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  • 1.
    A Hulten, Maj
    et al.
    University Warwick, Warwick Med Sch, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands England .
    Patel, Suketu
    University Warwick, Department Biol Science, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands England .
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Iwarsson, Erik
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Department Mol Med and Surg, Clin Genet Unit, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden .
    On the origin of the maternal age effect in trisomy 21 Down syndrome: the Oocyte Mosaicism Selection model2010In: Reproduction, ISSN 1470-1626, Vol. 139, no 1, 1-9 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have recently documented that trisomy 21 mosaicism is common in human foetal ovaries. On the basis of this observation we propose that the maternal age effect in Down syndrome (DS) is caused by the differential behaviour of trisomy 21 in relation to disomy 21 oocytes during development from foetal life until ovulation in adulthood. in particular, we suggest that trisomy 21 oocytes, lagging behind those that are disomic, may escape the timed pruning of the seven million in foetal life to the 300-400 finally selected for ovulation. The net effect of this preferential elimination will be an accumulation of trisomy 21 oocytes in the ovarian reserve of older women. We here highlight the implications of this Oocyte Mosaicism Selection (OMS) model with respect to the prevalent view that the maternal age effect is complex, dependent on many different biological and environmental factors. We examine conclusions drawn from recent large-scale studies in families, tracing DNA markers along the length of chromosome 21q between parents and DS children, in comparison to the OMS model. We conclude that these family linkage data are equally compatible with the maternal age effect originating from the accumulation of trisomy 21 oocytes with advancing maternal age. One relatively straightforward way to get to grips with what is actually going on in this regard would be to compare incidence of trisomy 21 oocytes (and their pairing configurations) in foetal ovaries with that in oocytes at the meiosis I stage from adult women.

  • 2.
    Aagaard, Lise
    et al.
    University of So Denmark, Denmark FKL Research Centre Qual Medical Use, Denmark Danish Pharmacovigilance Research Project DANPREP, Denmark .
    Strandell, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Melskens, Lars
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Petersen, Paw S. G.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Holme Hansen, Ebba
    FKL Research Centre Qual Medical Use, Denmark Danish Pharmacovigilance Research Project DANPREP, Denmark University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Global Patterns of Adverse Drug Reactions Over a Decade Analyses of Spontaneous Reports to VigiBase (TM)2012In: Drug Safety, ISSN 0114-5916, E-ISSN 1179-1942, Vol. 35, no 12, 1171-1182 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although systems to collect information about suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were established in many countries and by the WHO in the 1960s, few studies have examined reported ADRs related to national income. Objective: The aim of the study was to characterize ADRs reported to the WHO-ADR database, VigiBase (TM), and to relate data to national income. Methods: We analysed ADR reports submitted to VigiBase (TM) from 2000 to 2009 with respect to reporting rate, age and sex of patient, type, seriousness and medications. Reports were also analysed with respect to national income level, classified in accordance with the World Bank definition: low, lower-middle, upper-middle and high. Results: We analysed 1 359 067 ADR reports including 3 013 074 ADRs. Overall, 16% of reports were serious and 60% were reported for females. High-income countries had the highest ADR reporting rates (range 3-613 reports/million inhabitants/year) and low-income countries the lowest (range 0-21). Distribution of ADRs across income groups with respect to age group, seriousness and sex was non-significant. Overall, the majority of ADRs were reported for nervous system medications, followed by cardiovascular medicines. Low-income countries reported relatively more ADRs for antiinfectives for systemic use than high-income countries, and high-income countries reported more ADRs for antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents than lower-income groups. Conclusion: This study showed that high-income countries had the highest ADR reporting rates and low-income countries the lowest, with large variations across countries in each group. Significant differences in ADR reporting rates were only found for ADRs of the type skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders and for the therapeutic groups antiinfectives for systemic use and antineoplastic and immunomodulation agents. To strengthen ADR reporting rates, especially in low-income countries, more research is needed about the impact of organizational structures and economic resources of national pharmacovigilance centres and ADR reporting practices on the large variations in ADR reporting rates within income groups.

  • 3.
    Aalto, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaworski, M
    Gustavsson, M
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurosurgery UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of Betainterferon treatment in Multiple Sclerosis Studied by Quantitative 1H MRS2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Aalto, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sjoewall, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Davidsson, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Brain magnetic resonance imaging does not contribute to the diagnosis of chronic neuroborreliosis2007In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 48, no 7, 755-762 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Borrelia infections, especially chronic neuroborreliosis ( NB), may cause considerable diagnostic problems. This diagnosis is based on symptoms and findings in the cerebrospinal fluid but is not always conclusive. Purpose: To evaluate brain magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI) in chronic NB, to compare the findings with healthy controls, and to correlate MRI findings with disease duration. Material and Methods: Sixteen well- characterized patients with chronic NB and 16 matched controls were examined in a 1.5T scanner with a standard head coil. T1- ( with and without gadolinium), T2-, and diffusion- weighted imaging plus fluid- attenuated inversion recovery ( FLAIR) imaging were used. Results: White matter lesions and lesions in the basal ganglia were seen in 12 patients and 10 controls ( no significant difference). Subependymal lesions were detected in patients down to the age of 25 and in the controls down to the age of 43. The number of lesions was correlated to age both in patients ( rho=0.83, P < 0.01) and in controls ( rho=0.61, P < 0.05), but not to the duration of disease. Most lesions were detected with FLAIR, but many also with T2- weighted imaging. Conclusion: A number of MRI findings were detected in patients with chronic NB, although the findings were unspecific when compared with matched controls and did not correlate with disease duration. However, subependymal lesions may constitute a potential finding in chronic NB.

  • 5.
    Aaltonen, Kristina E.
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Rosendahl, Ann H.
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Malmstrom, Per
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hartman, Linda
    Lund University, Sweden; Regional Cancer Centre South, Sweden.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Association between insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) negativity and poor prognosis in a cohort of women with primary breast cancer2014In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 14, no 794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Resistance towards endocrine therapy is a great concern in breast cancer treatment and may partly be explained by the activation of compensatory signaling pathways. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) signaling pathway was activated or deregulated in breast cancer patients and to explore if any of the markers were prognostic, with or without adjuvant tamoxifen. This signaling pathway has been suggested to cause estrogen independent cell growth and thus contribute to resistance to endocrine treatment in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. Methods: The protein expression of IGF1R, phosphorylated Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (p-mTOR) and phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein (p-S6rp) were investigated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays in two patient cohorts. Cohort I (N = 264) consisted of mainly postmenopausal women with stage II breast cancer treated with tamoxifen for 2 years irrespective of ER status. Cohort II (N = 206) consisted of mainly medically untreated, premenopausal patients with node-negative breast cancer. Distant disease-free survival (DDFS) at 5 years was used as end-point for survival analyses. Results: We found that lower IGF1R expression was associated with worse prognosis for tamoxifen treated, postmenopausal women (HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.52 - 0.94, p = 0.016). The effect was seen mainly in ER-negative patients where the prognostic effect was retained after adjustment for other prognostic markers (adjusted HR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.29 - 0.82, p = 0.007). Expression of IGF1R was associated with ER positivity (p less than 0.001) in the same patient cohort. Conclusions: Our results support previous studies indicating that IGF1R positivity reflects a well differentiated tumor with low metastatic capacity. An association between lack of IGF1R expression and worse prognosis was mainly seen in the ER-negative part of Cohort I. The lack of co-activation of downstream markers (p-mTOR and p-S6rp) in the IGF1R pathway suggested that the prognostic effect was not due to complete activation of this pathway. Thus, no evidence could be found for a compensatory function of IGF1R signaling in the investigated cohorts.

  • 6.
    Aamand Grabau, Dorthe
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Bendahl, Par-Ola
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden .
    The prevalence of immunohistochemically determined oestrogen receptor positivity in primary breast cancer is dependent on the choice of antibody and method of heat-induced epitope retrieval - prognostic implications?2013In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 52, no 8, 1657-1666 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Oestrogen receptor (ER) status is important for the choice of systemic treatment of breast cancer patients. However, most data from randomised trials on the effect of adjuvant endocrine therapy according to ER status are based on the cytosol methods. Comparisons with immunohistochemical methods have given similar results. The aim of the present study was to examine whether different ER antibodies and heat-induced epitope retrieval (HIER) methods influence the prevalence of ER-positivity in primary breast cancer. Material and methods. This study is based on patients included in a clinical trial designed to compare the effect of two years of adjuvant tamoxifen versus no adjuvant systemic treatment in premenopausal women. From 1986 to 1991, 564 patients from two study centres in Sweden were enrolled and randomised. Patients were randomised independently of ER status. In the present study, ER status was assessed on tissue microarrays with the three different ER antibody/HIER combinations: 1D5 in citrate pH 6 (n = 390), SP1 in Tris pH 9 (n = 390) and PharmDx in citrate pH 6 (n = 361). Results. At cut-offs of 1% and 10%, respectively, the prevalence of ER-positivity was higher with SP1 (75% and 72%) compared with 1D5 (68% and 66%) and PharmDx (66% and 62%). At these cut-offs, patients in the discordant groups (SP1-positive and 1D5-negative) seem to have a prognosis intermediate between those of the double-positive and double-negative groups. Comparison with the ER status determined by the cytosol-based methods in the discordant group also showed an intermediate pattern. The repeatability was good for all antibodies and cut-offs, with overall agreement andgt;= 93%. Conclusion. The present study shows that the choice of antibody and HIER method influences the prevalence of ER-positivity. We suggest that this be taken into consideration when choosing a cut-off for clinical decision making.

  • 7.
    Aanaes, K
    et al.
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Rasmussen, N
    Rigshosp, Denmark Statens Serum Institute, Denmark .
    Pressler, T
    Rigshosp, Denmark Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Johansen, H K
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Lindberg, U
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Hoiby, N
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Carlsson, M
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Wieslander, J
    EuroDiagnostica AB, Sweden .
    Buchwald, C
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Extensive Endoscopic Image-Guided Sinus Surgery Decreases BPI-ANCA in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 76, no 6, 573-579 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) directed against bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) are common in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and serum levels are correlated with lung colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the severity of lung damage. The production of BPI-ANCA may be due to the costimulation of BPI when mounting an immune response against P. aeruginosa. The effect of surgery aiming to eradicate bacteria and infected tissue on BPI-ANCA levels is sparsely described. A cohort of patients with CF were included: 53 patients having extensive image-guided sinus surgery (EIGSS) with topical postoperative antibiotic treatment, 131 non-operated controls and 36 who had double lung transplantation (LTX). In all 219 patients, serum samples before and after surgery or at similar intervals were analysed for IgG and IgA BPI-ANCA. The EIGSS group showed a highly significant decrease in both IgA and IgG BPI-ANCA levels compared with their own preoperative values and control group values (P andlt; 0.0010.02). The LTX patients also showed a highly significant decrease in both IgA and IgG BPI-ANCA levels (P andlt; 0.001). EIGSS and LTX decrease IgA and IgG BPI-ANCA levels in patients with CF, indicating that extensive removal of infected tissue influences the pathogenic process of autoantibody production. The results shown herein are in favour of applying EIGSS in selected patients with CF and for using BPI-ANCA as a surrogate marker for guiding further therapeutic interventions.

  • 8.
    Aarao, J
    et al.
    University of S Australia, Australia .
    Miklavcic, Stan J.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ward, D A.
    University of S Australia, Australia .
    Extended-domain-eigenfunction method (EDEM): a study of ill posedness and regularization2013In: Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical, ISSN 1751-8113, Vol. 46, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extended-domain-eigenfunction method (EDEM) proposed for solving elliptic boundary value problems on annular-like domains requires an inversion process. The procedure thus represents an ill-posed problem, whose numerical solution involves an ill-conditioned system of equations. In this paper, the ill-posed nature of EDEM is studied and numerical solutions based on regularization schemes are considered. It is shown that the EDEM solution methodology lends itself naturally to a formulation in terms of the well-known iterative Landweber method and the more general and faster converging semi-iterative regularization schemes. Theoretical details and numerical results of the regularization schemes are presented for the case of the two-dimensional Laplace operator on annular domains.

  • 9.
    Aardal, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ann-Charlotté, Holm
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cortisol in Saliva: Reference Ranges and Relation to Cortisol in Serum1995In: European Journal of Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Biochemistry, ISSN 0939-4974, Vol. 33, 927-932 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to establish morning and evening reference ranges for cortisol in saliva. Another objective was to compare the concentrations of the mainly free cortisol in saliva to those of total cortisol in serum as determined with a commercial radioimmunoassay. The concentrations were determined in matched samples of saliva and serum collected at 8am and 10pm from 197 healthy volunteers. The saliva samples were stable for at least 7 days at room temperature and for 9 months at —20 °C. Reference ranges, the central 95%, were estimated to 3.5—27.0 nmol/1 at 8 am and < 6.0 nmol/1 at 10 pm. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was below 5% and total CV below 10%. The relation between the cortisol concentrations in serum and saliva was nonlinear with r = 0.86 for serum concentrations < 450 nmol/1 and r = 0.44 for serum concentrations ^ 450 nmol/1. In conclusion, the satisfactory precision of the analysis and the simple non-invasive sampling procedure suggest that saliva may be used for cortisol measurements in situations where blood sampling is difficult to perform.

  • 10.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Salivary cortisol and posttraumatic stress reactions: methodological and applied studies before and after trauma2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of psychotraumatology has its roots in ancient history. During the past decades, the surveillance of the psychobiological background of reactions to and consequences of traumatic stress has made great progress and the complexity of the human stress response system stands out. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis activity, modulated by various neuroimmunological substances, seems to play a major role in the stress response. However, there are still inconsistencies in explanations of relationships between biological and psychological changes following traumatic stress. Moreover, the matter of predictive factors for the development of posttraumatic morbidity is still in a speculative phase.

    The aims of the present thesis were to further develop a commercial serum cortisol radioimmunoassay (RIA) for determination of cortisol in saliva and to test its reliability, specificity and sensitivity as a biochemical assay. The saliva sampling procedures and sample storage stability were also to be tested. Further issues were to investigate determinations of salivary cortisol and serum prolactin in relation to selfratings of posttraumatic psychological distress and general psychological health. Possible predictive and concurrent validity of salivary cortisol as a biochemical marker for posttraumatic psychological distress were to be tested.

    Cortisol is present in saliva mainly in non-protein form, representing the free, biologically active fraction of the total plasma cortisol concentration. In a first phase of the present thesis, the commercial serum cortisol RIA was modified for determination of cortisol in saliva. The relation between salivary and serum cortisol concentrations was tested. Reference ranges at 8 AM and 10 PM for the salivary cortisol assay were established from 195 healthy subjects. Salivary cortisol concentrations were tested in relation to serum cortisol in estimating adrenocortical function during endocrine dynamic function tests in 37 patients and 13 healthy controls. In testing salivary cortisol as a marker for stress for fieldwork use, a screening study was performed on 66 male rescue workers. Salivary cortisol at 8 AM and 10 PM and serum prolactin were determined and general psychological health and posttraumatic psychological distress were estimated with the self-rating scales General Health Questionnaire, Impact of Event Scale and Posttraumatic Symptom Scale. These scales were used in the second phase of the thesis. Three applied follow-up studies were performed with sampling of salivary cortisol and self-ratings: (a) a study of 31 UN-soldiers five days, two and nine months after a mine accident; (b) a study of 145 UN-soldiers before, at return, and two and six month after a six month mission. (c) a study of 101 UN-soldiers six and twelve months after a six month mission with severe combat exposure.

    The results from the present thesis indicate that the modified method of salivary cortisol determination possesses sufficient precision, accuracy, sample storage stability and procedural advantages for laboratory, clinical and field application. Moreover, it possesses moderate predictive information and moderate to high concurrent validity as a biochemical marker for posttraumatic psychological distress.

    List of papers
    1. Cortisol in Saliva: Reference Ranges and Relation to Cortisol in Serum
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cortisol in Saliva: Reference Ranges and Relation to Cortisol in Serum
    1995 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Biochemistry, ISSN 0939-4974, Vol. 33, 927-932 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to establish morning and evening reference ranges for cortisol in saliva. Another objective was to compare the concentrations of the mainly free cortisol in saliva to those of total cortisol in serum as determined with a commercial radioimmunoassay. The concentrations were determined in matched samples of saliva and serum collected at 8am and 10pm from 197 healthy volunteers. The saliva samples were stable for at least 7 days at room temperature and for 9 months at —20 °C. Reference ranges, the central 95%, were estimated to 3.5—27.0 nmol/1 at 8 am and < 6.0 nmol/1 at 10 pm. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was below 5% and total CV below 10%. The relation between the cortisol concentrations in serum and saliva was nonlinear with r = 0.86 for serum concentrations < 450 nmol/1 and r = 0.44 for serum concentrations ^ 450 nmol/1. In conclusion, the satisfactory precision of the analysis and the simple non-invasive sampling procedure suggest that saliva may be used for cortisol measurements in situations where blood sampling is difficult to perform.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80129 (URN)10.1515/cclm.1995.33.12.927 (DOI)
    Available from: 2012-08-21 Created: 2012-08-21 Last updated: 2012-08-21Bibliographically approved
    2. Salivary cortisol: an alternative to serum cortisol determinations in dynamic function tests
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Salivary cortisol: an alternative to serum cortisol determinations in dynamic function tests
    1998 (English)In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, Vol. 36, no 4, 215-222 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Salivary cortisol was measured as an alternative to serum cortisol as a marker for adrenocortical function following insulin tolerance test, corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation and adreno-corticotrophic hormone stimulation. During insulin tolerance test and corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation adreno-corticotrophic hormone was also measured. The tests were performed on healthy control subjects as well as on patients under investigation for various disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (insulin tolerance test: 3 controls on two occasions and 14 patients; corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation: 4 controls and 18 patients; adreno-corticotrophic hormone stimulation: 6 controls and 10 patients). Five patients underwent both insulin tolerance test and corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation. Using criteria for adequate cortisol response in serum, the patients were classified as good or poor responders. In 42 of the 45 tests performed the same conclusion as to cortisol status was drawn when based on serum and salivary cortisol responses. In healthy subjects and good responders the mean cortisol relative increase was greater in saliva than in serum in all three tests (p < 0.05). Characteristic of the results for the insulin tolerance test was a significant initial mean decrease (p < 0.05), not found in serum, and the highest observed salivary cortisol value was delayed for at least 30 minutes compared to that in serum. Plasma adreno-corticotrophic hormone correlated significantly with the cortisol concentrations determined 15 minutes later in serum (r = 0.54–0.64) and in saliva (r = 0.76–0.85). The more pronounced cortisol response in saliva than in serum and its closer correlation with adreno-corticotrophic hormone offer advantages over serum cortisol, suggesting salivary cortisol measurement may be used as an alternative parameter in dynamic endocrine tets.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80133 (URN)10.1515/CCLM.1998.037 (DOI)
    Available from: 2012-08-21 Created: 2012-08-21 Last updated: 2012-10-24Bibliographically approved
    3. Salivary cortisol and serum prolactin in relation to stress rating scales in a group of rescue workers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Salivary cortisol and serum prolactin in relation to stress rating scales in a group of rescue workers
    1999 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 46, no 6, 850-855 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rescue service personnel are often exposed to traumatic events as part of their occupation, and higher prevalence rates of psychiatric illness have been found among this group.

    Methods: In 65 rescue workers, salivary cortisol at 8 am and 10 pm and serum prolactin at 8 am were related to the psychiatric self-rating scale General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) measuring psychiatric health, and the Impact of Events Scale (IES) and Post Traumatic Symptom Scale (PTSS) measuring posttraumatic symptoms.

    Results: Seventeen percent of the study population scored above the GHQ-28 cut-off limit but none scored beyond the cut-off limit in the IES and PTSS questionnaires. Salivary cortisol concentration at 10 pm correlated with statistical significance to anxiety (p < .005) and depressive symptoms (p < .01) measured with GHQ-28, as well as to posttraumatic symptoms, with avoidance behavior measured with IES (p < .01) and PTSS (p < .005). Two of the rescue workers were followed over time with the same sampling procedure after a major rescue commission.

    Conclusions: The correlation between evening salivary cortisol and anxiety, depressiveness, and posttraumatic avoidance symptoms indicates that these parameters can be used in screening and follow-up after traumatic stress events.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24816 (URN)10.1016/S0006-3223(98)00381-3 (DOI)9214 (Local ID)9214 (Archive number)9214 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2012-08-21Bibliographically approved
    4. Salivary cortisol, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and general health in the acute phase and during 9-month follow-up
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Salivary cortisol, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and general health in the acute phase and during 9-month follow-up
    2001 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 50, no 12, 986-993 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Because traumatic events are unpredictable, there are few studies of psychobiological states immediately following such events. Our study aimed to determine the relation of salivary cortisol to psychologic distress immediately after a traumatic event and then during follow-up.

    Methods: Measurement of morning and evening salivary cortisol and ratings of psychologic distress (using the Impact of Events Scale [IES], the Post Traumatic Symptom Scale, and the General Health Questionnaire) were performed with 31 United Nations soldiers at three time points—5 days and 2 and 9 months—following a mine accident in Lebanon.

    Results: Five days after the accident, 15 subjects reported substantial posttraumatic distress according to the IES, as well as significantly lower morning and higher evening cortisol levels compared with the low-impact group. Within 9 months, the posttraumatic distress of the high-impact group was reduced, accompanied by an increase in morning and a decrease in evening cortisol levels. There were significant relationships between evening cortisol and all rating scales at the first and third time points.

    Conclusions: Subclinical posttraumatic stress following an adverse event can be measured biologically via salivary cortisol levels soon after the event.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24817 (URN)10.1016/S0006-3223(01)01253-7 (DOI)9215 (Local ID)9215 (Archive number)9215 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2012-08-21Bibliographically approved
    5. Pre-trauma Salivary Cortisol Levels and General Health Ratings in Relation to Post-trauma Changes in Cortisol and Psychological Distress after UN-service in Bosnia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pre-trauma Salivary Cortisol Levels and General Health Ratings in Relation to Post-trauma Changes in Cortisol and Psychological Distress after UN-service in Bosnia
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The psychobiology of post-traumatic distress is known to some extent, however the pre-trauma psychobiology is not. The aims of the present study were to relate pre- and post-trauma salivary cortisol levels and general health to post-traumatic distress in a Swedish UN-battalion in Bosnia.

    Methods: Salivary 8 AM and I 0 PM cortisol levels and "General Health Questionnaire" ratings were collected from 145 subjects before the six months' mission, at return and two and six months after mission. During follow-up, the ratings were extended by the "Impact of Events Scale" (IES) and "Post Traumatic Symptom Scale".

    Results: Low pre-trauma morning and evening salivary cortisol levels were statistically significantly related to high scores in all rating scales six months after mission and to increasing IES scores during follow-up. Low morning and high evening post-trauma salivary cortisol levels were related to high ratings of psychological distress six months after mission

    Conclusions: Pre-trauma salivary cortisol levels seem to be related to posttrauma psychological distress, however not to the extent that salivary cortisol levels in a simple way could be used for predictive screening.

    Keyword
    Saliva, cortisol, relation to, rating scales, traumatic stress, UN-soldiers
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80134 (URN)
    Available from: 2012-08-21 Created: 2012-08-21 Last updated: 2012-08-21Bibliographically approved
    6. Twelve Months Follow-up of Salivary Cortisol in Relation to Psychological Distress and General Health in Swedish UN-personnel after Severe Combat Exposure during Six Months Mission in Bosnia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Twelve Months Follow-up of Salivary Cortisol in Relation to Psychological Distress and General Health in Swedish UN-personnel after Severe Combat Exposure during Six Months Mission in Bosnia
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Our group has presented evidence of relationships between salivary cortisol levels and psychological distress before, during and after trauma-related stress. The aim of the present study was to confirm the part of evidence of relationships between salivary cortisol and posttraumatic distress and their change over time.

    Methods: Salivary cortisol levels at 8 AM and 10 PM and self-ratings were collected from 106 subjects six and twelve months after a six months UNmission in Bosnia. The rating instruments were the "Impact of Event Scale" (IES), the "Post Traumatic Symptom Scale" and the "General Health Questionnaire".

    Results: Significant statistical interactions were found between changes in mean cortisol levels and IES scores over time. Decreasing evening cortisol levels over time were significantly related to decreasing IES scores and vice versa. Morning cortisol levels showed negative, and evening cortisol positive correlations with all rating scores.

    Conclusions: The evidence from previous studies on trauma related stress, that salivary cortisol is related to the development of posttraumatic stress reactions, the morning cortisol in reverse (negative) direction to that (positive) of evening cortisol, were confirmed.

    Keyword
    Saliva, cortisol, follow-up, relation to, rating scales, traumatic stress, UN-soldiers
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80136 (URN)
    Available from: 2012-08-21 Created: 2012-08-21 Last updated: 2012-08-21Bibliographically approved
  • 11.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Thomas E.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Salivary cortisol, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and general health in the acute phase and during 9-month follow-up2001In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 50, no 12, 986-993 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Because traumatic events are unpredictable, there are few studies of psychobiological states immediately following such events. Our study aimed to determine the relation of salivary cortisol to psychologic distress immediately after a traumatic event and then during follow-up.

    Methods: Measurement of morning and evening salivary cortisol and ratings of psychologic distress (using the Impact of Events Scale [IES], the Post Traumatic Symptom Scale, and the General Health Questionnaire) were performed with 31 United Nations soldiers at three time points—5 days and 2 and 9 months—following a mine accident in Lebanon.

    Results: Five days after the accident, 15 subjects reported substantial posttraumatic distress according to the IES, as well as significantly lower morning and higher evening cortisol levels compared with the low-impact group. Within 9 months, the posttraumatic distress of the high-impact group was reduced, accompanied by an increase in morning and a decrease in evening cortisol levels. There were significant relationships between evening cortisol and all rating scales at the first and third time points.

    Conclusions: Subclinical posttraumatic stress following an adverse event can be measured biologically via salivary cortisol levels soon after the event.

  • 12.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Thomas E.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Twelve Months Follow-up of Salivary Cortisol in Relation to Psychological Distress and General Health in Swedish UN-personnel after Severe Combat Exposure during Six Months Mission in BosniaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Our group has presented evidence of relationships between salivary cortisol levels and psychological distress before, during and after trauma-related stress. The aim of the present study was to confirm the part of evidence of relationships between salivary cortisol and posttraumatic distress and their change over time.

    Methods: Salivary cortisol levels at 8 AM and 10 PM and self-ratings were collected from 106 subjects six and twelve months after a six months UNmission in Bosnia. The rating instruments were the "Impact of Event Scale" (IES), the "Post Traumatic Symptom Scale" and the "General Health Questionnaire".

    Results: Significant statistical interactions were found between changes in mean cortisol levels and IES scores over time. Decreasing evening cortisol levels over time were significantly related to decreasing IES scores and vice versa. Morning cortisol levels showed negative, and evening cortisol positive correlations with all rating scores.

    Conclusions: The evidence from previous studies on trauma related stress, that salivary cortisol is related to the development of posttraumatic stress reactions, the morning cortisol in reverse (negative) direction to that (positive) of evening cortisol, were confirmed.

  • 13.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Thomas E.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pre-trauma Salivary Cortisol Levels and General Health Ratings in Relation to Post-trauma Changes in Cortisol and Psychological Distress after UN-service in BosniaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The psychobiology of post-traumatic distress is known to some extent, however the pre-trauma psychobiology is not. The aims of the present study were to relate pre- and post-trauma salivary cortisol levels and general health to post-traumatic distress in a Swedish UN-battalion in Bosnia.

    Methods: Salivary 8 AM and I 0 PM cortisol levels and "General Health Questionnaire" ratings were collected from 145 subjects before the six months' mission, at return and two and six months after mission. During follow-up, the ratings were extended by the "Impact of Events Scale" (IES) and "Post Traumatic Symptom Scale".

    Results: Low pre-trauma morning and evening salivary cortisol levels were statistically significantly related to high scores in all rating scales six months after mission and to increasing IES scores during follow-up. Low morning and high evening post-trauma salivary cortisol levels were related to high ratings of psychological distress six months after mission

    Conclusions: Pre-trauma salivary cortisol levels seem to be related to posttrauma psychological distress, however not to the extent that salivary cortisol levels in a simple way could be used for predictive screening.

  • 14.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holm, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundin, Tom
    Department of Psychiatry, Uppsala Academic Hospital, Uppsala University, Uppsala (TL), Sweden.
    Salivary cortisol and serum prolactin in relation to stress rating scales in a group of rescue workers1999In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 46, no 6, 850-855 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rescue service personnel are often exposed to traumatic events as part of their occupation, and higher prevalence rates of psychiatric illness have been found among this group.

    Methods: In 65 rescue workers, salivary cortisol at 8 am and 10 pm and serum prolactin at 8 am were related to the psychiatric self-rating scale General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) measuring psychiatric health, and the Impact of Events Scale (IES) and Post Traumatic Symptom Scale (PTSS) measuring posttraumatic symptoms.

    Results: Seventeen percent of the study population scored above the GHQ-28 cut-off limit but none scored beyond the cut-off limit in the IES and PTSS questionnaires. Salivary cortisol concentration at 10 pm correlated with statistical significance to anxiety (p < .005) and depressive symptoms (p < .01) measured with GHQ-28, as well as to posttraumatic symptoms, with avoidance behavior measured with IES (p < .01) and PTSS (p < .005). Two of the rescue workers were followed over time with the same sampling procedure after a major rescue commission.

    Conclusions: The correlation between evening salivary cortisol and anxiety, depressiveness, and posttraumatic avoidance symptoms indicates that these parameters can be used in screening and follow-up after traumatic stress events.

  • 15.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion.
    Holm, AC
    Eriksson, TE
    Lundin, T
    Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Biomed & Surg, Ctr Clin Chem, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Salivary cortisol and posttraumatic stress reactions methodological and applied studies before and after trauma2002In: International Journal of Psychophysiology, ISSN 0167-8760, Vol. 45, no 1-2, 89-89 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlberg, Bengt E.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holm, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Salivary cortisol: an alternative to serum cortisol determinations in dynamic function tests1998In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, Vol. 36, no 4, 215-222 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salivary cortisol was measured as an alternative to serum cortisol as a marker for adrenocortical function following insulin tolerance test, corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation and adreno-corticotrophic hormone stimulation. During insulin tolerance test and corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation adreno-corticotrophic hormone was also measured. The tests were performed on healthy control subjects as well as on patients under investigation for various disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (insulin tolerance test: 3 controls on two occasions and 14 patients; corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation: 4 controls and 18 patients; adreno-corticotrophic hormone stimulation: 6 controls and 10 patients). Five patients underwent both insulin tolerance test and corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation. Using criteria for adequate cortisol response in serum, the patients were classified as good or poor responders. In 42 of the 45 tests performed the same conclusion as to cortisol status was drawn when based on serum and salivary cortisol responses. In healthy subjects and good responders the mean cortisol relative increase was greater in saliva than in serum in all three tests (p < 0.05). Characteristic of the results for the insulin tolerance test was a significant initial mean decrease (p < 0.05), not found in serum, and the highest observed salivary cortisol value was delayed for at least 30 minutes compared to that in serum. Plasma adreno-corticotrophic hormone correlated significantly with the cortisol concentrations determined 15 minutes later in serum (r = 0.54–0.64) and in saliva (r = 0.76–0.85). The more pronounced cortisol response in saliva than in serum and its closer correlation with adreno-corticotrophic hormone offer advantages over serum cortisol, suggesting salivary cortisol measurement may be used as an alternative parameter in dynamic endocrine tets.

  • 17.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Mobäck, Caroline
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Jakobsson, Sandra
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Germany.
    Hoffmann, Johannes J. M. L.
    Abbott GmbH and Co KG, Germany.
    Iron depletion in blood donors - Have extended erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters diagnostic utility?2015In: Transfusion and apheresis science, ISSN 1473-0502, E-ISSN 1878-1683, Vol. 53, no 1, 76-81 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Blood donation is associated with iron depletion, but donor iron status is not usually investigated, as such tests are cumbersome and costly. It would therefore be desirable to have simple, fast and inexpensive tests that give information on a donors risk of developing iron depletion. In a pilot study we investigated whether novel erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters can serve this goal. Methods: In regular blood donors extended red cell parameters were measured using the Abbott CELL-DYN Sapphire hematology analyzer and conventional biochemical tests of iron status. Donors were compared with a regionally matched group of non-donating controls. Results: In the controls, the reference ranges of extended RBC parameters were well comparable to published data. Donors had significantly more microcytic RBC than controls (median 0.9 vs 0.6%), lower serum ferritin concentration (median 43 vs 91 mg/L) and higher soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index (median 1.60 vs 1.27). Overall 18-28% of the donors were iron depleted. Moreover, 3.3% of donors had iron-restricted erythropoiesis. Microcytic RBC and reticulocyte mean cell hemoglobin content predicted iron depletion with 70% and 64% sensitivities and specificities of 72% and 78%, respectively. When combined these two parameters increased the sensitivity to 82%. Conclusions: Our results in Swedish blood donors confirm a high prevalence of iron depletion, despite iron supplementation used by about half of the donors. Microcytic RBC and MCHr appeared to be helpful in identifying iron-depleted donors, who might benefit from iron supplementation. We recommend larger prospective investigations in order to confirm and extend the findings of this pilot study. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Aarts, B.
    et al.
    Netherlands Forensic Institute, Biological Traces and DNA, The Hague, Netherlands.
    Kokshoorn, B.
    Netherlands Forensic Institute, Biological Traces and DNA, The Hague, Netherlands.
    Mc Kenna, L.G.
    Forensic Science Ireland, DNA department, Dublin, Ireland.
    Drotz, W.
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, DNA department, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ansell, Ricky
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Forensic Centre, DNA department, Linköping, Sweden.
    van Oorschot, R.A.
    Office of the Chief Forensic Scientist, Victoria Police Forensic Services Department, Macleod- Victoria, Australia.
    Kloosterman, A.D.
    Netherlands Forensic Institute, Biological Traces and DNA, The Hague, Netherlands.
    DNActivity: International cooperation in activity level interpretation of forensic DNA evidence.2015In: Abstract book, 7th European Academy of Forensic Science, EAFS, Prag, Tjeckien, 2015., 2015, 555- p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Questions posed to expert witnesses by the legal community and the courts are expanding to include not just those relating to source level (i.e. ‘who is the donor of the trace?’) but also those relating to activitity level (i.e. ‘how did the DNA get there?’). The answers to these questions are usually formulated as the probability of the evidence under alternative scenarios. As activity level questions are part of investigative and legal considerations it is of paramount importance that expert witnesses are provided with knowledge and tools to address these questions.

    To answer such questions within a probabilistic framework, empirical data is needed to estimate probabilities of transfer, persistence and recovery of DNA as well as background levels of DNA on everyday objects. There is a paucity of empirical data on these topics, but the number of studies is increasing both through in-house experiments and experimental data published in international scientific journals.

    Laboratories that conduct such studies all use different experimental setups, trace recovery strategies and techniques and DNA analysis systems and equipment. It is essential for the forensic genetics community in general to establish whether the data generated by different labs are in concordance, and can therefore be readily used by the forensic community.

    Moreover, if existing data and data generated from future experiments are made available to the (forensic) community, knowledge is needed on the key factors that underlie potential interlaboratory variation.

    The aims and objectives of this ENFSI Monopoly 2013 project are to conduct a study of methodologies and data from different laboratories and to assess the comparability of the scientific data on transfer, persistence and recovery of DNA. This comparison will allow us to identify key factors that underlie potential variation. This information will be used to setup guidelines to enable sharing and database-storage of relevant scientific

    data. This will improve the ability of forensic scientists and other professionals of the Criminal Justice System to give evidence-based answers to questions that relate to the activity level of the crime under investigation.

  • 19.
    Aasa, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hovbäck, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Det preoperativa informationssamtalets betydelse för patientens delaktighet i sin vård inom kolorektalkirurgi2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: ERAS (Enhanced Recovery After Surgery) är ett standardiserat multimodalt vårdprogram vid elektiv kolorektalkirurgi, som syftar till snabbare återhämtning och kortare vårdtider genom ett tvärprofessionellt samarbete.  En vecka innan planerad operation träffar sjuksköterskan patienten för ett samtal om vårdförloppet.

     

    Syfte: Att identifiera och beskriva patientens upplevelse av sjuksköterskans ERAS- samtal och dess betydelse för patientens delaktighet i sin vård. 

     

    Metod: Datainsamlingen skedde genom kvalitativa intervjuer. Tolv patienter, nio män och tre kvinnor har intervjuats. De ljudinspelade samtalen har transkriberats ordagrant och analyserats med hjälp av tolkande fenomenologisk analys (Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis).

     

    Resultat: Analysarbetet resulterade i fem olika teman; bli sedd, trygghet, tillit, ansvar samt delaktighet. Alla teman relaterar till varandra och illustrerar en positiv och en negativ sida av den upplevda erfarenheten. Tillsammans bildar en helhet av upplevelsen; ERAS- samtalet och dess betydelse för patientens delaktighet.

     

    Konklusion: Resultatet visar att patienterna känner sig sedda under informationssamtalet. Det är viktigt att bekräfta patienten och knyta an mer till informationssamtalet under vårdtiden för att patienterna ska vara delaktiga och ta eget ansvar. Tilliten till vårdpersonalen har betydelse för att patienterna ska känna trygghet. Studien visar att ERAS- samtalet upplevs strukturerat och individuellt men informationen måste följa patienterna under hela vårdtillfället.

  • 20.
    Aasa, Agneta
    et al.
    Kirurgmottagningen, Ryhovs Länssjukhus, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hovbäck, Malin
    Kirurgmottagningen, Ryhovs Länssjukhus, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The importance of preoperative information for patient participation in colorectal surgery care2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 11-12, 1604-1612 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To identify and describe patients' experiences of a preoperative information session with a nurse, as part of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) concept, and its impact on patient participation in their own care.

    Background

    Enhanced recovery after surgery is a standardised, multimodal treatment programme for elective colorectal surgery, leading to faster recovery and shorter hospital stays via interprofessional collaboration. The ERAS concept is initiated for patients a week before surgery when the patient receives detailed information about the care process during a meeting with a nurse.

    Design

    The study is a qualitative interpretive study based on interviews.

    Methods

    Twelve patients, nine men and three women, were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA).

    Results

    The analysis identified and formulated five themes: being seen, security, trust, responsibility and participation. All themes are closely related and illustrate positive and negative sides of the patient's experience. They hang together and form a complete set of experiences: ERAS conversation and its impact on patients' participation.

    Conclusions

    The results show that patients feel confirmed in the ERAS conversation. Healthcare professionals need to be bonding more information call during hospitalisation. It is important to confirm the patient in order for them to participate and take responsibility. Reliance on caregivers is important for patients to feel safe and to participate in their own care. This study shows that the ERAS conversation was experienced as being structured and individually tailored, but the information must apply to the patients throughout the period of care.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    Some shortcomings have been revealed, which should enable improvement in the care of patients. Healthcare professionals need to raise awareness of patients' responsibilities for participation in their own recovery and care. Healthcare professionals and patients need to be aware of each other's responsibilities.

  • 21.
    Aasa, Mikael
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dellborg, Mikael
    Gothenburg University.
    Grip, Lars
    Gothenburg University.
    Herlitz, Johan
    Gothenburg University.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Leif
    Stockholm Prehospital Centre.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Cost and health outcome of primary percutaneous coronary intervention versus thrombolysis in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction-Results of the Swedish Early Decision reperfusion Study (SWEDES) trial2010In: AMERICAN HEART JOURNAL, ISSN 0002-8703, Vol. 160, no 2, 322-328 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background In ST-elevation myocardial infarction, primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has a superior clinical outcome, but it may increase costs in comparison to thrombolysis. The aim of the study was to compare costs, clinical outcome, and quality-adjusted survival between primary PCI and thrombolysis. Methods Patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction were randomized to primary PCI with adjunctive enoxaparin and abciximab (n = 101), or to enoxaparin followed by reteplase (n = 104). Data on the use of health care resources, work loss, and health-related quality of life were collected during a 1-year period. Cost-effectiveness was determined by comparing costs and quality-adjusted survival. The joint distribution of incremental costs and quality-adjusted survival was analyzed using a nonparametric bootstrap approach. Results Clinical outcome did not differ significantly between the groups. Compared with the group treated with thrombolysis, the cost of interventions was higher in the PCI-treated group ($4,602 vs $3,807; P = .047), as well as the cost of drugs ($1,309 vs $1,202; P = .001), whereas the cost of hospitalization was lower ($7,344 vs $9,278; P = .025). The cost of investigations, outpatient care, and loss of production did not differ significantly between the 2 treatment arms. Total cost and quality-adjusted survival were $25,315 and 0.759 vs $27,819 and 0.728 (both not significant) for the primary PCI and thrombolysis groups, respectively. Based on the 1-year follow-up, bootstrap analysis revealed that in 80%, 88%, and 89% of the replications, the cost per health outcome gained for PCI will be andlt;$0, $50,000, and $100,000 respectively. Conclusion In a 1-year perspective, there was a tendency toward lower costs and better health outcome after primary PCI, resulting in costs for PCI in comparison to thrombolysis that will be below the conventional threshold for cost-effectiveness in 88% of bootstrap replications.

  • 22.
    Aase, Audun
    et al.
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway.
    Hajdusek, Ondrej
    Academic Science Czech Republic, Czech Republic.
    Oines, Oivind
    Norwegian Vet Institute, Norway.
    Quarsten, Hanne
    Sorlandet Hospital Health Enterprise, Norway.
    Wilhelmsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Herstad, Tove K.
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway.
    Kjelland, Vivian
    University of Agder, Norway; Sorlandet Hospital Health Enterprise, Norway.
    Sima, Radek
    Academic Science Czech Republic, Czech Republic.
    Jalovecka, Marie
    Academic Science Czech Republic, Czech Republic.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Aaberge, Ingeborg S.
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway.
    Validate or falsify: Lessons learned from a microscopy method claimed to be useful for detecting Borrelia and Babesia organisms in human blood2016In: INFECTIOUS DISEASES, ISSN 2374-4235, Vol. 48, no 6, 411-419 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A modified microscopy protocol (the LM-method) was used to demonstrate what was interpreted as Borrelia spirochetes and later also Babesia sp., in peripheral blood from patients. The method gained much publicity, but was not validated prior to publication, which became the purpose of this study using appropriate scientific methodology, including a control group. Methods Blood from 21 patients previously interpreted as positive for Borrelia and/or Babesia infection by the LM-method and 41 healthy controls without known history of tick bite were collected, blinded and analysed for these pathogens by microscopy in two laboratories by the LM-method and conventional method, respectively, by PCR methods in five laboratories and by serology in one laboratory. Results Microscopy by the LM-method identified structures claimed to be Borrelia- and/or Babesia in 66% of the blood samples of the patient group and in 85% in the healthy control group. Microscopy by the conventional method for Babesia only did not identify Babesia in any samples. PCR analysis detected Borrelia DNA in one sample of the patient group and in eight samples of the control group; whereas Babesia DNA was not detected in any of the blood samples using molecular methods. Conclusions The structures interpreted as Borrelia and Babesia by the LM-method could not be verified by PCR. The method was, thus, falsified. This study underlines the importance of doing proper test validation before new or modified assays are introduced.

  • 23.
    Aaseth, Jan
    et al.
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Appl Science, Norway.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway; Norwegian University of Life Science NMBU, Norway.
    Bjorklund, Geir
    Council Nutr and Environm Med, Norway.
    Hestad, Knut
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Appl Science, Norway.
    Dusek, Petr
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Gen University Hospital Prague, Czech Republic.
    Roos, Per M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; St Goran Hospital, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Treatment strategies in Alzheimers disease: a review with focus on selenium supplementation2016In: Biometals, ISSN 0966-0844, E-ISSN 1572-8773, Vol. 29, no 5, 827-839 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimers disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder presenting one of the biggest healthcare challenges in developed countries. No effective treatment exists. In recent years the main focus of AD research has been on the amyloid hypothesis, which postulates that extracellular precipitates of beta amyloid (A beta) derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) are responsible for the cognitive impairment seen in AD. Treatment strategies have been to reduce A beta production through inhibition of enzymes responsible for its formation, or to promote resolution of existing cerebral A beta plaques. However, these approaches have failed to demonstrate significant cognitive improvements. Intracellular rather than extracellular events may be fundamental in AD pathogenesis. Selenate is a potent inhibitor of tau hyperphosphorylation, a critical step in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles. Some selenium (Se) compounds e.g. selenoprotein P also appear to protect APP against excessive copper and iron deposition. Selenoproteins show anti-inflammatory properties, and protect microtubules in the neuronal cytoskeleton. Optimal function of these selenoenzymes requires higher Se intake than what is common in Europe and also higher intake than traditionally recommended. Supplementary treatment with N-acetylcysteine increases levels of the antioxidative cofactor glutathione and can mediate adjuvant protection. The present review discusses the role of Se in AD treatment and suggests strategies for AD prevention by optimizing selenium intake, in accordance with the metal dysregulation hypothesis. This includes in particular secondary prevention by selenium supplementation to elderly with mild cognitive impairment.

  • 24.
    Aasland, Olaf G.
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Nygaard, Peter
    Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The long and winding road to widespread implementation of screening and brief intervention for alcohol problems: A historical overview with special attention to the WHO initiatives2008In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 25, no 6, 469-476 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Before 1970, special institutions, often prison-like, were built for the severely dependent. The effect of this type of treatment, often lasting for months or even years, was hard to document scientifically. During the 1970s several steps were taken towards a more preventive strategy that involved delivery of alcohol interventions in general health care settings, particularly within primary health care. The World Health Organization's (WHO) introduction of the concepts of hazardous and harmful drinking represented a shift from the traditional dichotomous view of individuals being alcoholic-or-not to a continuum where, in line with Rose's "prevention paradox", a large number of people with low risk may give rise to more cases of disease than the small number with high risk. The need for efficient methods to detect persons with various degrees of alcohol risk was evident, and a WHO multinational project that resulted in the publication of AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders identification Test) was carried out in the mid 1980s. The usefulness of this principle of case finding was then investigated in a subsequent multinational WHO project of brief intervention, as well as in several other similar projects. Many of these projects have proven quite efficient, but screening and brief intervention for alcohol problems is still not standard procedure in primary health care. The paper discusses some of the reasons why.

  • 25.
    Abate, E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. University of Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Elias, D.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Getachew, A.
    University of Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Alemu, S.
    University of Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Diro, E.
    University of Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Britton, S.
    Karolinska Hospital, Sweden.
    Aseffa, A.
    Armauer Hansen Research Institute, Ethiopia.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Effects of albendazole on the clinical outcome and immunological responses in helminth co-infected tuberculosis patients: a double blind randomised clinical trial2015In: International Journal of Parasitology, ISSN 0020-7519, E-ISSN 1879-0135, Vol. 45, no 2-3, 133-140 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite several review papers and experimental studies concerning the impact of chronic helminth infection on tuberculosis in recent years, there is a scarcity of data from clinical field studies in highly endemic areas for these diseases. We believe this is the first randomised clinical trial investigating the impact of albendazole treatment on the clinical and immunological outcomes of helminth co-infected tuberculosis patients. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of albendazole (400 mg per day for 3 days) in helminth-positive tuberculosis patients was conducted in Gondar, Ethiopia. The primary outcome was clinical improvement (Delta TB score) after 2 months. Among secondary outcomes were changes in the levels of eosinophils, CD4+ T cells, regulatory T cells, IFN-gamma, IL-5 and IL-10 after 3 months. A total of 140 helminth co-infected tuberculosis patients were included with an HIV co-infection rate of 22.8%. There was no significant effect on the primary outcome (Delta TB score: 5.6 +/- 2.9 for albendazole versus 5.9 +/- 2.5 for placebo, P = 0.59). The albendazole-treated group showed a decline in eosinophil cells (P = 0.001) and IL-10 (P = 0.017) after 3 months. In an exploratory analysis after 12 weeks, the albendazole treated group showed a trend towards weight gain compared with the placebo group (11.2 +/- 8.5 kg versus 8.2 +/- 8.7 kg, P = 0.08)). The reductions in eosinophil counts and IL-10 show that asymptomatic helminth infection significantly affects host immunity during tuberculosis and can be effectively reversed by albendazole treatment. The clinical effects of helminth infection on chronic infectious diseases such as tuberculosis merit further characterisation. (C) 2014 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 26.
    Abate, Ebba
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The impact of helminth infection in patients with active tuberculosis2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The geographic distribution of helminth infection and tuberculosis (TB) overlap substantially. Experimental animal models and limited data from humans have shown that intestinal helminths could subvert the host immune response towards a T-helper 2 (Th2)-type immune response and an increased regulatory T-cell activity (Tregs). This in turn affects the host's ability to mount an effective Th1 immune-mediated protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, evidence for this hypothesis in the human setting from helminth infected TB patients is limited. This thesis primarily focuses on the immunological and clinical impact of helminth infection on pulmonary TB. The kinetics of the Quantiferon-Gold (QFN) assay, which measures IFN-³ response to TB-specific antigens in whole blood was assessed and showed a modest decline during TB treatment to the level observed for healthy blood donors. We further assessed another clinical monitoring tool, the-TB-score, composed of clinical signs and symptoms of TB, and found an early decline two weeks after initiation of TB- treatment where a failure of decline correlated with increased mortality. Overall, the helminth co-infection rate was significantly higher in TB patients compared to healthy controls. Helminth co-infection was associated to a significantly higher rate of eosinophilia and IgE-levels in healthy controls and patients with tuberculosis. During the first weeks of anti-TB treatment, a marked decrease in the rate of helminth infection was observed in HIV co-infected compared to HIV-negative TB patients. However, helminth co-infection was more common in HIV negative than HIV positive TB patients. There was no detectable impact of helminth infection on the clinical presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis. At baseline, helminth co-infected TB patients showed an increased frequency of Tregs compared to helminth negative TB patients and healthy controls. This was accompanied by an increased rate of PPD stimulated IL-5 and spontaneous production of IL-10 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells among helminth co-infected TB patients. A placebo controlled randomized trial was conducted in order to test the hypothesis that albendazole treatment of helminth positive TB patients may improve the clinical response of TB by reducing the immunmodulatory effect of helminthes on TB immunity. A total of 140 helminth co-infected TB patients were randomized to albendazole (400 mg per os for three consecutive days) or placebo. No significant difference was observed between the albendazole and placebo group in terms of the primary outcome (TB score change between baseline and week 8). Among the secondary outcomes, a significant decline of peripheral eosinophil cells was observed in the albendazole treated group, but no effect on other outcome variables (changes in chest x-ray findings, IgE level and sputum smear conversion). Regarding the immunological assessment no significant difference was observed for changes in Tregs, and PPD-induced production of IFN- ³ or IL-5 although a non-significant trend of a decrease in IL-10 expressing PBMCs were observed in the albendazole group. Taken together, the burden of helminth infection was higher in TB patients than in a healthy control group. Helminth co-infection during pulmonary TB in the human setting induces an immune response characterized by increased IgE production, eosinophilia as well as increased levels of Tregs and spontaneous IL-10 production. Thus, the immunological impact of helminth infection on the outcome and risk for developing TB merits further investigation.

    List of papers
    1. Kinetics of the QuantiFERON((R))-TB Gold In-Tube test during treatment of patients with sputum smear-positive tuberculosis in relation to initial TST result and severity of disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kinetics of the QuantiFERON((R))-TB Gold In-Tube test during treatment of patients with sputum smear-positive tuberculosis in relation to initial TST result and severity of disease
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    2010 (English)In: Scandinavian journal of infectious diseases, ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 42, no 9, 650-657 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The QuantiFERON((R))-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFN) measures interferon-gamma production in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens. Our aim was to assess the kinetics of the QFN and initial tuberculin skin test (TST) result in relation to severity of disease in a tuberculosis (TB) endemic area. Smear-positive TB patients (n = 71) were recruited at Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia. The TST, QFN, CD4+ cell count and clinical symptoms (TB score) were assessed and followed up during treatment. From baseline to 7 months after treatment, there was a significant decrease in QFN reactivity (93.8% to 62.5% in HIV-negative/TB; 70.3% to 33.3% in HIV-positive/TB patients) down to a level comparable to a control group of blood donors (51.2%). The agreement between TST and QFN was poor in TB patients compared to healthy controls. A negative TST correlated to more advanced TB in contrast to a negative QFN test. We conclude that the QFN reactivity is significantly reduced at the end of treatment against active TB to the background level of healthy blood donors, and that the agreement between TST and QFN is poor including correlation to the severity of disease.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-58804 (URN)10.3109/00365548.2010.482942 (DOI)000282716000002 ()20465490 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-08-27 Created: 2010-08-27 Last updated: 2013-05-02
    2. Early treatment response evaluated by a clinical scoring system correlates with the prognosis of pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Ethiopia: A prospective follow-up study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early treatment response evaluated by a clinical scoring system correlates with the prognosis of pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Ethiopia: A prospective follow-up study.
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Scandinavian journal of infectious diseases, ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 44, no 11, 828-834 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In resource-limited settings the monitoring of tuberculosis (TB) patients is challenging, and early identification of TB patients with a high mortality risk is important. The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively whether early changes in a clinical scoring system (TB score) can predict treatment outcome in Ethiopian patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Method: TB patients (n = 250) and blood donors (n = 82) were recruited prospectively at Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia. Clinical scoring was performed using an interview-based questionnaire and clinical examination. Results: Among TB patients (53.6% of whom were HIV co-infected) the median TB score declined from week 0 to week 2 (8 (interquartile range (IQR) 6-9) vs 4 (IQR 2-6)) and dropped to a low level at week 8, which was still significantly higher than that found in blood donors (2 (IQR 1-4) vs 0 (IQR 0-1), p < 0.0001). Patients who died had a significantly higher TB score at week 0, week 2, and week 8 than survivors. Mortality was associated with a failure to achieve a decrease greater than 25% in the TB score at 2 weeks. Baseline CD4 + cell counts (< 200 cells/mm(3)) were associated with mortality but not with initial TB score results. Conclusions: The TB score was increased during the first 2 months of treatment among patients who died. Failure to achieve a greater than 25% decrease in TB score after 2 weeks of treatment was associated with increased mortality. Repeated clinical scoring during the intensive phase of TB treatment could be useful to identify high-risk patients.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-85315 (URN)10.3109/00365548.2012.694468 (DOI)000310008900004 ()22812387 (PubMedID)
    Note

    funding agencies|Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation||EU/EDCTP project|JP 2009.10800.006|Swedish heart and lung Foundation (King Oscar II Jubilee Foundation)||EU/EDCP|JP.10800.006|

    Available from: 2012-11-15 Created: 2012-11-15 Last updated: 2013-05-02
    3. The Impact of Asymptomatic Helminth Co-Infection in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Tuberculosis in North-West Ethiopia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Impact of Asymptomatic Helminth Co-Infection in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Tuberculosis in North-West Ethiopia
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Areas endemic of helminth infection, tuberculosis (TB) and HIV are to a large extent overlapping. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of asymptomatic helminth infection on the immunological response among TB patients with and without HIV, their house hold contacts and community controls. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethodology: Consecutive smear positive TB patients (n = 112), their household contacts (n = 71) and community controls (n = 112) were recruited in Gondar town, Ethiopia. Stool microscopy, HIV serology, serum IgE level, eosinophil and CD4 counts were performed and tuberculosis patients were followed up for 3 months after initiation of anti-TB treatment. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Helminth co-infection rate was 29% in TB patients and 21% in both community control and household contacts (p = 0.3) where Ascaris lumbricoides was the most prevalent parasite. In TB patients the seroprevalence of HIV was 47% (53/112). Eosinophilia and elevated IgE level were significantly associated with asymptomatic helminth infection. During TB treatment, the worm infection rate of HIV+/TB patients declined from 31% (10/32) at week 0 to 9% (3/32) at week 2 of TB treatment, whereas HIV2/TB patients showed no change from baseline to week 2, 29% (13/45) vs. 22.2% (10/45). This trend was stable at week 8 and 12 as well. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: One third of smear positive TB patients were infected with helminths. Eosinophilia and elevated IgE level correlated with asymptomatic worm infection, indicating an effect on host immunity. The rate of worm infection declined during TB treatment in HIV+/TB co-infected patients whereas no decline was seen in HIV2/TB group.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Public Library of Science, 2012
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-84349 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0042901 (DOI)000308206000014 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Agency for Research Cooperation with Developing Countries||Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SAREC/SIDA)||European-Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EU/EDCTP)|JP 10800.006|Swedish Research Council||Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation (Oscar II Jubilee Foundation)||

    Available from: 2012-10-05 Created: 2012-10-05 Last updated: 2013-05-02
    4. Impact of helminth infection on the clinical presentation 1 of pulmonary tuberculosis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of helminth infection on the clinical presentation 1 of pulmonary tuberculosis
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    2013 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The effects of helminth infection on chronic infectious diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis (TB) merit further characterization. Thus, we assessed the baseline clinical characteristics of helminth infection in patients with active TB in a high endemic area.

    Methodology: Consecutive, newly diagnosed TB patients were recruited from three health institutions in the north Gondar administrative zone, Ethiopia. Structured questionnaires were used to collect socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. Additionally, the TB score, mid upper arm circumference, body mass index (BMI), BCG vaccination status, stool and sputum microscopy as well as HIV serology and CD4+T cells counts were evaluated.

    Results: A total of 377 pulmonary TB patients were included in the study. The helminth co infection rate was 33% (123/377) and the most prevalent parasite was Ascaris lumbricoides (53%, 65/123). The HIV co-infection rate was 29% (110/377). Seventy percent (77/110) of the HIV co-infected patients were on anti- retroviral therapy at the time of TB diagnosis. Helminth infection was more prevalent in HIV-negative TB patients compared to HIV-positive TB patients (p=0.025). Smoking and walking bare foot were independently associated to helminth infection in TB patients after adjusting for the influence of HIV. Other than increased eosinophilia, no other significant differences were observed between helminth positive and helminth negative TB patients in the clinical presentation including the TB score, CD4+T-cells, BMI or bacterial load.

    Conclusion: The clinical presentation of active pulmonary tuberculosis was not affected by helminth infection. Helminth infection was less frequent among HIV-positive TB patients and this finding merits further investigation.

    Keyword
    Tuberculosis, HIV, helminth, TB score, CD4, Ethiopia
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91825 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-05-02 Created: 2013-05-02 Last updated: 2013-05-02Bibliographically approved
    5. Effects of albendazole treatment on the clinical outcome and immunological responses in patients with helminth infection and pulmonary tuberculosis: a randomized clinical trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of albendazole treatment on the clinical outcome and immunological responses in patients with helminth infection and pulmonary tuberculosis: a randomized clinical trial
    Show others...
    2013 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The impact of helminth infection on the host immune response to tuberculosis (TB) has been characterized in experimental models but less so in the clinical setting. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of deworming on the clinical outcome and cell mediated immune response in active TB.

    Methods: Newly diagnosed pulmonary TB patients in Gondar, Ethiopia were examined for helminth infection. Helminth-positive TB patients (W+/TB) were randomized to albendazole (400mg X III per os) or placebo. The primary outcome was change in TB-score after 2 months, and secondary outcomes were sputum smear conversion at the 2nd month, and changes in chest x-ray pattern, CD4+ T-cell count, eosinophil count, IgE-levels and immunological responses after 3 months. In a subset of W+/TB, W-/TB patients and healthy controls, flow cytometry and ELISPOT assays were used to characterize the regulatory T-cell population (Tregs) and the frequency of PPD- stimulated IFN-γ, IL-5 and IL-10 producing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs).

    Results: A total of 140 helminth co-infected TB patients were included with an HIV coinfection rate of 22.8 %. Following albendazole treatment of the W+/TB patients, there was a significant decrease in helminth infection compared to placebo (8% (4/49) vs. 48 % (22/46), p<0.001). No significant effect was observed for albendazole compared to placebo on the primary outcome as evaluated by the TB-score (5.6 ±2.87 vs. 5.87 ±2.54, p=0.59). Eosinophil counts decreased significantly in the albendazole group. In a subgroup analysis of helminthnegative patients following albendazole treatment versus placebo, the albendazole group showed a trend for lower levels of IL-10 producing cells at month three (p=0.08). At baseline, W+/TB patients had a significantly higher mean level of Tregs (% Tregs/CD4+) compared to W-/TB patients and helminth-positive community controls. Additionally, the frequency of IFN-γ, IL-5 and spontaneous IL-10 levels was increased in helminth-positive compared to helminth-negative TB patients.

    Conclusions: No significant effects on the clinical outcome as measured with the TB-score was detected after albendazole treatment of helminth-positive TB patients compared to placebo. However, significant changes were observed in specific immunological responses such as reduced eosinophil counts and a trend towards lower levels of IL-10 producing cells. At baseline, helminth co-infected TB patients exhibited an increased Treg response as well as an increased IL-5 and spontaneous IL-10 production.

    Keyword
    Regulatory T-cells, helminth, tuberculosis, albendazole, deworming, Ethiopia, HIV
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91827 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-05-02 Created: 2013-05-02 Last updated: 2013-05-02Bibliographically approved
  • 27.
    Abate, Ebba
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Belayneh, Meseret
    University of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia .
    Gelaw, Aschalew
    University of Gondar, Ethiopia .
    Idh, Jonna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Getachew, Assefa
    University of Gondar, Ethiopia .
    Alemu, Shitaye
    University of Gondar, Ethiopia .
    Diro, Ermias
    University of Gondar, Ethiopia .
    Fikre, Nigussu
    University of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia .
    Britton, Sven
    Karolinska Hospital, Sweden .
    Elias, Daniel
    University of So Denmark, Denmark .
    Aseffa, Abraham
    Armauer Hansen Research Institute, Ethiopia .
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Impact of Asymptomatic Helminth Co-Infection in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Tuberculosis in North-West Ethiopia2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Areas endemic of helminth infection, tuberculosis (TB) and HIV are to a large extent overlapping. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of asymptomatic helminth infection on the immunological response among TB patients with and without HIV, their house hold contacts and community controls. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethodology: Consecutive smear positive TB patients (n = 112), their household contacts (n = 71) and community controls (n = 112) were recruited in Gondar town, Ethiopia. Stool microscopy, HIV serology, serum IgE level, eosinophil and CD4 counts were performed and tuberculosis patients were followed up for 3 months after initiation of anti-TB treatment. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Helminth co-infection rate was 29% in TB patients and 21% in both community control and household contacts (p = 0.3) where Ascaris lumbricoides was the most prevalent parasite. In TB patients the seroprevalence of HIV was 47% (53/112). Eosinophilia and elevated IgE level were significantly associated with asymptomatic helminth infection. During TB treatment, the worm infection rate of HIV+/TB patients declined from 31% (10/32) at week 0 to 9% (3/32) at week 2 of TB treatment, whereas HIV2/TB patients showed no change from baseline to week 2, 29% (13/45) vs. 22.2% (10/45). This trend was stable at week 8 and 12 as well. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: One third of smear positive TB patients were infected with helminths. Eosinophilia and elevated IgE level correlated with asymptomatic worm infection, indicating an effect on host immunity. The rate of worm infection declined during TB treatment in HIV+/TB co-infected patients whereas no decline was seen in HIV2/TB group.

  • 28.
    Abate, Ebba
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Belayneh, Meseret
    University of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Idh, Jonna
    Vastervik Hospital, Sweden.
    Diro, Ermias
    University of Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Elias, Daniel
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Britton, Sven
    Karolinska Hospital, Sweden.
    Aseffa, Abraham
    Armauer Hansen Research Institute, Ethiopia.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Asymptomatic Helminth Infection in Active Tuberculosis Is Associated with Increased Regulatory and Th-2 Responses and a Lower Sputum Smear Positivity2015In: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, ISSN 1935-2727, E-ISSN 1935-2735, Vol. 9, no 8, e0003994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The impact of intestinal helminth infection on the clinical presentation and immune response during active tuberculosis (TB) infection is not well characterized. Our aim was to investigate whether asymptomatic intestinal helminth infection alters the clinical signs and symptoms as well as the cell mediated immune responses in patients with active TB.

    Methodology Consecutive, newly diagnosed TB patients and healthy community controls (CCs) were recruited in North-west Ethiopia. TB-score, body mass index and stool samples were analyzed. Cells from HIV-negative TB patients (HIV-/TB) and from CCs were analyzed for regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and cytokine responses using flow cytometry and ELISPOT, respectively.

    Results A significantly higher ratio of helminth co-infection was observed in TB patients without HIV (Helm+/HIV-/TB) compared to HIV negative CCs, (40% (121/306) versus 28% (85/306), p = 0.003). Helm+/HIV-/TB patients showed significantly increased IL-5 secreting cells compared to Helm-/HIV-/TB (37 SFU (IQR:13-103) versus 2 SFU (1-50); p = 0.02, n = 30). Likewise, levels of absolute Tregs (9.4 (3.2-16.7) cells/mu l versus 2.4 (1.1-4.0) cells/mu l; p = 0.041) and IL-10 secreting cells (65 SFU (7-196) versus 1 SFU (0-31); p = 0.014) were significantly higher in Helm+/HIV-/TB patients compared to Helm-/HIV-/TB patients. In a multivariate analysis, a lower rate of sputum smear positivity for acid fast bacilli, lower body temperature, and eosinophilia were independently associated with helminth infection in TB patients.

    Conclusions Asymptomatic helminth infection is associated with increased regulatory T-cell and Th2-type responses and a lower rate of sputum smear positivity. Further studies are warranted to investigate the clinical and immunological impact of helminth infection in TB patients.

  • 29.
    Abate, Ebba
    et al.
    Gondar College of Medical and Health Sciences, Gondar University, Gondar, Ethiopia; Armauer Hansen Research Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Elias, Daniel
    University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Department of cancer and inflammation, Odense, Denmark.
    Getachew, Assefa
    Gondar College of Medical and Health Sciences, Gondar University, Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Alemu, Shitaye
    Gondar College of Medical and Health Sciences, Gondar University, Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Diro, Ermias
    Department of Radiology, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Britton, Sven
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aseffa, Abraham
    Armauer Hansen Research Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of albendazole treatment on the clinical outcome and immunological responses in patients with helminth infection and pulmonary tuberculosis: a randomized clinical trial2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The impact of helminth infection on the host immune response to tuberculosis (TB) has been characterized in experimental models but less so in the clinical setting. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of deworming on the clinical outcome and cell mediated immune response in active TB.

    Methods: Newly diagnosed pulmonary TB patients in Gondar, Ethiopia were examined for helminth infection. Helminth-positive TB patients (W+/TB) were randomized to albendazole (400mg X III per os) or placebo. The primary outcome was change in TB-score after 2 months, and secondary outcomes were sputum smear conversion at the 2nd month, and changes in chest x-ray pattern, CD4+ T-cell count, eosinophil count, IgE-levels and immunological responses after 3 months. In a subset of W+/TB, W-/TB patients and healthy controls, flow cytometry and ELISPOT assays were used to characterize the regulatory T-cell population (Tregs) and the frequency of PPD- stimulated IFN-γ, IL-5 and IL-10 producing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs).

    Results: A total of 140 helminth co-infected TB patients were included with an HIV coinfection rate of 22.8 %. Following albendazole treatment of the W+/TB patients, there was a significant decrease in helminth infection compared to placebo (8% (4/49) vs. 48 % (22/46), p<0.001). No significant effect was observed for albendazole compared to placebo on the primary outcome as evaluated by the TB-score (5.6 ±2.87 vs. 5.87 ±2.54, p=0.59). Eosinophil counts decreased significantly in the albendazole group. In a subgroup analysis of helminthnegative patients following albendazole treatment versus placebo, the albendazole group showed a trend for lower levels of IL-10 producing cells at month three (p=0.08). At baseline, W+/TB patients had a significantly higher mean level of Tregs (% Tregs/CD4+) compared to W-/TB patients and helminth-positive community controls. Additionally, the frequency of IFN-γ, IL-5 and spontaneous IL-10 levels was increased in helminth-positive compared to helminth-negative TB patients.

    Conclusions: No significant effects on the clinical outcome as measured with the TB-score was detected after albendazole treatment of helminth-positive TB patients compared to placebo. However, significant changes were observed in specific immunological responses such as reduced eosinophil counts and a trend towards lower levels of IL-10 producing cells. At baseline, helminth co-infected TB patients exhibited an increased Treg response as well as an increased IL-5 and spontaneous IL-10 production.

  • 30.
    Abate, Ebba
    et al.
    Gondar College of Medical and Health Sciences, Gondar University, Gondar, Ethiopia; Armauer Hansen Research Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Idh, Jonna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Belayneh, Meseret
    School of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Medical Faculty, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa.
    Getachew, Assefa
    Gondar College of Medical and Health Sciences, Gondar University, Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Alemu, Shitaye
    Gondar College of Medical and Health Sciences, Gondar University, Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Diro, Ermias
    Department of Radiology, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Britton, Sven
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elias, Daniel
    University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Department of cancer and inflammation, Odense, Denmark.
    Aseffa, Abraham
    Armauer Hansen Research Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Impact of helminth infection on the clinical presentation 1 of pulmonary tuberculosis2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The effects of helminth infection on chronic infectious diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis (TB) merit further characterization. Thus, we assessed the baseline clinical characteristics of helminth infection in patients with active TB in a high endemic area.

    Methodology: Consecutive, newly diagnosed TB patients were recruited from three health institutions in the north Gondar administrative zone, Ethiopia. Structured questionnaires were used to collect socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. Additionally, the TB score, mid upper arm circumference, body mass index (BMI), BCG vaccination status, stool and sputum microscopy as well as HIV serology and CD4+T cells counts were evaluated.

    Results: A total of 377 pulmonary TB patients were included in the study. The helminth co infection rate was 33% (123/377) and the most prevalent parasite was Ascaris lumbricoides (53%, 65/123). The HIV co-infection rate was 29% (110/377). Seventy percent (77/110) of the HIV co-infected patients were on anti- retroviral therapy at the time of TB diagnosis. Helminth infection was more prevalent in HIV-negative TB patients compared to HIV-positive TB patients (p=0.025). Smoking and walking bare foot were independently associated to helminth infection in TB patients after adjusting for the influence of HIV. Other than increased eosinophilia, no other significant differences were observed between helminth positive and helminth negative TB patients in the clinical presentation including the TB score, CD4+T-cells, BMI or bacterial load.

    Conclusion: The clinical presentation of active pulmonary tuberculosis was not affected by helminth infection. Helminth infection was less frequent among HIV-positive TB patients and this finding merits further investigation.

  • 31.
    Abbas, Ashraf H.
    et al.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Moati, Taha Ali
    General Surgery department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Aesthetic Outcome After Reconstruction of Complex SoftTissue Defects with Free Antero-Lateral Thigh Flap UsingSimple Equipment2015In: Journal of surgery, ISSN 2330-0914, Vol. 3, no 2-1, 36-41 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: We aimed to assess the aesthetic outcome of surgical reconstruction by free ALT flap using binocular single-refraction magnifying glasses and a modified post- operative surveillance protocol. Methods: 16 patients were operated for free antero-lateral thigh flap to reconstruct complex soft tissue defects with a close clinical follow up protocol for post operative care depending on the attending personnel in the Plastic surgery unit, Suez Canal University hospital, Ismailia, Egypt. Aesthetic outcome was assessed using a questionnaire based on Posch et al. 2005, including the following items colour, contour, presence of hair, overall appearance and donor site scar. Results: The patients’ assessed aesthetic outcome was acceptable in majority of the cases; median score was 4 for all assessed items. Complete flap loss occurred in one case, other complications as arterial thrombosis and hematomas and infection were detected and managed accordingly with flap salvage in the 3 complicated cases. Conclusion: The result suggests that the proposed protocol is sufficient as an alternative. The aesthetic outcome assessed by the patient and the failure rate was in line with other studies.

  • 32.
    Abbass, Allan
    et al.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Bernier, Denise
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Kisely, Steve
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Town, Joel
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Sustained reduction in health care costs after adjunctive treatment of graded intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy in patients with psychotic disorders2015In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 228, no 3, 538-543 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the changes in symptom severity and long-term health care cost after intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy (ISTDP) individually tailored and administered to patients with psychotic disorders undergoing standard psychiatric care. Eleven therapists with different levels of expertise delivered an average of 13 one-hour sessions of graded ISTDP to 38 patients with psychotic disorders. Costs for health care services were compiled for a one-year period prior to the start of ISTDP (baseline) along with four one-year periods after termination. Two validated self-report scales, the Brief Symptom Inventory and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems, were administered at intake and termination of ISTDP. Results revealed that health care cost reductions were significant for the one-year post-treatment period relative to baseline year, for both physician costs and hospital costs, and the reductions were sustained for the follow-up period of four post-treatment years. Furthermore, at treatment termination self-reported symptoms and interpersonal problems were significantly reduced. These preliminary findings suggest that this brief adjunctive psychotherapy may be beneficial and reduce costs in selected patients with psychotic disorders, and that gains are sustained in long-term follow-up. Future research directions are discussed. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 33.
    Abbass, Allan
    et al.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rasic, Daniel
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Town, Joel M.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Long-term healthcare cost reduction with Intensive Short-term Dynamic Psychotherapy in a tertiary psychiatric service2015In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, ISSN 0022-3956, E-ISSN 1879-1379, Vol. 64, 114-120 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate whether a mixed population of patients treated with Intensive Short-term Dynamic Psychotherapy (ISTDP) would exhibit reduced healthcare costs in long-term follow-up. Methods: A quasi-experimental design was employed in which data on pre- and post-treatment healthcare cost were compared for all ISTDP cases treated in a tertiary care service over a nine year period. Observed cost changes were compared with those of a control group of patients referred but never treated. Physician and hospital costs were compared to treatment cost estimates and normal population cost figures. Results: 1082 patients were included; 890 treated cases for a broad range of somatic and psychiatric disorders and 192 controls. The treatment averaged 7.3 sessions and measures of symptoms and interpersonal problems significantly improved. The average cost reduction per treated case was $12,628 over 3 follow-up years: this compared favorably with the estimated treatment cost of $708 per patient. Significant differences were seen between groups for follow-up hospital costs. Conclusions: ISTDP in this setting appears to facilitate reductions in healthcare costs, supporting the notion that brief dynamic psychotherapy provided in a tertiary setting can be beneficial to health care systems overall. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 34.
    Abbey, Susan E.
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    De Luca, Enza
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Mauthner, Oliver E.
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    McKeever, Patricia
    Bloorview Research Institute, Bloorview Kids Rehab, Canada.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queen's University, Belfast, Northern Ireland.
    Poole, Jennifer M.
    Ryerson University, Canada.
    Gewarges, Mena
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Ross, Heather J.
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Qualitative interviews versus standardised self-report questionnaires in assessing qualityb of life in heart transplant recipients2011In: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, ISSN 1053-2498, Vol. 30, no 8, 963-966 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality of life (QoL) studies in heart transplant recipients (HTRs) using validated, quantitative, self-report questionnaires have reported poor QoL in approximately 20% of patients. This consecutive mixed methods study compared self-report questionnaires, the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey (MOS SF-36) and the Atkinson Life Satisfaction Scale, with phenomenologically informed audiovisual (AV) qualitative interview data in 27 medically stable HTRs (70% male; age 53 ± 13.77 years; time since transplant 4.06 ± 2.42 years). Self-report questionnaire data reported poor QoL and more distress compared with previous studies and normative population samples; in contrast, 52% of HTRs displayed pervasive distress according to visual methodology. Using qualitative methods to assess QoL yields information that would otherwise remain unobserved by the exclusive use of quantitative QOL questionnaires.

  • 35.
    Abbott, Allan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Physiotherapeutic rehabilitation and lumbar fusion surgery2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last two decades, the economic costs and rates of lumbar fusion surgery for chronic low back pain has risen dramatically in western industrialized countries. Data from the Swedish National Spine Register suggest that 25% of patients experience unimproved pain and up to 40% are not satisfied with the outcome of lumbar fusion surgery. Thus, there is a definite need to optimize the selection and management of patients to improve lumbar fusion outcomes. Aim: To investigate the role of biopsychosocial factors in explaining disability and health related quality of life in chronic low back pain patients before and after lumbar fusion surgery and to evaluate the effectiveness of post-operative rehabilitation regimes. Methods: At total of 107 patients were recruited, aged 18 to 65 years, selected for lumbar fusion due to 12 months of symptomatic back and/or leg pain due to spinal stenosis, degenerative/isthmic spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease. Measures of disability, health related quality of life, pain, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, pain coping styles, work status, health care use, analgesic use and sickness leave were collected with self-rated questionnaires at baseline (Studies I-IV), 3, 6, 12 months (Study II) and 2-3 years after surgery (Studies II-III). In Studies II-IV, patients were randomised to psychomotor therapy (N=53) or exercise therapy (N=54) implemented during the first 3 post-operative months. Semi-structured interviews were conducted 3-6 months after surgery on 20 patients including 10 from each rehabilitation group to investigate experiences of back problems before and after surgery, post-operative recovery and expectations of rehabilitation analysed in terms of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (Study IV). Results: Approximately 50% of the variability in baseline disability and 40% of the variability in baseline health related quality of life could be explained by psychological variables. In particular, catastrophizing, control over pain, self-efficacy and outcome expectancy had significant mediation roles (Study I). For the short and long term outcome of lumbar fusion surgery, post-operative psychomotor therapy is significantly more effective than exercise therapy with approximately 10-20% better outcome in measures of disability, fear of movement/(re)injury, pain catastrophizing, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy sickness leave, health care utilization and return to work (Study II). A model with good outcome predictive performance which significantly predicts disability, back pain and health related quality of life outcomes 2-3 year after lumbar fusion surgery, was shown to involve pre-operative screening of disability, leg pain intensity, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, outcome expectations, catastrophizing, control over pain and the implementation of post-operative psychomotor therapy (Study III). Lumbar fusion patient s experiences of back problems before and after the operation as well as experiences of recovery and outcome expectations correspond well with the content of outcomes measures used in the study suggesting good content validity (Study IV). Conclusion: Psychological factors strongly influence levels of disability and health related quality of life in lumbar fusion candidates as well as predicts post-operative outcomes. Early post-operative rehabilitation focusing on cognition, behaviour and motor control is recommended for improved lumbar fusion outcomes.

  • 36.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
    Evidence base and future research directions in the management of low back pain2016In: World Journal of Orthopedics, ISSN 2218-5836, E-ISSN 2218-5836, Vol. 7, no 3, 156-161 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent and costly condition. Awareness of valid and reliable patient history taking, physical examination and clinical testing is important for diagnostic accuracy. Stratified care which targets treatment to patient subgroups based on key characteristics is reliant upon accurate diagnostics. Models of stratified care that can potentially improve treatment effects include prognostic risk profiling for persistent LBP, likely response to specific treatment based on clinical prediction models or suspected underlying causal mechanisms. The focus of this editorial is to highlight current research status and future directions for LBP diagnostics and stratified care.

  • 37.
    Abbott, Allan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    The Coping Strategy Questionnaire2010In: Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 1836-9553, E-ISSN 1836-9561, Vol. 56, no 1, 63-63 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Neuro R1:07, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden; Institute of Health and Sport, Bond University, Queensland, Australia.
    Ghasemi-Kafash, Elaheh
    Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Department of Physical Therapy, Neuro R1:07, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    The validity of using an electrocutaneous device for pain assessment in patients with cervical radiculopathy2014In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 30, no 7, 500-506 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and preference for assessing pain magnitude with electrocutaneous testing (ECT) compared to the visual analogue scale (VAS) and Borg CR10 scale in men and women with cervical radiculopathy of varying sensory phenotypes. An additional purpose was to investigate ECT sensory and pain thresholds in men and women with cervical radiculopathy of varying sensory phenotypes. This is a cross-sectional study of 34 patients with cervical radiculopathy. Scatterplots and linear regression were used to investigate bivariate relationships between ECT, VAS and Borg CR10 methods of pain magnitude measurement as well as ECT sensory and pain thresholds. The use of the ECT pain magnitude matching paradigm for patients with cervical radiculopathy with normal sensory phenotype shows good linear association with arm pain VAS (R(2) = 0.39), neck pain VAS (R(2) = 0.38), arm pain Borg CR10 scale (R(2) = 0.50) and neck pain Borg CR10 scale (R(2) = 0.49) suggesting acceptable validity of the procedure. For patients with hypoesthesia and hyperesthesia sensory phenotypes, the ECT pain magnitude matching paradigm does not show adequate linear association with rating scale methods rendering the validity of the procedure as doubtful. ECT for sensory and pain threshold investigation, however, provides a method to objectively assess global sensory function in conjunction with sensory receptor specific bedside examination measures.

  • 39.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Physiotherapist, Department for Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Halvorsen, Marie
    Physiotherapist, Department for Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Physiotherapist, Department for Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Is there a need for cervical collar usage post anterior cervical decompression and fusion?: A randomized control pilot trial2013In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 29, no 4, 290-300 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a common surgical intervention for radiculopathy resulting from degenerative cervical spine conditions. Post-surgical cervical collar use is believed to reduce post-operative pain, provide the patient with a sense of security during activities of daily living and even reduce rates of non-fusion. This prospective randomized controlled pilot trial investigates trial design feasibility in relation to prospective physical, functional, and quality of life-related outcomes of patients undergoing ACDF with interbody cage, with (n = 17) and without (n = 16) post-operative cervical collar usage. Results show that the sample provides sufficient statistical power to show that the use of a rigid cervical collar during 6 post-operative weeks is associated with significantly lower levels of neck disability index after 6 weeks and significantly lower levels of prospective neck pain. To investigate causal quality of life or fusion rate outcomes, sample size needs to be increased at least fourfold and optimally sixfold when accounting for data loss in prospective follow-up. The study suggests that post-surgical cervical collar usage may help certain patients cope with initial post-operative pain and disability.

  • 40.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Orthopaedics, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm , Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute for Clinical Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Patient’s experience post-lumbar fusion regarding back problems, recovery and expectations in terms of the international classification of functioning, disability and health.2011In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 15-16, 1399-1408 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To describe within the context of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), patient's experiences post-lumber fusion regarding back problems, recovery and expectations of rehabilitation and to contrast with the content of outcome measures and the ICF low back pain (LBP) core sets.

    METHODS:

    The study has a cross-sectional and retrospective design and involves 20 lumbar fusion patients. Using the ICF, qualitative content analysis of semi-structured interviews 3-6 months post-surgery was performed. This was compared with the ICF related content of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36 (SF-36), European Quality of Life Questionnaire (EQ5D) and the ICF LBP core sets.

    RESULTS:

    Patient's experiences were most frequently linked to psychological, sensory, neuromusculoskeletal and movement related body function chapters of the ICF. The most frequently linked categories of activity and participation were mobility, domestic activities, family relationships, work, recreation and leisure. Environmental factors frequently linked were the use of analgesics, walking aids, family support, social security systems, health care systems and labour market employment services.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This study highlights important ICF related aspects of patient's experiences post-lumber fusion. The use of the comprehensive ICF core sets is recommended in conjunction with ODI, SF-36 and the EQ5D for a broader analysis of patient outcomes post-lumbar fusion.

  • 41.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Bond University, Australia.
    Kjellman, Görel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Multidimensional assessment of pain related disability after surgery for cervical disc disease2013In: APA Conference 2013: New moves, Australian Physiotherapy Association , 2013, 2-2 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Questions: Given only 25% of patients, 10 year post-surgery for cervical disc disease report clinically meaningful improvements in functional disability, what are the biopsychosocial factors associated with continued long-term disability? What are the implications for physiotherapy practice?

    Design: Cross-sectional observational study.

    Participants: Ninety patients who had undergone anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF) surgery 10-13 years prior.

    Outcome Measures: The Neck Disability Index (NDI), ACDF surgery type, surgical fusion status, patient age and Part 1 of the West Haven-Yale multidimensional pain inventory Swedish version (MPI-S) were entered into a statistical model. Part 1 of the MPI-S contains 5 subscales: pain severity, interference, life control, affective distress and support.

    Results: Seventy-three patients answered the questionnaires. Non-linear categorical regression modeling (CATREG) of the selected predictive variables explained 76.1% of the variance in NDI outcomes 10-13 years post ACDF. Of these predictors, MPI-S affective distress subscale (β = 0.635, p = <0.001) and pain severity subscale (β = 0.354, p = <0.001) were significant individual predictors of NDI ratings.

    Conclusion: This is the first study to investigate potential factors associated with prolonged functional disability greater than 10 years post-surgery for cervical disc disease. The results suggest the importance of not only pain severity but also screening affective distress as a potential barrier to physical functioning in patients previously operated for cervical disc disease. Future research on the utility of affect-focused body awareness therapy and pain coping strategies for post-surgical patients with continuing pain and physical disability is indicated.

    Key Practice Points:

    •  The screening of pain severity and affective distress is of importance for patients presenting with continuing physical disability after previous surgery for cervical disc disorders

    •  Affect-focused body awareness therapies and pain coping strategies may be a potential treatment alternative for patients with continuing pain and physical disability.

  • 42.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Möller, Hans
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gerdhem, Paul
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    CONTRAIS: CONservative TReatment for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: a randomised controlled trial protocol2013In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 14, 261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Idiopathic scoliosis is a three-dimensional structural deformity of the spine that occurs in children and adolescents. Recent reviews on bracing and exercise treatment have provided some evidence for effect of these interventions. The purpose of this study is to improve the evidence base regarding the effectiveness of conservative treatments for preventing curve progression in idiopathic scoliosis.

    Methods/design:

    Patients: Previously untreated girls and boys with idiopathic scoliosis, 9 to 17 years of age with at least one year of remaining growth and a curve Cobb angle of 25–40 degrees will be included. A total of 135 participants will be randomly allocated in groups of 45 patients each to receive one of the three interventions.Interventions: All three groups will receive a physical activity prescription according to the World Health Organisation recommendations. One group will additionally wear a hyper-corrective night-time brace. One group will additionally perform postural scoliosis-specific exercises.Outcome: Participation in the study will last until the curve has progressed, or until cessation of skeletal growth. Outcome variables will be measured every 6 months. The primary outcome variable, failure of treatment, is defined as progression of the Cobb angle more than 6 degrees, compared to the primary x-ray, seen on two consecutive spinal standing x-rays taken with 6 months interval. Secondary outcome measures include the SRS-22r and EQ5D-Y quality of life questionnaires, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) short form, and Cobb angle atend of the study.

    Discussion:This trial will evaluate which of the tested conservative treatment approaches that is the most effective for patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Trial registration: NCT01761305

  • 43.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Orthopaedics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department for Orthopaedics, Institute for Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Early rehabilitation targeting cognition, behaviour and motor function after lumbar fusion: A randomized controlled trial2010In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 35, no 8, 848-857 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design - Open label randomized controlled trial with 3-, 6-, 12-month, and 2- to 3-year follow-up.

    Objective - To investigate the effectiveness of a psychomotor therapy focusing on cognition, behavior, and motor relearning compared with exercise therapy applied during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion.

    Summary of Background Data - Postoperative management after lumbar fusion commonly focuses on analgesic pain control and activities of daily living. After 3 months, exercise therapy is often implemented. No randomized controlled trial has investigated early rehabilitation techniques conducted during the first 3 months after surgery.

    Methods - The study recruited 107 patients, aged 18 to 65 years, selected for lumbar fusion because of 12 months of symptomatic spinal stenosis, spondylosis, degenerative/isthmic spondylolisthesis, or degenerative disc disease. The exercise therapy group received a home program focusing on pain contingent training of back, abdominal, and leg muscle functional strength and endurance, stretching, and cardiovascular fitness. The psychomotor therapy group received a home program and 3 outpatient sessions focusing on modifying maladaptive pain cognitions, behaviors, and motor control. Rated questionnaires investigating functional disability, pain, health-related quality of life, functional self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, fear of movement/(re)injury, and coping were assessed at 3, 6, 12 months, and 2 to 3 years after surgery.

    Results - Follow-up rates were 93% at 12 months and 81% at 2 to 3 years after surgery. Psychomotor therapy improved functional disability, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and fear of movement/(re)injury significantly more than exercise therapy at respective follow-up occasions. Similar results occurred for pain coping but group differences were nonsignificant at 2 to 3 years follow-up. Potentially clinical relevant higher reoperation rates occurred after psychomotor therapy but rates were within normal ranges.

    Conclusion - The study shows that postoperative rehabilitation can be safely implemented during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion and should include measures to modify psychological as well as motor functions.

  • 44.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Orthopaedics, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department for Orthopaedics, Institute for Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Leg pain and psychological variables predict outcome 2-3 years after lumber fusion surgery2011In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 20, no 10, 1626-1634 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prediction studies testing a thorough range of psychological variables in addition to demographic, work-related and clinical variables are lacking in lumbar fusion surgery research. This prospective cohort study aimed at examining predictions of functional disability, back pain and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) 2-3 years after lumbar fusion by regressing nonlinear relations in a multivariate predictive model of pre-surgical variables. Before and 2-3 years after lumbar fusion surgery, patients completed measures investigating demographics, work-related variables, clinical variables, functional self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, fear of movement/(re)injury, mental health and pain coping. Categorical regression with optimal scaling transformation, elastic net regularization and bootstrapping were used to investigate predictor variables and address predictive model validity. The most parsimonious and stable subset of pre-surgical predictor variables explained 41.6, 36.0 and 25.6% of the variance in functional disability, back pain intensity and HRQOL 2-3 years after lumbar fusion. Pre-surgical control over pain significantly predicted functional disability and HRQOL. Pre-surgical catastrophizing and leg pain intensity significantly predicted functional disability and back pain while the pre-surgical straight leg raise significantly predicted back pain. Post-operative psychomotor therapy also significantly predicted functional disability while pre-surgical outcome expectations significantly predicted HRQOL. For the median dichotomised classification of functional disability, back pain intensity and HRQOL levels 2-3 years post-surgery, the discriminative ability of the prediction models was of good quality. The results demonstrate the importance of pre-surgical psychological factors, leg pain intensity, straight leg raise and post-operative psychomotor therapy in the predictions of functional disability, back pain and HRQOL-related outcomes.

  • 45.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Orthopaedics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Institute for Clinical Sciences, Department for Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The influence of psychological factors on pre-operative levels of pain intensity, disability and HRQOL in lumbar spinal fusion surgery patients2010In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 96, no 3, 213-221 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    To assess the extent to which perceived pain and psychological factors explain levels of disability and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients scheduled for lumbar fusion surgery, and to test the hypothesis that relationships between pain intensity, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, disability and HRQOL are mediated by cognitive beliefs and appraisals.

    DESIGN:

    Cross-sectional, correlation study.

    SETTING:

    Orthopaedic outpatient setting in a tertiary hospital.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    One hundred and seven chronic back pain patients scheduled for lumbar fusion surgery.

    MEASURES:

    Visual analogue scale for pain intensity, Short Form 36 mental health subscale, Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, Back Beliefs Questionnaire, Self-efficacy Scale, Coping Strategy Questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index and European Quality of Life Questionnaire.

    RESULTS:

    The group effect of multiple mediators significantly influenced the relationships between pain intensity and mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, functional disability and HRQOL. Pain catastrophising significantly mediated the relationship between pain intensity and mental health, control over pain significantly mediated the relationship between mental health and functional disability, self-efficacy and pain outcome expectancy significantly mediated the relationship between mental health and HRQOL, and self-efficacy also significantly mediated the relationship between pain intensity, fear of movement/(re)jury and functional disability. The model explained 28, 30, 52 and 42% of the variation in mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, functional disability and HRQOL, respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This study highlights the strong influence and mediation roles of psychological factors on pain, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, disability and HRQOL in patients scheduled for lumber fusion. Future research should focus on screening as well as pre- and post-operative interventions based on these psychological factors for the potential improvement of lumber fusion surgery outcomes.

    Copyright 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 46.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tynni-Lenne, Raija
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Early physiotherapeutic rehabilitation following lumbar spinal fusion surgery2009In: Oral Presentations: Cervical Spine: The Surgical Treatment of Painful Disorders, Springer, 2009, Vol. 18, Supplement 4, S409-S410 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physiotherapy after lumbar spinal fusion surgery is traditionally focused on physical exercise. Too few studies have investigatedthe efficacy of modern lumbar stabilization exercise regimes. Benefits have been shown for combining traditional physical exercise with a psychosocial intervention. No randomised controlled study has evaluated thecombined biopsychosocial effect of modern lumbar stabilization exercisesand cognitive behavioural intervention compared to traditional physical exercise starting immediately after lumbar spinal fusion.

    Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of modern physiotherapy(MPT) compared to a traditional physiotherapy (TPT) starting immediately after lumber spinal fusion.

    Study design/setting: Randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Patient sample, inclusion period and follow-up: Patients between 18 and 65 years, selected for lumbar spinal fusion due to at least 12 months of CLBP symptoms caused by spinal stenosis, spondylosis, spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease were included in the study between 2005 and 2007. A total of 107 patients were randomly allocated to the MPT group (n = 53) and TPT group (n = 54). The TPT group was prescribed daily home based pain contingent training of traditional physical exercises for back, abdominal and leg muscles. The MPT group was prescribed daily home based training of lumbar stabilization exercises combined with 90 min of cognitive behavioural intervention at 3, 6 and 9 weeks after the operation. The patients outcomes were followed up at 3, 6, 12 months and 2–3 years

    Outcome measures: Oswestry disability index (ODI), pain intensity, HRQOL, kinesiophobia, anxiety/depression, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, use of coping strategies, work status, sickness leave and health care use.

    Methods: Analysis of mean differences between groups.

    Results: 2–3 year follow-up showed that the MPT group had significantly lower percentage scores in ODI = 18.2 (P = 0.008), kinesiophobia= 30.0 (P = 0.001), catastrophizing = 21.8 (P = 0.006) and higher self-efficacy = 64.6 (P = 0.019) compared to TPT group’s ODI = 28.1, kinesiophobia = 41.9, catastrophizing = 31.3 and self-efficacy = 55.5. The MPT group had significantly more employment, less health care use (P = 0.035) and less long-term sickness leave (P = 0.040).

    Conclusions: This study provides evidence for the benefits of combining lumbar stabilization exercise and cognitive behavioural intervention starting immediately after lumbar fusion.

  • 47.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tynni-Lenné, R
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, R
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The effectiveness of physiotherapeutic rehabilitation and issues of outcome prediction after lumber fusion surgery.2011In: Proceedings of the WCPT Congress, Amsterdam Netherlands. / [ed] Physiotherapy, World Confederation of Physical Therapy , 2011, Vol. 97 (Suppl 1), 20- p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The primary purpose was to analyse the short and long term effectiveness of physiotherapeutic rehabilitation programs performed during the first 3 month after lumbar fusion surgery. A secondary purpose was to analyse factors predicting long-term disability, back pain and health related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes after lumbar fusion.

    Relevance: The study provides evidence for the effectiveness of early physiotherapy after lumbar fusion. Furthermore improved knowledge of predictive factors can help physiotherapist in the screening of lumbar fusion candidates and the individualised implementation of pre-surgical and post-surgical interventions.

    Participants: A total of 107 patients were recruited from the Karolinska University Hospital's Orthopaedic Clinic, Stockholm, Sweden. The inclusion criteria were: men and women aged between 18 and 65 years with a >12 month history of back pain and/or sciatica; a primary diagnosis of spinal stenosis, degenerative or isthmic spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease; selected for lumbar fusion with or without decompression; competence in the Swedish language. The criteria for exclusion were: previous lumbar fusion, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    Methods: An open book randomised controlled trial with pre-surgical and post-surgical measures at 3, 6, 12 and 24-36 months was performed to investigate the effectiveness of a psychomotor therapy focusing on cognition, behaviour and motor relearning compared to exercise therapy focusing on strength and conditioning, applied during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion. Randomisation allocated 53 patients to psychomotor therapy and 54 patients to exercise therapy. The Oswestry disability index (ODI) was the primary outcome measure. Secondary measures included the Visual analogue scale for back pain (VAS), European quality of life questionnaire (EQ5D), as well as other clinical, psychological and work related variables.

    Analysis: A total of 78 patients were needed assuming a power = 80%. Patient compliance was analysed and an intention to treat principle applied to data analysis. For statistical comparison between the 2 independent groups, analysis of covariance was used. Categorical regression with optimal scaling transformation, elastic net regularization and bootstrapping were used to investigate pre-surgical predictor variables and address predictive model validity.

    Results: Follow-up rates were 93% at 12 months and 81% at 24-36 months after surgery. Psychomotor therapy improved functional disability, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy and fear of movement/(re)injury significantly more than exercise therapy at respective follow-up occasions. Pre-surgical control over pain significantly predicted functional disability and HRQOL. Pre-surgical catastrophizing and leg pain intensity significantly predicted functional disability and back pain while the pre-surgical lasegue test significantly predicted back pain. The implementation of post-operative psychomotor therapy also significantly predicted functional disability while pre-surgical outcome expectations significantly predicted HRQOL.

    Conclusions: The study shows that post-operative rehabilitation can be safely implemented during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion and should include measures to modify psychological as well as motor functions. The study also demonstrates the importance of pre-surgical psychological factors, leg pain intensity, the lasegue test and post-operative psychomotor therapy in the predictions of functional disability, back pain and HRQOL related outcomes.

    Implications: Physiotherapist should screen patients pain, psychological factors and neuromusculoskeletal system pre-surgically and rehabilitate patients with early psychomotor therapy after lumbar fusion.

  • 48.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tynni-Lenné, Raija
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Early rehabilitation targeting cognition, behaviour and motor function after lumbar fusion: A randomised controlled trial2010In: Abstracts: Oral Presentations, 2010, 186-186 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design: Open label randomised controlled trial with 3, 6, 12 month and 2-3 year follow-up.

    Objective. To investigate the effectiveness of a psychomotor therapy focusing on cognition, behaviour and motor relearning compared to exercise therapy applied during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion.

    Methods: The study recruited 107 patients, aged 18 to 65 years, selected for lumbar fusion due to 12 months of symptomatic spinal stenosis, degenerative/isthmic spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease. The exercise therapy group received a home program focusing on pain contingent training of back, abdominal and leg muscle functional strength and endurance, stretching and cardiovascular fitness. The psychomotor therapy group received a home program and 3 outpatient sessions focusing on modifying maladaptive pain cognitions, behaviours and motor control. Patient-rated questionnaires investigating functional disability, pain, health related quality of life, functional self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, fear of movement/(re)injury and copingwere assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 12 months and 2-3 years after surgery.

    Results: Follow-up rates were 93% at 12 months and 81% at 2-3 years after surgery. Psychomotor therapy improved functional disability, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy and fear of movement/(re)injury significantly more than exercise therapy at respective follow-up occasions. Similar results occurred for pain coping but group differences were non-significant at 2-3 year follow-up.

    Conclusions: The study shows that post-operative rehabilitation can be effectively implemented during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion and should include measures to modify psychological aswell as motor functions.

  • 49.
    Abd Al Qahar Al-Kubaisy, Waqar
    et al.
    MARA University of Technology, Sungai Buloh, Malaysia; MARA University of Technology UiTM, Malaysia.
    Jawad Obaid, Kadhim
    MARA University of Technology, Sungai Buloh, Malaysia.
    Aini Mohd Noor, Nor
    MARA University of Technology, Sungai Buloh, Malaysia; MARA University of Technology UiTM, Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia.
    Shamsidah Binti Nik Ibrahim, Nik
    MARA University of Technology, Sungai Buloh, Malaysia.
    Albu-Kareem Al-Azawi, Ahmed
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Hepatitis C virus prevalence and genotyping among hepatocellular carcinoma patients in Baghdad2014In: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, ISSN 1513-7368, Vol. 15, no 18, 7725-7730 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most common cause for cancer death in the world, now being especially linked to chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This case-control study consisting of 65 HCC patients and 82 patients with other malignant tumours as controls was conducted to determine the association of HCV markers with HCC. Serum of each participant was obtained for detection of HCV Ab and RNA by DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA). Twenty six per cent (26.0%) of HCC patients had positive anti-HCV which was significantly greater than the control group (p=0.001). HCC patients significantly have a risk of exposure to HCV infection almost 3 times than the control group (OR=2.87, 95% C.I=1.1-7). Anti-HCV seropositive rate was significantly (p=0.03) higher among old age HCC patients and increases with age. Males with HCC significantly showed to have more than 9 times risk of exposure to HCV infection (OR=9.375, 95 % CI=1.299-67.647) than females. HCV-RNA seropositive rate was (70.8%) significantly higher among HCC patients compared to (22.2%) the control group (p=0.019). The most prevalent genotype (as a single or mixed pattern of infection) was HCV-1b. This study detected a significantly higher HCV seropositive rate of antibodies and RNA in HCC patients.

  • 50.
    Abdalla, Hana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Diab, Asim
    Department of Neurology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, USA.
    Forslund, Tony
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bakhiet, Moiz
    Department of Medicine, Divisions of lnfectious Diseases, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthases and nitrotyrosine during the course of Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis in ratManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial meningitis continues to be a major health problem and despite great advances in antimicrobial therapy the fatality rate remains high. There is increasing evidence that leukocyte-endothelial interactions are involved in CNS damage during bacterial meningitis. Once leukocytes have entered the CSF they cause injury by releasing toxic molecules such as nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The induction of iNOS was examined by assessing intracerebral mRNA expression and protein production during the course of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) meningitis in the rat. Induction of iNOS mRNA was detected 12h postinoculation (pi), followed by a gradual reduction. The increased number of intracerebral iN OS expressing cells was detected at 12h pi. followed by further elevation to peak expression at 72h pi. The iNOS positive tissue also bound antibodies specific for nitrotyrosine. The expression of iNOS and NO production, as shown by nitrotyrosine expression, correlated with disease severity, suggesting that activation of iNOS may play an important role in Haemophilus irifluenzae type b meningitis.

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