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  • 1.
    Aguilar-Calvo, Patricia
    et al.
    University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Xiao, Xiangzhu
    Case Western Reserve University, OH 44116 USA.
    Bett, Cyrus
    University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; US FDA, MD USA.
    Erana, Hasier
    CIC bioGUNE, Spain.
    Soldau, Katrin
    University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Castilla, Joaquin
    University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; CIC bioGUNE, Spain; Ikerbasque, Spain.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Surewicz, Witold K.
    Case Western Reserve University, OH 44116 USA.
    Sigurdson, Christina J.
    University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; University of Calif Davis, CA 95616 USA.
    Post-translational modifications in PrP expand the conformational diversity of prions in vivo2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 43295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Misfolded prion protein aggregates (PrPSc) show remarkable structural diversity and are associated with highly variable disease phenotypes. Similarly, other proteins, including amyloid-beta, tau, alpha-synuclein, and serum amyloid A, misfold into distinct conformers linked to different clinical diseases through poorly understood mechanisms. Here we use mice expressing glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)anchorless prion protein, PrPC, together with hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HXMS) and a battery of biochemical and biophysical tools to investigate how posttranslational modifications impact the aggregated prion protein properties and disease phenotype. Four GPI-anchorless prion strains caused a nearly identical clinical and pathological disease phenotype, yet maintained their structural diversity in the anchorless state. HXMS studies revealed that GPIanchorless PrPSc is characterized by substantially higher protection against hydrogen/deuterium exchange in the C-terminal region near the N-glycan sites, suggesting this region had become more ordered in the anchorless state. For one strain, passage of GPI-anchorless prions into wild type mice led to the emergence of a novel strain with a unique biochemical and phenotypic signature. For the new strain, histidine hydrogen-deuterium mass spectrometry revealed altered packing arrangements of beta-sheets that encompass residues 139 and 186 of PrPSc. These findings show how variation in posttranslational modifications may explain the emergence of new protein conformations in vivo and also provide a basis for understanding how the misfolded protein structure impacts the disease.

  • 2.
    Ahlsén, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology.
    The Effects of Abiotic Stress on Alternative Splicing in Non-specific Lipid Transfer Proteins in Marchantia polymorpha2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10,5 credits / 16 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Due to global warming, our planet will experience more extreme weather conditions. Plants can protect themselves against these abiotic stress conditions with their stress response, which includes alternative splicing of certain genes. Alternative splicing is a post-transcriptional process where a single gene gives rise to different mRNAs, which in turn produces different proteins. In plants, this is usually done by intron retention. One type of protein that may be involved in this stress response are the non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). Indeed, evidence of intron retention has been found in the LTP genes in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, called MpLTPd. To investigate whether this alternative splicing is caused by abiotic stress or not, I subjected the moss to two different types of stress trials, drought and cold, and compared the general expression of the intron in MpLTPd2 and MpLTPd3 from the stressed samples to samples from a moss grown under normal conditions. I found that the expression of the intron did change in the stressed moss, but none of the differences were significant. This suggests that alterative splicing in MpLTPd2 and MpLTPd3 is not caused by cold and drought and that the intron-containing protein plays no role in the protection of M. polymorpha against abiotic stress.

  • 3.
    Alberti, Esteban
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, International Center of Neurological Restoration, CIREN, Havana, Cuba..
    Los, Marek Jan
    Interfaculty Institute for Biochemistry, University of Tübingen, Germany; BioApplications Enterprises, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
    Garcia, Rocio
    Department of Neurobiology, International Center of Neurological Restoration, CIREN, Havana, Cuba..
    Fraga, JL
    Department of Neurobiology, International Center of Neurological Restoration, CIREN, Havana, Cuba..
    Serrano, T.
    Department of Neurobiology, International Center of Neurological Restoration, CIREN, Havana, Cuba..
    Hernandez, E.
    Department of Neurobiology, International Center of Neurological Restoration, CIREN, Havana, Cuba..
    Klonisch, Thomas
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Sciences, and Manitoba Institute of Child Health, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Macías, R.
    Department of Neurobiology, International Center of Neurological Restoration, CIREN, Havana, Cuba..
    Martinez, L.
    Department of Neurobiology, International Center of Neurological Restoration, CIREN, Havana, Cuba..
    Castillo, L.
    Department of Neurobiology, International Center of Neurological Restoration, CIREN, Havana, Cuba..
    de la Cuétara, K.
    Department of Neurobiology, International Center of Neurological Restoration, CIREN, Havana, Cuba.
    Prolonged Survival and expression of neural markers by bone marrow-derived stem cells transplanted into brain lesions2009In: Medical Science Monitor, ISSN 1234-1010, E-ISSN 1643-3750, Vol. 15, no 2, p. BR47-BR54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Bone marrow-derived stem cell transplantation is a potentially viable therapeutic option for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. MATERIAL/METHODS: We have isolated bone marrow stem cells by standard method. We then evaluated the survival of rats' bone marrow mononuclear cells implanted in rats' brain. The cells were extracted from rats' femurs, and marked for monitoring purposes by adenoviral transduction with Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Labeled cells were implanted within the area of rats' striatum lesions that were induced a month earlier employing quinolinic acid-based method. The implants were phenotyped by monitoring CD34; CD38; CD45 and CD90 expression. Bone marrow stromal cells were extracted from rats' femurs and cultivated until monolayer bone marrow stromal cells were obtained. The ability of bone marrow stromal cells to express NGF and GDNF was evaluated by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Implanted cells survived for at least one month after transplantation and dispersed from the area of injection towards corpus callosum and brain cortex. Interestingly, passaged rat bone marrow stromal cells expressed NGF and GDNF mRNA. CONCLUSIONS: The bone marrow cells could be successfully transplanted to the brain either for the purpose of trans-differentiation, or for the expression of desired growth factors.

  • 4.
    Aleckovic, Ehlimana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Andersson, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Chamoun, Sherley
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Einarsson, Ellen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Ekstedt, Ebba
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Eriksen, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Madan-Andersson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Method Development for Determining the Stability of Heat Stable Proteins Combined with Biophysical Characterization of Human Calmodulin and the Disease Associated Variant D130G2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10,5 credits / 16 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Calmodulin is a highly conserved calcium ion binding protein expressed in all eukaryotic species. The 149 amino acid residues in the primary structure are organized in seven α helices with the highly flexible central α helix connecting the two non-cooperative domains of calmodulin. Each domain contains two EF-hand motifs to which calcium ions bind in a cooperative manner, hence the binding of four calcium ions saturate one calmodulin molecule. In the cardiovascular area calmodulin is involved in the activation of cardiac muscle contraction, and mutations that arise in the genetic sequence of the protein often have severe consequences. One such consequential mutation that can arise brings about the replacement of the highly conserved aspartic acid with glycine at position 130 in the amino acid sequence. In this research, the thermal and chemical stability within the C domain of the D130G variant of human calmodulin was investigated using a new method only requiring circular dichroism spectroscopic measurements. Affinity studies within the C domain of the D130G variant of human calmodulin were performed using fluorescence spectroscopy, and the ligands chosen for this purpose were trifluoperazine and p- HTMI. All analytical experiments were performed with the C domain of wild type human calmodulin as a reference. From the new method, it was concluded that the C domain of the D130G variant of human calmodulin has a slightly decreased stability in terms of Tm and Cm values compared to the C domain of wild type human calmodulin. The affinity analyses indicated that neither trifluoperazine nor p-HTMI discriminates between the C domain of the D130G variant of human calmodulin and the C domain of wild type human calmodulin in terms of dissociation constants. The pivotal outcome from this research is that the new method is applicable for determination of the stability parameters Tm and Cm of heat stable proteins. 

  • 5.
    Alexander, Helen K.
    et al.
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, and Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Univ. Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Booy, Evan P.
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, and Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Univ. Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Xiao, Wenyan
    Cancer Care Manitoba, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba,.
    Ezzati, Peyman
    Cancer Care Manitoba, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba,.
    Baust, Heinrich
    Cancer Care Manitoba, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba,.
    Los, Marek Jan
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Selected technologies to control genes and their products for experimental and clinical purposes2007In: Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis, ISSN 0004-069X, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 139-149Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "On-demand" regulation of gene expression is a powerful tool to elucidate the functions of proteins and biologically-active RNAs. We describe here three different approaches to the regulation of expression or activity of genes or proteins. Promoter-based regulation of gene expression was among the most rapidly developing techniques in the 1980s and 1990s. Here we provide basic information and also some characteristics of the metallothionein-promoter-based system, the tet-off system, Muristerone-A-regulated expression through the ecdysone response element, RheoSwitch (R), coumermycin/novobiocin-regulated gene expression, chemical dimerizer-based promoter activation systems, the "Dual Drug Control" system, "constitutive androstane receptor"-based regulation of gene expression, and RU486/mifepristone-driven regulation of promoter activity. A large part of the review concentrates on the principles and usage of various RNA interference techniques (RNAi: siRNA, shRNA, and miRNA-based methods). Finally, the last part of the review deals with historically the oldest, but still widely used, methods of temperature-dependent regulation of enzymatic activity or protein stability (temperature-sensitive mutants). Due to space limitations we do not describe in detail but just mention the tet-regulated systems and also fusion-protein-based regulation of protein activity, such as estrogen-receptor fusion proteins. The information provided below is aimed to assist researchers in choosing the most appropriate method for the planned development of experimental systems with regulated expression or activity of studied proteins.

  • 6.
    Alexander, Helen K.
    et al.
    Cancer Care Manitoba, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba.
    Booy, Evan P.
    Cancer Care Manitoba, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada .
    Xiao, Wenyan
    Cancer Care Manitoba, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba.
    Ezzati, Peyman
    Cancer Care Manitoba, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba.
    Baust, Heinrich
    Department of Radiooncology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany .
    Los, Marek Jan
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba; Manitoba Institute of Child Health; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics; Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada, .
    Selected technologies to control genes and their products for experimental and clinical purposes2007In: Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis, ISSN 0004-069X, E-ISSN 1661-4917, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 139-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "On-demand" regulation of gene expression is a powerful tool to elucidate the functions of proteins and biologically-active RNAs. We describe here three different approaches to the regulation of expression or activity of genes or proteins. Promoter-based regulation of gene expression was among the most rapidly developing techniques in the 1980s and 1990s. Here we provide basic information and also some characteristics of the metallothionein-promoter-based system, the tet-off system, Muristerone-A-regulated expression through the ecdysone response element, RheoSwitch (R), coumermycin/novobiocin-regulated gene expression, chemical dimerizer-based promoter activation systems, the "Dual Drug Control" system, "constitutive androstane receptor"-based regulation of gene expression, and RU486/mifepristone-driven regulation of promoter activity. A large part of the review concentrates on the principles and usage of various RNA interference techniques (RNAi: siRNA, shRNA, and miRNA-based methods). Finally, the last part of the review deals with historically the oldest, but still widely used, methods of temperature-dependent regulation of enzymatic activity or protein stability (temperature-sensitive mutants). Due to space limitations we do not describe in detail but just mention the tet-regulated systems and also fusion-protein-based regulation of protein activity, such as estrogen-receptor fusion proteins. The information provided below is aimed to assist researchers in choosing the most appropriate method for the planned development of experimental systems with regulated expression or activity of studied proteins.

  • 7.
    Alexandre, Campos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Apraiz, Itzaso
    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    da Fonseca, Rute R
    The Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Shotgun analysis of the marine mussel Mytilus edulis hemolymph proteome and mapping the innate immunity elements.2015In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 15, no 23-24, p. 4021-4029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The marine mussel innate immunity provides protection to pathogen invasion and inflammation.In this regard, the mussel hemolymph takes a main role in the animal innate response.Despite the importance of this body fluid in determining the physiological condition of theanimal, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular and humoralresponses. In this work, we have applied aMS (nano-LC-MS/MS) strategy integrating genomicand transcriptomic data with the aim to: (i) identify the main protein functional groups thatcharacterize hemolymph and (ii) to map the elements of innate immunity in the marine musselMytilus edulis hemolymph proteome. After sample analysis and first protein identificationbased onMS/MS data comparison, proteins with unknown functions were annotated with blastusing public database (nrNCBI) information. Overall 595 hemolymph proteins were identifiedwith high confidence and annotated. These proteins encompass primary cellular metabolicprocesses: energy production and metabolism of biomolecules, as well as processes related tooxidative stress defence, xenobiotic detoxification, drug metabolism, and immune response.A group of proteins was identified with putative immune effector, receptor, and signalingfunctions in M. edulis. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001951(http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001951).

  • 8.
    Alfirevic, Ana
    et al.
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    Gonzalez-Galarza, Faviel
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    Bell, Catherine
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    Martinsson, Klara
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    Platt, Vivien
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    Bretland, Giovanna
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    Evely, Jane
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    Lichtenfels, Maike
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    Cederbrant, Karin
    Safety Assessment, AstraZeneca, Gartuna, Södertälje, Sweden.
    French, Neil
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    Naisbitt, Dean
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    Park, B Kevin
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    Jones, Andrew R
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    Pirmohamed, Munir
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    In silico analysis of HLA associations with drug-induced liver injury: use of a HLA-genotyped DNA archive from healthy volunteers2012In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 4, no 6, article id 51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is one of the most common adverse reactions leading to product withdrawal post-marketing. Recently, genome-wide association studies have identified a number of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles associated with DILI; however, the cellular and chemical mechanisms are not fully understood.

    METHODS: To study these mechanisms, we established an HLA-typed cell archive from 400 healthy volunteers. In addition, we utilized HLA genotype data from more than four million individuals from publicly accessible repositories such as the Allele Frequency Net Database, Major Histocompatibility Complex Database and Immune Epitope Database to study the HLA alleles associated with DILI. We utilized novel in silico strategies to examine HLA haplotype relationships among the alleles associated with DILI by using bioinformatics tools such as NetMHCpan, PyPop, GraphViz, PHYLIP and TreeView.

    RESULTS: We demonstrated that many of the alleles that have been associated with liver injury induced by structurally diverse drugs (flucloxacillin, co-amoxiclav, ximelagatran, lapatinib, lumiracoxib) reside on common HLA haplotypes, which were present in populations of diverse ethnicity.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our bioinformatic analysis indicates that there may be a connection between the different HLA alleles associated with DILI caused by therapeutically and structurally different drugs, possibly through peptide binding of one of the HLA alleles that defines the causal haplotype. Further functional work, together with next-generation sequencing techniques, will be needed to define the causal alleles associated with DILI.

  • 9.
    Almstedt, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Protein Misfolding in Human Diseases2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are several diseases well known that are due to aberrant protein folding. These types of diseases can be divided into three main categories:

    1. Loss-of-function diseases
    2. Gain-of-toxic-function diseases
    3. Infectious misfolding diseases

     

    Most loss-of-function diseases are caused by aberrant folding of important proteins. These proteins often misfold due to inherited mutations. The rare disease marble brain disease (MBD) also known as carbonic anhydrase II deficiency syndrome (CADS) can manifest in carriers of point mutations in the human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) gene. We have over the past 10-15 years studied the folding, misfolding and aggregation of the enzyme human carbonic anhydrase II. In summary our HCA II folding studies have shown that the protein folds via an intermediate of molten-globule type, which lacks enzyme activity and the molten globule state of HCA II is prone to aggregation. One mutation associated with MBD entails the His107Tyr (H107Y) substitution. We have demonstrated that the H107Y mutation is a remarkably destabilizing mutation influencing the folding behavior of HCA II. A mutational survey of position H107 and a neighboring conserved position E117 has been performed entailing the mutants H107A, H107F, H107N, E117A and the double mutants H107A/E117A and H107N/E117A. All mutants were severely destabilized versus GuHCl and heat denaturation. Thermal denaturation and GuHCl phase diagram and ANS analyses showed that the mutants shifted HCA II towards populating ensembles of intermediates of molten globule type under physiological conditions. The enormously destabilizing effects of the H107Y mutation is not due to loss of specific interactions of H107 with residue E117, instead it is caused by long range sterical destabilizing effects of the bulky tyrosine residue. We also showed that the folding equilibrium can be shifted towards the native state by binding of the small-molecule drug acetazolamide, and we present a small molecule inhibitor assessment with select sulfonamide inhibitors of varying potency to investigate the effectiveness of these molecules to inhibit the misfolding of HCA II H107Y. We also demonstrate that high concentration of the activator compound L-His increases the enzyme activity of the mutant but without stabilizing the folded protein.

     

    The infectious misfolding diseases is the smallest group of misfolding diseases. The only protein known to have the ability to be infectious is the prion protein. The human prion diseases Kuru, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob are characterized by depositions of amyloid plaque from misfolded prion protein (HuPrP) in various regions of the brain depending on disease. Amyloidogenesis of HuPrP is hence strongly correlated with prion disease.

    Our results show that amyloid formation of recHuPrP90-231 can be achieved starting from the native protein under gentle conditions without addition of denaturant or altered pH. The process is efficiently catalyzed by addition of preformed recHuPrP90-231 amyloid seeds. It is plausible that amyloid seeding reflect the mechanism of transmissibility of prion diseases. Elucidating the mechanism of PrP amyloidogenesis is therefore of interest for strategic prevention of prion infection.

    List of papers
    1. Unfolding a folding disease: folding, misfolding and aggregation of the marble brain syndrome-associated mutant H107Y of human carbonic anhydrase II
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unfolding a folding disease: folding, misfolding and aggregation of the marble brain syndrome-associated mutant H107Y of human carbonic anhydrase II
    Show others...
    2004 (English)In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 342, no 2, p. 619-633Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Most loss-of-function diseases are caused by aberrant folding of important proteins. These proteins often misfold due to mutations. The disease marble brain syndrome (MBS), known also as carbonic anhydrase II deficiency syndrome (CADS), can manifest in carriers of point mutations in the human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) gene. One mutation associated with MBS entails the His107Tyr substitution. Here, we demonstrate that this mutation is a remarkably destabilizing folding mutation. The loss-of-function is clearly a folding defect, since the mutant shows 64% of CO2 hydration activity compared to that of the wild-type at low temperature where the mutant is folded. On the contrary, its stability towards thermal and guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) denaturation is highly compromised. Using activity assays, CD, fluorescence, NMR, cross-linking, aggregation measurements and molecular modeling, we have mapped the properties of this remarkable mutant. Loss of enzymatic activity had a midpoint temperature of denaturation (Tm) of 16 °C for the mutant compared to 55 °C for the wild-type protein. GuHCl-denaturation (at 4 °C) showed that the native state of the mutant was destabilized by 9.2 kcal/mol. The mutant unfolds through at least two equilibrium intermediates; one novel intermediate that we have termed the molten globule light state and, after further denaturation, the classical molten globule state is populated. Under physiological conditions (neutral pH; 37 °C), the His107Tyr mutant will populate the molten globule light state, likely due to novel interactions between Tyr107 and the surroundings of the critical residue Ser29 that destabilize the native conformation. This intermediate binds the hydrophobic dye 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS) but not as strong as the molten globule state, and near-UV CD reveals the presence of significant tertiary structure. Notably, this intermediate is not as prone to aggregation as the classical molten globule. As a proof of concept for an intervention strategy with small molecules, we showed that binding of the CA inhibitor acetazolamide increases the stability of the native state of the mutant by 2.9 kcal/mol in accordance with its strong affinity. Acetazolamide shifts the Tm to 34 °C that protects from misfolding and will enable a substantial fraction of the enzyme pool to survive physiological conditions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford: Elsevier, 2004
    Keywords
    Misfolding, loss-of-function, aggregation, molten globule, misfolding inhibitor
    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-21072 (URN)10.1016/j.jmb.2004.07.024 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-09-28 Created: 2009-09-28 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
    2. Thermodynamic interrogation of a folding disease. Mutant mapping of position 107 in human carbonic anhydrase II linked to marble brain disease.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thermodynamic interrogation of a folding disease. Mutant mapping of position 107 in human carbonic anhydrase II linked to marble brain disease.
    2008 (English)In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 1288-1298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Marble brain disease (MBD) also known as Guibaud−Vainsel syndrome is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) gene. HCA II is a 259 amino acid single domain enzyme and is dominated by a 10-stranded β-sheet. One mutation associated with MBD entails the H107Y substitution where H107 is a highly conserved residue in the carbonic anhydrase protein family. We have previously demonstrated that the H107Y mutation is a remarkably destabilizing folding mutation [Almstedt et al. (2004) J. Mol. Biol. 342, 619−633]. Here, the exceptional destabilization by the H107Y mutation has been further investigated. A mutational survey of position H107 and a neighboring conserved position E117 has been performed entailing the mutants H107A, H107F, H107N, E117A and the double mutants H107A/E117A and H107N/E117A. All mutants were severely destabilized versus GuHCl and heat denaturation. Thermal denaturation and GuHCl phase diagram and ANS analyses showed that the mutants shifted HCA II toward populating ensembles of intermediates of molten globule type under physiological conditions. The native state stability of the mutants was in the following order:  wt > H107N > E117A > H107A > H107F > H107Y > H107N/E117A > H107A/E117A. In conclusion:  (i) H107N is least destabilizing likely due to compensatory H-bonding ability of the introduced Asn residue. (ii) Double mutant cycles surprisingly reveal additive destabilization of H107N and E117A showing that H107 and E117 are independently stabilizing the folded protein. (iii) H107Y and H107F are exceptionally destabilizing due to bulkiness of the side chains whereas H107A is more accommodating, indicating long-range destabilizing effects of the natural pathogenic H107Y mutation.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Washington: ACS, 2008
    Keywords
    mutant mapping, carbonic anhydrase, misfolding, loss-of-function, molten globule
    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-21056 (URN)10.1021/bi701720p (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-09-28 Created: 2009-09-28 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
    3. Small-Molecule Suppression of Misfolding of Mutated Human Carbonic Anhydrase II Linked to Marble Brain Disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Small-Molecule Suppression of Misfolding of Mutated Human Carbonic Anhydrase II Linked to Marble Brain Disease
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 48, no 23, p. 5358-5364Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Carbonic anhydrase II deficiency syndrome or Marble brain disease (MBD) is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) gene. Here we report a small-molecule stabilization study of the exceptionally destabilized HCA II mutant H107Y employing inhibitors based on p-aminobenzoyisulfonamide compounds and 1,3,4-thiadiazolylsulfonamides as well as amino acid activators. Protein stability assays showed a significant stabilization by the aromatic sulfonamide inhibitors when present at 10 mu M concentration, providing shifts of the midpoint of thermal denaturation between 10 degrees C and 16 degrees C and increasing the free energies of denaturation 0.5-3.0 kcal/mol as deduced from GuHCl denaturation. This study could be used as a starting point for the design of small-molecule folding modulators and possibly autoactivatable molecules for suppression of misfolding of destabilized HCA II mutants.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-19548 (URN)10.1021/bi900128e (DOI)
    Note
    On the day of the defence date tha status of this articel was In Manuscript.Available from: 2009-06-29 Created: 2009-06-26 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
    4. Amyloid fibrils of human prion protein are spun and woven from morphologically disordered aggregates
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amyloid fibrils of human prion protein are spun and woven from morphologically disordered aggregates
    2009 (English)In: Prion, ISSN 1933-6896, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 224-235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Propagation and infectivity of prions in human prionopathies are likely associated with conversion of the mainly α-helical human prion protein, HuPrP, into an aggregated form with amyloid-like properties. Previous reports on efficient conversion of recombinant HuPrP have used mild to harsh denaturing conditions to generate amyloid fibrils in vitro. Herein we report on the in vitro conversion of four forms of truncated HuPrP (sequences 90-231 and 121-231 with and without an N-terminal hexa histidine tag) into amyloid-like fibrils within a few hours by using a protocol (phosphate buffered saline solutions at neutral pH with intense agitation) close to physiological conditions. The conversion process monitored by thioflavin T, ThT, revealed a three stage process with lag, growth and equilibrium phases. Seeding with preformed fibrils shortened the lag phase demonstrating the classic nucleated polymerization mechanism for the reaction. Interestingly, comparing thioflavin T kinetics with solubility and turbidity kinetics it was found that the protein initially formed non-thioflavionophilic, morphologically disordered aggregates that over time matured into amyloid fibrils. By transmission electron microscopy and by fluorescence microscopy of aggregates stained with luminescent conjugated polythiophenes (LCPs); we demonstrated that HuPrP undergoes a conformational conversion where spun and woven fibrils protruded from morphologically disordered aggregates. The initial aggregation functioned as a kinetic trap that decelerated nucleation into a fibrillation competent nucleus, but at the same time without aggregation there was no onset of amyloid fibril formation. The agitation, which was necessary for fibril formation to be induced, transiently exposes the protein to the air-water interface suggests a hitherto largely unexplored denaturing environment for prion conversion.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Austin: Landes Bioscience Journals, 2009
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-21064 (URN)10.4161/pri.3.4.10112 (DOI)000280061100009 ()
    Available from: 2009-09-28 Created: 2009-09-28 Last updated: 2018-04-25
  • 10.
    Almstedt, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jonsson, Bengt-Harald
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Unfolding a folding disease: folding, misfolding and aggregation of the marble brain syndrome-associated mutant H107Y of human carbonic anhydrase II2004In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 342, no 2, p. 619-633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most loss-of-function diseases are caused by aberrant folding of important proteins. These proteins often misfold due to mutations. The disease marble brain syndrome (MBS), known also as carbonic anhydrase II deficiency syndrome (CADS), can manifest in carriers of point mutations in the human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) gene. One mutation associated with MBS entails the His107Tyr substitution. Here, we demonstrate that this mutation is a remarkably destabilizing folding mutation. The loss-of-function is clearly a folding defect, since the mutant shows 64% of CO2 hydration activity compared to that of the wild-type at low temperature where the mutant is folded. On the contrary, its stability towards thermal and guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) denaturation is highly compromised. Using activity assays, CD, fluorescence, NMR, cross-linking, aggregation measurements and molecular modeling, we have mapped the properties of this remarkable mutant. Loss of enzymatic activity had a midpoint temperature of denaturation (Tm) of 16 °C for the mutant compared to 55 °C for the wild-type protein. GuHCl-denaturation (at 4 °C) showed that the native state of the mutant was destabilized by 9.2 kcal/mol. The mutant unfolds through at least two equilibrium intermediates; one novel intermediate that we have termed the molten globule light state and, after further denaturation, the classical molten globule state is populated. Under physiological conditions (neutral pH; 37 °C), the His107Tyr mutant will populate the molten globule light state, likely due to novel interactions between Tyr107 and the surroundings of the critical residue Ser29 that destabilize the native conformation. This intermediate binds the hydrophobic dye 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS) but not as strong as the molten globule state, and near-UV CD reveals the presence of significant tertiary structure. Notably, this intermediate is not as prone to aggregation as the classical molten globule. As a proof of concept for an intervention strategy with small molecules, we showed that binding of the CA inhibitor acetazolamide increases the stability of the native state of the mutant by 2.9 kcal/mol in accordance with its strong affinity. Acetazolamide shifts the Tm to 34 °C that protects from misfolding and will enable a substantial fraction of the enzyme pool to survive physiological conditions.

  • 11.
    Almstedt, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mårtensson, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Thermodynamic interrogation of a folding disease. Mutant mapping of position 107 in human carbonic anhydrase II linked to marble brain disease.2008In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 1288-1298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marble brain disease (MBD) also known as Guibaud−Vainsel syndrome is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) gene. HCA II is a 259 amino acid single domain enzyme and is dominated by a 10-stranded β-sheet. One mutation associated with MBD entails the H107Y substitution where H107 is a highly conserved residue in the carbonic anhydrase protein family. We have previously demonstrated that the H107Y mutation is a remarkably destabilizing folding mutation [Almstedt et al. (2004) J. Mol. Biol. 342, 619−633]. Here, the exceptional destabilization by the H107Y mutation has been further investigated. A mutational survey of position H107 and a neighboring conserved position E117 has been performed entailing the mutants H107A, H107F, H107N, E117A and the double mutants H107A/E117A and H107N/E117A. All mutants were severely destabilized versus GuHCl and heat denaturation. Thermal denaturation and GuHCl phase diagram and ANS analyses showed that the mutants shifted HCA II toward populating ensembles of intermediates of molten globule type under physiological conditions. The native state stability of the mutants was in the following order:  wt > H107N > E117A > H107A > H107F > H107Y > H107N/E117A > H107A/E117A. In conclusion:  (i) H107N is least destabilizing likely due to compensatory H-bonding ability of the introduced Asn residue. (ii) Double mutant cycles surprisingly reveal additive destabilization of H107N and E117A showing that H107 and E117 are independently stabilizing the folded protein. (iii) H107Y and H107F are exceptionally destabilizing due to bulkiness of the side chains whereas H107A is more accommodating, indicating long-range destabilizing effects of the natural pathogenic H107Y mutation.

  • 12.
    Anandapadamanaban, Madhanagopal
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Structural insights into protein-protein interactions governing regulation in transcription initiation and ubiquitination2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtually every aspect of the cellular processes in eukaryotes requires that the interactions between protein molecules are well coordinated in different regulatory pathways. Any protein dysfunction involved in these regulatory pathways might lead to various pathological conditions. Understanding the structural and functional peculiarities of these proteins molecular machineries will help in formulating structure-based drug design.

    The first regulatory process studied here is the RNA polymerase-II mediated transcription of the eukaryotic protein-coding genes to produce mRNAs. This process requires the formation of the ‘transcription initiation’ by the assembly of Pre-Initiation Complex (PIC) formation at a core promoter region. Regulation at this initiation level is a key mechanism for the control of gene expression that governs cellular growth and differentiation. The transcription Factor IID (TFIID) is a conserved multiprotein general transcription factor with an essential role in  nucleating the PIC formation, composed of TATA Binding Protein (TBP) and about 14 TBP Associated Factors (TAFs). The here presented crystal structure (1.97Å) of TBP bound to TAND1 and TAND2 domains from TAF1 reveals a detailed molecular pattern of interactions involving both transcriptionally activating and repressing regions in TBP, thereby uncovering central principles for anchoring of TBP-binding motifs. Together with NMR and cellular analysis, this work provides the structural basis of competitive binding with TFIIA to modulate TBP in promoter recognition.

    In eukaryotes, another fundamental mechanism in the regulation of cellular physiology is the posttranslational modification of substrate proteins by ubiquitin, termed ‘ubiquitination’. Important actors in this mechanism are the ubiquitin-ligases (E3s) that culminate the transfer of ubiquitin to the substrate and govern the specificity of this system. One E3 ligase in particular, TRIM21, defines a subgroup of the Tripartite Motif (TRIM) family, which belongs to the major RING-type of E3 ubiquitin ligases, and plays an important role in pathogenesis of autoimmunity by mediating ubiquitination of transcription factors. The crystal structure (2.86Å) of the RING domain from TRIM21 in complex with UBE2E1, an E2 conjugating enzyme, together with the NMR and SAXS analysis as well as biochemical functional analysis, reveals the molecular basis for the dynamic binding interfaces. The TRIM21 mode of ubiquitin recognition and activation for catalytic transfer of ubiquitin can be modeled onto the entire TRIM family.

    Finally, we explored the concepts of conformational selection in proteins as a possible key component for protein-mediated transcriptional regulation. In this framework, MexR, a bacterial repressor of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump, and its mutant Arg21Trp were studied as an example for proteins presenting different conformations. The residue Arg21Trp mutation is clinically identified to cause of Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) by attenuated DNA binding, and leads to the overexpression of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump. With the crystal structure (2.19Å) of MexR mutant Arg21Trp, in combination with MD-simulations and SAXS for both wild-type and mutant, we could unravel the atomic details of the wild-type conformations consisting in subsets of populations of DNA bound and unbound forms. Remarkably, the mutant Arg21Trp stabilize the DNA unbound state and shifts MexR in a pre-existing equilibrium, from a repressed to a derepressed state.

    Taken together, these studies substantially broaden our knowledge at a molecular level in protein interactions that are involved in transcriptional regulation and ubiquitination, studied by a carefully selected combination of complementary structural methods spanning different resolutions and time scales.

    List of papers
    1. High-resolution structure of TBP with TAF1 reveals anchoring patterns in transcriptional regulation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>High-resolution structure of TBP with TAF1 reveals anchoring patterns in transcriptional regulation
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, ISSN 1545-9993, E-ISSN 1545-9985, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1008-+Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The general transcription factor TFIID provides a regulatory platform for transcription initiation. Here we present the crystal structure (1.97 angstrom) and NMR analysis of yeast TAF1 N-terminal domains TAND1 and TAND2 bound to yeast TBP, together with mutational data. We find that yeast TAF1-TAND1, which in itself acts as a transcriptional activator, binds TBPs concave DNA-binding surface by presenting similar anchor residues to TBP as does Mot1 but from a distinct structural scaffold. Furthermore, we show how TAF1-TAND2 uses an aromatic and acidic anchoring pattern to bind a conserved TBP surface groove traversing the basic helix region, and we find highly similar TBP-binding motifs also presented by the structurally distinct TFIIA, Mot1 and Brf1 proteins. Our identification of these anchoring patterns, which can be easily disrupted or enhanced, provides insight into the competitive multiprotein TBP interplay critical to transcriptional regulation.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 75 VARICK ST, 9TH FLR, NEW YORK, NY 10013-1917 USA, 2013
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96977 (URN)10.1038/nsmb.2611 (DOI)000322715300016 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council|621-2011-6028621-2012-5250621-2012-5136|VINNOVA|P32045-1|Swedish Cancer Foundation|11 0681|Swedish Child Cancer Foundation|PROJ09/092|Forum Scientium Award||Canadian Institutes for Health Research|MT-13611|Japan Society for the Promotion of Science|23370077|Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation||Canada Research Chair||

    Available from: 2013-09-05 Created: 2013-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Mutation-Induced Population Shift in the MexR Conformational Ensemble Disengages DNA Binding: A Novel Mechanism for MarR Family Derepression
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mutation-Induced Population Shift in the MexR Conformational Ensemble Disengages DNA Binding: A Novel Mechanism for MarR Family Derepression
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Structure, ISSN 0969-2126, E-ISSN 1878-4186, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 1311-1321Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    MexR is a repressor of the MexAB-OprM multidrug efflux pump operon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, where DNA-binding impairing mutations lead to multidrug resistance (MDR). Surprisingly, the crystal structure of an MDR-conferring MexR mutant R21W (2.19 angstrom) presented here is closely similar to wildtype MexR. However, our extended analysis, by molecular dynamics and small-angle X-ray scattering, reveals that the mutation stabilizes a ground state that is deficient of DNA binding and is shared by both mutant and wild-type MexR, whereas the DNA-binding state is only transiently reached by the more flexible wild-type MexR. This population shift in the conformational ensemble is effected by mutation-induced allosteric coupling of contact networks that are independent in the wild-type protein. We propose that the MexR-R21W mutant mimics derepression by small-molecule binding to MarR proteins, and that the described allosteric model based on population shifts may also apply to other MarR family members.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    CELL PRESS, 2016
    National Category
    Structural Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131908 (URN)10.1016/j.str.2016.06.008 (DOI)000383244600012 ()27427478 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|European Communitys Seventh Framework Program (FP7) under BioStruct-X [283570]; Swedish e-Science Research Center; Swedish Research Council; Tage Erlander Visiting Professor grant.

    The original status of this article was Manuscript and the titel was Population shift disengages DNA binding in a multidrug resistance MexR mutant.

    Available from: 2016-10-13 Created: 2016-10-11 Last updated: 2018-05-06
    3. Anti-Ro52 Autoantibodies from Patients with Sjögren's Syndrome Inhibit the Ro52 E3 Ligase Activity by Blocking the E3/E2 Interface
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti-Ro52 Autoantibodies from Patients with Sjögren's Syndrome Inhibit the Ro52 E3 Ligase Activity by Blocking the E3/E2 Interface
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 286, no 42, p. 36478-36491Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Ro52 (TRIM21) is an E3 ligase of the tripartite motif family that negatively regulates proinflammatory cytokine production by ubiquitinating transcription factors of the interferon regulatory factor family. Autoantibodies to Ro52 are present in patients with lupus and Sjögren's syndrome, but it is not known if these autoantibodies affect the function of Ro52. To address this question, the requirements for Ro52 E3 ligase activity were first analyzed in detail. Scanning a panel of E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, we found that UBE2D1–4 and UBE2E1–2 supported the E3 ligase activity of Ro52 and that the E3 ligase activity of Ro52 was dependent on its RING domain. We also found that the N-terminal extensions in the class III E2 enzymes affected their interaction with Ro52. Although the N-terminal extension in UBE2E3 made this E2 enzyme unable to function together with Ro52, the N-terminal extensions in UBE2E1 and UBE2E2 allowed for a functional interaction with Ro52. Anti-Ro52-positive patient sera and affinity-purified anti-RING domain autoantibodies inhibited the E3 activity of Ro52 in ubiquitination assays. Using NMR, limited proteolysis, ELISA, and Ro52 mutants, we mapped the interactions between Ro52, UBE2E1, and anti-Ro52 autoantibodies. We found that anti-Ro52 autoantibodies inhibited the E3 ligase activity of Ro52 by sterically blocking the E2/E3 interaction between Ro52 and UBE2E1. Our data suggest that anti-Ro52 autoantibodies binding the RING domain of Ro52 may be actively involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatic autoimmune disease by inhibiting Ro52-mediated ubiquitination.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2011
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-53170 (URN)10.1074/jbc.M111.241786 (DOI)000296538300033 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies|Swedish Research Council||Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research||VINNOVA||CeNano||Swedish Cancer Society||Karolinska Institutet||Linkoping University||King Gustaf Vs 80-Year Foundation||Heart-Lung Foundation||Stockholm County Council||Gustafsson Foundation||Soderberg Foundation||National Cancer Institute of Canada||Swedish Rheumatism Association||Wallenberg Foundation||

    Available from: 2010-01-18 Created: 2010-01-18 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    4. Structure of a TRIM21 - UBE2El complex reveals the specificity of E2 and ubiquitin recognition by TRIM E3 RINGs
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structure of a TRIM21 - UBE2El complex reveals the specificity of E2 and ubiquitin recognition by TRIM E3 RINGs
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    TRIM21, a RlNG-containing E3 ubiquitin-ligase of the TRIM   protein family, is a major autoantigen in SLE and Sjögren's syndrome as well as a modifier of interferon regulatory factors, thereby regulating innate immune signalling. We herein report the 2.86 Å crystal structure ofhuman TRIM211-91 comprising the RING domain (residues 16-55), in complex with the human E2 conjugating UBE2El enzyme (also denoted UbcH6). The crystal structure, joint with analysis by NMR and SAXS as well as structure-directed mutations and functional assays provides a detailed view of the specificity-determining contacts that support specific E2 recognition in the TRIM family. A detailed comparison of our structure with known E2 bound ubiquitin complexes, supported by biochemical analyses, reveals the molecular basis for TRIM21 interactions with donor ubiquitin that activates catalytic ubiquitin transfer. Finally, our structure convincingly demonstrates the placement of the Ub-targeted Lys61 of the adjacent TRIM211- 91 close to the catalytically active UBE2El cysteine, and how the Lys61 amide is activated fora nucleophilic attack by hydrogen-bondeffected deshielding by conserved acidic residues at the E2 active site. In all, our structural findings provide molecular details ofthe selectivity involved in TRIM21 interactions with its cognate UBE2E1 enzyme and how TRIM21 positions ubiquitin in a catalytic conformation for ubiquitin transfer, and presents a snapshot of the Ub ligation step on a specific target residue of TRIM211-91 as an auto-ubiquitinated pseudo-substrate at high concentration. Increased structural and functional understanding of the TRIM mediated ubiquitination will aid development ofnovel therapeutic approaches in the entire TRIM family ofproteins.

    National Category
    Chemical Sciences Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122466 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-11-03 Created: 2015-11-03 Last updated: 2015-11-13Bibliographically approved
  • 13.
    Anandapadamanaban, Madhanagopal
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kyriakidis, Nikolaos
    Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Center for Molecular Medicine L8:04, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Espinosa, Alexander
    Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Center for Molecular Medicine L8:04, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Round, Adam R.
    European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, Grenoble, France.
    Trewhella, Jill
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. School of Molecular Bioscience, The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Center for Molecular Medicine L8:04, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Moche, Martin
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Protein Science Facility, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sunnerhagen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Structure of a TRIM21 - UBE2El complex reveals the specificity of E2 and ubiquitin recognition by TRIM E3 RINGsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    TRIM21, a RlNG-containing E3 ubiquitin-ligase of the TRIM   protein family, is a major autoantigen in SLE and Sjögren's syndrome as well as a modifier of interferon regulatory factors, thereby regulating innate immune signalling. We herein report the 2.86 Å crystal structure ofhuman TRIM211-91 comprising the RING domain (residues 16-55), in complex with the human E2 conjugating UBE2El enzyme (also denoted UbcH6). The crystal structure, joint with analysis by NMR and SAXS as well as structure-directed mutations and functional assays provides a detailed view of the specificity-determining contacts that support specific E2 recognition in the TRIM family. A detailed comparison of our structure with known E2 bound ubiquitin complexes, supported by biochemical analyses, reveals the molecular basis for TRIM21 interactions with donor ubiquitin that activates catalytic ubiquitin transfer. Finally, our structure convincingly demonstrates the placement of the Ub-targeted Lys61 of the adjacent TRIM211- 91 close to the catalytically active UBE2El cysteine, and how the Lys61 amide is activated fora nucleophilic attack by hydrogen-bondeffected deshielding by conserved acidic residues at the E2 active site. In all, our structural findings provide molecular details ofthe selectivity involved in TRIM21 interactions with its cognate UBE2E1 enzyme and how TRIM21 positions ubiquitin in a catalytic conformation for ubiquitin transfer, and presents a snapshot of the Ub ligation step on a specific target residue of TRIM211-91 as an auto-ubiquitinated pseudo-substrate at high concentration. Increased structural and functional understanding of the TRIM mediated ubiquitination will aid development ofnovel therapeutic approaches in the entire TRIM family ofproteins.

  • 14.
    Anderson, Judy E.
    et al.
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; Manitoba Institute of Child's Health (MICH), University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Hansen, Lise Lotte
    Institute of Human Genetics, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
    Mooren, Frank C.
    Department of Sports Medicine, Institute of Sport Sciences, University Giessen, Germany.
    Post, Markus
    Department of Sports Medicine, Institute of Sport Sciences, University Giessen, Germany.
    Hug, Hubert
    DSM Nutritional Products Ltd, Research & Development, Kaiseraugst, Switzerland.
    Zuse, Anne
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology (MICB), CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Ave. Rm. ON6010, Winnipeg, Man. R3E 0V9, Canada.
    Los, Marek Jan
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba; Manitoba Institute of Child Health; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics; Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada, .
    Methods and biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer and other diseases: Towards personalized medicine2006In: Drug resistance updates, ISSN 1368-7646, E-ISSN 1532-2084, Vol. 9, no 4-5, p. 198-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of new diagnostic procedures, the mapping of the human genome, progress in mapping genetic polymorphisms, and recent advances in nucleic acid- and protein chip technologies are driving the development of personalized therapies. This breakthrough in medicine is expected to be achieved largely due to the implementation of "lab-on-the-chip" technology capable of performing hundreds, even thousands of biochemical, cellular and genetic tests on a single sample of blood or other body fluid. Focusing on a few disease-specific examples, this review discusses selected technologies and their combinations likely to be incorporated in the "lab-on-the-chip" and to provide rapid and versatile information about specific diseases entities. Focusing on breast cancer and after an overview of single-nucleofide polymorphism (SNP)-screening methodologies, we discuss the diagnostic and prognostic importance of SNPs. Next, using Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) as an example, we provide a brief overview of powerful and innovative integration of traditional immuno-histochemistry techniques with advanced biophysical methods such as NMR-spectroscopy or Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. A brief overview of the challenges and opportunities provided by protein and aptamer microarrays follows. We conclude by highlighting novel and promising biochemical markers for the development of personalized treatment of cancer and other diseases: serum cytochrome c, cytokeratin-18 and -19 and their proteolytic fragments for the detection and quantitation of malignant tumor mass, tumor cell turn-over, inflammatory processes during hepatitis and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and apoptotic/necrotic cancer cell death. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Elucidation of the product synthesis of the sesquiterpene synthase Cop6 isolated from Coprinus cinereus2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Mushrooms are believed to have a great potential for production of bioactive metabolites e. g. terpenes, a group of interesting compounds with diverse chemical properties such as antitumour and antibacterial activity. Cop6 is a terpene cyclase isolated from the mushroom Coprinus cinereus that catalyzes the cyclization of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) to mainly α-cuprenene. In this study gas chromatography combined with mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) is used to analyze the product profile of Cop6 mutants created by PCR based site directed mutagenesis. The goal is to produce trichodiene, the parent hydrocarbon in the biosynthesis of trichothecene antibiotics and mycotoxins. Valine instead of tyrosine in amino acid position 195 resulted in cyclisation of (E)-β-Farnesene and (3Z,6E)-α-Farnesene besides the products of the wild type enzyme. Another mutant with aspartic acid instead of asparagine in position 224 resulted in the synthesis of β-Bisabolene except for α-cuprenene and methionine in position 74 instead of isoleucine killed the activity of the cyclase. Furthermore, an attempt to saturation of position 98 was made, resulting in four mutants. Two of them essentially killed the activity of the cyclase whereas two had minor effect of the product profile compared to the wild type. 

  • 16.
    Ansell, Ricky
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Polismyndigheten - Nationellt Forensiskt Centrum.
    Nordgaard, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Polismyndigheten - Nationellt Forensiskt Centrum.
    Hedell, Ronny
    Polismyndigheten - Nationellt Forensiskt Centrum.
    Interpretation of DNA Evidence: Implications of Thresholds Used in the Forensic Laboratory2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluation of forensic evidence is a process lined with decisions and balancing, not infrequently with a substantial deal of subjectivity. Already at the crime scene a lot of decisions have to be made about search strategies, the amount of evidence and traces recovered, later prioritised and sent further to the forensic laboratory etc. Within the laboratory there must be several criteria (often in terms of numbers) on how much and what parts of the material should be analysed. In addition there is often a restricted timeframe for delivery of a statement to the commissioner, which in reality might influence on the work done. The path of DNA evidence from the recovery of a trace at the crime scene to the interpretation and evaluation made in court involves several decisions based on cut-offs of different kinds. These include quality assurance thresholds like limits of detection and quantitation, but also less strictly defined thresholds like upper limits on prevalence of alleles not observed in DNA databases. In a verbal scale of conclusions there are lower limits on likelihood ratios for DNA evidence above which the evidence can be said to strongly support, very strongly support, etc. a proposition about the source of the evidence. Such thresholds may be arbitrarily chosen or based on logical reasoning with probabilities. However, likelihood ratios for DNA evidence depend strongly on the population of potential donors, and this may not be understood among the end-users of such a verbal scale. Even apparently strong DNA evidence against a suspect may be reported on each side of a threshold in the scale depending on whether a close relative is part of the donor population or not. In this presentation we review the use of thresholds and cut-offs in DNA analysis and interpretation and investigate the sensitivity of the final evaluation to how such rules are defined. In particular we show what are the effects of cut-offs when multiple propositions about alternative sources of a trace cannot be avoided, e.g. when there are close relatives to the suspect with high propensities to have left the trace. Moreover, we discuss the possibility of including costs (in terms of time or money) for a decision-theoretic approach in which expected values of information could be analysed.

  • 17.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stranius, Kati
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Börjesson, Karl
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dyrager, Christine
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Specific Imaging of Intracellular Lipid Droplets Using a Benzothiadiazole Derivative with Solvatochromic Properties2017In: Bioconjugate chemistry, ISSN 1043-1802, E-ISSN 1520-4812, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 1363-1370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Altered lipid metabolism and extensive lipid storage in cells have been associated with various medical disorders, including cancer. The development of fluorescent probes that specifically accumulate in lipid deposits is therefore of great interest in order to study pathological processes that are linked to dysregulated lipogenesis. In the present study, we present a small fluorescent benzothiadiazole dye that specifically stains lipid droplets in living and fixated cells. The photophysical characterization of the probe revealed strong solvatochromic behavior, large Stokes shifts, and high fluorescent quantum yields in hydrophobic solvents. In addition, the fluorophore exhibits a nontoxic profile and a high signal-to-noise ratio in cells (i.e., lipid droplets vs cytosol), which make it an excellent candidate for studying lipid biology using confocal fluorescent microscopy.

  • 18.
    Aronsson, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tunable and modular assembly of polypeptides and polypeptide-hybrid biomaterials2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomaterials are materials that are specifically designed to be in contact with biological systems and have for a long time been used in medicine. Examples of biomaterials range from sophisticated prostheses used for replacing outworn body parts to ordinary contact lenses. Currently it is possible to create biomaterials that can e.g. specifically interact with cells or respond to certain stimuli. Peptides, the shorter version of proteins, are excellent molecules for fabrication of such biomaterials. By following and developing design rules it is possible to obtain peptides that can self-assemble into well-defined nanostructures and biomaterials.

    The aim of this thesis is to create ”smart” and tunable biomaterials by molecular self-assembly using dimerizing –helical polypeptides. Two different, but structurally related, polypeptide-systems have been used in this thesis. The EKIV-polypeptide system was developed in this thesis and consists of four 28-residue polypeptides that can be mixed-and-matched to self-assemble into four different coiled coil heterodimers. The dissociation constant of the different heterodimers range from μM to < nM. Due to the large difference in affinities, the polypeptides are prone to thermodynamic social self-sorting. The JR-polypeptide system, on the other hand, consists of several 42-residue de novo designed helix-loop-helix polypeptides that can dimerize into four-helix bundles. In this work, primarily the glutamic acid-rich polypeptide JR2E has been explored as a component in supramolecular materials. Dimerization was induced by exposing the polypeptide to either Zn2+, acidic conditions or the complementary polypeptide JR2K.

    By conjugating JR2E to hyaluronic acid and the EKIV-polypeptides to star-shaped poly(ethylene glycol), respectively, highly tunable hydrogels that can be self-assembled in a modular fashion have been created. In addition, self-assembly of spherical superstructures has been investigated and were obtained by linking two thiol-modified JR2E polypeptides via a disulfide bridge in the loop region. ŒThe thesis also demonstrates that the polypeptides and the polypeptide-hybrids can be used for encapsulation and release of molecules and nanoparticles. In addition, some of the hydrogels have been explored for 3D cell culture. By using supramolecular interactions combined with bio-orthogonal covalent crosslinking reactions, hydrogels were obtained that enabled facile encapsulation of cells that retained high viability.

    The results of the work presented in this thesis show that dimerizing α–helical polypeptides can be used to create modular biomaterials with properties that can be tuned by specific molecular interactions. The modularity and the tunable properties of these smart biomaterials are conceptually very interesting andmake them useful in many emerging biomedical applications, such as 3D cell culture, cell therapy, and drug delivery

    .

    List of papers
    1. Self-sorting heterodimeric coiled coil peptides with defined and tuneable self-assembly properties
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-sorting heterodimeric coiled coil peptides with defined and tuneable self-assembly properties
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, no 14063Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Coiled coils with defined assembly properties and dissociation constants are highly attractive components in synthetic biology and for fabrication of peptide-based hybrid nanomaterials and nanostructures. Complex assemblies based on multiple different peptides typically require orthogonal peptides obtained by negative design. Negative design does not necessarily exclude formation of undesired species and may eventually compromise the stability of the desired coiled coils. This work describe a set of four promiscuous 28-residue de novo designed peptides that heterodimerize and fold into parallel coiled coils. The peptides are non-orthogonal and can form four different heterodimers albeit with large differences in affinities. The peptides display dissociation constants for dimerization spanning from the micromolar to the picomolar range. The significant differences in affinities for dimerization make the peptides prone to thermodynamic social self-sorting as shown by thermal unfolding and fluorescence experiments, and confirmed by simulations. The peptides self-sort with high fidelity to form the two coiled coils with the highest and lowest affinities for heterodimerization. The possibility to exploit self-sorting of mutually complementary peptides could hence be a viable approach to guide the assembly of higher order architectures and a powerful strategy for fabrication of dynamic and tuneable nanostructured materials.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2015
    National Category
    Physical Sciences Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121739 (URN)10.1038/srep14063 (DOI)000361177400001 ()26370878 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council (VR); Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF)

    Available from: 2015-10-06 Created: 2015-10-05 Last updated: 2017-12-01
    2. Tailoring Supramolecular Peptide-Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels by Coiled Coil Self-Assembly and Self-Sorting
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tailoring Supramolecular Peptide-Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels by Coiled Coil Self-Assembly and Self-Sorting
    2016 (English)In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 2260-2267Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Physical hydrogels are extensively used in a wide range of biomedical applications. However, different applications require hydrogels with different mechanical and structural properties. Tailoring these properties demands exquisite control over the supramolecular peptides with different affinities for dimerization. Four different mechanical properties of hydrogels using de novo designed coiled coil interactions involved. Here we show that it is possible to control the nonorthogonal peptides, designed to fold into four different coiled coil heterodimers with dissociation constants spanning from mu M to pM, were conjugated to star-shaped 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The different PEG-coiled coil conjugates self-assemble as a result of peptide heterodimerization. Different combinations of PEG peptide conjugates assemble into PEG peptide networks and hydrogels with distinctly different thermal stabilities, supramolecular, and rheological properties, reflecting the peptide dimer affinities. We also demonstrate that it is possible to rationally modulate the self-assembly process by means of thermodynamic self-sorting by sequential additions of nonpegylated peptides. The specific interactions involved in peptide dimerization thus provides means for programmable and reversible self-assembly of hydrogels with precise control over rheological properties, which can significantly facilitate optimization of their overall performance and adaption to different processing requirements and applications.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2016
    National Category
    Polymer Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130135 (URN)10.1021/acs.biomac.6b00528 (DOI)000377924800038 ()27219681 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [621-2011-4319]; Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research [ICA10-0002]; Linkoping University; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University (Faculty Grant SFO-Mat-LiU) [2009 00971]

    Available from: 2016-07-12 Created: 2016-07-11 Last updated: 2017-11-28
    3. Zinc-Triggered Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Fibrous Helix-Loop-Helix Peptide Superstructures for Controlled Encapsulation and Release
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Zinc-Triggered Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Fibrous Helix-Loop-Helix Peptide Superstructures for Controlled Encapsulation and Release
    2016 (English)In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 49, no 18, p. 6997-7003Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate a novel route for hierarchical self-assembly of sub-micrometer-sized peptide superstructures that respond to subtle changes in Zn2+ concentration. The self-assembly process is triggered by a specific folding-dependent coordination of Zn2+ by a de novo designed nonlinear helix-loop-helix peptide, resulting in a propagating fiber formation and formation of spherical superstructures. The superstructures further form larger assemblies that can be completely disassembled upon removal of Zn2+ or degradation of the nonlinear peptide. This flexible and reversible assembly strategy of the superstructures enables facile encapsulation of nanoparticles and drugs that can be released by means of different stimuli.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2016
    National Category
    Polymer Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132215 (URN)10.1021/acs.macromol.6b01724 (DOI)000384399100030 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [621-2011-4319]; Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research [ICA10-0002]; Linkoping University; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University [2009 00971]

    Available from: 2016-10-26 Created: 2016-10-21 Last updated: 2017-11-29
  • 19.
    Atikuzzaman, Mohammad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sanz, Libia
    Instituto de Biomedicina de Valencia, CSIC, Valencia, Spain.
    Pla, Davinia
    Instituto de Biomedicina de Valencia, CSIC, Valencia, Spain.
    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Manuel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wright, Dominic
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Calvete, Juan J.
    Instituto de Biomedicina de Valencia, CSIC, Valencia, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Selection for higher fertility reflects in the seminal fluid proteome of modern domestic chicken2017In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part D: Genomics and Proteomics, ISSN 1744-117X, E-ISSN 1878-0407, Vol. 21, p. 27-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high egg-laying capacity of the modern domestic chicken (i.e. White Leghorn, WL) has arisen from the low egg-laying ancestor Red Junglefowl (RJF) via continuous trait selection and breeding. To investigate whether this long-term selection impacted the seminal fluid (SF)-proteome, 2DE electrophoresis-based proteomic analyses and immunoassays were conducted to map SF-proteins/cytokines in RJF, WL and a 9th generation Advanced Intercross Line (AIL) of RJF/WL-L13, including individual SF (n = 4, from each RJF, WL and AIL groups) and pools of the SF from 15 males of each group, analyzed by 2DE to determine their degree of intra-group (AIL, WL, and RJF) variability using Principal Component Analysis (PCA); respectively an inter-breed comparative analysis of intergroup fold change of specific SF protein spots intensity between breeds. The PCA clearly highlighted a clear intra-group similarity among individual roosters as well as a clear inter-group variability (e.g. between RJF, WL and AIL) validating the use of pools to minimize confounding individual variation. Protein expression varied considerably for processes related to sperm motility, nutrition, transport and survival in the female, including signaling towards immunomodulation. The major conserved SF-proteins were serum albumin and ovotransferrin. Aspartate aminotransferase, annexin A5, arginosuccinate synthase, glutathione S-transferase 2 and l-lactate dehydrogenase-A were RJF-specific. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase appeared specific to the WL-SF while angiotensin-converting enzyme, γ-enolase, coagulation factor IX, fibrinogen α-chain, hemoglobin subunit α-D, lysozyme C, phosphoglycerate kinase, Src-substrate protein p85, tubulins and thioredoxin were AIL-specific. The RJF-SF contained fewer immune system process proteins and lower amounts of the anti-inflammatory/immunomodulatory TGF-β2 compared to WL and AIL, which had low levels- or lacked pro-inflammatory CXCL10 compared to RJF. The seminal fluid proteome differs between ancestor and modern chicken, with a clear enrichment of proteins and peptides related to immune-modulation for sperm survival in the female and fertility.

  • 20.
    Backlund, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Assessment of ventricular morphology using echocardiography in Ornate tinamous (Nothoprocta ornata) and domestic chickens (Gallus domesticus)2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10,5 credits / 16 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Ornate Tinamou (Nothoprocta ornata), an ancient bird, has adapted to life at high altitude (>2.400 m.a.s.l) for a longer period than the domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), which came to South America with the Spanish conquerors. Ornate tinamous have a smaller heart in relation to body size than domestic chickens. This study was made to evaluate heart morphometric measurements comparing Ornate Tinamou and domestic chicken using echocardiography measurements to determine wall thickness and chamber size and to evaluate whether it can retrieve measurements consistent with previous results on dissected hearts. I was also interested in evaluating potential adaptations of the Ornate Tinamou to life in hypoxic environments by exposing the heart to positive inotropic stimulation. The results were compared with those previously obtained on dissected hearts. The results showed that the chamber size of the domestic chicken was significantly larger than in Ornate Tinamou, both in conscious and anesthetized birds. Injection of 1µg/kg isoproterenol caused domestic chickens’ systolic chamber size to decrease significantly and fractional shortening to increase significantly. The same changes were seen in the Ornate Tinamou but they were not significant. In conclusion, this study confirms that echocardiography is a valid method for retrieving cardiac measurements without euthanizing animals, opening for the possibility of taking several measurements at different ages.

  • 21.
    Banerji, Shantanu
    et al.
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada .
    Los, Marek Jan
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba; Manitoba Institute of Child Health; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics; Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Important differences between topoisomerase-I and -II targeting agents2006In: Cancer Biology & Therapy, ISSN 1538-4047, E-ISSN 1555-8576, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 965-966Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Commentary to: Activation of ATM and Histone H2AX Phosphorylation Induced by Mitoxantrone But Not by Topotecan is Prevented by the Antioxidant N-acetyl-L-Cysteine Xuan Huang, Akira Kurose, Toshiki Tanaka, Frank Traganos, Wei Dai and Zbigniew Darzynkiewicz

     

  • 22.
    Barczyk, K.
    et al.
    Department of Immunology, Faculty of Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland; Institute of Experimental Dermatology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany.
    Kreuter, M.
    Department of Medicine/Hematology and Oncology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany.
    Pryjma, J.
    Department of Immunology, Faculty of Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland.
    Booy, Evan P.
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, and Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Univ. Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Maddika, Subbareddy
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics,University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada .
    Ghavami, Saeid
    Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
    Berdel, W. E.
    Department of Medicine/Hematology and Oncology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany.
    Roth, J.
    Institute of Experimental Dermatology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany.
    Los, Marek Jan
    Institute of Experimental Dermatology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba; Manitoba Institute of Child Health; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics; Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada, .
    Serum cytochrome c indicates in vivo apoptosis and can serve as a prognostic marker during cancer therapy2005In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 116, no 2, p. 167-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite significant progress in cancer therapy, the outcome of the treatment is often unfavorable. Better treatment monitoring would not only allow an individual more effective, patient-adjusted therapy, but also it would eliminate some of the side effects. Using a cytochrome c ELISA that was modified to increase sensitivity, we demonstrate that serum cytochrome c is a sensitive apoptotic marker in vivo reflecting therapy-induced cell death burden. Furthermore, increased serum cytochrome c level is a negative prognostic marker. Cancer patients whose serum cytochrome c level was normal 3 years ago have a twice as high probability to be still alive, as judged from sera samples collected for years, analyzed recently and matched with survival data. Moreover, we show that serum cytochrome c and serum LDH-activity reflect different stages and different forms of cell death. Cellular cytochrome c release is specific for apoptosis, whereas increased LDH activity is an indicator of (secondary) necrosis. Whereas serum LDH activity reflects the "global" degree of cell death over a period of time, the sensitive cytochrome c-based method allows confirmation of the individual cancer therapy-induced and spontaneous cell death events. The combination of cytochrome c with tissue-specific markers may provide the foundation for precise monitoring of apoptosis in vivo, by "lab-on-the-chip" technology. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 23.
    Bauer, M. K. A.
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine I, Medical Clinics, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tübingen.
    Vogt, M.
    Department of Internal Medicine I, Medical Clinics, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tübingen.
    Los, Marek Jan
    Department of Internal Medicine I, Medical Clinics, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tübingen, Germany.
    Siegel, J.
    Department of Virology, Albrecht-Ludwigs-University, Freiburg, Germany.
    Wesselborg, Sebastian
    Department of Internal Medicine I, Medical Clinics, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tübingen, Germany.
    Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus
    Department of Internal Medicine I, Medical Clinics, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tübingen.
    Role of reactive oxygen intermediates in activation-induced CD95 (APO-1/Fas) ligand expression1998In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 273, no 14, p. 8048-8055Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Activation-induced cell death of T lymphocytes requires the inducible expression of CD95 (APO-1/Fas) ligand, which triggers apoptosis in CD95-bearing target cells by an autocrine or paracrine mechanism. Although execution of the CD95 death pathway is largely independent of reactive oxygen intermediates, activation-induced cell death is blocked by a variety of antioxidants. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of redox processes in the regulation of CD95 ligand (CD95L) expression in Jurkat T cells. We show that various antioxidants potently inhibited the transcriptional activation of CD95L following T cell receptor litigation or stimulation of cells with phorbol ester and ionomycin. Conversely, a prooxidant such as hydrogen peroxide alone was able to increase CD95L expression. As detected by Western blot and cytotoxicity assays, functional expression of CD95L protein was likewise diminished by antioxidants. Inhibition of CD95L expression was associated with a decreased DNA binding activity of nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B, an important redox-controlled transcription factor. Moreover, inhibition of NF-kappa B activity by a transdominant I kappa B mutant attenuated CD95L expression. Our data suggest that, although reactive oxygen intermediates do not act as mediators in the execution phase of CD95-mediated apoptosis, they are involved in the transcriptional regulation of CD95L expression.

  • 24. Baust, H.
    et al.
    Schiessl, I.
    Mueller, B.
    Roedel, F.
    Distel, L.
    Los, Marek Jan
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba; Manitoba Institute of Child Health; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics; Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada, .
    Thomas, S.
    Rolf, S.
    Implications for the role of PKD2 in the radiotherapy of tumours2006In: Strahlentherapie und Onkologie (Print), ISSN 0179-7158, E-ISSN 1439-099X, Vol. 182, p. 81-81Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Baust, H.
    et al.
    Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm, Germany.
    Schoke, A.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm, Germany.
    Brey, A.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm, Germany.
    Gern, U.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm, Germany.
    Los, Marek Jan
    Institute of Experimental Dermatology, University of Muenster, D-48149 Muenster, Germany.
    Schmid, R. M.
    2nd Department of Internal Medicine, University of Munich, D-81675 Munich, Germany.
    Röttinger, E. M.
    Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm, Germany.
    Seufferlein, T.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm, Germany.
    Evidence for radiosensitizing by gliotoxin in HL-60 cells: implications for a role of NF-kappa B independent mechanisms2003In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 22, no 54, p. 8786-8796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radioresistance markedly impairs the efficacy of tumor radiotherapy and may involve antiapoptotic signal transduction pathways that prevent radiation-induced cell death. A common cellular response to genotoxic stress induced by radiation is the activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB). NF-kappaB activation in turn can lead to an inhibition of radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Thus, inhibition of NF-kappaB activation is commonly regarded as an important strategy to abolish radioresistance. Among other compounds, the fungal metabolite gliotoxin (GT) has been reported to be a highly selective inhibitor of NF-kappaB activation. Indeed, low doses of GT were sufficient to significantly enhance radiation-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. However, this effect turned out to be largely independent of NF-kappaB activation since radiation of HL-60 cells with clinically relevant doses of radiation induced only a marginal increase in NF-kappaB activity, and selective inhibition of NF-kappaB by SN50 did not result in a marked enhancement of GT-induced apoptosis. GT induced activation of JNKs, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria and potently stimulated the caspase cascade inducing cleavage of caspases -9, -8, -7 and -3. Furthermore, cleavage of the antiapoptotic protein X-linked IAP and downregulation of the G2/M-specific IAP-family member survivin were observed during GT-induced apoptosis. Finally, the radiation-induced G2/M arrest was markedly reduced in GT-treated cells most likely due to the rapid induction of apoptosis. Our data demonstrate that various other pathways apart from the NF-kappaB signaling complex can sensitize tumor cells to radiation and propose a novel mechanism for radio-sensitization by GT, the interference with the G2/M checkpoint that is important for repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in p53-deficient tumor cells.

  • 26.
    Baykov, Alexander A.
    et al.
    A. N. Belozersky Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology and School of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Russia.
    Hyytiä, Teppo
    Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, USA.
    Turkina, Maria V.
    A. N. Belozersky Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology and School of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Russia.
    Efimova, Irina S.
    A. N. Belozersky Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology and School of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Russia.
    Kasho, Vladimir N.
    Center for Ulcer Research and Education, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Goldman, Adrian
    Department of Biochemistry University of Turku, Finland; Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Cooperman, Barry S.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, USA.
    Lahti, Reijo
    Department of Biochemistry University of Turku, Finland.
    Functional characterization of Escherichia coli inorganic pyrophosphatase in zwitterionic buffers1999In: European Journal of Biochemistry, ISSN 0014-2956, E-ISSN 1432-1033, Vol. 260, no 2, p. 308-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catalysis by Escherichia coli inorganic pyrophosphatase (E-PPase) was found to be strongly modulated by Tris and similar aminoalcoholic buffers used in previous studies of this enzyme. By measuring ligand-binding and catalytic properties of E-PPase in zwitterionic buffers, we found that the previous data markedly underestimate Mg2+-binding affinity for two of the three sites present in E-PPase (3.5- to 16-fold) and the rate constant for substrate (dimagnesium pyrophosphate) binding to monomagnesium enzyme (20- to 40-fold). By contrast, Mg2+-binding and substrate conversion in the enzyme-substrate complex are unaffected by buffer. These data indicate that E-PPase requires in total only three Mg2+ ions per active site for best performance, rather than four, as previously believed. As measured by equilibrium dialysis, Mg2+ binds to 2.5 sites per monomer, supporting the notion that one of the tightly binding sites is located at the trimer–trimer interface. Mg2+ binding to the subunit interface site results in increased hexamer stability with only minor consequences for catalytic activity measured in the zwitterionic buffers, whereas Mg2+ binding to this site accelerates substrate binding up to 16-fold in the presence of Tris. Structural considerations favor the notion that the aminoalcohols bind to the E-PPase active site.

  • 27.
    Belka, C.
    et al.
    Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen (Germany), Hoppe Seyler Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany.
    Marini, P.
    Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen (Germany), Hoppe Seyler Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany.
    Lepple-Wienhues, A.
    Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany), Gmelinstrasse 5, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany.
    Budach, W.
    Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen (Germany), Hoppe Seyler Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany.
    Jekle, A.
    Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany), Gmelinstrasse 5, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany.
    Los, Marek Jan
    Department of Internal Medicine I, University of Tuebingen (Germany), Otfried Müller Str. 10, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany.
    Lang, F.
    Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany), Gmelinstrasse 5, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany.
    Schulze-Osthoff, K.
    Department of Internal Medicine I, University of Tuebingen (Germany), Otfried Müller Str. 10, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany.
    Gulbins, E.
    Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany), Gmelinstrasse 5, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany.
    Bamberg, M.
    Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen (Germany), Hoppe Seyler Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany.
    The tyrosine kinase Lck is required for CD95-independent caspase-8 activation and apoptosis in response to ionizing radiation1999In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 18, no 35, p. 4983-4992Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Induction of apoptosis is a hallmark of cytostatic drug and radiation-induced cell death in human lymphocytes and lymphoma cells. However, the mechanisms leading to apoptosis are not well understood. We provide evidence that ionizing radiation induces a rapid activation of caspase-8 (FLICE) followed by apoptosis independently of CD95 ligand/receptor interaction. The radiation induced cleavage pattern of procaspase-8 into mature caspase-8 resembled that following CD95 crosslinking and resulted in cleavage of the proapoptotic substrate BID. Overexpression of dominant-negative caspase-8 interfered with radiation-induced apoptosis, Caspase-8 activation by ionizing radiation was not observed in cells genetically defective for the Src-like tyrosine kinase Lck, Cells lacking Lck also displayed a marked resistance towards apoptosis induction upon ionizing radiation. After retransfection of Lck, caspase-8 activation and the capability to undergo apoptosis in response to ionizing radiation was restored. We conclude that radiation activates caspase-8 via an Lck-controlled pathway independently of CD95 ligand expression, This is a novel signaling event required for radiation induced apoptosis in T lymphoma cells.

  • 28.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Flow Cytometry Sensor System Targeting Escherichia Coli as an Indicator of Faecal Contamination of Water Sources2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Poor water quality is a global health concern affecting one billion people around the world. It is important to monitor water sources in order to maintain the quality of our drinking water and to avoid disease outbreaks. Targeting Escherichia coli as a faecal indicator is a widely used procedure, but the current methods are time consuming and not adequate to prevent spreading of faecal influence.

     

    This Master thesis demonstrates the development of a near infrared fluorescence flow cytometer sensor system targeting Escherichia coli, using fluorescently labeled chicken IgY antibodies. The near infrared light was chosen to avoid fluorescence from blue-green algae that are present in the water source.

     

    The hardware was developed with a 785  nm laser line to detect Alexa Fluor 790 labeled antibodies, using a photomultiplier tube or two different CMOS cameras. The antibodies were labeled using a commercial labeling kit, and evaluated using antibody binding assays and the developed hardware.

     

    The IgY antibodies were successfully labeled with Alexa Fluor 790 and the function was maintained after the labeling process. The result demonstrates the principles of the sensor system and how it solved to the problem with fluorescence from blue-green algae. An aperture was used to overcome the suboptimal laser and filter setup, and to increase the sensitivity of the system. However, only a small fraction of the cells could be detected, due to challenges with the focal depth and loss of sensitivity in the photomultiplier tube at near infrared wavelengths. Further development is required to create a working product.

  • 29.
    Bergkvist, Liza
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Amyloid-β and lysozyme proteotoxicity in Drosophila: Beneficial effects of lysozyme and serum amyloid P component in models of Alzheimer’s disease and lysozyme amyloidosis2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the work presented this thesis, two different conditions that are classified as protein misfolding diseases: Alzheimer's disease and lysozyme amyloidosis and proteins that could have a beneficial effect in these diseases, have been studied using Drosophila melanogaster, commonly known as the fruit fly. The fruit fly has been used for over 100 years to study and better understand fundamental biological processes. Although the fruit fly, unlike humans, is an invertebrate, many of its central biological mechanisms are very similar to ours. The first transgenic flies were designed in the early 1980s, and since then, the fruit fly has been one of the most widely used model organisms in studies on the effects of over-expressed human proteins in a biological system; one can regard the fly as a living, biological test tube. For  most proteins, it is necessary that they fold into a three-dimensional structure to function properly. But sometimes the folding goes wrong; this may be due to mutations that make the protein unstable and subject to misfolding. A misfolded protein molecule can then aggregate with other misfolded proteins. In Alzheimer's disease, which is the most common form of dementia, protein aggregates are present in the brains of patients. These aggregates are composed of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, a small peptide of around 42 amino acids which is cleaved from the larger, membrane-bound, protein AβPP by two different enzymes, BACE1 and γ-secretase. In the first part of this thesis, two different fly models for Alzheimer’s disease were used: the Aβ fly model, which directly expresses the Aβ peptide, and the AβPP-BACE1 fly model, in which all the components necessary to produce the Aβ peptide in the fly are expressed in the fly central nervous system (CNS). The two different fly models were compared and the results show that a significantly smaller amount of the Aβ peptide is needed to achieve the same, or an even greater, toxic effect in the AβPP-BACE1 model compared to the Aβ model. In the second part of the thesis, these two fly models for Alzheimer’s disease were again used, but now to investigate whether lysozyme, a protein involved in our innate immune system, can counteract the toxic effect of Aβ generated in the fly models. And indeed, lysozyme is able to save the flies from Aβ-induced toxicity. Aβ and lysozyme were found to interact with each other in vivo. The second misfolding disease studied in this thesis is lysozyme amyloidosis. It is a rare, dominantly inherited amyloid disease in which mutant variants of lysozyme give rise to aggregates, weighing up to several kilograms, that accumulate around the kidneys and liver, eventually leading to organ failure. In the third part of this thesis, a fly model for lysozyme amyloidosis was used to study the effect of co-expressing the serum amyloid P component (SAP), a protein that is part of all protein aggregates found within this disease class. SAP is able to rescue the toxicity induced by expressing the mutant variant of lysozyme, F57I, in the fly's CNS. To further investigate how SAP was able to do this, double-expressing lysozyme flies, which exhibit stronger disease phenotypes than those of the single-expressing lysozyme flies previously studied, were used in the fourth part of this thesis. SAP was observed to reduce F57I toxicity and promote F57I to form aggregates with more distinct amyloid characteristics. In conclusion, the work included in this thesis demonstrates that: i) Aβ generated from AβPP processing in the fly CNS results in higher proteotoxicity compared with direct expression of Aβ from the transgene, ii) lysozyme can prevent Aβ proteotoxicity in Drosophila and could thus be a potential therapeutic molecule to treat Alzheimer’s disease and iii) in a Drosophila model of lysozyme amyloidosis, SAP can prevent toxicity from the disease-associated lysozyme variant F57I and promote formation of aggregated lysozyme morphotypes with amyloid properties; this is important to take into account when a reduced level of SAP is considered as a treatment strategy for lysozyme amyloidosis.

    List of papers
    1. A beta PP processing results in greater toxicity per amount of A beta(1-42) than individually expressed and secreted A beta(1-42) in Drosophila melanogaster
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A beta PP processing results in greater toxicity per amount of A beta(1-42) than individually expressed and secreted A beta(1-42) in Drosophila melanogaster
    2016 (English)In: BIOLOGY OPEN, ISSN 2046-6390, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 1030-1039Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aggregation of the amyloid-beta (A beta) peptide into fibrillar deposits has long been considered the key neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimers disease (AD). A beta peptides are generated from proteolytic processing of the transmembrane A beta precursor protein (A beta PP) via sequential proteolysis through the beta-secretase activity of beta-site A beta PP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) and by the intramembranous enzyme gamma-secretase. For over a decade, Drosophila melanogaster has been used as a model organism to study AD, and two different approaches have been developed to investigate the toxicity caused by AD-associated gene products in vivo. In one model, the A beta peptide is directly over-expressed fused to a signal peptide, allowing secretion of the peptide into the extracellular space. In the other model, human A beta PP is co-expressed with human BACE1, resulting in production of the A beta peptide through the processing of A beta PP by BACE1 and by endogenous fly gamma-secretase. Here, we performed a parallel study of flies that expressed the A beta(1-42) peptide alone or that co-expressed A beta PP and BACE1. Toxic effects (assessed by eye phenotype, longevity and locomotor assays) and levels of the A beta(1-42), A beta(1-40) and A beta(1-38) peptides were examined. Our data reveal that the toxic effect per amount of detected A beta(1-42) peptide was higher in the flies co-expressing A beta PP and BACE1 than in the A beta(1-42)-expressing flies, and that the co-existence of A beta(1-42) and A beta(1-40) in the flies co-expressing A beta PP and BACE1 could be of significant importance to the neurotoxic effect detected in these flies. Thus, the toxicity detected in these two fly models seems to have different modes of action and is highly dependent on how and where the peptide is generated rather than on the actual level of the A beta(1-42) peptide in the flies. This is important knowledge that needs to be taken into consideration when using Drosophila models to investigate disease mechanisms or therapeutic strategies in AD research.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    COMPANY OF BIOLOGISTS LTD, 2016
    Keywords
    Alzheimers disease; Amyloid-beta (A beta); A beta PP processing; Drosophila melanogaster; Proteotoxicity
    National Category
    Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131685 (URN)10.1242/bio.017194 (DOI)000382304400003 ()27387531 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Torsten Soderbergs Stiftelse [M26/11]; Alzheimer Foundation [03-069]; Dementia Foundation; Ahlen Foundation; Gamla Tjanarinnor [2015-00187]

    Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-05-16
    2. Beneficial effects of increased lysozyme levels in Alzheimer’s disease modelled in Drosophila melanogaster
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beneficial effects of increased lysozyme levels in Alzheimer’s disease modelled in Drosophila melanogaster
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: The FEBS Journal, ISSN 1742-464X, E-ISSN 1742-4658, Vol. 283, no 19, p. 3508-3522Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic polymorphisms of immune genes that associate with higher risk to develop Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have led to an increased research interest on the involvement of the immune system in AD pathogenesis. A link between amyloid pathology and immune gene expression was suggested in a genome-wide gene expression study of transgenic amyloid mouse models. In this study, the gene expression of lysozyme, a major player in the innate immune system, was found to be increased in a comparable pattern as the amyloid pathology developed in transgenic mouse models of AD. A similar pattern was seen at protein levels of lysozyme in human AD brain and CSF, but this lysozyme pattern was not seen in a tau transgenic mouse model. Lysozyme was demonstrated to be beneficial for different Drosophila melanogaster models of AD. In flies that expressed Aβ1-42 or AβPP together with BACE1 in the eyes, the rough eye phenotype indicative of toxicity was completely rescued by coexpression of lysozyme. In Drosophila flies bearing the Aβ1-42 variant with the Arctic gene mutation, lysozyme increased the fly survival and decreased locomotor dysfunction dose dependently. An interaction between lysozyme and Aβ1-42 in the Drosophila eye was discovered. We propose that the increased levels of lysozyme, seen in mouse models of AD and in human AD cases, were triggered by Aβ1-42 and caused a beneficial effect by binding of lysozyme to toxic species of Aβ1-42, which prevented these from exerting their toxic effects. These results emphasize the possibility of lysozyme as biomarker and therapeutic target for AD.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2016
    Keywords
    Alzheimer’s disease, amyloid-β, Drosophila, lysozyme
    National Category
    Genetics Medical Genetics Developmental Biology Bioinformatics and Systems Biology Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131796 (URN)10.1111/febs.13830 (DOI)000386033700001 ()27562772 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-10-07 Created: 2016-10-07 Last updated: 2018-03-20Bibliographically approved
    3. Serum Amyloid P Component Ameliorates Neurological Damage Caused by Expressing a Lysozyme Variant in the Central Nervous System of Drosophila melanogaster
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serum Amyloid P Component Ameliorates Neurological Damage Caused by Expressing a Lysozyme Variant in the Central Nervous System of Drosophila melanogaster
    2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 7, p. e0159294-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Lysozyme amyloidosis is a hereditary disease in which mutations in the gene coding for lysozyme leads to misfolding and consequently accumulation of amyloid material. To improve understanding of the processes involved we expressed human wild type (WT) lysozyme and the disease-associated variant F57I in the central nervous system (CNS) of a Drosophila melanogaster model of lysozyme amyloidosis, with and without co-expression of serum amyloid p component (SAP). SAP is known to be a universal constituent of amyloid deposits and to associate with lysozyme fibrils. There are clear indications that SAP may play an important role in lysozyme amyloidosis, which requires further elucidation. We found that flies expressing the amyloidogenic variant F57I in the CNS have a shorter lifespan than flies expressing WT lysozyme. We also identified apoptotic cells in the brains of F57I flies demonstrating that the flies neurological functions are impaired when F57I is expressed in the nerve cells. However, co-expression of SAP in the CNS prevented cell death and restored the F57I flies lifespan. Thus, SAP has the apparent ability to protect nerve cells from damage caused by F57I. Furthermore, it was found that co-expression of SAP prevented accumulation of insoluble forms of lysozyme in both WT- and F57I-expressing flies. Our findings suggest that the F57I mutation affects the aggregation process of lysozyme resulting in the formation of cytotoxic species and that SAP is able to prevent cell death in the F57I flies by preventing accumulation of toxic F57I structures.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2016
    National Category
    Developmental Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131183 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0159294 (DOI)000380169300043 ()27428539 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council; Soderberg foundation [M26/11]; Linkoping University Neurobiology Center

    Available from: 2016-09-19 Created: 2016-09-12 Last updated: 2017-11-21
  • 30.
    Bivall Persson, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jonsson, Bengt-Harald
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology.
    Tibell, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
    Use of Chemical Force Feedback for Multisensory Insights into Ligand Docking2007In: VII European Symposium of The Protein Society: From Proteins to Proteome, 2007, p. 151-151Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Bivall Persson, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tibell, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jonsson, Bengt-Harald
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology.
    Evaluating the Effectiveness of Haptic Visualization in Biomolecular Education - Feeling Molecular Specificity in a Docking Task2006In: 12th IOSTE Symposium, Universiti Science Malaysia , 2006, p. 745-752Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the molecular life sciences extensive use is made of visual representations, ranging from sketches to advanced computer graphics, often used to convey abstract knowledge that is difficult for the student to grasp. This work evaluates a new visual and haptic (tactile/kinetic) tool for protein docking in an in situ learning situation by combining qualitative and quantitative methods, performing tests and interviews with students; all aiming at a proper inclusion of visualization tools into biomolecular education. Preliminary results indicate time gains, strong positive affective responses and learning gains from the tasks, however the influence of haptics needs further investigation.

  • 32.
    Bivall, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ainsworth, Shaaron
    School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, U.K..
    Tibell, Lena A. E.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Do Haptic Representations Help Complex Molecular Learning?2011In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 700-719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored whether adding a haptic interface (that provides users with somatosensory information about virtual objects by force and tactile feedback) to a three-dimensional (3D) chemical model enhanced students' understanding of complex molecular interactions. Two modes of the model were compared in a between-groups pre- and posttest design. In both modes, users could move and rotate virtual 3D representations of the chemical structures of the two molecules, a protein and a small ligand molecule. In addition, in a haptic mode users could feel the interactions (repulsive and attractive) between molecules as forces with a haptic device. Twenty postgraduate students (10 in each condition) took pretests about the process of protein--ligand recognition before exploring the model in ways suggested by structured worksheets and then completing a posttest. Analysis addressed quantitative learning outcomes and more qualitatively students' reasoning during the learning phase. Results showed that the haptic system helped students learn more about the process of protein–ligand recognition and changed the way they reasoned about molecules to include more force-based explanations. It may also have protected students from drawing erroneous conclusions about the process of protein–ligand recognition observed when students interacted with only the visual model.

  • 33.
    Blissing, Annica
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thiopurine S-methyltransferase - characterization of variants and ligand binding2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) belongs to the Class I S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase (SAM-MT) super family of structurally related proteins. Common to the members of this large protein family is the catalysis of methylation reactions using S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as a methyl group donor, although SAM-MTs act on a wide range of different substrates and carry out numerous biologically important functions. While the natural function of TPMT is unknown, this enzyme is involved in the metabolism of thiopurines, a class of pharmaceutical substances administered in treatment of immune-related disorders. Specifically, methylation by TPMT inactivates thiopurines and their metabolic intermediates, which reduces the efficacy of clinical treatment and increases the risk of adverse side effects. To further complicate matters, TPMT is a polymorphic enzyme with over 40 naturally occurring variants known to date, most of which exhibit lowered methylation activity towards thiopurines. Consequently, there are individual variations in TPMTmediated thiopurine inactivation, and the administered dose has to be adjusted prior to clinical treatment to avoid harmful side effects.

    Although the clinical relevance of TPMT is well established, few studies have investigated the molecular causes of the reduced methylation activity of variant proteins. In this thesis, the results of biophysical characterization of two variant proteins, TPMT*6 (Y180F) and TPMT*8 (R215H), are presented. While the properties of TPMT*8 were indistinguishable from those of the wild-type protein, TPMT*6 was found to be somewhat destabilized. Interestingly, the TPMT*6 amino acid substitution did not affect the functionality or folding pattern of the variant protein. Therefore, the decreased in vivo functionality reported for TPMT*6 is probably caused by increased proteolytic degradation in response to the reduced stability of this protein variant, rather than loss of function.

    Also presented herein are novel methodological approaches for studies of TPMT and its variants. Firstly, the advantages of using 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) to probe TPMT tertiary structure and active site integrity are presented. ANS binds exclusively to the native state of TPMT with high affinity (KD ~ 0.2 μm) and a 1:1 ratio. The stability of TPMT was dramatically increased by binding of ANS, which was shown to co-localize with the structurally similar adenine moiety of the cofactor SAM. Secondly, an enzyme activity assay based on isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is presented. Using this approach, the kinetics of 6-MP and 6-TG methylation by TPMT has been characterized.

  • 34.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Studies on interfaces between primary and secondary hemostasis2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our conceptual understanding of hemostasis is still heavily influenced by outdated experimental models wherein the hemostatic activity of platelets and coagulation factors are understood and studied in isolation. Although perhaps convenient for researchers and clinicians, this reductionist view is negated by an ever increasing body of evidence pointing towards an intimate relationship between the two phases of hemostasis, marked by strong interdependence. In this thesis, I have focused on factual and proposed interfaces between primary and secondary hemostasis, and on how these interfaces can be studied.

    In my first project, we zoomed in on the mechanisms behind the well-known phenomenon of thrombin-induced platelet activation, an important event linking secondary to primary hemostasis. In our study, we examined how thrombin makes use of certain domains for high-affinity binding to substrates, called exosite I and II, to activate platelets via PAR4. We show that thrombin-induced platelet activation via PAR4 is critically dependent on exosite II, and that blockage of exosite II with different substances virtually eliminates PAR4 activation. Apart from providing new insights into the mechanisms by which thrombin activates PAR4, these results expand our knowledge of the antithrombotic actions of various endogenous proteins such as members of the serpin superfamily, which inhibit interactions with exosite II. Additionally, we show that inhibition of exosite II could be a feasible pharmacological strategy for achieving selective blockade of PAR4.

    In my second project, we examined the controversial issue of whether platelets can initiate the coagulation cascade by means of contact activation, a hypothesis which, if true, could provide a direct link between primary and secondary hemostasis. In contrast to previous results, our findings falsify this hypothesis, and show that some of the erroneous conclusions drawn from earlier studies can be explained by inappropriate experimental models unsuitable for the study of plateletcoagulation interfaces.

    My third project comprised an assessment of the methodological difficulties encountered when trying to measure the ability of platelets to initiate secondary hemostasis by the release of microparticles expressing tissue factor. Our study shows that the functional assays available for this purpose are highly susceptible to error caused by artificial contact activation. These results could help to improve the methodology of future research and thus pave the way for new insights into the roles of tissue factor-bearing microparticles in the pathophysiology of various thrombotic disorders.

    From a personal perspective, my PhD project has been a fascinating scientific odyssey into the largely unexplored interfaces between primary and secondary hemostasis. Looking forward, my ambition is to continue our work exploring platelet-coagulation interactions and to translate these insights into clinically meaningful information, which may someday improve the treatment of patients with bleeding and/or thrombosis.

    List of papers
    1. Thrombin-induced platelet activation via PAR4: pivotal role for exosite II
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thrombin-induced platelet activation via PAR4: pivotal role for exosite II
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 112, no 3, p. 558-565Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Thrombin-induced platelet activation via PAR1 and PAR4 is an important event in haemostasis. Although the underlying mechanisms responsible for ensuring efficient PAR1 activation by thrombin have been extensively studied, the potential involvement of recognitions sites outside the active site of the protease in thrombin-induced PAR4 activation is largely unknown. In this study, we developed a new assay to assess the importance of exosite I and II for PAR4 activation with alpha- and gamma-thrombin. Surprisingly, we found that exosite II is critical for activation of PAR4. We also show that this dependency on exosite II likely represents a new mechanism, as it is unaffected by blockage of the previously known interaction between thrombin and glycoprotein Ib alpha.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Schattauer Gmbh, 2014
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111269 (URN)10.1160/TH13-12-1013 (DOI)000341547000015 ()24990072 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [K2010-65X-15060-07-3, K2013-65X-15060-10-3]; Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation [20100219, 20120263]

    Available from: 2014-10-15 Created: 2014-10-14 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Putting polyphosphates to the test: evidence against platelet-induced activation of factor XII
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Putting polyphosphates to the test: evidence against platelet-induced activation of factor XII
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    2013 (English)In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 122, no 23, p. 3818-3824Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The recent claim that stimulated platelets activate the intrinsic pathway of coagulation by the release of polyphosphates has been considered a breakthrough in hemostasis research. In little more than 3 years, the original publication by Muller et al has been cited greater than100 times. However, none of the citing articles has sought to independently validate this potentially paradigm-shifting concept. To this end, we performed extensive experimentation in vitro and in vivo in an attempt to verify the claim that factor XII (FXII) is primarily activated by stimulated platelets. In contrast to the original assertion, platelet-derived polyphosphates were found to be weak activators of FXII, with a FXIIa-generating activity of less than10% compared with equivalent concentrations of kaolin. Using different coagulation assays, it was shown that platelet contribution to whole blood coagulation was unrelated to the generation of activated FXII in vitro. Additionally, key results used to verify the hypothesis in the original study in vivo were found to be irreproducible. We conclude that platelet-derived polyphosphates are not physiologically relevant activators of FXII.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Society of Hematology, 2013
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104301 (URN)10.1182/blood-2013-05-499384 (DOI)000329735000021 ()
    Available from: 2014-02-17 Created: 2014-02-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    3. Response: platelets do not generate activated factor XII--how inappropriate experimental models have led to misleading conclusions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Response: platelets do not generate activated factor XII--how inappropriate experimental models have led to misleading conclusions
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 124, no 10, p. 1692-1694Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Society of Hematology, 2014
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111531 (URN)10.1182/blood-2014-04-566067 (DOI)000342762300027 ()25190755 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-10-22 Created: 2014-10-22 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    4. Contact activation: important to consider when measuring the contribution of tissue factor-bearing microparticles to thrombin generation using phospholipid-containing reagents
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contact activation: important to consider when measuring the contribution of tissue factor-bearing microparticles to thrombin generation using phospholipid-containing reagents
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 1538-7933, E-ISSN 1538-7836, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 515-518Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background A commercial MP reagent containing phospholipids is used for thrombin generation (TG) measurements to estimate the procoagulant activity of microparticles (MPs). Previous reports have shown that contact activation affects TG when TF levels are low, and that addition of phospholipids might augment this effect. Objectives To quantify the impact of contact activation on TG in the presence of phospholipids and low/no TF, as is the case using a commercially available MP-reagent. Methods Thrombin generation was analyzed using MP- or platelet-rich plasma (PRP)-reagent in the presence and absence of corn trypsin inhibitor and anti-TF antibodies, respectively. To quantify the impact of different experimental parameters on contact activation, microparticle-depleted plasma was analyzed in the presence of different concentrations of phospholipids, TF and/or contact activating agents (kaolin). Results Even with low contact activating blood collection tubes, substantial thrombin generation was observed with the MP-reagent, but this was completely inhibited by addition of corn trypsin inhibitor. Control experiments illustrate that the phospholipids in the reagent play a major role in enhancing TG initiated by FXIIa. Even with the PRP-reagent, which is recommended for determining the content of phospholipids from MPs, TG was partly dependent on contact activation. Conclusions Contact activation plays a major role in TG when using reagents/samples containing phospholipids but little or no tissue factor. This needs to be considered and accounted for in future clinical studies using TG to assess the procoagulant activity of MPs.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley, 2014
    Keywords
    cell-derived microparticles; thromboplastin; blood coagulation; thrombin; factor XII
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106682 (URN)10.1111/jth.12503 (DOI)000334157000012 ()
    Available from: 2014-05-21 Created: 2014-05-19 Last updated: 2017-12-05
  • 35.
    Booy, Evan P.
    et al.
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, and Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Univ. Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Johar, Dina
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology,CancerCare Manitoba, University of Manitoba, ON6010-675 McDermot Ave., Winnipeg, MB, R3E 0V9, Canada; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada .
    Maddika, Srilekha
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology,CancerCare Manitoba, University of Manitoba, ON6010-675 McDermot Ave., Winnipeg, MB, R3E 0V9, Canada; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada .
    Pirzada, Hasan
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology,CancerCare Manitoba, University of Manitoba, ON6010-675 McDermot Ave., Winnipeg, MB, R3E 0V9, Canada.
    Sahib, Mickey M.
    Department of Oral Biology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada .
    Gehrke, Iris
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology,CancerCare Manitoba, University of Manitoba, ON6010-675 McDermot Ave., Winnipeg, MB, R3E 0V9, Canada.
    Loewen, Shauna
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology,CancerCare Manitoba, University of Manitoba, ON6010-675 McDermot Ave., Winnipeg, MB, R3E 0V9, Canada; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada .
    Louis, Sherif F.
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology,CancerCare Manitoba, University of Manitoba, ON6010-675 McDermot Ave., Winnipeg, MB, R3E 0V9, Canada.
    Kadkhoda, Kamran
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology,CancerCare Manitoba, University of Manitoba, ON6010-675 McDermot Ave., Winnipeg, MB, R3E 0V9, Canada; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada .
    Mowat, Michael
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology,CancerCare Manitoba, University of Manitoba, ON6010-675 McDermot Ave., Winnipeg, MB, R3E 0V9, Canada; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada .
    Los, Marek Jan
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba; Manitoba Institute of Child Health; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics; Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada, .
    Monoclonal and bispecific antibodies as novel therapeutics2006In: Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis, ISSN 0004-069X, E-ISSN 1661-4917, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 85-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gene amplification, over-expression, and mutation of growth factors, or the receptors themselves, causes increased signaling through receptor kinases, which has been implicated in many human cancers and is associated with poor prognosis. Tumor growth has been shown to be decreased by interrupting this process of extensive growth factor-mediated signaling by directly targeting either the surface receptor or the ligand and thereby preventing cell survival and promoting apoptosis. Monoclonal antibodies have long been eyed as a potential new class of therapeutics targeting cancer and other diseases. Antibody-based therapy initially entered clinical practice when trastuzumab/Herceptin became the first clinically approved drug against an oncogene product as a well-established blocking reagent for tumors with hyperactivity of epidermal growth factor signaling pathways. In the first part of this review we explain basic terms related to the development of antibody-based drugs, give a brief historic perspective of the field, and also touch on topics such as the "humanization of antibodies" or creation of hybrid antibodies. The second part of the review gives an overview of the clinical usage of bispecific antibodies and antibodies "armed" with cytotoxic agents or enzymes. Further within this section, cancer-specific, site-specific, or signaling pathway-specific therapies are discussed in detail. Among other antibody-based therapeutic products, we discuss: Avastin (bevacizumab), CG76030, Theragyn (pemtumomab), daclizumab (Zenapax), TriAb, MDX-210, Herceptin (trastuzumab), panitumumab (ABX-EGF), mastuzimab (EMD-72000), Erbitux (certuximab, IMC225), Panorex (edrecolomab), STI571, CeaVac, Campath (alemtuizumab), Mylotarg (gemtuzumab, ozogamicin), and many others. The end of the review deliberates upon potential problems associated with cancer immunotherapy.

  • 36.
    Borglin, Johan
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Selegård, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ericson, Marica B.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Peptide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles as a Stimuli Responsive Contrast Medium in Multiphoton Microscopy2017In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 2102-2108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for biochemical contrast mediators with high signal-to-noise ratios enabling noninvasive biomedical sensing, for example, for neural sensing and protein protein interactions, in addition to cancer diagnostics. The translational challenge is to develop a biocompatible approach ensuring high biochemical contrast while avoiding a raise of the background signal. We here present a concept where gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be utilized as a stimuli responsive contrast medium by chemically triggering their ability to exhibit multiphoton-induced luminescence (MIL) when performing multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPM). Proof-of-principle is demonstrated using peptide-functionalized AuNPs sensitive to zinc ions (Zn2+). Dispersed particles are invisible in the MPM until addition of millimolar concentrations of Zn2+ upon which MIL is enabled through particle aggregation caused by specific peptide interactions and folding. The process can be reversed by removal of the Zn2+ using a chelator, thereby resuspending the AuNPs. In addition, the concept was demonstrated by exposing the particles to matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) causing peptide digestion resulting in AuNP aggregation, significantly elevating the MIL signal from the background. The approach is based on the principle that aggregation shifts the plasmon resonance, elevating the absorption cross section in the near-infrared wavelength region enabling onset of MIL. This Letter demonstrates how biochemical sensing can be obtained in far-field MPM and should be further exploited as a future tool for noninvasive optical biosensing.

  • 37.
    Borutinskaite, Veronika Viktorija
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Characterization of proteins involved in differentiation and apoptosis of human leukemia and epithelial cancer cells2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, cancer is understood as an epigenetic as well as a genetic disease. The main epigenetic hallmarks of the cancer cell are DNA methylation and histone modifications. The latter changes may be an optimal target for novel anticancer agents. The main goal of using histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) would be restoration of gene expression of those tumor-suppressor genes that have been transcriptionally silenced by promoter-associated histone deacetylation. However, HDACIs have pleiotropic effects that we are only just starting to understand. These may also be responsible for the induction of differentiation, cell-cycle arrest and pro-apoptotic effects.

    There are now so many HDACIs available, with such different chemical structures and biological and biochemical properties, that it is hopeful that at least some of them will succeed, probably in combination with other agents or therapies.

    In our studies we focussed ourselves on studies some new HDACIs, that can be useful for treating cancers, including leukemia and epithelial cancer. To do that, we used novel HDACIs, like BML-210, and their combination with the differentiation inducer all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). Cell differentiation and proliferation in general, and specific gene expression require de novo protein synthesis and/or post-translational protein modifications. So, we tried to identify proteins in general and specifically the proteins that could be important for the cell differentiation process, and when and where in the cell the proteins appear.

    We delineated that HDACIs inhibited leukemia (NB4 and HL-60) cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent way. Moreover, BML-210 blocked HeLa cell growth and promoted apoptosis in a time-dependent way. Combining of BML-210 with ATRA induced a differentiation process in leukemia cell lines that lead to apoptosis. This correlated with cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 stage and changes in expression of cell cycle proteins (p21, p53), transcription factors (NF-κB, Sp1) and their binding activity to consensus or specific promoter sequences. We also assessed histone modifications, i.e. H3 phosphorylation and H4 hyperacetylation due to HDACI, leading to chromatin remodeling and changes in gene transcriptions.

    We have also studied changes in protein maps caused by HDACIs and differentiation agents, identifying differences for a few proteins due to growth inhibition and induction of differentiation in NB4 cells using BML-210 alone or in combination with ATRA. These proteins are involved in cell proliferation and signal transduction, like Rab, actin and calpain. One of them was alpha-dystrobrevin (α-DB). To further study possible roles of the latter, we determined changes of α-DB protein isoform expression that correlated with induction of differentiation. We thus identified a novel ensemble of α-DB interacting proteins in promyelocytic leukemia cells, including tropomyosin 3, actin, tubulin, RIBA, STAT and others, being important in cytoskeleton reorganization and signal transduction. Using confocal microscopy, we determined that α-DB co-localizes with HSP90 and F-actin in NB4 and HeLa cells. We also revealed that it changes sub-cellular compartment after treatment with ATRA and/or BML-210. α-DB silencing affected F-actin expression in HeLa cells, further supporting the idea that α-DB is involved in cytoskeleton reorganization in cells. Altogether, our results suggest that α−DB may work as a structural protein during proliferation and differentiation processes of human cancer cells.

    Based on our findings, we suggest that HDACIs, like BML-210, can be promising anticancer agents, especially in leukemia treatment, by inducing apoptosis and regulating proliferation and differentiation through the modulation of histone acetylations and gene expression.

    List of papers
    1. The novel histone deacetylase inhibitor BML-210 exerts growth inhibitory, proapoptotic and differentiation stimulating effects on the human leukemia cell lines
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The novel histone deacetylase inhibitor BML-210 exerts growth inhibitory, proapoptotic and differentiation stimulating effects on the human leukemia cell lines
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: European Journal of Pharmacology, ISSN 0014-2999, Vol. 549, no 1-3, p. 9-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors have a potent role in the strategy for the treatment of leukemias. BML-210 (N-(2-Aminophenyl)-N′ phenyloctanol diamine) is the novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, and its mechanism of action has not been characterized. In this study, we examined the in vitro effects of BML-210 on the human leukemia cell lines (NB4, HL-60, THP-1, and K562). We found that BML-210 inhibits the growth of all cell lines and promotes apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. BML-210 alone induces HL-60 and K562 cell differentiation (up to 30%) to granulocytes and erythrocytes, respectively, and in combination with differentiation agents — all-trans retinoic acid and hemin, markedly potentates it. Those treatments cause G1 arrest and histone H4 acetylation, affects transcription factor NF-κB and Sp1 binding activity to their consensus sequences, the p21 or the FasL promoters, and influences expression of Sp1, NF-κB, p21 and FasL. These findings suggest that BML-210 could be a promising antileukemic agent to induce apoptosis and to modulate differentiation through the modulation of histone acetylation and gene expression.

    Keywords
    Apoptosis; Differentiation; Histone deacetylase inhibitor; Leukemia; Transcription factors
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13262 (URN)10.1016/j.ejphar.2006.08.010 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-30 Created: 2008-05-30
    2. Apoptotic effects of the novel histone deacetylase inhibitor BML-210 on HeLa cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Apoptotic effects of the novel histone deacetylase inhibitor BML-210 on HeLa cells
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13263 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-05-30 Created: 2008-05-30 Last updated: 2010-01-13
    3. Effects of retinoic acid and histone deacetylase inhibitor Bml-210 on protein expression in NB4 cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of retinoic acid and histone deacetylase inhibitor Bml-210 on protein expression in NB4 cells
    2005 (English)In: Biologija, ISSN 1392-0146, Vol. 4, p. 88-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13264 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-05-30 Created: 2008-05-30
    4. Multiple roles of alpha-dystrobrevin in human cancer cells during proliferation and differentiation processes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multiple roles of alpha-dystrobrevin in human cancer cells during proliferation and differentiation processes
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13265 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-05-30 Created: 2008-05-30 Last updated: 2010-01-13
    5. Retinoic acid and histone deacelytase inhibitor BML-210 inhibit proliferation of human cervical cancer HeLa cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Retinoic acid and histone deacelytase inhibitor BML-210 inhibit proliferation of human cervical cancer HeLa cells
    2006 (English)In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, Vol. 1091, p. 346-355Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is believed to be the central cause of cervical cancer. The viral proteins E6 and E7 from high-risk HPV types prevent cells from differentiating apoptosis and inducing hyperproliferative lesions. Human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells contain integrated human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18). Retinoic acid (RA) is a key regulator of epithelial cell differentiation and a growth inhibitor in vitro of HeLa cervical carcinoma cells. Cellular responses to RA are mediated by nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors. On the other hand, histone deacetylase inhibitors have been shown to be chemopreventive agents for the treatment of cancer cells. In this article, we have examined the antiproliferative effect of RA and histone deacetylase inhibitor BML-210 on HeLa cells, and particularly the effects on protein expression that may be involved in the cell cycle control and apoptosis. Our data suggest that a combination of RA and BML-210 leads to cell growth inhibition with subsequent apoptosis in a treatment time-dependent manner. We confirm that BML-210 alone or in combination with RA causes a marked increase in the level of p21. The changes in the p53 level are under the influence of p38 phosphorylation. We also discovered that the histone deacetylase inhibitor BML-210 causes increased levels of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and phosphorylated p38 MAP Kinase; the latter link in cell cycle arrest with response to extracellular stimuli. Our results suggest that RA and BML-210 are involved in different signaling pathways that regulate cell cycle arrest and lead to apoptosis of HeLa cells.

    Keywords
    histone deacetylase inhibitor, proliferation, p53, p21
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13266 (URN)10.1196/annals.1378.079 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-30 Created: 2008-05-30 Last updated: 2009-05-07
    6. The histone deacetylase inhibitor FK228 distinctly sensitizes the human leukemia cells to retinoic acid-induced differentiation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The histone deacetylase inhibitor FK228 distinctly sensitizes the human leukemia cells to retinoic acid-induced differentiation
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, Vol. 1091, p. 368-384Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    FK228 (depsipeptide) is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) that has shown therapeutical efficacy in clinical trials for malignant lymphoma. In this article, we examined in vitro effects of FK228 on human leukemia cell lines, NB4 and HL-60. FK228 alone (0.2–1 ng/mL) inhibited leukemia cell growth in a dose-dependent manner and induced death by apoptosis. FK228 had selective differentiating effects on two cell lines when used for 6 h before induction of granulocytic differentiation by retinoic acid (RA) or in combination with RA. These effects were accompanied by a time- and dose-dependent histone H4 hyper-acetylation or histone H3 dephosphorylation and alterations in DNA binding of NF-κB in association with cell death and differentiation. Pifithrin-α (PFT), an inhibitor of p53 transcriptional activity, protected only NB4 cells with functional p53 from FK228-induced apoptosis and did not interfere with antiproliferative activity in p53-negative HL-60 cells. In NB4 cells, PFT inhibited p53 binding to the p21 (Waf1/Cip1) promotor and induced DNA binding of NF-κB leading to enhanced cell survival. Thus, beneficial effects of FK228 on human promyelocytic leukemia may be exerted through the induction of differentiation or apoptosis via histone modification and selective involvement of transcription factors, such as NF-κB and p53.

    Keywords
    differentiation, histone deacetylase inhibitor, leukemia, NF-κB, p53
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13267 (URN)10.1196/annals.1378.081 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-30 Created: 2008-05-30 Last updated: 2011-01-11
  • 38.
    Burek, C. J.
    et al.
    University of Münster, Germany.
    Roth, J.
    University of Münster, Germany.
    Koch, H. G.
    University of Münster, Germany.
    Harzer, K.
    University of Tübingen, Germany.
    Los, Marek Jan
    Department of Immunology and Cell Biology, University of Münster, Germany.
    Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus
    University of Münster, Germany .
    The role of ceramide in receptor- and stress-induced apoptosis studied in acidic ceramidase-deficient Farber disease cells2001In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 20, no 45, p. 6493-6502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The activation of sphingomyelinases leading to the generation of ceramide has been implicated in various apoptotic pathways. However, the role of ceramide as an essential death mediator remains highly controversial. In the present study, we investigated the functional relevance of ceramide in a genetic model by using primary cells from a Farber disease patient. These cells accumulate ceramide as the result of an inherited deficiency of acidic ceramidase. We demonstrate that Farber disease lymphocytes and fibroblasts underwent apoptosis induced by various stress stimuli, including staurosporine, anticancer drugs and gamma -irradiation, equally as normal control cells. In addition, caspase activation by these proapoptotic agents occurred rather similarly in Farber disease and control fibroblasts. Interestingly, Farber disease lymphoid cells underwent apoptosis induced by the CD95 death receptor more rapidly than control cells. Our data therefore suggest that ceramide does not play an essential role as a second messenger in stress-induced apoptosis. However, in accordance with a role in lipid-rich microdomains, ceramide by altering membrane composition may function as an amplifier in CD95-mediated apoptosis.

  • 39.
    Burek, M.
    et al.
    Department of Immunology and Cell Biology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany.
    Maddika, Subbareddy
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics,University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada .
    Burek, C. J.
    Department of Immunology and Cell Biology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany.
    Daniel, P. T.
    Department of Hematology, Oncology and Tumor Immunology, Charité, Berlin, Germany.
    Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus
    nstitute of Molecular Medicine, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany .
    Los, Marek Jan
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba; Manitoba Institute of Child Health; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics; Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada, .
    Apoptin-induced cell death is modulated by Bcl-2 family members and is Apaf-1dependent2006In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 25, no 15, p. 2213-2222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apoptin, a chicken anemia virus-derived protein, selectively induces apoptosis in transformed but not in normal cells, thus making it a promising candidate as a novel anticancer therapeutic. The mechanism of apoptin-induced apoptosis is largely unknown. Here, we report that contrary to previous assumptions, Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L) inhibit apoptin-induced cell death in several tumor cell lines. In contrast, deficiency of Bax conferred resistance, whereas Bax expression sensitized cells to apoptin-induced death. Cell death induction by apoptin was associated with cytochrome c release from mitochondria as well as with caspase-3 and -7 activation. Benzyloxy-carbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone, a broad spectrum caspase inhibitor, was highly protective against apoptin-induced cell death. Apoptosis induced by apoptin required Apaf-1, as immortalized Apaf-1-deficient fibroblasts as well as tumor cells devoid of Apaf-1 were strongly protected. Thus, our data indicate that apoptin-induced apoptosis is not only Bcl-2- and caspase dependent, but also engages an Apaf-1 apoptosome-mediated mitochondrial death pathway.

  • 40.
    Bäcklund, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Elfwing, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ajjan, Fatimá Nadia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Babenko, Viktoria
    Department of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre, University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Dzwolak, Wojciech
    Department of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre, University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    PEDOT-S coated protein fibril microhelicesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We show here the preparation and characterization of micrometer sized conductive helices. We utilize protein fibrils as structural templates to create chiral helices with either right or left handed helicity. The helices are coated with the conductive polymer alkoxysulfonate poly(ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT-S) to create micrometer sized conductive helices. The coating acts as a stabilizer for the template structure, facilitates the preparation of solid state films and shows significant conductivity. The helices have been investigated using Circular Dichroism (CD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the conductivity have been measured for solid state films.

  • 41.
    Campos, Alexandre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Danielsson, Gabriela
    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Science for Life Laboratory, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Farinha, Ana Paula
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kuruvilla, Jacob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Warholm, Per
    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Science for Life Laboratory, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University.
    Shotgun proteomics to unravel marine mussel (Mytilus edulis) response to long-term exposure to low salinity and propranolol in a Baltic Sea microcosm2016In: Journal of Proteomics, ISSN 1874-3919, E-ISSN 1876-7737, Vol. 137, p. 97-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pharmaceuticals, among them the β-adrenoreceptor blocker propranolol, are an important group of environmental contaminants reported in European waters. Laboratory exposure to pharmaceuticals on marine species has been performed without considering the input of the ecosystem flow. To unravel the ecosystem response to long-term exposure to propranolol we have performed long-term exposure to propranolol and low salinity in microcosms. We applied shotgun proteomic analysis to gills of Mytilus edulis from those Baltic Sea microcosms and identified 2071 proteins with a proteogenomic strategy. The proteome profiling patterns from the 587 highly reproductive proteins among groups define salinity as a key factor in the mussel´s response to propranolol. Exposure at low salinity drives molecular mechanisms of adaptation based on a decrease in the abundance of several cytoskeletal proteins, signalling and intracellular membrane trafficking pathway combined with a response towards the maintenance of transcription and translation. The exposure to propranolol combined with low salinity modulates the expression of structural proteins including cilia functions and decrease the expression membrane protein transporters. This study reinforces the environment concerns of the impact of low salinity in combination with anthropogenic pollutants and anticipate critical physiological conditions for the survival of the blue mussel in the northern areas.

  • 42.
    Cassens, U.
    et al.
    Institute of Transfusion Medicine, University of Münster, D-48149 Münster, Germany.
    Lewinski, G.
    Unit of Surgery, Municipal Hospital, 38-300 Gorlice, Poland.
    Samraj, A. K.
    Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Düsseldorf, D-40225 Düsseldorf, Germany.
    von Bernuth, H.
    Children´s University Clinic, Laboratory for Clinical Research, D-01307 Dresden, Germany.
    Baust, H.
    Department of Radiotherapy, University of Ulm, D-89070 Ulm, Germany.
    Khazaie, K.
    Department of Cancer Immunology and Aids, Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, MA 02115, USA.
    Los, Marek Jan
    Institute of Experimental Dermatology, University of Muenster, Germany.
    Viral modulation of cell death by inhibition of caspases2003In: Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis, ISSN 0004-069X, E-ISSN 1661-4917, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 19-27Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caspases are key effectors of the apoptotic process. Some of them play important roles in the immune system, being involved in the proteolytic maturation of the key cytokines, including interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) and IL-18. The latter directs the production of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). Among pathogens, particularly viruses express various modulators of caspases that inhibit their activity by direct binding. By evading the apoptotic process, viruses can better control their production in the infected cell and avoid the attack of the immune system. Targeting the maturation of the key cytokines involved in the initiation of (antiviral) immune response helps to avoid recognition and eradication by the immune system. The three main classes of caspase inhibitors frequently found among viruses include serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins: CrmA/SPI-2), viral IAPs (vIAPs) and p35. Their molecular mechanisms of action, structures and overall influence on cellular physiology are discussed in the review below.

  • 43.
    Cederberg, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Felaktig alternativ splicing: Vissa mutationer i BRCA1, BRCA2, ERα och ERβ är starkt förknippade med bröstcancer2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10,5 credits / 16 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Alternative splicing is a process that partly rejects the common definition of a gene – that one gene codes for one specific protein. By variable combination of coding regions (exons) and exclusion of non-coding regions (introns), formation of several different mRNA-transcripts, and consequently several different proteins, can derive from the same gene. Alternative splicing is an important condition for the development of complex life forms, but it is also a highly sensitive process and inaccurate splicing is the cause of approximately 15 % of mutations that cause genetic diseases. This article presents four genes, BRCA1, BRCA2, ERα and ERβ, and inaccurate splicing of these genes increases the risk of developing cancer, particularly breast cancer and ovarian cancer. Breast cancer is the second most common form of lethal cancer among women. After identifying the cancerogenic mutations, women of high-risk families can undergo genetic testing and preventive therapy can reduce the morbidity and mortality. The article also presents a short discussion around the ethical problems of genetic testing, and the social and psychological dilemmas women of high-risk families are facing when they are given the option to undergo genetic testing.

  • 44.
    Chen, Gefei
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Abelein, Axel
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Harriet E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Leppert, Axel
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Tambaro, Simone
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hemmingsson, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Roshan, Firoz
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Landreh, Michael
    University of Oxford, England; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Biverstal, Henrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Latvian Institute Organ Synth, Latvia.
    Koeck, Philip J. B.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Presto, Jenny
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hebert, Hans
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Fisahn, Andre
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Johansson, Jan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bri2 BRICHOS client specificity and chaperone activity are governed by assembly state2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 2081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    . Protein misfolding and aggregation is increasingly being recognized as a cause of disease. In Alzheimers disease the amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) misfolds into neurotoxic oligomers and assembles into amyloid fibrils. The Bri2 protein associated with Familial British and Danish dementias contains a BRICHOS domain, which reduces A beta fibrillization as well as neurotoxicity in vitro and in a Drosophila model, but also rescues proteins from irreversible nonfibrillar aggregation. How these different activities are mediated is not known. Here we show that Bri2 BRICHOS monomers potently prevent neuronal network toxicity of A beta, while dimers strongly suppress A beta fibril formation. The dimers assemble into high-molecular-weight oligomers with an apparent two-fold symmetry, which are efficient inhibitors of non-fibrillar protein aggregation. These results indicate that Bri2 BRICHOS affects qualitatively different aspects of protein misfolding and toxicity via different quaternary structures, suggesting a means to generate molecular chaperone diversity.

  • 45. Chlichlia, K.
    et al.
    Los, Marek Jan
    Department of Immunology and Cell Biology, University of Muenster, Roentgenstr. 21, D-48149 Muenster, Germany.
    Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus
    Department of Immunology and Cell Biology, University of Muenster, Roentgenstr. 21, D-48149 Muenster, Germany.
    Gazzolo, L.
    INSERM U412, Ecole Normale S périeure de Lyon, 69367 Lyon, Cedex 07, France.
    Schirrmacher, V.
    Division of Cellular Immunology (G0100), Tumor Immunology Program, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Khazaie, K.
    Division of Cellular Immunology (G0100), Tumor Immunology Program, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D69120 Heidelberg, Germany; 4Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02115, U.S.A..
    Redox events in HTLV-1 tax-induced apoptotic T-cell death2002In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, ISSN 1523-0864, E-ISSN 1557-7716, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 471-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of studies implicate reactive oxygen intermediates in the induction of DNA damage and apoptosis. Recent studies suggest that the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) Tax protein induces oxidative stress and apoptotic T-cell death. Activation of the T-cell receptor/CD3 pathway enhances the Tax-mediated oxidative and apoptotic effects. Tax-mediated apoptosis and oxidative stress as well as activation of nuclear factor-kappaB can be potently suppressed by antioxidants. This review focuses on Tax-dependent changes in the intracellular redox status and their role in Tax-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis. The relevance of these observations to HTLV-1 virus-mediated T-cell transformation and leukemogenesis are discussed.

  • 46.
    Cristobal, Susana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tedesco, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bayat, Narges
    Stockholm University.
    Danielsson, Gabriela
    Stockholm University.
    Buque, Xavier
    Basque country University, Spain.
    Aspichueta, Patricia
    Basque Country University, Spain.
    Fresnedo, Olatz
    Basque Country University, Spain.
    Proteomic and lipidomic analysis of primary mouse hepatocytes exposed to metal and metal oxide nanoparticles2015In: Journal of Integrated OMICS, ISSN 2182-0287, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 44-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global analysis of the cellular lipid and protein content upon exposure to metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) can provide an overviewof the possible impact of exposure. Proteomic analysis has been applied to understand the nanoimpact however the relevance of the alterationon the lipidic proOle has been underestimated. In our study, primary mouse hepatocytes were treated with ultra-small (US) TiO2-USNPsas well as ZnO-NPs, CuO-NPs and Ag-NPs. e protein extracts were analysed by 2D-DIGE and quantiOed by imaging soPware and the selecteddi9erentially expressed proteins were identiOed by nLC-ESI-MS/MS. In parallel, lipidomic analysis of the samples was performed usingthin layer chromatography (TLC) and analyzed by imaging soPware. Our Ondings show an overall ranking of the nanoimpact at the cellularand molecular level: TiO2-USNPs<ZnO-NPs<Ag-NPs<CuO-NPs. CuO-NPs and Ag-NPs were cytotoxic while ZnO-NPs and CuO-NPs hadoxidative capacity. TiO2-USNPs did not have oxidative capacity and were not cytotoxic. e most common cellular impact of the exposurewas the down-regulation of proteins. e proteins identiOed were involved in urea cycle, lipid metabolism, electron transport chain, metabolismsignaling, cellular structure and we could also identify nuclear proteins. CuO-NPs exposure decreased phosphatidylethanolamine andphosphatidylinositol and caused down-regulation of electron transferring protein subunit beta. Ag-NPs exposure caused increased of totallipids and triacylglycerol and decrease of sphingomyelin. TiO2-USNPs also caused decrease of sphingomyelin as well as up-regulation of ATPsynthase and electron transferring protein alfa. ZnO-NPs a9ected the proteome in a concentration-independent manner with down-regulationof RNA helicase. ZnO-NPs exposure did not a9ect the cellular lipids. To our knowledge this work represents the Orst integrated proteomic andlipidomic approach to study the e9ect of NPs exposure to primary mouse hepatocytes in vitro.

  • 47.
    Csizmok, Veronika
    et al.
    Hospital Sick Children, Canada; University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Montecchio, Meri
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lin, Hong
    Hospital Sick Children, Canada.
    Tyers, Mike
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Sunnerhagen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Forman-Kay, Julie D.
    Hospital Sick Children, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Multivalent Interactions with Fbw7 and Pin1 Facilitate Recognition of c-Jun by the SCFFbw7 Ubiquitin Ligase2018In: Structure, ISSN 0969-2126, E-ISSN 1878-4186, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 28-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many regulatory proteins, including the transcription factor c-Jun, are highly enriched in disordered protein regions that govern growth, division, survival, differentiation, and response to signals. The stability of c-Jun is controlled by poorly understood regulatory interactions of its disordered region with both the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCFFbw7 and prolyl cis-trans isomerase Pin1. We use nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence studies of c-Jun to demonstrate that multisite c-Jun phosphorylation is required for high-affinity interaction with Fbw7. We show that the Pin1 WW and PPIase domains interact in a dynamic complex with multiply phosphorylated c-Jun. Importantly, Pin1 isomerizes a pSer-Pro peptide bond at the c-Jun N terminus that affects binding to Fbw7 and thus modulates the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of c-Jun. Our findings support the general principle that multiple weak binding motifs within disordered regions can synergize to yield high-affinity interactions and provide rapidly evolvable means to build and fine-tune regulatory events.

  • 48.
    de Souza Marinho, Thatiany
    et al.
    University of Estado Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.
    Kawasaki, Adriana
    University of Estado Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.
    Bryntesson, Marcus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Souza-Mello, Vanessa
    University of Estado Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.
    Barbosa-da-Silva, Sandra
    University of Estado Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.
    Aguila, Marcia B.
    University of Estado Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.
    Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos A.
    University of Estado Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.
    Rosuvastatin limits the activation of hepatic stellate cells in diet-induced obese mice2017In: Hepatology Research, ISSN 1386-6346, E-ISSN 1872-034X, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 928-940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of rosuvastatin in a model of diet-induced obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, with attention to the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Method Male C57BL/6 mice received a control diet (C; 10% energy as lipids) or a high-fat diet (HF; 50% energy as lipids) for 12 weeks, followed by 7 weeks of treatment. Group CR received control diet + rosuvastatin; group HFR received high-fat diet + rosuvastatin. Results The HF group showed higher insulin, total cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and leptin levels than the C group, all of which were significantly diminished by rosuvastatin in the HFR group. The HF group had greater steatosis and activated HSCs than the C group, whereas rosuvastatin diminished the steatosis (less 21%, P amp;lt; 0.001) and significantly inhibited the activation of the HSCs in the HFR group compared to the HF group. The sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma protein expressions were increased in HF animals and reduced after treatment in the HFR group. By contrast, low PPAR-alpha and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 expressions were found in the HF group, and were restored by rosuvastatin treatment in the HFR group. Conclusion Rosuvastatin mitigated hepatic steatosis by modulating PPAR balance, favoring PPAR-alpha over PPAR-gamma downstream effects. The effects were accompanied by a diminishing of insulin resistance, the anti-inflammatory adipokine profile, and HSC activation, avoiding non-alcoholic fatty liver disease progression and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis onset in this model.

  • 49.
    Debatin, K. M.
    et al.
    GERMAN CANC RES CTR,DIV MOL ONCOL,D-69120 HEIDELBERG,GERMANY.
    Beltinger, C.
    GERMAN CANC RES CTR,DIV MOL ONCOL,D-69120 HEIDELBERG,GERMANY.
    Bohler, T.
    GERMAN CANC RES CTR,DIV MOL ONCOL,D-69120 HEIDELBERG,GERMANY.
    Fellenberg, J.
    GERMAN CANC RES CTR,DIV MOL ONCOL,D-69120 HEIDELBERG,GERMANY.
    Friesen, C.
    GERMAN CANC RES CTR,DIV MOL ONCOL,D-69120 HEIDELBERG,GERMANY.
    Fulda, S.
    GERMAN CANC RES CTR,DIV MOL ONCOL,D-69120 HEIDELBERG,GERMANY.
    Herr, I.
    GERMAN CANC RES CTR,DIV MOL ONCOL,D-69120 HEIDELBERG,GERMANY.
    Los, Marek Jan
    GERMAN CANC RES CTR,DIV MOL ONCOL,D-69120 HEIDELBERG,GERMANY.
    Scheuerpflug, C.
    GERMAN CANC RES CTR,DIV MOL ONCOL,D-69120 HEIDELBERG,GERMANY.
    Sieverts, H.
    GERMAN CANC RES CTR,DIV MOL ONCOL,D-69120 HEIDELBERG,GERMANY.
    Stahnke, K.
    GERMAN CANC RES CTR,DIV MOL ONCOL,D-69120 HEIDELBERG,GERMANY.
    Regulation of apoptosis through CD95 (APO-I/Fas) receptor-ligand interaction1997In: Biochemical Society Transactions, ISSN 0300-5127, E-ISSN 1470-8752, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 405-410Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Debatin, K. M.
    et al.
    UNIV HEIDELBERG,CHILDRENS HOSP,D-6900 HEIDELBERG,GERMANY.
    Friesen, C.
    UNIV HEIDELBERG,CHILDRENS HOSP,D-6900 HEIDELBERG,GERMANY.
    Herr, I.
    UNIV HEIDELBERG,CHILDRENS HOSP,D-6900 HEIDELBERG,GERMANY.
    Los, Marek Jan
    UNIV HEIDELBERG,CHILDRENS HOSP,D-6900 HEIDELBERG,GERMANY.
    Activation of the CD95 pathway by anticancer drugs.1996In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 88, no 10, p. 2641-2641Article in journal (Refereed)
12345 1 - 50 of 248
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