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  • 1.
    Anastasopoulos, M.
    et al.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Bebb, R.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Berry, K.
    Spallat Neutron Source, TN 37831 USA.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brys, T.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Buffet, J. -C.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Clergeau, J. -F.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Deen, P. P.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Ehlers, G.
    Spallat Neutron Source, TN 37831 USA.
    van Esch, P.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Everett, S. M.
    Spallat Neutron Source, TN 37831 USA.
    Guerard, B.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Hall-Wilton, R.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Herwig, K.
    Spallat Neutron Source, TN 37831 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Iruretagoiena, I.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Issa, F.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khaplanov, A.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Kirstein, O.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden; University of Newcastle, Australia.
    Lopez Higuera, I.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Piscitelli, F.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Robinson, L.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Stefanescu, I.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Multi-Grid detector for neutron spectroscopy: results obtained on time-of-flight spectrometer CNCS2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, article id P04030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Multi-Grid detector technology has evolved from the proof-of-principle and characterisation stages. Here we report on the performance of the Multi-Grid detector, the MG. CNCS prototype, which has been installed and tested at the Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer, CNCS at SNS. This has allowed a side-by-side comparison to the performance of He-3 detectors on an operational instrument. The demonstrator has an active area of 0.2m(2). It is specifically tailored to the specifications of CNCS. The detector was installed in June 2016 and has operated since then, collecting neutron scattering data in parallel to the He-3 detectors of CNCS. In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of this data, in particular on instrument energy resolution, rate capability, background and relative efficiency. Stability, gamma-ray and fast neutron sensitivity have also been investigated. The effect of scattering in the detector components has been measured and provides input to comparison for Monte Carlo simulations. All data is presented in comparison to that measured by the He-3 detectors simultaneously, showing that all features recorded by one detector are also recorded by the other. The energy resolution matches closely. We find that the Multi-Grid is able to match the data collected by He-3, and see an indication of a considerable advantage in the count rate capability. Based on these results, we are confident that the Multi-Grid detector will be capable of producing high quality scientific data on chopper spectrometers utilising the unprecedented neutron flux of the ESS.

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  • 2.
    Andersen, Ken
    et al.
    European Spallation Source ESS AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Bigault, Thierry
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buffet, J. C.
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Correa, Jonathan
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Hall-Wilton, Richard
    European Spallation Source ESS AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Guerard, Bruno
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khaplanov, Anton
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Kirstein, Oliver
    Linköping University.
    Piscitelli, Fransesco
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    van Esch, P.
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Vettier, Christian
    European Spallation Source, Lund, Sweden.
    10B multi-grid proportional gas counters for large area thermal neutrondetectors2013In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 720, p. 116-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    3He was a popular material in neutrons detectors until its availability dropped drastically in 2008. The development of techniques based on alternative convertors is now of high priority for neutron research institutes. Thin films of 10B or 10B4C have been used in gas proportional counters to detect neutrons, but until now, only for small or medium sensitive area. We present here the multi-grid design, introduced at the ILL and developed in collaboration with ESS for LAN (large area neutron) detectors. Typically thirty 10B4C films of 1 μm thickness are used to convert neutrons into ionizing particles which are subsequently detected in a proportional gas counter. The principle and the fabrication of the multi-grid are described and some preliminary results obtained with a prototype of 200 cm×8 cm are reported; a detection efficiency of 48% has been measured at 2.5 Å with a monochromatic neutron beam line, showing the good potential of this new technique.

  • 3.
    Bigault, Thierry
    et al.
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buffet, J. C.
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Correa, Jonathan
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Hall-Wilton, Richard
    European Spallation Source ESS AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Guérard, Bruno
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Khaplanov, Anton
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Piscitelli, Fransesco
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    van Esch, P.
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    10B multi-grid proportional gas counters for large area thermal neutron detectors2012In: Neutron News, ISSN 1044-8632, E-ISSN 1931-7352, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 20-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Birch, Jens
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Buffet, J. -C.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Clergeau, J. -F.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    van Esch, P.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Ferraton, M.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Guerard, B.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Hall-Wilton, R.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khaplanov, A.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France; European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Piscitelli, F.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France; European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Investigation of background in large-area neutron detectors due to alpha emission from impurities in aluminium2015In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 10, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal neutron detector based on films of (B4C)-B-10 have been developed as an alternative to He-3 detectors. In particular, The Multi-Grid detector concept is considered for future large area detectors for ESS and ILL instruments. An excellent signal-to-background ratio is essential to attain expected scientific results. Aluminium is the most natural material for the mechanical structure of of the Multi-Grid detector and other similar concepts due to its mechanical and neutronic properties. Due to natural concentration of alpha emitters, however, the background from alpha particles misidentified as neutrons can be unacceptably high. We present our experience operating a detector prototype affected by this issue. Monte Carlo simulations have been used to confirm the background as alpha particles. The issues have been addressed in the more recent implementations of the Multi-Grid detector by the use of purified aluminium as well as Ni-plating of standard aluminium. The result is the reduction in background by two orders of magnitude. A new large-area prototype has been built incorporating these modifications.

  • 5.
    Birch, Jens
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buffet, J. C.
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Correa, Jonathan
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    van Esch, P.
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Guerard, Bruno
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Hall-Wilton, Richard
    European Spallation Source ESS AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khaplanov, Anton
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Piscitelli, Fransesco
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    (B4C)-B-10 Multi-Grid as an Alternative to He-3 for Large Area Neutron Detectors2013In: IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, ISSN 0018-9499, E-ISSN 1558-1578, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 871-878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its present shortage, 3He continues to be the most common neutron converter for detectors in neutron scattering science. However, it is obvious that the development of large area neutron detectors based on alternative neutron converters is rapidly becoming a matter of urgency. In the technique presented here, grids each comprising 28 10B4C layers (each 1 μm thick) are used to convert neutrons into ionizing particles which are subsequently detected in proportional gas counters. The total active area of the prototype is 8 cm × 200 cm. To instrument this detector 4.6 m2 of 10B-enriched boron carbide were coated onto aluminium blades using a DC magnetron sputtering machine.

  • 6.
    Enqvist, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Synthesis and Characterisation of Non-Evaporable Getter Films Based on Ti, Zr and V2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Non-evaporable getters (NEG) are widely used in ultra high vacuum (UHV) systems for particle accelerators to assure distributed pumping speed. By heating the NEG to an activation temperature, the oxide layer on the surface dissolves into the material, leaving a clean (activated) surface. The activated NEG surface is capable of chemisorbing most of the residual gases present in a UHV system and will act as a vacuum pump. NEG can be sputter deposited on the inner wall of vacuum chambers, turning the whole wall from a source of gas into a pump. At the largest particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider, more than 6 km of beam pipe has been NEG coated.

    In this work, a DC magnetron sputtering system dedicated for coating cylindrical vacuum chambers with NEG has been assembled, installed and commissioned. The system has been used to do NEG depositions on inner walls of vacuum chambers. The vacuum performance of the coating has been measured in terms of pumping speed, electron stimulated desorption and activation temperature. In addition, the thin film composition and morphology has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

    The work has resulted in an operational DC magnetron sputtering system, which can be used for further studies of NEG materials and compositions.

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  • 7.
    Lindström, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A novel diamond-based beam position monitoring system for the High Radiation to Materials facility at CERN SPS2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The High Radiation to Materials facility employs a high intensity pulsed beam imposing several challenges on the beam position monitors. Diamond has been shown to be a resilient material with its radiation hardness and mechanical strength, while it is also simple due to its wide bandgap removing the need for doping. A new type of diamond based beam position monitor has been constructed, which includes a hole in the center of the diamond where the majority of the beam is intended to pass through. This increases the longevity of the detectors as well as allowing them to be used for high intensity beams. The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the performance of the detectors in the High Radiation to Materials facility for various beam parameters, involving differences in position, size, bunch intensity and bunch number. A prestudy consisting of calibration of the detectors using single incident particles is also presented. The detectors are shown to work as intended after a recalibration of the algorithm, albeit with a slightly lower precision than requested, giving a promising new beam position monitoring system. They work for the full intensity range and a single bunch resolution is achieved. Functionality is also shown with backscattering from dense targets.

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  • 8.
    Margato, L. M. S.
    et al.
    Univ Coimbra, Portugal.
    Morozov, A.
    Univ Coimbra, Portugal.
    Blanco, A.
    Univ Coimbra, Portugal.
    Fonte, P.
    Univ Coimbra, Portugal; Coimbra Polytech ISEC, Portugal.
    Fraga, F. A. F.
    Univ Coimbra, Portugal.
    Guerard, B.
    ILL Inst Laue Langevin, France.
    Hall-Wilton, R.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden; Mid Sweden Univ, Sweden.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Mangiarotti, A.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Robinson, L.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Schmidt, S.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden; IHI Ionbond AG, Switzerland.
    Zeitelhack, K.
    Tech Univ Munich, Germany.
    Boron-10 lined RPCs for sub-millimeter resolution thermal neutron detectors: Feasibility study in a thermal neutron beam2019In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 14, article id P01017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results of an experimental feasibility study of a position sensitive thermal neutron detector based on a resistive plate chamber (RPC) are presented. The detector prototype features a thin-gap (0.35 mm) hybrid RPC with an aluminium cathode and a float glass anode. The cathode is lined with a 2 mu m thick (B4C)-B-10 neutron converter enriched in B-10. A detection efficiency of 6.2% is measured at the neutron beam (lambda = 2.5 angstrom) for normal incidence. A spatial resolution better than 0.5 mm FWHM is demonstrated.

  • 9.
    Mauri, G.
    et al.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden; STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab, England.
    Apostolidis, I
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Christensen, M. J.
    Data Management and Software Ctr, Denmark.
    Glavic, A.
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Switzerland.
    Lai, Chung-Chuan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Laloni, A.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Messi, F.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Olsson, A. Lindh
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Robinson, L.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Stahn, J.
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Switzerland.
    Svensson, P. O.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Hall-Wilton, R.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden; Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy.
    Piscitelli, F.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    The Multi-Blade Boron-10-based neutron detector performance using a focusing reflectometer2020In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 15, no 3, article id P03010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Multi-Blade is a Boron-10-based neutron detector designed for neutron reflectometers and developed for the two instruments (Estia and FREIA) planned for the European Spallation Source in Sweden. A demonstrator has been installed at the AMOR reflectometer at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI - Switzerland). AMOR exploits the Selene guide concept and can be considered a scaled-down demonstrator of Estia. The results of these tests are discussed. It will be shown how the characteristics of the Multi-Blade detector are features that allow the focusing reflectometry operation mode. Additionally the performance of the Multi-Blade, in terms of rate capability, exceeds current state-of-the-art technology. The improvements with respect to the previous prototypes are also highlighted; from background considerations to the linear and angular uniformity response of the detector.

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  • 10.
    Mourad, Ghassan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Röndahl, Gerd
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Symptoms of anxiety and depression and the role of social support in patients with chest pain.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim: Being admitted to a coronary care unit due to chest pain is stressful. Limited data is available on anxiety and depression in chest pain patients during the acute phase. Social support may act as a buffer to the psychological impact of an acute cardiac event. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of symptoms of anxiety and depression and their relationship to social support in patients admitted to a coronary care unit (CCU) for acute chest pain. Methods: The study had a descriptive, cross sectional design based on data collected by standardised questionnaires. Data was collected consecutively at a university hospital in central Sweden between October 2006 and October 2007. Eligible for the study were patients younger than 75 years, hospitalized due to chest pain at the CCU, who spoke and read Swedish and were in a general state of health to participate in the study. Patients were asked to answer three different questionnaires: State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Medical Outcome Study-Social Support Survey (MOS-SSS) within 24 hours after being admitted to CCU. Results:A total of 337 patients were included in the study (mean age 60.5 years, 73 % men, 73 % married). Only two patients were free from symptoms of anxiety and depression, while 7 % of the patients had clinically significant levels of both anxiety and depression. A total 71 % had a clinically significant or severe level of anxiety and 22 % were at a borderline level for anxiety. A total of 14 % had a clinically significant level of depression and 67 % were at a borderline level of depression. Regression analysis showed that social support was independently related to anxiety and depression. Conclusion: Patients admitted to CCU experience extreme levels of psychological distress in the acute phase and social support seems to play an important role. Assessment of anxiety and depression as well as interventions including support and information should be considered in the CCU setting in order to improve mental well-being of patients with chest pain.

  • 11.
    Muraro, Andrea
    et al.
    Assoc EURATOM ENEA CNR, Italy.
    Croci, Gabriele
    Assoc EURATOM ENEA CNR, Italy; Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy; Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy.
    Cippo, Enrico Perelli
    Assoc EURATOM ENEA CNR, Italy.
    Grosso, Giovanni
    Assoc EURATOM ENEA CNR, Italy.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden.
    Albani, Giorgia
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy.
    Hall-Wilton, Richard
    European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden; Mid Sweden Univ, Sweden.
    Kanaki, Kalliopi
    European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden.
    Murtas, Fabrizio
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy.
    Raspino, Davide
    Rutherford Appleton Lab, England.
    Robinson, Linda
    European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden.
    Rodhes, Nigel
    Rutherford Appleton Lab, England.
    Rebai, Marica
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden.
    Schooneveld, Erik
    Rutherford Appleton Lab, England.
    Tardocchi, Marco
    Assoc EURATOM ENEA CNR, Italy.
    Gorini, Giuseppe
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy; Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy.
    Performance of the high-efficiency thermal neutron BAND-GEM detector2018In: Progress in Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0079-6468, E-ISSN 2050-3911, no 2, article id 023H01Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Newhigh-count-rate detectors are required for future spallation neutron sources where large-area and high-efficiency (amp;gt;50%) detectors are envisaged. In this framework, Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) is one of the detector technologies being explored, since it features good spatial resolution (amp;lt;0.5 cm) and timing properties, has excellent rate capability (MHz/mm(2)) and can cover large areas (some m(2)) at low cost. In the BAND-GEM (boron array neutron detector GEM) approach a 3D geometry for the neutron converter cathode was developed that is expected to provide an efficiency amp;gt;30% in thewavelength range of interest for small angle neutron scattering instruments. A system of aluminum grids with thin walls coated with a 0.59 mu m layer of (B4C)-B-10 has been built and positioned in the first detector gap, orthogonally to the cathode. By tilting the grid system with respect to the beam, there is a significant increase of effective thickness of the borated material crossed by the neutrons. As a consequence, both interaction probability and detection efficiency are increased. This paper presents the results of the performance of the BAND-GEM detector in terms of efficiency and spatial resolution.

  • 12.
    Nagy, Bela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, Hungary.
    Merkel, D. G.
    Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, Hungary.
    Jakab, L.
    Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, Hungary.
    Fuzi, J.
    Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, Hungary.
    Veres, T.
    Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, Hungary.
    Bottyan, L.
    Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, Hungary.
    4-bounce neutron polarizer for reflectometry applications2018In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 89, no 5, article id 056105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A neutron polarizer using four successive reflections on m = 2.5 supermirrors was built and installed at the GINA neutron reflectometer at the Budapest Neutron Centre. This simple setup exhibits 99.6% polarizing efficiency with 80% transmitted intensity of the selected polarization state. Due to the geometry, the higher harmonics in the incident beam are filtered out, while the optical axis of the beam remains intact for easy mounting and dismounting the device in an existing experimental setup. Published by AIP Publishing.

  • 13.
    Pfeiffer, D.
    et al.
    European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden; CERN, Switzerland.
    Resnati, F.
    European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden; CERN, Switzerland.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Etxegarai, M.
    European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden.
    Hall-Wilton, R.
    European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden.
    Hultman, L.
    Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Llamas-Jansa, I.
    European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden; Institute Energy Technology IFE, Norway.
    Oliveri, E.
    CERN, Switzerland.
    Oksanen, E.
    European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden.
    Robinson, L.
    European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden.
    Ropelewski, L.
    CERN, Switzerland.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden.
    Streli, C.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Thuiner, P.
    CERN, Switzerland; Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    First measurements with new high-resolution gadolinium-GEM neutron detectors2016In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 11, no P05011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    European Spallation Source instruments like the macromolecular diffractometer (NMX) require an excellent neutron detection efficiency, high-rate capabilities, time resolution, and an unprecedented spatial resolution in the order of a few hundred micrometers over a wide angular range of the incoming neutrons. For these instruments solid converters in combination with Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs) are a promising option. A GEM detector with gadolinium converter was tested on a cold neutron beam at the IFE research reactor in Norway. The mu TPC analysis, proven to improve the spatial resolution in the case of B-10 converters, is extended to gadolinium based detectors. For the first time, a Gd-GEM was successfully operated to detect neutrons with a measured efficiency of 11.8% at a wavelength of 2 angstrom and a position resolution better than 250 mu m.

  • 14.
    Pfeiffer, D.
    et al.
    European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden; CERN, Switzerland.
    Resnati, F.
    European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden; CERN, Switzerland.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hall-Wilton, R.
    European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden.
    Hultman, L.
    Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Iakovidis, G.
    CERN, Switzerland; Brookhaven National Lab, NY 11973 USA.
    Oliveri, E.
    CERN, Switzerland.
    Oksanen, E.
    European Spallat Source ESS AB, Sweden.
    Ropelewski, L.
    CERN, Switzerland.
    Thuiner, P.
    CERN, Switzerland; Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    The mu TPC method: improving the position resolution of neutron detectors based on MPGDs2015In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 10, no P04004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the He-3 crisis, alternatives to the standard neutron detection techniques are becoming urgent. In addition, the instruments of the European Spallation Source (ESS) require advances in the state of the art of neutron detection. The instruments need detectors with excellent neutron detection efficiency, high rate capabilities and unprecedented spatial resolution. The Macromolecular Crystallography instrument (NMX) requires a position resolution in the order of 200 mu m over a wide angular range of incoming neutrons. Solid converters in combination with Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs) are proposed to meet the new requirements. Charged particles rising from the neutron capture have usually ranges larger than several millimetres in gas. This is apparently in contrast with the requirements for the position resolution. In this paper, we present an analysis technique, new in the field of neutron detection, based on the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) concept. Using a standard Single-GEM with the cathode coated with (B4C)-B-10, we extract the neutron interaction point with a resolution of better than sigma = 200 mu m.

  • 15.
    Piscitelli, F.
    et al.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Mauri, G.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden; Univ Perugia, Italy.
    Messi, F.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Anastasopoulos, M.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Arnold, T.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Glavic, A.
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Switzerland.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Ilves, T.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Higuera, I. Lopez
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Pazmandi, P.
    Wigner Res Ctr Phys, Hungary.
    Raspino, D.
    Rutherford Appleton Lab, England.
    Robinson, L.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Schmidt, S.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden; IHI Ionbond AG, Switzerland.
    Svensson, P.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Varga, D.
    Wigner Res Ctr Phys, Hungary.
    Hall-Wilton, R.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden; Mid Sweden Univ, Sweden.
    Characterization of the Multi-Blade 10B-based detector at the CRISP reflectometer at ISIS for neutron reflectometry at ESS2018In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 13, article id P05009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Multi-Blade is a Boron-10-based gaseous thermal neutron detector developed to face the challenge arising in neutron reflectometry at neutron sources. Neutron reflectometers are challenging instruments in terms of instantaneous counting rate and spatial resolution. This detector has been designed according to the requirements given by the reflectometers at the European Spallation Source (ESS) in Sweden. The Multi-Blade has been installed and tested on the CRISP reflectometer at the ISIS neutron and muon source in U.K.. The results on the detailed detector characterization are discussed in this manuscript.

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  • 16.
    Piscitelli, F.
    et al.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Messi, F.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Anastasopoulos, M.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Brys, T.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Chicken, F.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Dian, E.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden; Hungarian Academic Science, Hungary.
    Fuzi, J.
    Wigner Research Centre Phys, Hungary.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Kiss, G.
    Wigner Research Centre Phys, Hungary.
    Orban, J.
    Wigner Research Centre Phys, Hungary.
    Pazmandi, P.
    Wigner Research Centre Phys, Hungary.
    Robinson, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Rosta, L.
    Wigner Research Centre Phys, Hungary.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden.
    Varga, D.
    Wigner Research Centre Phys, Hungary.
    Zsiros, T.
    Wigner Research Centre Phys, Hungary.
    Hall-Wilton, R.
    European Spallat Source ERIC ESS, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    The Multi-Blade Boron-10-based neutron detector for high intensity neutron reflectometry at ESS2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, article id P03013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Multi-Blade is a Boron-10-based gaseous detector introduced to face the challenge arising in neutron reflectometry at pulsed neutron sources. Neutron reflectometers are the most challenging instruments in terms of instantaneous counting rate and spatial resolution. This detector has been designed to cope with the requirements set for the reflectometers at the upcoming European Spallation Source (ESS) in Sweden. Based on previous results obtained at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in France, an improved demonstrator has been built at ESS and tested at the Budapest Neutron Centre (BNC) in Hungary and at the Source Testing Facility (STF) at the Lund University in Sweden. A detailed description of the detector and the results of the tests are discussed in this manuscript.

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  • 17.
    Puglisi, Donatella
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Politecnico di Milano, Campus Como, Como, Italy.
    Bertuccio, Giuseppe
    Politecnico di Milano, Como Campus, Italy; Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Section Milano, Milan, Italy.
    Silicon Carbide Microstrip Radiation Detectors2019In: Micromachines, ISSN 2072-666X, E-ISSN 2072-666X, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compared with the most commonly used silicon and germanium, which need to work at cryogenic or low temperatures to decrease their noise levels, wide-bandgap compound semiconductors such as silicon carbide allow the operation of radiation detectors at room temperature, with high performance, and without the use of any bulky and expensive cooling equipment. In this work, we investigated the electrical and spectroscopic performance of an innovative position-sensitive semiconductor radiation detector in epitaxial 4H-SiC. The full depletion of the epitaxial layer (124 µm, 5.2 × 1013 cm−3) was reached by biasing the detector up to 600 V. For comparison, two different microstrip detectors were fully characterized from −20 °C to +107 °C. The obtained results show that our prototype detector is suitable for high resolution X-ray spectroscopy with imaging capability in a wide range of operating temperatures.

  • 18.
    Santoni, A.
    et al.
    ENEA, Italy.
    Celentano, G.
    ENEA, Italy.
    Claps, G.
    ENEA, Italy.
    Fedrigo, A.
    ISIS Facil, England.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source ERIC, Sweden.
    Murtas, F.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy; CERN, Switzerland.
    Rondino, F.
    ENEA, Italy.
    Rufoloni, A.
    ENEA, Italy.
    Scherillo, A.
    ISIS Facil, England.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. IHI Ionbond AG, Switzerland.
    Vannozzi, A.
    ENEA, Italy.
    Pietropaolo, A.
    ENEA, Italy.
    Physical-chemical characterization of a GEM side-on B-10-based thermal neutron detector and analysis of its neutron diffraction performances2018In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 906, p. 83-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synergic interplay between nuclear physics, detector technology and solid state and surface sciences is a fundamental aspect of the development of new neutron detection devices. The synthesis technique and the physical-chemical properties of the B4C films used as a neutron-to-charged particle converter are described in relation to the GEM side-on thermal neutron detector. Neutron detection is performed allowing scattered neutrons to be converted into charged particles by means of a series of sheets covered by B-10-enriched boron carbide (B4C) layers placed along their flight path inside the detector. The extremely interesting performance shown by the detector in neutron diffraction measurements at the ISIS spallation neutron sources are discussed and related to the chemical-physical properties of the converting layers.

  • 19.
    Schulte, E C
    et al.
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA.
    Afanasev, A
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Amarian, M
    INFN/Sanita, Roma, Italy.
    Aniol, K
    California State University, Los Angeles, USA.
    Becher, S
    University of Georgia, Athens, USA.
    Benslama, K
    University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
    Bimbot, L
    Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Orsay, France.
    Bosted, P
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA.
    Brash, E
    University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
    Calarco, J
    University of New Hampshire, Durham, USA.
    Chai, Z
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA.
    Chang, C
    University of Maryland, College Park, USA.
    Chang, T
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA.
    Chen, J P
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Choi, S
    Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
    Chudakov, E
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA.
    Churchwell, S
    Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
    Crovelli, D
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Dieterich, S
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Dumalski, S
    University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
    Dutta, D
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA.
    Epstein, M
    California State University, Los Angeles, USA.
    Fissum, K
    University of Lund, Sweden.
    Fox, B
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Frullani, S
    INFN/Sanita, Roma, Italy.
    Gao, H
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA.
    Gao, J
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA.
    Garibaldi, F
    INFN/Sanita, Roma, Italy.
    Gayou, O
    College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, USA.
    Gilman, R
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Glamazdin, A
    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine.
    Glashausser, C
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Gomez, J
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Gorbenko, V
    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine.
    Hansen, J O
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Holt, R J
    Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois, USA.
    Hovdebo, J
    University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada .
    Huber, G M
    University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada .
    De Jager, C W
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Jiang, X
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Jones, C
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA.
    Jones, M K
    Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, USA.
    Kelly, J
    University of Maryland, College Park, USA.
    Kinney, E
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Kooijman, E
    Kent State University, Ohio, USA.
    Kumbartzki, G
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Kuss, M
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    LeRose, J
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Liang, M
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Lindgren, R
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA.
    Liyanage, N
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Malov, S
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Margaziotis, D
    California State University, Los Angeles, USA.
    Markowitz, D
    Florida International University, Miami, USA.
    McCormick, K
    DAPNIA, Saclay, France.
    Meekins, D
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA.
    Meziani, Z E
    Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
    Michaels, R
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Mitchell, J
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Morand, L
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Perdrisat, C
    College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, USA.
    Pomatsalyuk, R
    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine.
    Punjabi, V
    Norfolk State University, Virginia, USA.
    Radyushkin, A
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Ransome, R
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Roche, R
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA.
    Rvachev, M
    American University, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
    Saha, A
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Sarty, A
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA.
    Simon, Daniel
    University of Georgia, Athens, USA.
    Strauch, S
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Suleiman, R
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
    Todor, L
    Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, USA.
    Ulmer, P
    Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, USA.
    Urciuoli, G M
    INFN/Sanita, Roma, Italy.
    Wijesooriya, K
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA.
    Wojtsekhowski, B
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Xiong, F
    (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA.
    Xu, W
    (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA.
    High energy angular distribution measurements of the exclusive deuteron photodisintegration reaction2002In: Physical Review C. Nuclear Physics, ISSN 0556-2813, E-ISSN 1089-490X, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 042201-1-042201-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first complete measurements of the angular distributions of the two-body deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section at photon energies above 1.6 GeV were performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The results show a persistent forward-backward asymmetry up to Eγ = 2.4 GeV, the highest-energy measured in this experiment. The Hard Rescattering and the Quark-Gluon string models are in fair agreement with the results.

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    schulte2002
  • 20.
    Sundberg, Christel
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Persson, Mats
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Ehliar, Andreas
    Prismat Sensors AB, SE-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sjolin, Martin
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Wikner, Jacob
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Circuits and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Danielsson, Mats
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Increased count-rate performance and dose efficiency for silicon photon-counting detectors for full-field CT using an ASIC with adjustable shaping time2019In: MEDICAL IMAGING 2019: PHYSICS OF MEDICAL IMAGING, SPIE-INT SOC OPTICAL ENGINEERING , 2019, Vol. 10948, article id 109481WConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photon-counting silicon strip detectors are attracting interest for use in next generation CT scanners. For silicon detectors, a low noise floor is necessary to obtain a good dose efficiency. A low noise floor can be achieved by having a filter with a long shaping time in the readout electronics. This also increases the pulse length, resulting in a long deadtime and thereby a degraded count-rate performance. However, as the flux typically varies greatly during a CT scan, a high count-rate capability is not required for all projection lines. It would therefore be desirable to use more than one shaping time within a single scan. To evaluate the potential benefit of using more than one shaping time, it is of interest to characterize the relation between the shaping time, the noise, and the resulting pulse shape. In this work we present noise and pulse shape measurements on a photon-counting detector with two different shaping times along with a complementary simulation model of the readout electronics. We show that increasing the shaping time from 28.1 ns to 39.4 ns decreases the noise and increases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with 6.5% at low count rates and we also present pulse shapes for each shaping time as measured at a synchrotron source. Our results demonstrate that the shaping time plays an important role in optimizing the dose efficiency in a photon-counting x-ray detector.

  • 21.
    Tsiledakis, Georgios
    et al.
    Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    Delbart, Alain
    Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    Desforge, Daniel
    Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    Giomataris, Ioanis
    Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    Papaevangelou, Thomas
    Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    Hall-Wilton, Richard
    ESS ERIC, Sweden.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. ESS ERIC, Sweden.
    Robinson, Linda
    ESS ERIC, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. ESS ERIC, Sweden; IHI Ionbond AG, Switzerland.
    Menelle, Alain
    Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    Pomorski, Michal
    Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    Large High-Efficiency Thermal Neutron Detectors Based on the Micromegas Technology2018In: UNIVERSE, ISSN 2218-1997, Vol. 4, no 12, article id 134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the so-called He-3 shortage crisis, many detection techniques for thermal neutrons are currently based on alternative converters. There are several possible ways of increasing the detection efficiency for thermal neutrons using the solid neutron-to-charge converters B-10 or (B4C)-B-10. Here, we present an investigation of the Micromegas technology The micro-pattern gaseous detector Micromegas was developed in the past years at Saclay and is now used in a wide variety of neutron experiments due to its combination of high accuracy, high rate capability, excellent timing properties, and robustness. A large high-efficiency Micromegas-based neutron detector is proposed for thermal neutron detection, containing several layers of (B4C)-B-10 coatings that are mounted inside the gas volume. The principle and the fabrication of a single detector unit prototype with overall dimension of similar to 15 x 15 cm(2) and its possibility to modify the number of B-10 or (B4C)-B-10 neutron converter layers are described. We also report results from measurements that are verified by simulations, demonstrating that typically five (B4C)-B-10 layers of 1-2 mu m thickness would lead to a detection efficiency of 20% for thermal neutrons and a spatial resolution of sub-mm. The high potential of this novel technique is given by the design being easily adapted to large sizes by constructing a mosaic of several such detector units, resulting in a large area coverage and high detection efficiencies. An alternative way of achieving this is to use a multi-layered Micromegas that is equipped with two-side (B4C)-B-10-coated gas electron multiplier (GEM)-type meshes, resulting in a robust and large surface detector. Another innovative and very promising concept for cost-effective, high-efficiency, large-scale neutron detectors is by stacking (B4C)-B-10-coated microbulk Micromegas. A prototype was designed and built, and the tests so far look very encouraging.

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  • 22.
    Wallin, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Transients and Coil Displacement in Accelerator Magnets2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    For a long time voltage spikes has been seen in measurement data from accelerator magnets during current ramps. These has been believed to be caused by movements, but has never before been studied in depth. The purpose of this thesis is therefore to prove, or disprove, that these events are caused by movements and to analyse what kind of displacements that actually occur. Measurement data from coil voltage, magnetic pick-up coils and current during transients has been acquired and analysed for the Nb3Sn-dipole magnets FRESCA2 and 11T models—named MBHSP107 and MBHSP109. The measurement data is compared to movement simulations that was done with the ROXIE-program, which is used to calculate mutual inductance change for a number of different movement types. The study strongly suggests that the transients are caused by movements, and also indicates that the maximal length of a single slip-stick motion can be up to around 10 micrometers, mostly in the direction of the magnet’s internal forces. The study has proven that transients in measurement data occur due to coil movements, and that these can be quantified—a discovery that can possibly affect future construction and design of accelerator magnets.

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  • 23.
    Wijesooriya, K
    et al.
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA.
    Afanasev, A
    North Carolina Central University, Durham, USA.
    Amarian, M
    INFN, Sezione Sanitá and Istituto Superiore di Sanitá, Laboratorio di Fisica, Rome, Italy.
    Aniol, K
    California State University, Los Angeles, USA.
    Becher, S
    University of Georgia, Athens, USA.
    Benslama, K
    University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
    Bimbot, L
    Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Orsay, France.
    Bosted, P
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA.
    Brash, E
    University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
    Calarco, J
    University of New Hampshire, Durham, USA.
    Chai, Z
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA.
    Chang, C C
    University of Maryland, College Park, USA.
    Chang, T
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA.
    Chen, J P
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Choi, S
    Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
    Chudakov, E
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Churchwell, S
    Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
    Crovelli, D
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Dieterich, S
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Dumalski, S
    University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
    Dutta, D
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA.
    Epstein, M
    California State University, Los Angeles, USA.
    Fissum, K
    University of Lund, Sweden.
    Fox, B
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Frullani, S
    INFN, Sezione Sanitá and Istituto Superiore di Sanitá, Laboratorio di Fisica, Rome, Italy.
    Gao, H
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA.
    Gao, J
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA.
    Garibaldi, F
    INFN, Sezione Sanitá and Istituto Superiore di Sanitá, Laboratorio di Fisica, Rome, Italy.
    Gayou, O
    Université Blaise Pascal/IN2P3, Aubière, France.
    Gilman, R
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Glamazdin, S
    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine.
    Glashausser, C
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Gomez, J
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Gorbenko, V
    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine.
    Hansen, O
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Holt, R J
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA.
    Hovdebo, J
    University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada .
    Huber, G M
    University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada .
    De Jager, C W
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Jiang, X
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Jones, C
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA.
    Jones, M K
    Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, USA.
    Kelly, J
    University of Maryland, College Park, USA.
    Kinney, E
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Kooijman, E
    Kent State University, Ohio, USA.
    Kumbartzki, G
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Kuss, M
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    LeRose, J
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Liang, M
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Lindgren, R
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA.
    Liyanage, N
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Malov, S
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Margaziotis, D J
    California State University, Los Angeles, USA.
    Markowitz, P
    Florida International University, Miami, USA.
    McCormick, K
    DAPNIA, Saclay, France.
    Meekins, D
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA.
    Meziani, Z E
    Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
    Michaels, R
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Mitchell, J
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Morand, L
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Perdrisat, C F
    College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, USA.
    Pomatsalyuk, R
    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine.
    Punjabi, V
    Norfolk State University, Virginia, USA.
    Ransome, R D
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Roche, R
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA.
    Rvachev, M
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA.
    Saha, A
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Sarty, A
    Florida State University, Tallahassee,USA.
    Schulte, E C
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA.
    Simon, Daniel
    University of Georgia, Athens, USA.
    Strauch, S
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, USA.
    Suleiman, R
    Kent State University, Ohio, USA.
    Todor, L
    Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, USA.
    Ulmer, P E
    Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, USA.
    Urciuoli, G M
    INFN, Sezione Sanitá and Istituto Superiore di Sanitá, Laboratorio di Fisica, Rome, Italy.
    Wojtsekhowski, B
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, USA.
    Xiong, F
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA.
    Xu, W
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA.
    Polarization measurements in high-energy deuteron photodisintegration2001In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 86, no 14, p. 2975-2979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present measurements of the recoil proton polarization for the d(γ⃗,p⃗)n reaction at θc.m. = 90° for photon energies up to 2.4 GeV. These are the first data in this reaction for polarization transfer with circularly polarized photons. The induced polarization py vanishes above 1 GeV, contrary to meson-baryon model expectations, in which resonances lead to large polarizations. However, the polarization transfer Cx does not vanish above 1 GeV, inconsistent with hadron helicity conservation. Thus, we show that the scaling behavior observed in the d(γ,p)ncross sections is not a result of perturbative QCD. These data should provide important tests of new nonperturbative calculations in the intermediate energy regime.

    Download full text (pdf)
    wijesooriya2001
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