Mingfang
    Australian Research Data Commons.
    Yaman, Beyza
    ADAPT Centre, Trinity College Dublin.
    Zamazal, Ondrej
    Prague University of Economics and Business, Czech Republic.
    Zhou, Lu
    TigerGraph, Inc. USA.
    Results of the Ontology Alignment EvaluationInitiative 20222022In: Proceedings of the 17th International Workshop on Ontology Matching (OM 2022): co-located with the 21th International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC 2022) / [ed] Pavel Shvaiko, Jerome Euzenat, Ernesto Jimenez-Ruiz, Oktie Hassanzadeh, Cassia Trojahn, CEUR Workshop Proceedings , 2022, p. 84-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Ontology Alignment Evaluation Initiative (OAEI) aims at comparing ontology matching systems on precisely defined test cases. These test cases can be based on ontologies of different levels of complexity and use different evaluation modalities. The OAEI 2022 campaign offered 14 tracks and was attended by18 participants. This paper is an overall presentation of that campaign

  • 37.
    Abd Nikooie Pour, Mina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Li, Huanyu
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Armiento, Rickard
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lambrix, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Högskolan i Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    A First Step towards a Tool for Extending Ontologies2021In: Proceedings of the Sixth International Workshop on the Visualization and Interaction for Ontologies and Linked Data: co-located with the 20th International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC 2021) / [ed] Patrick Lambrix, Catia Pesquita, Vitalis Wiens, CEUR Workshop proceedings , 2021, p. 1-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ontologies have been proposed as a means towards making data FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable). This has attracted much interest in several communities and ontologies are being developed. However, to obtain good results when using ontologies in semantically-enabled applications, the ontologies need to be of high quality. One of the quality aspects is that the ontologies should be as complete as possible. In this paper we propose a first version of a tool that supports users in extending ontologies using a phrase-based approach.  To demonstrate the usefulness of our proposed tool, we exemplify the use by extending the Materials Design Ontology.

  • 38.
    Abd Nikooie Pour, Mina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques.
    Li, Huanyu
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Armiento, Rickard
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lambrix, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A First Step towards Extending the Materials Design Ontology2021In: Workshop on Domain Ontologies for Research Data Management in Industry Commons of Materials and Manufacturing - DORIC-MM 2021 / [ed] S Chiacchiera, MT Horsch, J Francisco Morgado, G Goldbeck, 2021, p. 1-11Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ontologies have been proposed as a means towards making data FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable) and has recently attracted much interest in the materials science community. Ontologies for this domain are being developed and one such effort is the Materials Design Ontology. However, to obtain good results when using ontologies in semantically-enabled applications, the ontologies need to be of high quality. One of the quality aspects is that the ontologies should be as complete as possible. In this paper we show preliminary results regarding extending the Materials Design Ontology using a phrase-based topic model.

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  • 39.
    Abd Nikooie Pour, Mina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Swedish e-Science Research Centre, Sweden.
    Li, Huanyu
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish e-Science Research Centre, Sweden.
    Armiento, Rickard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Swedish e-Science Research Centre, Sweden.
    Lambrix, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish e-Science Research Centre, Sweden; University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Phrase2Onto: A Tool to Support Ontology Extension2023In: 27th International Conference on Knowledge Based and Intelligent Information and Engineering Sytems (KES 2023) / [ed] Robert Howlett, Elsevier, 2023, p. 1415-1424Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to importance of data FAIRness (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable), ontologies as a means to make data FAIR have attracted more and more attention in different communities and are being used in semantically-enabled applications. However, to obtain good results while using ontologies in these applications, high quality ontologies are needed of which completeness is one of the important aspects. An ontology lacking information can lead to missing results. In this paper we present a tool, Phrase2Onto, that supports users in extending ontologies to make the ontologies more complete. It is particularly suited for ontology extension using a phrase-based topic model approach, but the tool can support any extension approach where a user needs to make decisions regarding the appropriateness of using phrases to define new concepts. We describe the functionality of the tool and a user study using Pizza Ontology. The user study showed  a good usability of the system and high task completion. Further, we report on a real application where we extend the Materials Design Ontology.

  • 40.
    Abdala, Esraa
    et al.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mustafa, Mustafa A.
    Materials and Nanotechnology Research Centre, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan.
    Efficient Biodiesel Production from Algae Oil Using Ca-Doped ZnO Nanocatalyst2020In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 59, no 43, p. 19235-19243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biodiesel is a sustainable alternative to petroleum diesel produced by transesterification of vegetable oils in the presence of a catalyst. The present study investigates heterogeneous transesterification of algal oil to biodiesel using novel calcium-doped zinc oxide nanocatalysts synthesized using a UV shaker. The developed catalyst was under different light sources, UV and non-UV; different calcium concentrations (0.01, 0.03, 0.05 M); and different calcination temperatures (600, 700, 800 degrees C). The catalyst has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The effects of the different parameters used in catalyst preparation were studied for transesterification of algal oil. The catalyst of 0.05 M calcium loading and 700 degrees C calcination temperature synthesized in UV light is considered as the most suitable nanocatalyst, which achieved 99.18% yield of biodiesel. The catalyst was used three times effectively with 76% yield. The chemical properties of biodiesel have been investigated using gas chromatography (GC).

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  • 41. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Abdalla, Hassan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Charge and Energy Transport in Disordered Organic Semiconductors2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Improvement of the performance of organic disordered semiconductors (OSC) is driven by the understanding   of the underlying charge transport mechanisms and systematic exploitation thereof. There exists a multitude of materials and material systems based on polymers and small molecules with promising performance for use in organic light emitting diodes, photovoltaics, organic field-effect transistors and thermoelectrics. However, universal understanding of many classes of these materials has eluded researchers, due to their broad   spectrum of morphologies, molecular structures and electrical properties. Building on the large body of existing models, this thesis deals with charge transport phenomena from the perspective of transport energetics, by studying the interplay between a few but important concepts commonly accepted to play a crucial role in all  OSC materials; energetic disorder, charge carrier hopping and Coulomb interactions. The influence of these concepts on the energetic landscape through which charge carriers move and how this translates to experimentally observed transport phenomena are studied by a combination of experimental work, kinetic Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and empirical and analytical models.

    The universal scaling and collapse of the temperature and electric field dependence of the conductivity of PEDOT:PSS to a single curve is shown to be functionally equivalent to the scaling of the effective temperature, which describes the effect of field heating as a broadening of the charge carrier distribution. From numerical investigation of the energy relaxation, an empirical model is developed that relates the physical meaning   behind both concepts to the heat balance between Joule heating of the carrier distribution via the effective temperature and energy loss to the lattice. For this universal description to be applicable a strongly energy- dependent density of states (DOS) as well as Coulomb interactions and large carrier concentrations are needed.

    Chemical doping is a common way of improving charge transport in OSC and is also beneficial for energy transport, which combined leads to an increased thermoelectric power factor. The ensuing thermoelectric investigations not only showed the potential of these materials for use in thermoelectric generators, but are  also helpful in unraveling charge transport mechanism as they give direct insight into the energetics of a material. Interestingly, doped OSC exhibit the same universal power-law relationship between thermopower and conductivity, independent of material system or doping method, pointing towards a common energy and charge transport mechanism. In this thesis an analytical model is presented, which reproduces said universal power-law behavior and is able to attribute it to Variable Range Hopping (VRH) or a transition between Nearest Neighbour Hopping (NNH) and VRH at higher concentrations. This model builds on an existing three- dimensional hopping formalism that includes the effect of the attractive Coulomb potential of ionized dopants that leads to a broadening of the DOS. Here, this model is extended by including the energy offset between   host and dopant material and is positively tested against MC simulations and a set of thermoelectric measurements covering different material groups and doping mechanisms.

    Organic field effect transistors (OFETs) have become increasingly comparable in electrical mobility to their inorganic (silicon) counterparts. The spatial extent of charge transport in OFETs has been subject to debate since their inception with many experimental, numerical and analytical studies having been undertaken. Here it is shown that the common way of analyzing the dimensionality of charge transport in OFETs may be prone to misinterpretations. Instead, the results in this thesis suggest that charge transport in OFETs is, in fact, quasi- two-dimensional (2D) due to the confinement of the gate field in addition to a morphology-induced preferred in-plane direction of the transport. The inherently large charge carrier concentrations in OFETs in addition to   the quasi-2D confinement leads to increased Coulomb interaction between charge carriers as compared to bulk material, leading to a thermoelectric behavior that deviates from doped organic systems. At very large concentrations interesting charge transport phenomena are observed, including an unexpected simultaneous increase of the concentration dependence and the magnitude of the mobility, the appearance of a negative transconductance, indicating a transition to an insulating Mott-Hubbard phase. The experimental and   numerical results in this thesis relate these phenomena the intricacies of the interplay between Coulomb interactions, energetic disorder and charge carrier hopping.

    List of papers
    1. Effective Temperature and Universal Conductivity Scaling in Organic Semiconductors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effective Temperature and Universal Conductivity Scaling in Organic Semiconductors
    2015 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 16870Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the scalability of the temperature-and electric field-dependence of the conductivity of disordered organic semiconductors to universal curves by two different but commonly employed methods; by so-called universal scaling and by using the effective temperature concept. Experimentally both scaling methods were found to be equally applicable to the out-of-plane charge transport in PEDOT: PSS thin films of various compositions. Both methods are shown to be equivalent in terms of functional dependence and to have identical limiting behavior. The experimentally observed scaling behavior can be reproduced by a numerical nearest-neighbor hopping model, accounting for the Coulomb interaction, the high charge carrier concentration and the energetic disorder. The underlying physics can be captured in a simple empirical model, describing the effective temperature of the charge carrier distribution as the outcome of a heat balance between Joule heating and (effective) temperature-dependent energy loss to the lattice.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Nature Publishing Group, 2015
    National Category
    Physical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123329 (URN)10.1038/srep16870 (DOI)000364933800002 ()26581975 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-12-14 Created: 2015-12-11 Last updated: 2022-09-15
    2. Impact of doping on the density of states and the mobility in organic semiconductors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of doping on the density of states and the mobility in organic semiconductors
    2016 (English)In: PHYSICAL REVIEW B, ISSN 2469-9950, Vol. 93, no 23, p. 235203-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We experimentally investigated conductivity and mobility of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) doped with tetrafluorotetracyanoquinodimethane (F(4)TCNQ) for various relative doping concentrations ranging from ultralow (10(-5)) to high (10(-1)) and various active layer thicknesses. Although the measured conductivity monotonously increases with increasing doping concentration, the mobilities decrease, in agreement with previously published work. Additionally, we developed a simple yet quantitative model to rationalize the results on basis of a modification of the density of states (DOS) by the Coulomb potentials of ionized dopants. The DOS was integrated in a three-dimensional (3D) hopping formalism in which parameters such as energetic disorder, intersite distance, energy level difference, and temperature were varied. We compared predictions of our model as well as those of a previously developed model to kinetic Monte Carlo (MC) modeling and found that only the former model accurately reproduces the mobility of MC modeling in a large part of the parameter space. Importantly, both our model and MC simulations are in good agreement with experiments; the crucial ingredient to both is the formation of a deep trap tail in the Gaussian DOS with increasing doping concentration.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER PHYSICAL SOC, 2016
    National Category
    Other Physics Topics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130276 (URN)10.1103/PhysRevB.93.235203 (DOI)000378813800009 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC)

    Available from: 2016-08-01 Created: 2016-07-28 Last updated: 2018-08-29
    3. Range and energetics of charge hopping in organic semiconductors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Range and energetics of charge hopping in organic semiconductors
    2017 (English)In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 96, no 24, article id 241202Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The recent upswing in attention for the thermoelectric properties of organic semiconductors (OSCs) adds urgency to the need for a quantitative description of the range and energetics of hopping transport in organic semiconductors under relevant circumstances, i.e., around room temperature (RT). In particular, the degree to which hops beyond the nearest neighbor must be accounted for at RT is still largely unknown. Here, measurements of charge and energy transport in doped OSCs are combined with analytical modeling to reach the univocal conclusion that variable-range hopping is the proper description in a large class of disordered OSC at RT. To obtain quantitative agreement with experiment, one needs to account for the modification of the density of states by ionized dopants. These Coulomb interactions give rise to a deep tail of trap states that is independent of the materials initial energetic disorder. Insertion of this effect into a classical Mott-type variable-range hopping model allows one to give a quantitative description of temperature-dependent conductivity and thermopower measurements on a wide range of disordered OSCs. In particular, the model explains the commonly observed quasiuniversal power-law relation between the Seebeck coefficient and the conductivity.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER PHYSICAL SOC, 2017
    National Category
    Condensed Matter Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-144143 (URN)10.1103/PhysRevB.96.241202 (DOI)000418616700001 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC); Knut och Alice Wallenberg stiftelse

    Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2018-08-29
    4. Investigation of the dimensionality of charge transport in organic field effect transistors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigation of the dimensionality of charge transport in organic field effect transistors
    2017 (English)In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 95, no 8, article id 85301Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Ever since the first experimental investigations of organic field effect transistors (OFETs) the dimensionality of charge transport has alternately been described as two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D). More recently, researchers have turned to an analytical analysis of the temperature-dependent transfer characteristics to classify the dimensionality as either 2D or 3D as well as to determine the disorder of the system, thereby greatly simplifying dimensionality investigations. We applied said analytical analysis to the experimental results of our OFETs comprising molecularly well-defined polymeric layers as the active material as well as to results obtained from kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and found that it was not able to correctly distinguish between 2D and 3D transports or give meaningful values for the disorder and should only be used for quasiquantitative and comparative analysis. We conclude to show that the dimensionality of charge transport in OFETs is a function of the interplay between transistor physics and morphology of the organic material.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER PHYSICAL SOC, 2017
    National Category
    Condensed Matter Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-138929 (URN)10.1103/PhysRevB.95.085301 (DOI)000402194500006 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Knut och Alice Wallenbergs stiftelse; Advanced Functional Materials Center at Linkoping University [2009-00971]; VINNOVA [2015-04859]

    Available from: 2017-06-27 Created: 2017-06-27 Last updated: 2018-03-14
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    Charge and Energy Transport in Disordered Organic Semiconductors
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  • 42.
    Abdalla, Hassan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Investigation of the dimensionality of charge transport in organic field effect transistors2017In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 95, no 8, article id 85301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ever since the first experimental investigations of organic field effect transistors (OFETs) the dimensionality of charge transport has alternately been described as two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D). More recently, researchers have turned to an analytical analysis of the temperature-dependent transfer characteristics to classify the dimensionality as either 2D or 3D as well as to determine the disorder of the system, thereby greatly simplifying dimensionality investigations. We applied said analytical analysis to the experimental results of our OFETs comprising molecularly well-defined polymeric layers as the active material as well as to results obtained from kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and found that it was not able to correctly distinguish between 2D and 3D transports or give meaningful values for the disorder and should only be used for quasiquantitative and comparative analysis. We conclude to show that the dimensionality of charge transport in OFETs is a function of the interplay between transistor physics and morphology of the organic material.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 43.
    Abdalla, Hassan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    van de Ruit, Kevin
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Effective Temperature and Universal Conductivity Scaling in Organic Semiconductors2015In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 16870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the scalability of the temperature-and electric field-dependence of the conductivity of disordered organic semiconductors to universal curves by two different but commonly employed methods; by so-called universal scaling and by using the effective temperature concept. Experimentally both scaling methods were found to be equally applicable to the out-of-plane charge transport in PEDOT: PSS thin films of various compositions. Both methods are shown to be equivalent in terms of functional dependence and to have identical limiting behavior. The experimentally observed scaling behavior can be reproduced by a numerical nearest-neighbor hopping model, accounting for the Coulomb interaction, the high charge carrier concentration and the energetic disorder. The underlying physics can be captured in a simple empirical model, describing the effective temperature of the charge carrier distribution as the outcome of a heat balance between Joule heating and (effective) temperature-dependent energy loss to the lattice.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44.
    Abdalla, Hassan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zuo, Guangzheng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Range and energetics of charge hopping in organic semiconductors2017In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 96, no 24, article id 241202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent upswing in attention for the thermoelectric properties of organic semiconductors (OSCs) adds urgency to the need for a quantitative description of the range and energetics of hopping transport in organic semiconductors under relevant circumstances, i.e., around room temperature (RT). In particular, the degree to which hops beyond the nearest neighbor must be accounted for at RT is still largely unknown. Here, measurements of charge and energy transport in doped OSCs are combined with analytical modeling to reach the univocal conclusion that variable-range hopping is the proper description in a large class of disordered OSC at RT. To obtain quantitative agreement with experiment, one needs to account for the modification of the density of states by ionized dopants. These Coulomb interactions give rise to a deep tail of trap states that is independent of the materials initial energetic disorder. Insertion of this effect into a classical Mott-type variable-range hopping model allows one to give a quantitative description of temperature-dependent conductivity and thermopower measurements on a wide range of disordered OSCs. In particular, the model explains the commonly observed quasiuniversal power-law relation between the Seebeck coefficient and the conductivity.

  • 45.
    Abdallah, Nancy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics.
    Hansson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Axel
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Topology of posets with special partial matchings2019In: Advances in Mathematics, ISSN 0001-8708, E-ISSN 1090-2082, Vol. 348, p. 255-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Special partial matchings (SPMs) are a generalisation of Brentis special matchings. Let a pircon be a poset in which every non-trivial principal order ideal is finite and admits an SPM. Thus pircons generalise Mariettis zircons. We prove that every open interval in a pircon is a PL ball or a PL sphere. It is then demonstrated that Bruhat orders on certain twisted identities and quasiparabolic W-sets constitute pircons. Together, these results extend a result of Can, Cherniaysky, and Twelbeck, prove a conjecture of Hultman, and confirm a claim of Rains and Vazirani.

  • 46.
    Abdallah, Nancy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Axel
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Combinatorial invariance of Kazhdan-Lusztig-Vogan polynomials for fixed point free involutions2018In: Journal of Algebraic Combinatorics, ISSN 0925-9899, E-ISSN 1572-9192, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 543-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When acts on the flag variety of , the orbits are in bijection with fixed point free involutions in the symmetric group . In this case, the associated Kazhdan-Lusztig-Vogan polynomials can be indexed by pairs of fixed point free involutions , where denotes the Bruhat order on . We prove that these polynomials are combinatorial invariants in the sense that if is a poset isomorphism of upper intervals in the Bruhat order on fixed point free involutions, then for all v amp;gt;= u.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 47.
    Abdelfattah, Ahmed
    et al.
    Univ Mediterranea Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Malacrinò, Antonino
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wisniewski, Michael
    USDA ARS, WV 25430 USA.
    Cacciola, Santa O.
    Univ Catania, Italy.
    Schena, Leonardo
    Univ Mediterranea Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Metabarcoding: A powerful tool to investigate microbial communities and shape future plant protection strategies2018In: Biological control (Print), ISSN 1049-9644, E-ISSN 1090-2112, Vol. 120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microorganisms are the main drivers shaping the functioning and equilibrium of all ecosystems, contributing to nutrient cycling, primary production, litter decomposition, and multi-trophic interactions. Knowledge about the microbial assemblies in specific ecological niches is integral to understanding the assemblages interact and function the function, and becomes essential when the microbiota intersects with human activities, such as protecting crops against pests and diseases. Metabarcoding has proven to be a valuable tool and has been widely used for characterizing the microbial diversity of different environments and has been utilized in many research endeavors. Here we summarize the current status of metabarcoding technologies, the advantages and challenges in utilizing this technique, and how this pioneer approach is being applied to studying plant diseases and pests, with a focus on plant protection and biological control. Current and future developments in this technology will foster a more comprehensive understanding of microbial ecology, and the development of new, innovative pest control strategies.

  • 48.
    Abdollahi Sani, Negar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Robertsson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cooper, Philip
    De La Rue Plc, Overton, Hampshire, UK .
    Wang, Xin
    Acreo AB, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Svensson, Magnus
    Acreo AB, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    Acreo AB, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Norberg, Petronella
    Acreo AB, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Marie
    Acreo AB, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, David
    Acreo AB, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hesselbom, Hjalmar
    Hesselbom Innovation and Development HB, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Akesso, Laurent
    De La Rue Plc, Overton, Hampshire, UK .
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Acreo AB, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Goran
    Acreo AB, Norrköping, Sweden.
    All-printed diode operating at 1.6 GHz2014In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 111, no 33, p. 11943-11948Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Printed electronics are considered for wireless electronic tags and sensors within the future Internet-of-things (IoT) concept. As a consequence of the low charge carrier mobility of present printable organic and inorganic semiconductors, the operational frequency of printed rectifiers is not high enough to enable direct communication and powering between mobile phones and printed e-tags. Here, we report an all-printed diode operating up to 1.6 GHz. The device, based on two stacked layers of Si and NbSi2 particles, is manufactured on a flexible substrate at low temperature and in ambient atmosphere. The high charge carrier mobility of the Si microparticles allows device operation to occur in the charge injection-limited regime. The asymmetry of the oxide layers in the resulting device stack leads to rectification of tunneling current. Printed diodes were combined with antennas and electrochromic displays to form an all-printed e-tag. The harvested signal from a Global System for Mobile Communications mobile phone was used to update the display. Our findings demonstrate a new communication pathway for printed electronics within IoT applications.

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    fulltext
  • 49.
    Abdolmajid Ahmad, Bookan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Programmering av generativ konst i C# .Net2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta examensarbete utfördes på IDA (Institutionen för datavetenskap) vid Linköpings universitet. 

    Syftet med det här examensarbetet var att utveckla ett program som skulle skapa förutsättningar för generativ konst med hjälp av MyPaint som är ett digitalt rit/målarverktyg. Metoden gick ut på att registrera vad användaren skapat för komponenter, dvs. musinteraktioner och kortkommandon, och därefter använda dem algoritmiskt.

    Examensarbetet resulterades i ett program (SharpArt), som fångar musinteraktioner samt simulerar tangentbordstryckningar (kortkommandon) från och till Mypaint, vilket i sin tur skapar komponenter som används algoritmiskt. Programmet kan även positionera objektet på canvasen enligt det önskade koordinatvärdet.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 50.
    Abdulahad, Bassam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Lounis, Georgios
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    A user interface for the ontology merging tool SAMBO2004Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree)Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Ontologies have become an important tool for representing data in a structured manner. Merging ontologies allows for the creation of ontologies that later can be composed into larger ontologies as well as for recognizing patterns and similarities between ontologies. Ontologies are being used nowadays in many areas, including bioinformatics. In this thesis, we present a desktop version of SAMBO, a system for merging ontologies that are represented in the languages OWL and DAML+OIL. The system has been developed in the programming language JAVA with JDK (Java Development Kit) 1.4.2. The user can open a file locally or from the network and can merge ontologies using suggestions generated by the SAMBO algorithm. SAMBO provides a user-friendly graphical interface, which guides the user through the merging process.

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    FULLTEXT01
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