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  • 1. Adan, Antonio
    et al.
    Alpaydin, Ethem
    Andreadis, I.
    Baldock, Richard
    Basu, Anup
    Bayro-Corrochano, Eduardo
    Berberidis, Kostas
    Bergevin, Robert
    Bhanu, Bir
    Biehl, Michael
    Pattern Recognition Referees 20092010In: Pattern Recognition, ISSN 0031-3203, E-ISSN 1873-5142, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Agnvall, Beatrix
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bélteky, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brain size is reduced by selectionfor tameness in Red Junglefowl–correlated effects in vital organs2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 3306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During domestication animals have undergone changes in size of brain and other vital organs. We hypothesize that this could be a correlated effect to increased tameness. Red Junglefowl (ancestors of domestic chickens) were selected for divergent levels of fear of humans for five generations. The parental (P0) and the fifth selected generation (S5) were culled when 48–54 weeks old and the brains were weighed before being divided into telencephalon, cerebellum, mid brain and optic lobes. Each single brain part as well as the liver, spleen, heart and testicles were also weighed. Brains of S5 birds with high fear scores (S5 high) were heavier both in absolute terms and when corrected for body weight. The relative weight of telencephalon (% of brain weight) was significantly higher in S5 high and relative weight of cerebellum was lower. Heart, liver, testes and spleen were all relatively heavier (% of body weight) in S5 high. Hence, selection for tameness has changed the size of the brain and other vital organs in this population and may have driven the domesticated phenotype as a correlated response.

  • 3.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Heart: Image quality, measurement accuracy and patient experience2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Non-invasive diagnostic imaging of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) is frequently carried out with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) or myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (MPS). CMR is the gold standard for the evaluation of scar after myocardial infarction and MPS the clinical gold standard for ischemia. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is at times difficult for patients and may induce anxiety while patient experience of MPS is largely unknown.

    Aims: To evaluate image quality in CMR with respect to the sequences employed, the influence of atrial fibrillation, myocardial perfusion and the impact of patient information. Further, to study patient experience in relation to MRI with the goal of improving the care of these patients.

    Method: Four study designs have been used. In paper I, experimental cross-over, paper (II) experimental controlled clinical trial, paper (III) psychometric crosssectional study and paper (IV) prospective intervention study. A total of 475 patients ≥ 18 years with primarily cardiac problems (I-IV) except for those referred for MRI of the spine (III) were included in the four studies.

    Result: In patients (n=20) with atrial fibrillation, a single shot steady state free precession (SS-SSFP) sequence showed significantly better image quality than the standard segmented inversion recovery fast gradient echo (IR-FGRE) sequence (I). In first-pass perfusion imaging the gradient echo-echo planar imaging sequence (GREEPI) (n=30) had lower signal-to-noise and contrast–to-noise ratios than the steady state free precession sequence (SSFP) (n=30) but displayed a higher correlation with the MPS results, evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively (II). The MRIAnxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ) was validated on patients, referred for MRI of either the spine (n=193) or the heart (n=54). The final instrument had 15 items divided in two factors regarding Anxiety and Relaxation. The instrument was found to have satisfactory psychometric properties (III). Patients who prior CMR viewed an information video scored significantly (lower) better in the factor Relaxation, than those who received standard information. Patients who underwent MPS scored lower on both factors, Anxiety and Relaxation. The extra video information had no effect on CMR image quality (IV).

    Conclusion: Single shot imaging in atrial fibrillation produced images with less artefact than a segmented sequence. In first-pass perfusion imaging, the sequence GRE-EPI was superior to SSFP. A questionnaire depicting anxiety during MRI showed that video information prior to imaging helped patients relax but did not result in an improvement in image quality.

    List of papers
    1. Image quality and myocardial scar size determined with magnetic resonance imaging in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation: a comparison of two imaging protocols
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Image quality and myocardial scar size determined with magnetic resonance imaging in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation: a comparison of two imaging protocols
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    2010 (English)In: CLINICAL PHYSIOLOGY AND FUNCTIONAL IMAGING, ISSN 1475-0961, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 122-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Pandgt;Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the heart generally requires breath holding and a regular rhythm. Single shot 2D steady-state free precession (SS_SSFP) is a fast sequence insensitive to arrhythmia as well as breath holding. Our purpose was to determine image quality, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios and infarct size with a fast single shot and a standard segmented MRI sequence in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation and chronic myocardial infarction. Methods: Twenty patients with chronic myocardial infarction and ongoing atrial fibrillation were examined with inversion recovery SS_SSFP and segmented inversion recovery 2D fast gradient echo (IR_FGRE). Image quality was assessed in four categories: delineation of infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium, occurrence of artefacts and overall image quality. SNR and CNR were calculated. Myocardial volume (ml) and infarct size, expressed as volume (ml) and extent (%), were calculated, and the methodological error was assessed. Results: SS_SSFP had significantly better quality scores in all categories (P = 0 center dot 037, P = 0 center dot 014, P = 0 center dot 021, P = 0 center dot 03). SNRinfarct and SNRblood were significantly better for IR_FGRE than for SS_SSFP (P = 0 center dot 048, P = 0 center dot 018). No significant difference was found in SNRmyocardium and CNR. The myocardial volume was significantly larger with SS_SSFP (170 center dot 7 versus 159 center dot 2 ml, P andlt; 0 center dot 001), but no significant difference was found in infarct volume and infarct extent. Conclusion: SS_SSFP displayed significantly better image quality than IR_FGRE. The infarct size and the error in its determination were equal for both sequences, and the examination time was shorter with SS_SSFP.

    Keyword
    atrial fibrillation, magnetic resonance imaging, myocardial infarction, segmented inversion recovery 2D fast gradient echo, single shot inversion recovery 2D steady-state free precession
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54159 (URN)10.1111/j.1475-097X.2009.00914.x (DOI)000274438800006 ()
    Available from: 2010-02-26 Created: 2010-02-26 Last updated: 2016-08-24
    2. An echo-planar imaging sequence is superior to a steady-state free precession sequence for visual as well as quantitative assessment of cardiac magnetic resonance stress perfusion
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>An echo-planar imaging sequence is superior to a steady-state free precession sequence for visual as well as quantitative assessment of cardiac magnetic resonance stress perfusion
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    2017 (English)In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 52-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background To assess myocardial perfusion, steady-state free precession cardiac magnetic resonance (SSFP, CMR) was compared with gradient-echo–echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI) using myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) as reference. Methods Cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion was recorded in 30 patients with SSFP and in another 30 patients with GRE-EPI. Timing and extent of inflow delay to the myocardium was visually assessed. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated. Myocardial scar was visualized with a phase-sensitive inversion recovery sequence (PSIR). All scar positive segments were considered pathologic. In MPS, stress and rest images were used as in clinical reporting. The CMR contrast wash-in slope was calculated and compared with the stress score from the MPS examination. CMR scar, CMR perfusion and MPS were assessed separately by one expert for each method who was blinded to other aspects of the study. Results Visual assessment of CMR had a sensitivity for the detection of an abnormal MPS at 78% (SSFP) versus 91% (GRE-EPI) and a specificity of 58% (SSFP) versus 84% (GRE-EPI). Kappa statistics for SSFP and MPS was 0·29, for GRE-EPI and MPS 0·72. The ANOVA of CMR perfusion slopes for all segments versus MPS score (four levels based on MPS) had correlation r = 0·64 (SSFP) and r = 0·96 (GRE-EPI). SNR was for normal segments 35·63 ± 11·80 (SSFP) and 17·98 ± 8·31 (GRE-EPI), while CNR was 28·79 ± 10·43 (SSFP) and 13·06 ± 7·61 (GRE-EPI). Conclusion GRE-EPI displayed higher agreement with the MPS results than SSFP despite significantly lower signal intensity, SNR and CNR.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2017
    Keyword
    cardiac imaging techniques, coronary heart disease, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, nuclear medicine, perfusion
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies Medical Image Processing Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130795 (URN)10.1111/cpf.12267 (DOI)000390688200008 ()26147785 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden [12437]; Futurum, the County council of Jonkoping [12440, 81851, 217261]; Linkoping University; County Council of Ostergotland [281281]; Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation [20120449]

    Available from: 2016-08-24 Created: 2016-08-24 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
    3. Development and validation of a questionnaire evaluating patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging: the Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and validation of a questionnaire evaluating patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging: the Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ)
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 6, p. 1368-1380Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To develop and validate a new instrument measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations, Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire. Background. Questionnaires measuring patients anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations have been the same as used in a wide range of conditions. To learn about patients experience during examination and to evaluate interventions, a specific questionnaire measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging is needed. Design. Psychometric cross-sectional study with test-retest design. Methods. A new questionnaire, Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire, was designed from patient expressions of anxiety in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-scanners. The sample was recruited between October 2012-October 2014. Factor structure was evaluated with exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency with Cronbachs alpha. Criterion-related validity, known-group validity and test-retest was calculated. Results. Patients referred for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of either the spine or the heart, were invited to participate. The development and validation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire resulted in 15 items consisting of two factors. Cronbachs alpha was found to be high. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire correlated higher with instruments measuring anxiety than with depression scales. Known-group validity demonstrated a higher level of anxiety for patients undergoing Magnetic Resonance Imaging scan of the heart than for those examining the spine. Test-retest reliability demonstrated acceptable level for the scale. Conclusion. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire bridges a gap among existing questionnaires, making it a simple and useful tool for measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016
    Keyword
    anxiety; instrument development; magnetic resonance imaging; nurse; nursing; reliability; validity
    National Category
    Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129145 (URN)10.1111/jan.12917 (DOI)000376007400014 ()26893007 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation; Futurum County Council of Jonkoping

    Available from: 2016-06-13 Created: 2016-06-13 Last updated: 2017-11-28
  • 4.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Department of Radiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Maret, Eva
    Department of Radiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping / Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Brudin, Lars
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar.
    Starck, Sven-Åke
    Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University / Department of Oncology, Hospital Physics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    An echo-planar imaging sequence is superior to a steady-state free precession sequence for visual as well as quantitative assessment of cardiac magnetic resonance stress perfusion2017In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 52-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background To assess myocardial perfusion, steady-state free precession cardiac magnetic resonance (SSFP, CMR) was compared with gradient-echo–echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI) using myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) as reference. Methods Cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion was recorded in 30 patients with SSFP and in another 30 patients with GRE-EPI. Timing and extent of inflow delay to the myocardium was visually assessed. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated. Myocardial scar was visualized with a phase-sensitive inversion recovery sequence (PSIR). All scar positive segments were considered pathologic. In MPS, stress and rest images were used as in clinical reporting. The CMR contrast wash-in slope was calculated and compared with the stress score from the MPS examination. CMR scar, CMR perfusion and MPS were assessed separately by one expert for each method who was blinded to other aspects of the study. Results Visual assessment of CMR had a sensitivity for the detection of an abnormal MPS at 78% (SSFP) versus 91% (GRE-EPI) and a specificity of 58% (SSFP) versus 84% (GRE-EPI). Kappa statistics for SSFP and MPS was 0·29, for GRE-EPI and MPS 0·72. The ANOVA of CMR perfusion slopes for all segments versus MPS score (four levels based on MPS) had correlation r = 0·64 (SSFP) and r = 0·96 (GRE-EPI). SNR was for normal segments 35·63 ± 11·80 (SSFP) and 17·98 ± 8·31 (GRE-EPI), while CNR was 28·79 ± 10·43 (SSFP) and 13·06 ± 7·61 (GRE-EPI). Conclusion GRE-EPI displayed higher agreement with the MPS results than SSFP despite significantly lower signal intensity, SNR and CNR.

  • 5.
    Ahlström, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nonlinear phonocardiographic Signal Processing2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis work has been to develop signal analysis methods for a computerized cardiac auscultation system, the intelligent stethoscope. In particular, the work focuses on classification and interpretation of features derived from the phonocardiographic (PCG) signal by using advanced signal processing techniques.

    The PCG signal is traditionally analyzed and characterized by morphological properties in the time domain, by spectral properties in the frequency domain or by nonstationary properties in a joint time-frequency domain. The main contribution of this thesis has been to introduce nonlinear analysis techniques based on dynamical systems theory to extract more information from the PCG signal. Especially, Takens' delay embedding theorem has been used to reconstruct the underlying system's state space based on the measured PCG signal. This processing step provides a geometrical interpretation of the dynamics of the signal, whose structure can be utilized for both system characterization and classification as well as for signal processing tasks such as detection and prediction. In this thesis, the PCG signal's structure in state space has been exploited in several applications. Change detection based on recurrence time statistics was used in combination with nonlinear prediction to remove obscuring heart sounds from lung sound recordings in healthy test subjects. Sample entropy and mutual information were used to assess the severity of aortic stenosis (AS) as well as mitral insufficiency (MI) in dogs. A large number of, partly nonlinear, features was extracted and used for distinguishing innocent murmurs from murmurs caused by AS or MI in patients with probable valve disease. Finally, novel work related to very accurate localization of the first heart sound by means of ECG-gated ensemble averaging was conducted. In general, the presented nonlinear processing techniques have shown considerably improved results in comparison with other PCG based techniques.

    In modern health care, auscultation has found its main role in primary or in home health care, when deciding if special care and more extensive examinations are required. Making a decision based on auscultation is however difficult, why a simple tool able to screen and assess murmurs would be both time- and cost-saving while relieving many patients from needless anxiety. In the emerging field of telemedicine and home care, an intelligent stethoscope with decision support abilities would be of great value.

    List of papers
    1. A method for accurate localization of the first heart sound and possible applications
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A method for accurate localization of the first heart sound and possible applications
    2008 (English)In: Physiological Measurement, ISSN 0967-3334, E-ISSN 1361-6579, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 417-428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously developed a method for localization of the first heart sound (S1) using wavelet denoising and ECG-gated peak-picking. In this study, an additional enhancement step based on cross-correlation and ECG-gated ensemble averaging (EA) is presented. The main objective of the improved method was to localize S1 with very high temporal accuracy in (pseudo-) real time. The performance of S1 detection and localization, with and without EA enhancement, was evaluated on simulated as well as experimental data. The simulation study showed that EA enhancement reduced the localization error considerably and that S1 could be accurately localized at much lower signal-to-noise ratios. The experimental data were taken from ten healthy subjects at rest and during invoked hyper- and hypotension. For this material, the number of correct S1 detections increased from 91% to 98% when using EA enhancement. Improved performance was also demonstrated when EA enhancement was used for continuous tracking of blood pressure changes and for respiration monitoring via the electromechanical activation time. These are two typical applications where accurate localization of S1 is essential for the results.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Institutionen för medicinsk teknik, 2008
    Keyword
    ensemble averaging, detection, localization, heart sound, bioacoustics
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-11856 (URN)10.1088/0967-3334/29/3/011 (DOI)
    Note
    Original publication: C Ahlstrom, T Länne, P Ask and A Johansson, A method for accurate localization of the first heart sound and possible applications, 2008, Physiological Measurement, (29), 3, 417-428. http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0967-3334/29/3/011. Copyright: Institute of Physics and IOP Publishing Limited, http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/PMAvailable from: 2008-05-20 Created: 2008-05-20 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Assessing Aortic Stenosis using Sample Entropy of the Phonocardiographic Signal in Dogs
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing Aortic Stenosis using Sample Entropy of the Phonocardiographic Signal in Dogs
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    2008 (English)In: IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, ISSN 0018-9294, E-ISSN 1558-2531, Vol. 55, no 8, p. 2107-2109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In aortic valve stenosis (AS), heart murmurs arise as an effect of turbulent blood flow distal to the obstructed valves. With increasing AS severity, the flow becomes more unstable, and the ensuing murmur becomes more complex. We hypothesize that these hemodynamic flow changes can be quantified based on the complexity of the phonocardiographic (PCG) signal. In this study, sample entropy (SampEn) was investigated as a measure of complexity using a dog model. Twenty-seven boxer dogs with various degrees of AS were examined with Doppler echocardiography, and the peak aortic flow velocity (Vmax) was used as a reference of AS severity. SampEn correlated to Vmax with R = 0.70 using logarithmic regression. In a separate analysis, significant differences were found between physiologic murmurs and murmurs caused by AS (p < 0.05), and the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated to 0.96. Comparison with previously presented PCG measures for AS assessment showed improved performance when using SampEn, especially for differentiation between physiological murmurs and murmurs caused by mild AS. Studies in patients will be needed to properly assess the technique in humans.

    Keyword
    Aortic stenosis (AS), bioacoustics, heart sound, murmur, sample entropy (SampEn)
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13042 (URN)10.1109/TBME.2008.923767 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-03-20 Created: 2008-03-20 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    3. Assessing mitral regurgitation attributable to myxomatous mitral valve disease in dogs using signal analysis of heart sounds and murmurs
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing mitral regurgitation attributable to myxomatous mitral valve disease in dogs using signal analysis of heart sounds and murmurs
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    2008 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13043 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-03-20 Created: 2008-03-20 Last updated: 2009-03-26
    4. Feature Extraction for Systolic Heart Murmur Classification
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feature Extraction for Systolic Heart Murmur Classification
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    2006 (English)In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, ISSN 0090-6964, E-ISSN 1573-9686, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 1666-1677Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Heart murmurs are often the first signs of pathological changes of the heart valves, and they are usually found during auscultation in the primary health care. Distinguishing a pathological murmur from a physiological murmur is however difficult, why an “intelligent stethoscope” with decision support abilities would be of great value. Phonocardiographic signals were acquired from 36 patients with aortic valve stenosis, mitral insufficiency or physiological murmurs, and the data were analyzed with the aim to find a suitable feature subset for automatic classification of heart murmurs. Techniques such as Shannon energy, wavelets, fractal dimensions and recurrence quantification analysis were used to extract 207 features. 157 of these features have not previously been used in heart murmur classification. A multi-domain subset consisting of 14, both old and new, features was derived using Pudil’s sequential floating forward selection (SFFS) method. This subset was compared with several single domain feature sets. Using neural network classification, the selected multi-domain subset gave the best results; 86% correct classifications compared to 68% for the first runner-up. In conclusion, the derived feature set was superior to the comparative sets, and seems rather robust to noisy data.

    Keyword
    Auscultation, Bioacoustics, Feature selection, Heart sounds, Valvular disease
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13044 (URN)10.1007/s10439-006-9187-4 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-03-20 Created: 2008-03-20 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    5. Heart sound cancellation from lung sound recordings using recurrence time statistics and nonlinear prediction
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heart sound cancellation from lung sound recordings using recurrence time statistics and nonlinear prediction
    2005 (English)In: IEEE Signal Processing Letters, ISSN 1070-9908, E-ISSN 1558-2361, Vol. 12, no 12, p. 812-815Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Heart sounds (HS) obscure the interpretation of lung sounds (LS). This letter presents a new method to detect and remove this undesired disturbance. The HS detection algorithm is based on a recurrence time statistic that is sensitive to changes in a reconstructed state space. Signal segments that are found to contain HS are removed, and the arising missing parts are replaced with predicted LS using a nonlinear prediction scheme. The prediction operates in the reconstructed state space and uses an iterated integrated nearest trajectory algorithm. The HS detection algorithm detects HS with an error rate of 4% false positives and 8% false negatives. The spectral difference between the reconstructed LS signal and an LS signal with removed HS was 0.34/spl plusmn/0.25, 0.50/spl plusmn/0.33, 0.46/spl plusmn/0.35, and 0.94/spl plusmn/0.64 dB/Hz in the frequency bands 20-40, 40-70, 70-150, and 150-300 Hz, respectively. The cross-correlation index was found to be 99.7%, indicating excellent similarity between actual LS and predicted LS. Listening tests performed by a skilled physician showed high-quality auditory results.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Institutionen för medicinsk teknik, 2005
    Keyword
    Bioacoustics, heart sound (HS), lung sound (LS), nonlinear prediction, recurrence time statistics
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-11857 (URN)10.1109/LSP.2005.859528 (DOI)
    Note
    Original publication: Ahlstrom, C., Liljefeldt, O., Hult, P. and Ask, P., Heart sound cancellation from lung sound recordings using recurrence time statistics and nonlinear prediction, 2005, IEEE Signal Processing Letters, (12), 12, 812-815. http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/LSP.2005.859528. Copyright: IEEE, http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/RecentIssue.jsp?punumber=97Available from: 2008-05-20 Created: 2008-05-20 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 6.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Detection of the 3(rd) heart sound using recurrence time statistics2006In: 2006 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, Vols 1-13, 2006, Vol. 1-13, p. 2288-2291Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 3(rd) heart sound (S3) is normally heard during auscultation of younger individuals, but it is also common in many patients with heart failure. Compared to the 1(st) and 2(nd) heart sounds, S3 has low amplitude and low frequency content, making it hard to detect (both manually for the physician and automatically by a detection algorithm). We present an algorithm based on a recurrence time statistic which is sensitive to changes in a reconstructed state space, particularly for detection of transitions with very low energy. Heart sound signals from ten children were used in this study. Most S3 occurrences were detected (98%), but the amount of false extra detections was rather high (7% of the heart cycles). In conclusion, the method seems capable of detecting S3 with high accuracy and robustness.

  • 7.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Liljefeldt, Olle
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Heart sound cancellation from lung sound recordings using recurrence time statistics and nonlinear prediction.2005In: Medicinteknikdagarna, 2005, Vol. 12, p. 812-815Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart sounds (HS) obscure the interpretation of lung sounds (LS). This letter presents a new method to detect and remove this undesired disturbance. The HS detection algorithm is based on a recurrence time statistic that is sensitive to changes in a reconstructed state space. Signal segments that are found to contain HS are removed, and the arising missing parts are replaced with predicted LS using a nonlinear prediction scheme. The prediction operates in the reconstructed state space and uses an iterated integrated nearest trajectory algorithm. The HS detection algorithm detects HS with an error rate of 4% false positives and 8% false negatives. The spectral difference between the reconstructed LS signal and an LS signal with removed HS was 0 34 0 25, 0 50 0 33, 0 46 0 35, and 0 94 0 64 dB/Hz in the frequency bands 20–40, 40–70, 70–150, and 150–300 Hz, respectively. The cross-correlation index was found to be 99.7%, indicating excellent similarity between actual LS and predicted LS. Listening tests performed by a skilled physician showed high-quality auditory results.

  • 8.
    Akbarian-Tefaghi, Ladan
    et al.
    Unit of Functional Neurosurgery, Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
    Akram, Harith
    Unit of Functional Neurosurgery, Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
    Johansson, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zrinzo, Ludvic
    Unit of Functional Neurosurgery, Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
    Kefalopoulou, Zinovia
    Unit of Functional Neurosurgery, Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
    Limousin, Patricia
    Unit of Functional Neurosurgery, Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
    Joyce, Eileen
    Unit of Functional Neurosurgery, Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
    Hariz, Marwan
    Unit of Functional Neurosurgery, Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Foltynie, Tom
    Unit of Functional Neurosurgery, Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
    Refining the Deep Brain Stimulation Target within the Limbic Globus Pallidus Internus for Tourette Syndrome2017In: Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, ISSN 1011-6125, E-ISSN 1423-0372, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 251-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with severe, refractory Tourette syndrome (TS) has demonstrated promising but variable results thus far. The thalamus and anteromedial globus pallidus internus (amGPi) have been the most commonly stimulated sites within the cortico-striato thalamic circuit, but an optimal target is yet to be elucidated.

    OBJECTIVES: This study of 15 patients with long-term amGPi DBS for severe TS investigated whether a specific anatomical site within the amGPi correlated with optimal clinical outcome for the measures of tics, obsessive compulsive behaviour (OCB), and mood.

    METHODS: Validated clinical assessments were used to measure tics, OCB, quality of life, anxiety, and depression before DBS and at the latest follow-up (17-82 months). Electric field simulations were created for each patient using information on electrode location and individual stimulation parameters. A subsequent regression analysis correlated these patient-specific simulations to percentage changes in outcome measures in order to identify any significant voxels related to clinical improvement.

    RESULTS: A region within the ventral limbic GPi, specifically on the medial medullary lamina in the pallidum at the level of the AC-PC, was significantly associated with improved tics but not mood or OCB outcome.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study adds further support to the application of DBS in a tic-related network, though factors such as patient sample size and clinical heterogeneity remain as limitations and replication is required.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-08-05 15:57
  • 9.
    Al-Absi, Thabit
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Efficient Characterization of Short Anelloviruses Fragments Found in Metagenomic Samples2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Some viral metagenomic serum samples contain a huge amount of Anellovirus, which is a genetically diverse family with a few conserved regions making it hard to efficiently characterize. Multiple sequence alignment of the Anelloviruses found in the sample must be constructed to get a clear picture of Anellovirus diversity and to identify stable regions. Using available multiple sequence alignment software directly on these fragments results in an MSA of a very poor quality due to their diversity, misaligned regions and low-quality regions present in the sequence.

    An efficient MSA must be constructed in order to characterize these Anellovirus present in the samples. Pairwise alignment is used to align one fragment to the database sequences at a time. The fragments are then aligned to the database sequences using the start and end position from the pairwise alignment results. The algorithm will also exclude non-aligned portions of the fragments, as these are very hard to handle properly and are often products of misassembly or chimeric sequenced fragments. Other tools to aid further analysis were developed, such as finding a non-overlapping window that contains the most fragments, find consensus of the alignment and extract any regions from the MSA for further analysis.

    An MSA was constructed with a high percent of correctly aligned bases compared to an MSA constructed using MSA softwares. The minimal number of genomes found in the sampled sequence was found as well as a distribution of the fragments along the database sequence. Moreover, highly conserved region and the window containing most fragments were extracted from the MSA and phylogenetic trees were constructed for these regions. 

  • 10.
    Almeida, Eduardo Carlos Venancio de
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Development of a wearable sensor system for real-time control of knee prostheses2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    It was demonstrated in recent studies that Complementary Limb Motion Estimation (CLME) is robust approach for controlling active knee prostheses. A wearable sensor system is then needed to provide inputs to the controller in a real-time platform. In the present work, a wearable sensor system based on magnetic and inertial measurement units (MIMU) together with a simple calibration procedure were proposed. This sensor system was intended to substitute and extend the capabilities of a previous device based on potentiometers and gyroscopes. The proposed sensor system and calibration were validated with an Optical Tracking System (OTS) in a standard gait lab and first results showed that the proposed solution had a performance comparable to similar studies in the literature.

  • 11.
    Almeida, Nuno
    et al.
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium; GE Vingmed Ultrasound AS, Norway.
    Papachristidis, Alexandros
    Kings Coll Hospital London, England.
    Pearson, Peter
    Kings Coll Hospital London, England.
    Imre Sarvari, Sebastian
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Edvardsen, Thor
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Monaghan, Mark
    Kings Coll Hospital London, England.
    Gerard, Olivier
    GE Vingmed Ultrasound AS, Norway.
    Samset, Eigil
    GE Vingmed Ultrasound AS, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Dhooge, Jan
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Left atrial volumetric assessment using a novel automated framework for 3D echocardiography: a multi-centre analysis2017In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 1008-1015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims This study aims at validating a software tool for automated segmentation and quantification of the left atrium (LA) from 3D echocardiography. Methods and results The LA segmentation tool uses a dual-chamber model of the left side of the heart to automatically detect and track the atrio-ventricular plane and the LA endocardium in transthoracic 3D echocardiography. The tool was tested in a dataset of 121 ultrasound images from patients with several cardiovascular pathologies (in a multi-centre setting), and the resulting volumes were compared with those assessed manually by experts in a blinded analysis using conventional contouring. Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreement between the automated method and the manual references, with differences (mean +/- 1.96 SD) of 0.5 +/- 5.7 mL for LA minimum volume and -1.6 +/- 9.7 mL for LA maximum volume (comparable to the inter-observer variability of manual tracings). The automated tool required no user interaction in 93% of the recordings, while 4% required a single click and only 2% required contour adjustments, reducing considerably the amount of time and effort required for LA volumetric analysis. Conclusion The automated tool was validated in a multi-centre setting, providing quantification of the LA volume over the cardiac cycle with minimal user interaction. The results of the automated analysis were in agreement with those estimated manually by experts. This study shows that such approach has clinical utility for the assessment of the LA morphology and function, automating and facilitating the time-consuming task of analysing 3D echocardiographic recordings.

  • 12.
    Almqvist, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sjörs, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Validation of MobileMe: a psychophysiological recording system – from a motion sickness perspective2006Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    MobileMe is a recently developed system for monitoring and recording physiological variables. It is wireless, and can therefore be suitable for field research, for example when measuring motion sickness symptoms.

    The aim of this thesis was to conclude whether the MobileMe recording system was valid for research studies. A validation study, consisting of two parts and including 10 subjects, was performed. The first part was a laboratory study, where data from MobileMe and a reference equipment were compared. A field study was also performed, onboard a combat boat, to determine the equipment’s validity in uncontrolled environments. Furthermore, the field study included an investigation of motion sickness symptoms, and provided data for evaluation of motion sickness rating scales.

    Statistical results from the laboratory study, and results from evaluation of data from the field study, showed that MobileMe was valid in both controlled and uncontrolled environments.

  • 13.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Modeling and simulation of DBS – comparison between leads and stimulation modes2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Latorre, Malcolm
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Göransson, Nathanael
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wårdell, karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Investigation into Deep Brain Stimulation Lead Designs: A Patient-Specific Simulation Study2016In: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode designs offer operation in voltage and current mode and capability to steer the electric field (EF). The aim of the study was to compare the EF distributions of four DBS leads at equivalent amplitudes (3 V and 3.4 mA). Finite element method (FEM) simulations (n = 38) around cylindrical contacts (leads 3389, 6148) or equivalent contact configurations (leads 6180, SureStim1) were performed using homogeneous and patient-specific (heterogeneous) brain tissue models. Steering effects of 6180 and SureStim1 were compared with symmetric stimulation fields. To make relative comparisons between simulations, an EF isolevel of 0.2 V/mm was chosen based on neuron model simulations (n = 832) applied before EF visualization and comparisons. The simulations show that the EF distribution is largely influenced by the heterogeneity of the tissue, and the operating mode. Equivalent contact configurations result in similar EF distributions. In steering configurations, larger EF volumes were achieved in current mode using equivalent amplitudes. The methodology was demonstrated in a patient-specific simulation around the zona incerta and a “virtual” ventral intermediate nucleus target. In conclusion, lead design differences are enhanced when using patient-specific tissue models and current stimulation mode.

  • 15.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Latorre, Malcolm
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Brain Stimulation Steering of the Electric Field: A Patient-Specific Simulation Study2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vogel, Dorian
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland FHNW, 4132 Muttenz, Switzerland.
    Johansson, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hemm, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. rthwestern Switzerland FHNW, 4132 Muttenz, Switzerland.
    Electric Field Comparison between Microelectrode Recording and Deep Brain Stimulation Systems: A Simulation Study2018In: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 8, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) relies primarily on the localization of the implanted electrode. Its final position can be chosen based on the results of intraoperative microelectrode recording (MER) and stimulation tests. The optimal position often differs from the final one selected for chronic stimulation with the DBS electrode. The aim of the study was to investigate, using finite element method (FEM) modeling and simulations, whether lead design, electrical setup, and operating modes induce differences in electric field (EF) distribution and in consequence, the clinical outcome. Finite element models of a MER system and a chronic DBS lead were developed. Simulations of the EF were performed for homogenous and patient-specific brain models to evaluate the influence of grounding (guide tube vs. stimulator case), parallel MER leads, and non-active DBS contacts. Results showed that the EF is deformed depending on the distance between the guide tube and stimulating contact. Several parallel MER leads and the presence of the non-active DBS contacts influence the EF distribution. The DBS EF volume can cover the intraoperatively produced EF, but can also extend to other anatomical areas. In conclusion, EF deformations between stimulation tests and DBS should be taken into consideration as they can alter the clinical outcome

  • 17.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vogel, Dorian
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hemm-Ode, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Institute for Medical and Analytical Technologies and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Applied Sciences and Art Northwestern Switzerland.
    Comparison between intraoperative and chronic and deep brain stimulation2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION

    The success of the deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy relies primarily in the localization of the implanted electrode, implying the need of utmost accuracy in the targeting process. Intraoperative microelectrode recording and stimulation tests are a common procedure before implanting the permanent DBS lead to determine the optimal position with a large therapeutic window where side effects are avoided and the best improvement of the symptoms is achieved. Differences in dimensions and operating modes exist between the exploration and the permanent DBS electrode which might lead to different stimulation fields, even when ideal placement is achieved. The aim of this investigation is to compare the electric field (EF) distribution around the intraoperative and the chronic electrode, assuming that both have exactly the same position.

    METHODS

    3D models of the intraoperative exploration electrode and the chronically implanted DBS lead 3389 (Medtronic Inc., USA) were developed using COMSOL 5.2 (COMSOL AB, Sweden). Patient-specific MR images were used to determine the conductive medium around the electrode. The exploration electrode and the first DBS contact were set to current and voltage respectively (0.2mA(V) - 3 mA(V) in 0.1 mA(V) steps). The intraoperative model included the grounded guide tube used to introduce the exploration electrode; for the chronic DBS model, the outer boundaries were grounded and the inactive contacts were set to floating potential considering a monopolar configuration. The localization of the exploration and the chronic electrode was set according to the planned trajectory. The EF was visualized and compared in terms of volume and extension using a fixed isocontour of 0.2 V/mm.

    RESULTS

    The EF distribution simulated for the exploration electrode showed the influence of the parallel trajectory and the grounded guide tube. For an amplitude of e.g. 2 mA/2 V, the EF extension of the intraoperative was 0.6 mm larger than the chronic electrode at the target level; the corresponding difference in volume was 76.1 mm3.

    CONCLUSION

    Differences in the EF shape between the exploration and the chronic DBS electrode have been observed using patient-specific models. The larger EF extension obtained for the exploration electrode responds to its higher impedance and the use of current controlled stimulation. The presence of EF around the guide tube and the influence of the parallel trajectory require further experimental and clinical evaluation.

  • 18.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Comparison of deep brain stimulation systems2014In: Poster Presentations, 2014, Vol. 29, p. 1173-1173, article id Suppl 1Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To quantitatively compare the electric field generated by voltage and current controlled deep brain stimulation systems.

    Background: Traditionally deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems have used voltage control however more recently, current controlled systems have been approved to treat Parkinson's disease and related movement disorders. In the endeavor of understanding the behavior of DBS systems a common approach is the use of computer models suitable to simulate the electric field, current density and other related electric parameters.

    Methods: 2D finite element models based on commercially available DBS systems have been built for each system: I. Model 3389, Medtronic Inc., USA for voltage control; and II. Model 6142, St Jude Medical Inc. USA for current control. The brain tissue has been simplified to homogeneous and isotropic medium. The electric settings correspond to a monopolar configuration, using one of the four contacts available as the active electrode and the outer boundary of the tissue as the reference. Three simulations were performed to mimic different stages of the leads implantation: a) an original stage where the brain tissue is considered as pure gray matter, b) an acute stage that simulates the leakage of cerebral spinal fluid immediately after the electrodes' insertion; and c) a chronic stage mimicking fibrous tissue created around the electrodes some weeks after implantation. Both systems were submitted to the same conditions using as active electrode the third contact from the tip of the lead. The comparison is based on the maximal distance reached by the isopotential of 0.2 V/mm.

    Results: The simulations showed that voltage controlled stimulation systems are more susceptible to changes in the electrical conductivity of the medium i.e. change over time of the tissue around the electrode. This agrees with the adjustment of the stimulation amplitude often necessary a few weeks postoperatively. Current controlled stimulation in turn, presented a linear behavior of the distance reached at different stimulation amplitudes at all stages.

    Conclusions: Current controlled stimulation might be a good option due to its linear behavior over time, nevertheless more studies including a more realistic brain model, different designs of DBS electrodes and different electric parameter, are needed to encourage the use of this type of systems.

  • 19.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electric Field Comparison of Deep Brain Stimulation Lead Designs - a Stimulation Study2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Latorre, Malcolm
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Comparison of Three Deep Brain Stimulation Lead Designs under Voltage and Current Modes2015In: WORLD CONGRESS ON MEDICAL PHYSICS AND BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, 2015, VOLS 1 AND 2 / [ed] David A. Jaffray, Springer, 2015, Vol. 51, p. 1196-1199Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the introduction of deep brain stimulation (DBS) the technique has been dominated by Medtronic sys-tems. In recent years, new DBS systems have become available for patients, and some are in clinical trials. The present study aims to evaluate three DBS leads operated in either voltage or current mode. 3D finite element method (FEM) models were built in combination with a neuron model for this purpose. The axon diameter was set to D = 5 μm and simulations performed in both voltage (0.5-5 V) and current (0.5-5 mA) mode. The evaluation was achieved based on the distance from the lead for neural activation and the electric field (EF) extension at 0.1 V/mm. The results showed that the neural activation distance agrees well between the leads with an activation distance dif-ference less than 0.5 mm. The shape of the field at the 0.1 V/mm isopotential surface in 3D is mostly spherical in shape around the activated section of the steering lead.

  • 21.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Latorre, Malcolm
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Neural Activation Compared to Electric Field Extension of Three DBS Lead Designs2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SINCE the introduction of deep brain stimulation (DBS) about 20 years ago, the stimulation technique has been dominated by Medtronic DBS-system setup. In recent years, new DBS systems have become available, of which some are in clinical trials or available to patients [1]. In the present study three different lead designs are investigated via computer simulation:

    Medtronic 3389, St. Jude 6148 and Sapiens SureStim. The aim was to compare the neural activation distance and the electric field (EF) maximum spatial extension for each lead.

    A 3D finite element method model was built using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.4a (COMSOL AB, Stockholm, Sweden) to simulate the electric potential around the DBS lead. Brain tissue was modelled as a homogeneous volume of grey matter (electric conductivity of 0.09 S/m). The electrode-tissue interface was modelled with a 250μm thick peri-electrode space mimicking the fibrous tissue which covers the lead at the chronic stimulation stage (σ = 0.06S/m, equivalent to white matter electric conductivity). The stimulation amplitude was set to 1V in monopolar configuration using C1 electrode or equivalent in all cases. Each simulated electric potential distribution was exported to MatLab (The MathWorks, USA) and used as input to a cable neuron simulation.

    An axon cable model with 21 nodes based on the concept by Åström et al., [2] was set up in MatLab and combined with the exported field distributions. The model considered a 5 μm thick neuron, a pulse width of 60 μs and a drive potential ranging from 0.5 V to 5 V in 0.5 V steps.

    The SureStim lead results showed a shorter neural activation distance and EF extension. The distance to the isolevel of 0.2 V/mm is close to the neural activation distance at each stimulation amplitude, and we conclude that the electric field is a suitable predictor to visualize the stimulated regions.

  • 22.
    Alonso Orozco, Fabiola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Finite Element Method Modelling and Simulations for Comparisonbetween Deep Brain Stimulation Electrodes2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an invasive therapy that alleviates the symptoms of several neurological disorders by electrically stimulating specific regions of the brain, generally within the basal ganglia. Until now Medtronic DBS system is the only approved by the Food and Drug Administration, nevertheless European and Australian countries  have recently approved St. Jude DBS systems to treat Parkinson’s disease and related movement disorders.

         Traditionally, voltage-controlled stimulation (the type of systems provided by Medtronic) has been used and clinicians are familiar with its settings; however the knowledge about systems based in current-controlled stimulation (St. Jude systems) is rather scarce. One of the key factors for a successful therapy is the optimal selection of the electrical parameters for stimulation. Due to the critical zone where the surgery is performed, modeling and simulations of DBS systems have been extensively used to observe how the electric field is distributed in the brain tissue and ultimately to help the clinicians to select the best parameters.

         In this thesis two finite element models of the DBS systems mentioned above have been developed; five examinations were designed, based on the physical and electrical differences between the systems, to observe and quantitatively compare the electric field distribution.

        The aim of this thesis was to investigate the differences between two representative models of each company but moreover to contribute with information regarding current-controlled stimulation.

    The results obtained are expected to be useful for further investigations where the magnitude and distribution of the electric field generated by this type of electrodes are needed.

  • 23.
    Altgärde, Noomi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Local release of lithium from sol-gel coated orthopaedic screws: an in vitro and in vivo study2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     

    In orthopaedic practice, fractures are usually stabilised with metal screws or rods. This is done in order to keep the fracture parts in place during the rather slow healing process. The healing time can potentially be reduced by local- or systemic treatment with different bone promoting drugs. In later years, lithium, otherwise used to treat bipolar disease, has shown promise to be such a drug.

     

    The aim of this master thesis was to find a way to coat metal bone screws with lithium and to characterise the coating. The coating was to be designed in such a way that it could release lithium to the surrounding bone tissue.

     

    Lithium chloride was incorporated into a titanate sol-gel and attached to silicon wafers and stainless steel screws by dip coating. Wafers were used for initial in vitro studies of how lithium changed coating characteristics. This was studied using ellipsometry, AFM and SEM. Lithium is most probably physisorbed and not incorporated into the network building up the sol-gel. Coating structure is changed as more lithium is incorporated. For large amounts of lithium, the nanoparticles normally formed when curing the sol-gel are inhibited. One effect of this is reduced bioactivity, seen as a reduced ability for calcium phosphate crystals to nucleate on the coating when immersed in simulated body fluid.

    Lithium release was investigated using AAS. Lithium is released from the coating, showing a burst effect. By changing the number of coating layers used, the release profile can be partly altered. The coating was also applied to screws, showing good attachment, and the lithium release profile was similar to the one seen from wafers.

    Finally, a screw model was used in rats to assess the effect of local lithium treatment from screws and systemic lithium treatment on fracture healing. In the model, a screw was inserted in tibia, mimicking a fracture. When the bone around the screw was healed, a pullout test was performed, giving information about the strength of the bone surrounding the screw. No significant difference could be found for either local- or systemic lithium treatment compared to control. However, when evaluating the strength of intact bone in a similar way, a positive effect of systemic lithium treatment could be seen. Therefore, it is still likely that lithium has a positive effect on bone and further studies are needed to fully evaluate its role in fracture healing.

     

  • 24. Anderson, C.
    et al.
    Andersson, T.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Changes in skin circulation after microdialysis probe insertion visualized by laser Doppler perfusion imaging1994In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, ISSN 0022-202X, E-ISSN 1523-1747, Vol. 102, no 5, p. 807-811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microdialysis makes possible in vivo estimation of endogenous and exogenous substances in the dermal extracellular space. Insertion of the microdialysis probe and its subsequent presence in the skin may affect both the reactivity of the skin test site and the measurement of target substances. Laser Doppler flowmetry is a non-invasive method for estimating cutaneous blood flow. A further development of this technique, laser Doppler perfusion imaging, has been used to study the time course of the circulatory changes caused in the area of microdialysis probe insertion. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging was performed prior to, during, and after microdialysis probe insertion in the skin of the ventral forearm in three subjects. Probe insertion caused an increase in skin blood perfusion in the whole test area. About 15 min after probe insertion, the flare, which is presumed to be of chiefly axon reflex origin, began to subside and the circulatory response could be seen to center around the site of insertion and the tip of the probe. Skin perfusion levels had returned to near normal levels within 60 min. Local anesthesia of the point of guide insertion inhibited the flare, but did not affect circulatory reactivity in the skin nearby. Both microdialysis and laser Doppler perfusion imaging seem to be promising new methods in dermatologic research.

  • 25. Anderson, C.
    et al.
    Svensson, .
    Sjögren, F.
    Andersson, T.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Human in vivo microdialysis technique can be used to measure cytokines in contact reactions.1995In: Current Problems in Dermatology, ISSN 1421-5721, E-ISSN 1662-2944, Vol. 23, p. 121-130Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Andersson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Real-time ECG for objective stress level measurement2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 27.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Burdakov, Oleg
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zikrin, Spartak
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Global search strategies for solving multilinear least-squares problems2012In: Sultan Qaboos University Journal for Science, ISSN 1027-524X, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 12-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multilinear least-squares (MLLS) problem is an extension of the linear leastsquares problem. The difference is that a multilinear operator is used in place of a matrix-vector product. The MLLS is typically a large-scale problem characterized by a large number of local minimizers. It originates, for instance, from the design of filter networks. We present a global search strategy that allows for moving from one local minimizer to a better one. The efficiency of this strategy is illustrated by results of numerical experiments performed for some problems related to the design of filter networks.

  • 28.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Burdakov, Oleg
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zikrin, Spartak
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Global Search Strategies for Solving Multilinear Least-squares Problems2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The multilinear least-squares (MLLS) problem is an extension of the linear least-squares problem. The difference is that a multilinearoperator is used in place of a matrix-vector product. The MLLS istypically a large-scale problem characterized by a large number of local minimizers. It originates, for instance, from the design of filter networks. We present a global search strategy that allows formoving from one local minimizer to a better one. The efficiencyof this strategy isillustrated by results of numerical experiments performed forsome problems related to the design of filter networks.

  • 29.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Burdakov, Oleg
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zikrin, Spartak
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sparsity Optimization in Design of Multidimensional Filter Networks2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Filter networks is a powerful tool used for reducing the image processing time, while maintaining its reasonably high quality.They are composed of sparse sub-filters whose low sparsity ensures fast image processing.The filter network design is related to solvinga sparse optimization problem where a cardinality constraint bounds above the sparsity level.In the case of sequentially connected sub-filters, which is the simplest network structure of those considered in this paper, a cardinality-constrained multilinear least-squares (MLLS) problem is to be solved. If to disregard the cardinality constraint, the MLLS is typically a large-scale problem characterized by a large number of local minimizers. Each of the local minimizers is singular and non-isolated.The cardinality constraint makes the problem even more difficult to solve.An approach for approximately solving the cardinality-constrained MLLS problem is presented.It is then applied to solving a bi-criteria optimization problem in which both thetime and quality of image processing are optimized. The developed approach is extended to designing filter networks of a more general structure. Its efficiency is demonstrated by designing certain 2D and 3D filter networks. It is also compared with the existing approaches.

  • 30.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Adaptive Spatio-temporal Filtering of 4D CT-Heart2013In: Image Analyses: Image Processing, Computer Vision, Pattern Recognition, and Graphics / [ed] Joni-Kristian Kämäräinen, Markus Koskela, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer, 2013, p. 246-255Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this project is to keep the x-ray exposure of the patient as low as reasonably achievable while improving the diagnostic image quality for the radiologist. The means to achieve these goals is to develop and evaluate an efficient adaptive filtering (denoising/image enhancement) method that fully explores true 4D image acquisition modes.

    The proposed prototype system uses a novel filter set having directional filter responses being monomials. The monomial filter concept is used both for estimation of local structure and for the anisotropic adaptive filtering. Initial tests on clinical 4D CT-heart data with ECG-gated exposure has resulted in a significant reduction of the noise level and an increased detail compared to 2D and 3D methods. Another promising feature is that the reconstruction induced streak artifacts which generally occur in low dose CT are remarkably reduced in 4D.

  • 31.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kronander, Torbjorn
    Velocity Adaptive Filtered Angiography1999Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A method of imaging a blood vessel in a body using X-rays and an injectable contrast medium is described. The contrast medium is injected into the body, and signals constituted by an X-ray image sequence depicting X-ray attenuation values is recorded. The X-ray attenuated values in each spaced-time neighborhood are combined in a way that is dependent on the processed image sequence and separately established for each neighborhood, and separating, from background and vessel signals, flow signals having energy contributions mainly in an area of frequency domain bounded by surfaces corresponding to threshold velocities separately established for each neighborhood, which surfaces are shifted a specified amount along a temporal frequency axis.

  • 32. Andersson, R
    et al.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pressure sensed non-invasively directly on the extra corporeal bloodline tube2001In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 23RD ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY SOCIETY, VOLS 1-4: BUILDING NEW BRIDGES AT THE FRONTIERS OF ENGINEERING AND MEDICINE, 2001, Vol. 23, p. 3179-3181Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To clinically measure blood pressure at extra corporeal bloodlines involves a hazard due to the infection risk and a risk for thrombosis formation. The aim was to design a non-invasive pressure sensor, measuring directly on a tube section. A modified tube cross-section was used to improve sensitivity. Using the developed sensing principle, a consistent relation (r=0.999) was obtained between pressure and output signal. The output was stable and an acceptable drift within the temperature-range. The method shows great promise for applications in monitoring of the dialysis process.

  • 33. Andersson, T.
    et al.
    Anderson, C.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Human in vivo cutaneous microdialysis: Estimation of histamine release in cold urticaria.1995In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, no 75, p. 343-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel bioanalytical in vivo sampling technique, cutaneous microdialysis, was used to follow the chronology of skin histamine release in 3 patients with cold urticaria and in 2 healthy volunteers. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging was used simultaneously to monitor the skin circulatory response. Microdialysis samples were collected at 10-min intervals and analysed by radioimmunoassay technique. Fifty minutes after probe insertion, the ventral forearm skin in the area of the dialysis membrane was provoked for 5-15 min with a 25 x 40 mm ice cube covered with plastic foil. In the cold urticaria patients, an up to 80-fold increase of histamine was observed, with peak levels 20-30 min after challenge. Histamine levels then fell to reach "baseline" levels within 50 min. In the healthy subjects, the histamine increase was earlier, less pronounced and of shorter duration. Cutaneous microdialysis and laser Doppler imaging offer new possibilities for the chronological multiparameter assessment of inflammatory skin disorders in vivo.

  • 34.
    Andersson, Thord
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Läthén, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lenz, Reiner
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Modified Gradient Search for Level Set Based Image Segmentation2013In: IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, ISSN 1057-7149, E-ISSN 1941-0042, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 621-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Level set methods are a popular way to solve the image segmentation problem. The solution contour is found by solving an optimization problem where a cost functional is minimized. Gradient descent methods are often used to solve this optimization problem since they are very easy to implement and applicable to general nonconvex functionals. They are, however, sensitive to local minima and often display slow convergence. Traditionally, cost functionals have been modified to avoid these problems. In this paper, we instead propose using two modified gradient descent methods, one using a momentum term and one based on resilient propagation. These methods are commonly used in the machine learning community. In a series of 2-D/3-D-experiments using real and synthetic data with ground truth, the modifications are shown to reduce the sensitivity for local optima and to increase the convergence rate. The parameter sensitivity is also investigated. The proposed methods are very simple modifications of the basic method, and are directly compatible with any type of level set implementation. Downloadable reference code with examples is available online.

  • 35.
    Andersson, Thord
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction in water–fat MRI2015In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 468-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the water-signal performance of the consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction (CIIC) method to correct for intensity inhomogeneities METHODS: Water-fat volumes were acquired using 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0T symmetrically sampled 2-point Dixon three-dimensional MRI. Two datasets: (i) 10 muscle tissue regions of interest (ROIs) from 10 subjects acquired with both 1.5T and 3.0T whole-body MRI. (ii) Seven liver tissue ROIs from 36 patients imaged using 1.5T MRI at six time points after Gd-EOB-DTPA injection. The performance of CIIC was evaluated quantitatively by analyzing its impact on the dispersion and bias of the water image ROI intensities, and qualitatively using side-by-side image comparisons.

    RESULTS:

    CIIC significantly ( P1.5T≤2.3×10-4,P3.0T≤1.0×10-6) decreased the nonphysiological intensity variance while preserving the average intensity levels. The side-by-side comparisons showed improved intensity consistency ( Pint⁡≤10-6) while not introducing artifacts ( Part=0.024) nor changed appearances ( Papp≤10-6).

    CONCLUSION:

    CIIC improves the spatiotemporal intensity consistency in regions of a homogenous tissue type. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2014.

  • 36.
    Andersson, Thord
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Self-calibrated DCE MRI using Multi Scale Adaptive Normalized Averaging (MANA)2012In: Proceedings of the annual meeting of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2012), 2012, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Angland, Erik
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Karlsson, Henrik
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Gustafsson, Agnetha
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Pettersson, Håkan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Luftmätningar av  inhalerat 99mTc till BMA vid ventilationsundersökningar med Technegas.2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Antonsson, Jacob
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Motion Tracking Using a Permanent Magnet2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this project the possibility of using a network of magnetometers sensing a permanent magnet for tracking has been investigated. Both the orientation and the position of the magnet have been considered. A dipole approximation of the magnetic field is used to develop two models. One of the models parametrizes the orientation with the magnetic moment vector, while the other parametrizes the orientation with a unit quaternion. An extended Kalman filter have been used to estimate position and orientation.

    Several calibration algorithms have been developed to calibrate for sensor errors, differences in sensor coordinate frame orientations and also for the estimation of the magnetic moment norm of a permanent magnet. The models have been tested using an optical reference system for position and orientation estimation. Initial results are ambiguous and further testing is necessary. One conclusion is that the model using the magnetic moment vector as orientation parametrization is less sensitive to the accuracy of the initial guesses of the filter recursions and also less sensitive to possible model errors.

    A mathematical result of the possibility of using a non stationary sensor network to track the magnet is also given.

  • 39.
    Antonsson, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    On optical methods for intracerebral measurements during stereotactic and functional neurosurgery: Experimental studies2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Radio frequency (RF) lesioning and deep brain stimulation (DBS) are the two prevailing surgical treatments for movement disorders within the field of stereotactic and functional neurosurgery. For RF-lesioning, a small volume of brain tissue is coagulated and knowledge of the lesion size and growth is of great importance for the safety and outcome of the procedure. This thesis deals with adapting the laser Doppler perfusion monitoring (LDPM) technique for measurements in brain tissue during RF-lesioning. The relation between LDPM signal changes and developed lesion size was investigated. LDPM measurements were evaluated both in vitro (albumin protein solution) and in vivo in the porcine brain during RF-lesioning corresponding to a bilateral thalamotomy in man. The investigated signals from the LDPI measurements can be used for following the lesioning time course and to detect if a lesion was created, both in vitro and in the animal model. For the albumin model, both the total backscattered light intensity and the perfusion signal can be used as markers for estimating the final coagulation size, while in the animal model this conclusion was not statistical verified.

    Independent on surgical method, RF-lesioning or DBS, intracerebral guidance is an important aspect within stereotactic and functional neurosurgery. To increase the accuracy and precision of reaching the correct target, different methods for intracerebral guidance exist, such as microelectrode recording and impedance methods. In this thesis, the possibility of developing an optical intracerebral guidance method has been investigated. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy served as technology and all measurements were performed stereotactically in both porcine and human brain. Measurements of white and gray matter showed large differences, with higher reflectivity for white brain matter, both in porcine and in human brain. For the human measurements during DBS-implants, large differences between white matter and functional targets were found. Additionally, differences between native and lesioned porcine brain matter were detected. Both studies support the idea of using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for developing an intracerebral guidance method.

    List of papers
    1. Radio frequency electrode system for optical lesion size estimation in functional neurosurgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radio frequency electrode system for optical lesion size estimation in functional neurosurgery
    2005 (English)In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, ISSN 1083-3668, E-ISSN 1560-2281, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Radiofrequency(RF) lesioning in the human brain is one possible surgicaltherapy for severe pain as well as movement disorders. Oneobstacle for a safer lesioning procedure is the lack ofsize monitoring. The aim of this study was to investigateif changes in laser Doppler or intensity signals could beused as markers for size estimation during experimental RF lesioning.A 2 mm in diameter monopolar RF electrode was equippedwith optical fibers and connected to a digital laser Dopplersystem. The optical RF electrode's performance was equal to astandard RF electrode with the same dimensions. An albumin solutionwith scatterers was used to evaluate the intensity and laserDoppler signal changes during lesioning at 70, 80, and 90 °C.Significant signal changes were found for these three different clotsizes, represented by the temperatures (p<0.05,  n=10). The volume, width, andlength of the created coagulations were correlated to the intensitysignal changes (r=0.88, n=30, p<0.0001) and to the perfusion signalchanges (r=0.81, n=30, p<0.0001). Both static and Doppler-shifted light canbe used to follow the lesioning procedure as well asbeing used for lesion size estimation during experimental RF lesioning.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2005
    National Category
    Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14232 (URN)10.1117/1.1924615 (DOI)000235127400040 ()16229664 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-24144476322 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2007-01-26 Created: 2007-01-26 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Optical measurements during experimental stereotactic radiofrequency lesioning
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optical measurements during experimental stereotactic radiofrequency lesioning
    2006 (English)In: Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, ISSN 1011-6125, E-ISSN 1423-0372, Vol. 84, no 2-3, p. 118-124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo a laser Doppler measurement system in porcine brain tissue during thermal lesioning. A 2-mm monopolar radiofrequency lesioning electrode was equipped with optical fibers in order to monitor the lesioning procedure. Laser Doppler and backscattered light intensity signals were measured along the electrode trajectory and during bilateral lesioning in the central gray (70, 80 and 90°C, n = 14). The time course of the coagulation process could be followed by optical recordings. Two separate groups of tissue were identified from the intensity signals. The changes in the perfusion levels in both groups displayed significant changes (p < 0.05, n = 48) at all temperature settings, while backscattered light intensity was significant for only one group at the different temperatures (p < 0.05, n = 39). These results indicate that optical measurements correlate with lesion development in vivo. The study also indicates that it is possible to follow the lesioning process intra-operatively.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    S. Karger, 2006
    Keyword
    Laser Doppler, Radiofrequency lesioning, Functional neurosurgery, Brain electrodes
    National Category
    Biomedical Laboratory Science/Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14233 (URN)10.1159/000094463 (DOI)000239562300010 ()16840822 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-33746647435 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2007-01-26 Created: 2007-01-26 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    3. In-vivo reflection spectroscopy measurements in pig brain during stereotactic surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>In-vivo reflection spectroscopy measurements in pig brain during stereotactic surgery
    2003 (English)In: Biophotonics West: Biomedical Optics, 2003, Vol. 4958, p. 242-250Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radiofrequency (RF) lesioning in the human brain is a commonsurgical therapy for relieving severe pain as well as formovement disorders such as Parkinsonia. During the procedure a smallelectrode is introduced by stereotactic means towards a target arealocalized by CT or MRI. An RF-current is applied throughthe electrode tip when positioned in the target area. Thetissue in the proximity of the tip is heated bythe current and finally coagulated.The overall aim of this studywas to improve the RF-technique and its ability to estimatelesion size by means of optical methods. Therefore, the opticaldifferences between white and gray matter, as well as lesionedand unlesioned tissue were investigated. Reflection spectroscopy measurements in therange of 450-800 nm were conducted on fully anesthetized pigsduring stereotactic RF-lesioning (n=6). Light from a tungsten lamp wasguided to the electrode tip through optical fibers, inserted alonga 2 mm in diameter monopolar RF-electrode. Measurements were performedin steps of 0-10 mm from the target in eachhemisphere towards the entry point of the skull. In thecentral gray of the porcine brain measurements were performed bothbefore and after the creation of a lesion. A totalof 55 spectra were collected during this study. Correlation totissue type was done using post-operative MR-images. The spectral signaturefor white and gray matter differs significantly for the entirespectral range of 450-800 nm. Pre- and post-lesioning reflection spectroscopyshowed the largest differences below 600 and above 620 nm,which implies that lasers within this wavelength range may beuseful for in-vivo measurements of tissue optical changes during RF-lesioning.

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14234 (URN)10.1117/12.476131 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-01-26 Created: 2007-01-26 Last updated: 2017-02-22Bibliographically approved
    4. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements for tissue type discrimination during deep brain stimulation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements for tissue type discrimination during deep brain stimulation
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Journal of neural engineering, ISSN 1741-2560, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 185-190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as a method for improving intracerebral guidance during functional neurosurgery has been investigated. An optical probe was developed for measurements during stereotactic and functional neurosurgery in man. The aim of the study was to investigate the spectral differences between white and grey matter and between white matter and functional targets. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements in ten patients were recorded at incremental steps towards and in three different functional targets (STN, GPi and Zi). The recorded spectra along the trajectory were sorted into white or grey matter, based on preoperative MRI images or the recorded spectral shape and intensity. The difference between tissue types was calculated as a quotient. Significant intensity differences between white and grey matter were found to be at least 14% (p < 0.05) and 20% (p < 0.0001) for MRI and spectral-sorted data respectively. The reflectance difference between white matter and the functional targets of GPi was higher than for STN and Zi. The results indicate that diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has a potential to be developed to a suitable complement to other intracerebral guidance methods.

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14235 (URN)10.1088/1741-2560/5/2/009 (DOI)000257253800009 ()18460743 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-48949118315 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2007-01-26 Created: 2007-01-26 Last updated: 2017-02-10Bibliographically approved
    5. In vitro measurements of optical properties of porcine brain using a novel compact device
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>In vitro measurements of optical properties of porcine brain using a novel compact device
    Show others...
    2005 (English)In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 658-666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of the optical properties of tissues can be applied in numerous medical and scientific fields, including cancer diagnostics and therapy. There are many different ways of determining the optical properties of turbid media. The paper describes measurements of the optical properties of porcine brain tissue using novel instrumentation for simultaneous absorption and scattering characterisation of small turbid samples. Integrating sphere measurements are widely used as a reference method for determination of the optical properties of relatively thin turbid samples. However, this technique is associated with bulky equipment, complicated measuring techniques, interference compensation techniques and inconvenient sample handling. It is believed that the sphere for some applications can be replaced by a new, compact device, called the combined angular and spatially resolved head sensor, to measure the optical properties of thin turbid samples. The results compare very well with data obtained with an integrating sphere for well-defined samples. The instrument was shown to be accurate to within 12% for μa and 1% for μ s in measurements of intralipid-ink samples. The corresponding variations of data were 17% and 2%, respectively. The reduced scattering coefficient for porcine white matter was measured to be 100 cm−1 at 633 nm, and the value for coagulated brain tissue was 65 cm−1. The corresponding absorption coefficients were 2 and 3 cm−1, respectively.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2005
    Keyword
    Optical properties, Turbid media, Integrating sphere, CASH sensor, Porcine brain tissue, Scattering
    National Category
    Other Medical Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14236 (URN)10.1007/BF02351040 (DOI)000234262300016 ()2-s2.0-29244462497 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2007-01-26 Created: 2007-01-26 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
  • 40.
    Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio
    et al.
    Institute Jean Pierre Bourgin, France.
    Turaga, Srinivas C.
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, VA USA.
    Berger, Daniel P.
    Harvard University, MA 02138 USA.
    Ciresan, Dan
    Scuola University of Profess Svizzera Italiana, Switzerland.
    Giusti, Alessandro
    Scuola University of Profess Svizzera Italiana, Switzerland.
    Gambardella, Luca M.
    Scuola University of Profess Svizzera Italiana, Switzerland.
    Schmidhuber, Juergen
    Scuola University of Profess Svizzera Italiana, Switzerland.
    Laptev, Dmitry
    ETH, Switzerland.
    Dwivedi, Sarvesh
    ETH, Switzerland.
    Buhmann, Joachim M.
    ETH, Switzerland.
    Liu, Ting
    University of Utah, UT USA.
    Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba
    University of Utah, UT USA.
    Tasdizen, Tolga
    University of Utah, UT USA.
    Kamentsky, Lee
    Broad Institute, MA USA.
    Burget, Radim
    Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic.
    Uher, Vaclav
    Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic.
    Tan, Xiao
    University of New S Wales, Australia.
    Sun, Changming
    CSIRO, Australia.
    Pham, Tuan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bas, Erhan
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, VA USA.
    Uzunbas, Mustafa G.
    Rutgers State University, NJ 08903 USA.
    Cardona, Albert
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, VA USA.
    Schindelin, Johannes
    University of Wisconsin, WI USA.
    Sebastian Seung, H.
    Princeton University, NJ 08544 USA; Princeton University, NJ 08544 USA.
    Crowdsourcing the creation of image segmentation algorithms for connectomics2015In: Frontiers in Neuroanatomy, ISSN 1662-5129, E-ISSN 1662-5129, Vol. 9, no 142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To stimulate progress in automating the reconstruction of neural circuits, we organized the first international challenge on 2D segmentation of electron microscopic (EM) images of the brain. Participants submitted boundary maps predicted for a test set of images, and were scored based on their agreement with a consensus of human expert annotations. The winning team had no prior experience with EM images, and employed a convolutional network. This "deep learning" approach has since become accepted as a standard for segmentation of FM images. The challenge has continued to accept submissions, and the best so far has resulted from cooperation between two teams. The challenge has probably saturated, as algorithms cannot progress beyond limits set by ambiguities inherent in 2D scoring and the size of the test dataset. Retrospective evaluation of the challenge scoring system reveals that it was not sufficiently robust to variations in the widths of neurite borders. We propose a solution to this problem, which should be useful for a future 3D segmentation challenge.

  • 41.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Low-compliance perfusion pump for oesophageal manometry.1978In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 732-738Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Measurement techniques for urodynamic investigations.1989In: Critical reviews in biomedical engineering, ISSN 0278-940X, E-ISSN 1943-619X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 413-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Important measurement techniques for investigating lower urinary tract function are flow and pressure measurements. The demands on urinary flowmeters and the measurement principles of balance type, rotating disc, dipstick, and air-displacement type are described. Urological pressure measurements are performed in the bladder, in the urethra, and in the abdominal cavity. Various fluid-filled and microtransducer systems are reviewed and demands for performance given. Differences in measuring a mechanical pressure, like in the urethra, and a fluid pressure in the bladder are discussed. Electromyography (EMG) technique is used to investigate various neurological disturbances in the lower urinary tract. The electrode technique is also described. Furthermore, techniques for incontinence detection are reviewed.

  • 43.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Edwall, G
    Johansson, K E
    Tibbling, Lita
    On the use of monocrystalline antimony pH electrodes in gastro-oesophageal functional disorders.1982In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 383-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monocrystalline antimony electrodes have been shown to be suitable for thein vivo determination of pH in blood, tissue and in the upper gastro-intestinal canal. Thanks to their small dimensions it has been possible to mount them into conventional manometry catheters for oesophageal investigation. The monocrystalline antimony pH electrode has several advantages over the conventional pH glass electrode; better accuracy, shorter rise time, smaller dimensions. The monocrystalline antimony electrode has been used for long-term registration of gastro-oesophageal reflux, for the oesophageal acid clearing test and for identification of the pH gradient zone between the gastric and oesophageal mucosa. Its use in combination with pressure sensors has added a new dimension to the diagnosis of functional disorders in the gastro-oesophageal region.

  • 44.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hägglund, Sture
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olsson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pettersson, Nils-Erik
    Sjöqvist, Bengt-Arne
    Åhlfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    36-nätet och "pensionärsdatorer" kan bidra till att lösa sjukvårdens problem2003In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 100, no 14, p. 1257-1258Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Regurgitant flow through heart valves: a hydraulic model applicable to ultrasound Doppler measurements.1986In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 643-646Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Skogh, Marcus
    Öberg, Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Undersökning av EKG-elektroners elektriska och mekaniska långtidsegenskaper1974Report (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Athanasiou, Vasileios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Estimation and modelling of fMRI BOLD response2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    One of the current topics of research in neuroimaging techniques is related to explaining and modelling the Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) responses. BOLD responses are estimated by processing functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data. BOLD responses are caused by hemodynamic responses to neural activity which alter the levels of blood oxygenation at local brain regions. The main aims of the current thesis were to i) develop and examine methods regarding BOLD response estimation from the visual cortex and the frontal cortex of human brain and to ii) develop a model in order to explain the physiological mechanisms which cause the estimated BOLD responses.

    In order to satisfy the main aims, fMRI data were provided by the Center of Medical Imaging and Visualization (CMIV). The provided fMRI data consist of fMRI brain measurements of twelve healthy human subjects who were subjected to visual stimulation. By processing the fMRI data, Regions Of Interest (ROIs) were extracted at the anatomical sites of the visual cortex and the frontal cortex. Afterwards, the fMRI data were manipulated in order to extract BOLD responses from the visual cortex and the frontal cortex. Various methods were developed and compared in terms of which technique provided well representative BOLD responses.       

    Subsequently, a model was developed by using software Wolfram Mathematica 9 in order to explain the physiological mechanisms of the estimated BOLD responses at the visual and the frontal cortex. The model aimed to solve for oxygen concentration in blood plasma as blood flows from the arterial part to the venous part of the blood circulation system through a capillary. Oxygen outward diffusion through the capillary wall and oxygen concentration at the extravascular environment were modelled as well. Blood plasma oxygen concentration was turned into hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Sa ) through hemoglobin oxygen dissociation curve and Henry’s law for gases. As a result, the Sa  was estimated through modelling for oxygen concentration in blood plasma. Finally, the developed model ended to a system with input the fractional change of Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) velocity and Cerebral Metabolic Rate of Oxygen (CMR ) and as output a proportional signal to the BOLD response. By simulating for different scenarios of fractional changes of CBF velocity and CMR  and by comparing the resulted BOLD responses to the estimated ones, it was attempted to explain for the physiological mechanisms which caused the BOLD responses at the anatomical sites of the visual and frontal cortex.

  • 48.
    Azzouzi, Sawsen
    et al.
    University of Sousse, Tunisia.
    Patra, Hirak Kumar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ben Ali, Mounir
    University of Sousse, Tunisia.
    Nooredeen Abbas, Mohammed
    National Research Centre, Egypt.
    Dridi, Cherif
    Centre Research Microelect and Nanotechnol CRMN Sousse, Tunisia.
    Errachid, Abdelhamid
    University of Lyon 1, France.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Citrate-selective electrochemical mu-sensor for early stage detection of prostate cancer2016In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 228, p. 335-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extremely specialised anatomical function of citrate inside the prostate, make it one of the preferred biomarkers for early stage detection of prostate cancer. However, current detection methods are seriously limited due to the very low citrate concentrations that need to be measured in order to follow disease progression. In the present work, we report a novel citrate-selective-sensor based on iron (III) phthalocyanine chloride-C-monoamido-Poly-n-Butyl Acrylate (Fe(III)MAPcC1 P n BA) modified gold -electrodes for the electrochemical determination and estimation of the pathophysiological range of citrate. The newly synthesised ionophore has been structurally characterised using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-vis spectroscopy. Contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used to investigate the adhesion and morphological properties of the membrane. The developed citrate-selective-electrodes had a Nernstian sensitivity of-19.34 +/- 0.83 mV/decade with a detection limit of about 9 x 10-6M and a linear range from 4 x 10(-5)M to 10(-1) M, which covered the pathologically important clinical range. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed very high sensitivity with a lower Limit of detection 1.7 x 10(-9) M and linear detection range (10(-8)-10(-1) M), which is very important not only for the early-stage diagnosis and screening procedures, but also in mapping the stage of the cancer too. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 49.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Bergen, Norway.
    Case Based Reasoningin Support of the LVAD Surgical Treatment2013In: Medicinteknikdagarna 2013, Electronic Proceedings, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Babic, Ankica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Bergen, Norway.
    Peterzen, Bengt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center.
    Lönn, Urban
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center.
    Casimir Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Case Based Reasoning in a Web Based Decision Support System for Thoracic Surgery2013In: IFMBE Proceedings 41 / [ed] L.M. Roa Romero, Springer, 2013, p. 1413-1416Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Case Based Reasoning (CBR) methodology provides means of collecting patients cases and retrieving them following the clinical criteria. By studying previously treated patients with similar backgrounds, the physician can get a better base for deciding on treatment for a current patient and be better prepared for complications that might occur during and after surgery. This could be taken advantage of when there is not enough data for a statistical analysis, but electronic patient records that provide all the relevant information to assure a timely and accurate clinical insight into a patient particular situation.

    We have developed and implemented a CBR engine using the Nearest Neighbor algorithm. A patient case is represented as a combination of perioperative variable values and operation reports. Physicians could review a selected number of cases by browsing through the electronic patient record and operational narratives which provides an exhaustive insight into the previously treated cases. An evaluation of the search algorithm suggests a very good functionality.

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