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  • 1.
    Amundstuen Reppe, Linda
    et al.
    Nordic University, Norway; Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; St Olavs Hospital, Norway.
    Spigset, Olav
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; St Olavs Hospital, Norway.
    Kampmann, Jens Peter
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark.
    Damkier, Per
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Rolighed Christensen, Hanne
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Schjott, Jan
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Quality assessment of structure and language elements of written responses given by seven Scandinavian drug information centres2017In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 623-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify structure and language elements affecting the quality of responses from Scandinavian drug information centres (DICs). Six different fictitious drug-related queries were sent to each of seven Scandinavian DICs. The centres were blinded for which queries were part of the study. The responses were assessed qualitatively by six clinical pharmacologists (internal experts) and six general practitioners (GPs, external experts). In addition, linguistic aspects of the responses were evaluated by a plain language expert. The quality of responses was generally judged as satisfactory to good. Presenting specific advice and conclusions were considered to improve the quality of the responses. However, small nuances in language formulations could affect the individual judgments of the experts, e.g. on whether or not advice was given. Some experts preferred the use of primary sources to the use of secondary and tertiary sources. Both internal and external experts criticised the use of abbreviations, professional terminology and study findings that was left unexplained. The plain language expert emphasised the importance of defining and explaining pharmacological terms to ensure that enquirers understand the response as intended. In addition, more use of active voice and less compressed text structure would be desirable. This evaluation of responses to DIC queries may give some indications on how to improve written responses on drug-related queries with respect to language and text structure. Giving specific advice and precise conclusions and avoiding too compressed language and non-standard abbreviations may aid to reach this goal.

  • 2.
    André, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department Public Health and Caring Science, Sweden.
    Grondal, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Eva-Lena
    Lund University, Sweden; Blekinge County Council, Sweden.
    Brorsson, Annika
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne Reg, Sweden.
    Hedin, Katarina
    Lund University, Sweden; Kronoberg County Council, Sweden.
    Uncertainty in clinical practice - an interview study with Swedish GPs on patients with sore throat2016In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 17, no 56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Uncertainty is inevitable in clinical practice in primary care and tolerance for uncertainty and concern for bad outcomes has been shown to vary between physicians. Uncertainty is a factor for inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. Evidence-based guidelines as well as near-patient tests are suggested tools to decrease uncertainty in the management of patients with respiratory tract infections. The aim of this paper was to describe strategies for coping with uncertainty in patients with pharyngotonsillitis in relation to guidelines. Methods: An interview study was conducted among a strategic sample of 25 general practitioners (GPs). Results: All GPs mentioned potential dangerous differential diagnoses and complications. Four strategies for coping with uncertainty were identified, one of which was compliant with guidelines, "Adherence to guidelines", and three were idiosyncratic: "Clinical picture and C-reactive protein (CRP)", "Expanded control", and "Unstructured". The residual uncertainty differed for the different strategies: in the strategy "Adherence to guidelines" and " Clinical picture and CRP" uncertainty was avoided, based either on adherence to guidelines or on the clinical picture and near-patient CRP; in the strategy " Expanded control" uncertainty was balanced based on expanded control; and in the strategy "Unstructured" uncertainty prevailed in spite of redundant examination and anamnesis. Conclusion: The majority of the GPs avoided uncertainty and deemed they had no problems. Their strategies either adhered to guidelines or comprised excessive use of tests. Thus use of guidelines as well as use of more near-patient tests seemed associated to reduced uncertainty, although the later strategy at the expense of compliance to guidelines. A few GPs did not manage to cope with uncertainty or had to put in excessive work to control uncertainty.

  • 3.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lopez-Pelayo, Hugo
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Palacio-Vieira, Jorge
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Colom, Joan
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Gual, Antoni
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Anderson, Peter
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Implementing referral to an electronic alcohol brief advice website in primary healthcare: results from the ODHIN implementation trial2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 6, article id e010271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The objective of the present study was to explore whether the possibility of offering facilitated access to an alcohol electronic brief intervention (eBI) instead of delivering brief face-to-face advice increased the proportion of consulting adults who were screened and given brief advice. Design The study was a 12-week implementation study. Sixty primary healthcare units (PHCUs) in 5 jurisdictions (Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden) were asked to screen adults who attended the PHCU for risky drinking. Setting A total of 120 primary healthcare centres from 5 jurisdictions in Europe. Participants 746 individual providers (general practitioners, nurses or other professionals) participated in the study. Primary outcome Change in the proportion of patients screened and referred to eBI comparing a baseline 4-week preimplementation period with a 12-week implementation period. Results The possibility of referring patients to the eBI was not found to be associated with any increase in the proportion of patients screened. However, it was associated with an increase in the proportion of screen-positive patients receiving brief advice from 70% to 80% for the screen-positive sample as a whole (pamp;lt;0.05), mainly driven by a significant increase in brief intervention rates in England from 87% to 96% (pamp;lt;0.01). The study indicated that staff displayed a low level of engagement in this new technology. Staff continued to offer face-to-face advice to a larger proportion of patients (54%) than referral to eBI (38%). In addition, low engagement was seen among the referred patients; on average, 18% of the patients logged on to the website with a mean log-on rate across the different countries between 0.58% and 36.95%. Conclusions Referral to eBI takes nearly as much time as brief oral advice and might require more introduction and training before staff are comfortable with referring to eBI.

  • 4.
    Benkirane, Raja
    et al.
    Moroccan Pharmacovigilance Centre, Rabat, Morocco; Centre AntiPoison et de Pharmacovigilance, Rabat, Morocco.
    Soulaymani-Bencheikh, Rachida
    Faculty of Medicine, Mohamed V, Rabat, Morocco.
    Khattabi, Asmae
    Institut National Administration Sanitaire, Rabat, Morocco.
    Benabdallah, Ghita
    Moroccan Pharmacovigilance Centre, Rabat, Morocco.
    Alj, Loubna
    Moroccan Pharmacovigilance Centre, Rabat, Morocco.
    Sefiani, Houda
    Moroccan Pharmacovigilance Centre, Rabat, Morocco.
    Hedna, Khedidja
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ouammi, Lahcen
    Moroccan Pharmacovigilance Centre, Rabat, Morocco.
    Olsson, Sten
    Uppsala Monitoring Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pal, Shanti N
    World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Assessment of a New Instrument for Detecting Preventable Adverse Drug Reactions.2015In: Drug safety, ISSN 0114-5916, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 383-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Pharmacovigilance centres (PVCs) in the World Health Organization (WHO) Programme for International Drug Monitoring have demonstrated their ability to detect preventable adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in their databases. In this field, there is no gold-standard method for detecting medication errors and evaluating ADR preventability. Therefore, we developed, from existing tools, a preventability assessment method: the 'P Method' (PM).

    OBJECTIVE: To present the PM and to evaluate its inter-rater reliability.

    METHODS: The PM includes 20 explicit criteria for assessing ADR preventability. This approach is based on identification of any potentially preventable risk factor that increases the likelihood of ADR occurrence. The outcome of the preventability assessment results in one of three possible scores: 'preventable', 'non-preventable' or 'not assessable'. The PM was tested in a multicentre study involving nine national PVCs. Two experienced reviewers at each participating PVC independently analysed the preventability of 183 ADRs, applying the PM.

    RESULTS: The overall agreement between all reviewers for assessment of ADR preventability was 'fair', with a kappa value of 0.27 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.21-0.40]. The level of agreement between reviewer pairs ranged from 'slight', with a kappa value of 0.12 (95 % CI -0.03 to 0.27), to 'substantial', with a kappa value of 0.69 (95 % CI 0.48-0.89).

    CONCLUSION: The analysis of the agreements and disagreements between reviewers highlighted where improvements might be made. Given that no standard assessment tool exists in the WHO Programme, the transparency of the assessment process in this method provides a substantial basis for further development and for support in signalling possible preventability.

  • 5.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Laine, Kari
    Medbase Ltd, Finland; Univ Turku, Finland.
    Korhonen, Tuomas
    Medbase Ltd, Finland; Univ Turku, Finland.
    Lahdesmaki, Janne
    Medbase Ltd, Finland; Turku Univ Hosp, Finland; Univ Turku, Finland.
    Shemeikka, Tero
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden.
    Julander, Margaretha
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden.
    Edlert, Maria
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden.
    Andersson, Marine L.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Development and pilot testing of PHARAO-a decision support system for pharmacological risk assessment in the elderly2018In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 365-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study are to describe the development of PHARAO (Pharmacological Risk Assessment Online), a decision support system providing a risk profile for adverse events, associated with combined effects of multiple medicines, and to present data from a pilot study, testing the use, functionality, and acceptance of the PHARAO system in a clinical setting. About 1400 substances were scored in relation to their risk to cause any of nine common and/or serious adverse effects. Algorithms for each adverse effect score were developed to create individual risk profiles from the patients list of medication. The system was tested and integrated to the electronic medical record, during a 4-month period in two geriatric wards and three primary healthcare centers, and a questionnaire was answered by the users before and after the test period. A total of 732 substances were tagged with one or more of the nine risks, most commonly with the risk of sedation or seizures. During the pilot, the system was used 933 times in 871 patients. The most common signals generated by PHARAO in these patients were related to the risks of constipation, sedation, and bleeding. A majority of responders considered PHARAO easy to use and that it gives useful support in performing medication reviews. The PHARAO decision support system, designed as a complement to a database on drug-drug interactions used nationally, worked as intended and was appreciated by the users during a 4-month test period. Integration aspects need to be improved to minimize unnecessary signaling.

  • 6.
    Coleman, Jamie J.
    et al.
    Univ Birmingham, England; Univ Hosp Birmingham NHS Fdn Trust, England; City Hosp, England.
    Samer, Caroline
    Geneva Univ Hosp HUG, Switzerland.
    Zeitlinger, Markus
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    van Agtmael, Michiel
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Rongen, Gerard A.
    Radboudumc, Netherlands.
    Marquet, Pierre
    Univ Limoges, France.
    Simon, Tabassome
    Pierre and Marie Curie Univ, France.
    Singer, Donald
    11 Chandos St, England.
    Manolopoulos, Vangelis G.
    Democritus Univ Thrace, Greece.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    The European Association for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics25years young and going strong2019In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 75, no 6, p. 743-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical pharmacology as a scientific discipline and medical specialty was unarguably born in the twentieth century. Whilst pharmacologythe science behind the treatment of diseasehad been in evolution since at least medieval times, the clinical discipline of pharmacology has had a more recent genesis and rather insidious evolution. During the 1900s, there were some clear father (parent) figures of clinical pharmacology in Europe that emerged and were responsible for the development of the specialty in this continent. This was a time when there were parallel developments in geographically dispersed academic departments (around the globe), during an age of excitement in drug discovery and clinical application of new therapeutic agents. It was the meeting of minds of some of these progenitors of the specialty that led to the development of the European Association for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (EACPT) 25years ago arising from a working party supported by the World Health Organization in Europe. The EACPT now includes all major national organizations for clinical pharmacology in Europe, representing over 4000 individual professionals interested in clinical pharmacology and therapeutics. The EACPT has a major interest in promoting the safe use of medicines across Europe and internationally and has supported these aims since 1995, through biennial international scientific congresses and summer schools with delegates and presenters from around the world as well as various working group activities. In this article, the current executive committee members of EACPT recall this history, describe the evolution of the association over the last quarter of a century, and provide an update on the activities and ambitions of the association today.

  • 7.
    Danielsson, Marita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rutberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar; The Research Unit, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden..
    A National Study of Patient Safety Culture in Hospitals in Sweden2019In: Journal of patient safety, ISSN 1549-8417, E-ISSN 1549-8425, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 328-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Using the Hospital Survey on Patient Culture, our aim was to investigate the patient safety culture in all Swedish hospitals and to compare the culture among managers, physicians, registered nurses, and enrolled nurses and to identify factors associated with high overall patient safety.

    METHODS: The study used a correlational design based on cross-sectional surveys from health care practitioners in Swedish health care (N = 23,781). We analyzed the associations between overall patient safety (outcome variable) and 12 culture dimensions and 5 background characteristics (explanatory variables). Simple logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the bivariate association between each explanatory variable and the outcome variable. The explanatory variables were entered to determine the multivariate associations between the variables and the outcome variable.

    RESULTS: The highest rated culture dimensions were "teamwork within units" and "nonpunitive response to error," and the lowest rated dimensions were "management support for patient safety" and "staffing." The multivariate analysis showed that long professional experience (>15 years) was associated with increased probability for high overall patient safety. Compared with general wards, the probability for high overall patient safety was higher for emergency care but lower for psychiatric care. The probability for high overall patient safety was higher for both enrolled nurses and physicians compared with managers.

    CONCLUSIONS: The safety culture dimensions of the Hospital Survey on Patient Culture contributed far more to overall patient safety than the background characteristics, suggesting that these dimensions are very important in efforts to improve the overall patient safety culture.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  • 8.
    Gyllensten, Hanna
    et al.
    Nordic School Public Health NHV, Sweden University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Hakkarainen, Katja M.
    Nordic School Public Health NHV, Sweden University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Carlsten, Anders
    Nordic School Public Health NHV, Sweden;Medical Prod Agency, Sweden .
    Petzold, Max
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Rehnberg, Clas
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Jönsson, Anna K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Economic Impact of Adverse Drug Events - A Retrospective Population-Based Cohort Study of 4970 Adults2014In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 0092061-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim was to estimate the direct costs caused by ADEs, including costs for dispensed drugs, primary care, other outpatient care, and inpatient care, and to relate the direct costs caused by ADEs to the societal COI (direct and indirect costs), for patients with ADEs and for the entire study population. Methods: We conducted a population-based observational retrospective cohort study of ADEs identified from medical records. From a random sample of 5025 adults in a Swedish county council, 4970 were included in the analyses. During a three-month study period in 2008, direct and indirect costs were estimated from resource use identified in the medical records and from register data on costs for resource use. Results: Among 596 patients with ADEs, the average direct costs per patient caused by ADEs were USD 444.9 [95% CI: 264.4 to 625.3], corresponding to USD 21 million per 100 000 adult inhabitants per year. Inpatient care accounted for 53.9% of all direct costs caused by ADEs. For patients with ADEs, the average societal cost of illness was USD 6235.0 [5442.8 to 7027.2], of which direct costs were USD 2830.1 [2260.7 to 3399.4] (45%), and indirect costs USD 3404.9 [2899.3 to 3910.4] (55%). The societal cost of illness was higher for patients with ADEs compared to other patients. ADEs caused 9.5% of all direct healthcare costs in the study population. Conclusions: Healthcare costs for patients with ADEs are substantial across different settings; in primary care, other outpatient care and inpatient care. Hence the economic impact of ADEs will be underestimated in studies focusing on inpatient ADEs alone. Moreover, the high proportion of indirect costs in the societal COI for patients with ADEs suggests that the observed costs caused by ADEs would be even higher if including indirect costs. Additional studies are needed to identify interventions to prevent and manage ADEs.

  • 9.
    Hultberg, Josabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Åby.
    Rudebeck, Carl-Edvard
    Kalmar County Council, Sweden; University of Tromso, Norway.
    Patient participation in decision-making about cardiovascular preventive drugs - resistance as agency2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the study was to describe and explore patient agency through resistance in decision-making about cardiovascular preventive drugs in primary care. Design: Six general practitioners from the southeast of Sweden audiorecorded 80 consultations. From these, 28 consultations with proposals from GPs for cardiovascular preventive drug treatments were chosen for theme-oriented discourse analysis. Results: The study shows how patients participate in decision-making about cardiovascular preventive drug treatments through resistance in response to treatment proposals. Passive modes of resistance were withheld responses and minimal unmarked acknowledgements. Active modes were to ask questions, contest the address of an inclusive we, present an identity as a non-drugtaker, disclose non-adherence to drug treatments, and to present counterproposals. The active forms were also found in anticipation to treatment proposals from the GPs. Patients and GPs sometimes displayed mutual renouncement of responsibility for decision-making. The decision-making process appeared to expand both beyond a particular phase in the consultations and beyond the single consultation. Conclusions: The recognition of active and passive resistance from patients as one way of exerting agency may prove valuable when working for patient participation in clinical practice, education and research about patient-doctor communication about cardiovascular preventive medication. We propose particular attentiveness to patient agency through anticipatory resistance, patients disclosures of non-adherence and presentations of themselves as non-drugtakers. The expansion of the decision-making process beyond single encounters points to the importance of continuity of care.

  • 10. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Ingadóttir, Brynja
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Learning as a patient: What and how individuals want to learn when preparing for surgery, and the potential use of serious games in their education2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Surgical patients need knowledge to participate in their own care and to engage in self-care behaviour in the perioperative period which is important for their recovery. Patient education facilitates such knowledge acquisition and several methods can be used to facilitate it, for example, face-to-face education and brochures or using information technology such as website or computer games. Healthcare professionals have been slow to seize the possibilities that information technology has to offer within the field, including the use of serious games. To optimise patient education, the information is needed on the patients’ needs and preferences and what they think about the idea of using a serious game to learn about self-care.

    Aim: The overall aims of this thesis were to describe the knowledge expectations of surgical patients, to describe how surgical patients want to learn, and to explore the potential use of serious games in patient education.

    Methods: This thesis includes four studies that used both quantitative and qualitative data to describe aspects of patient learning in relation to surgery. Study I has a prospective and comparative design with survey data collected before surgery and before hospital discharge from 290 patients with osteoarthritis undergoing knee arthroplasty. Data was collected on fulfilment of knowledge expectations and related factors. Study II is a cross-­‐sectional study in 104 patients with heart failure who had been scheduled for cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) device implantation. Data was collected on knowledge expectations and related factors. In Study III the perceptions of 13 surgical patients towards novel and traditional methods to learn about post-operative pain management are explored in a qualitative interview study using content analysis. Study IV describes the development and evaluation of a serious game to learn about pain management with the participation of 20 persons recruited from the public. The game was developed by an interdisciplinary team following a structured approach. Data on the efficacy and usability of the game was collected in one session with questionnaires, observations and interviews.

    Results: Participants reported high knowledge expectations. Knowledge expectations were highest within the bio-physiological knowledge dimension on disease, treatment and complications and the functional dimension on how daily activities are affected, both of which include items on self-care. Most participants wanted to know about the possible complications related to the surgery procedure. In none of the knowledge dimensions the expectations of participants were fulfilled. Participants received most knowledge on the physical and functional issues and received least on the financial and social aspects of their illness. The main predictor of fulfilment of knowledge expectations was having access to knowledge in the hospital from doctors and nurses. Trust in the information source and own motivation to learn shaped how the participants thought about different learning methods. Although the participants were open to using novel learning methods such as websites or games they were also doubtful about their use and called for advice by healthcare professionals. To develop a serious game with the goal to learn about pain management, theories of self-care and adult learning, evidence on the educational needs of patients about pain management and principles of gamification were found useful. The game character is a surgical patient just discharged home from hospital who needs to attend to daily activities while simultaneously managing post-operative pain with different strategies. Participants who evaluated a first version of the serious game improved their knowledge and described usability of the game as high. They were positive towards this new learning method and found it suitable for learning about pain management after surgery in spite of some technical obstacles.

    Conclusions: Surgical patients have high knowledge expectations about all aspects of their upcoming surgery and although they prefer direct communication with healthcare professionals as a source for knowledge they might be open to try using more novel methods such as games. Preliminary short-­‐term results demonstrate that a serious game can help individuals to learn about pain management, and has the potential to improve knowledge. A careful introduction, recommendation, and support from healthcare professionals is needed for implementation of such a novel method in patient education.

    List of papers
    1. The fulfilment of knowledge expectations during the perioperative period of patients undergoing knee arthroplasty - a Nordic perspective
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The fulfilment of knowledge expectations during the perioperative period of patients undergoing knee arthroplasty - a Nordic perspective
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 19-20, p. 2896-2908Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe the possible differences between knowledge expectations and received knowledge of patients undergoing elective knee arthroplasty in Iceland, Sweden and Finland and also to determine the relationship between such a difference and both background factors and patient satisfaction with care.

    BACKGROUND: Knee arthroplasty is a fast-growing and a successful treatment for patients with osteoarthritis. Patient education can improve surgery outcomes, but it remains unknown what knowledge patients expect to receive and actually acquire during the perioperative period and what factors are related to that experience.

    DESIGN: Descriptive, prospective survey.

    METHODS: In total, 290 patients answered questionnaires about their expectations (Knowledge Expectations of hospital patients - scale) before surgery and about received knowledge (Received Knowledge of hospital patients - scale) and satisfaction with hospital care (Patient Satisfaction Scale) at discharge. Sociodemographics, clinical information, accessibility to knowledge from healthcare providers (Access to Knowledge Scale), and preferences for information and behavioural control (Krantz Health Opinion Survey) were collected as background data.

    RESULTS: Patients` knowledge expectations were higher (mean 3·6, SD 0·4) than their perception of received knowledge (mean 3·0, SD 0·7). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that access to knowledge, information preferences and work experience within health- or social care explained 33% (R²) of the variation in the difference between received and expected knowledge. Patients reported high satisfaction with their care except regarding how their family was involved.

    CONCLUSION: Patients undergoing knee arthroplasty receive less knowledge than they expect, and individual factors and communication with healthcare providers during hospitalisation are related to their experience. The content of patient education and family involvement should be considered in future care.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The results strengthen the knowledge base on the educational needs of knee arthroplasty patients and can be used to develop and test new interventions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
    Keywords
    Knee arthroplasty, osteoarthritis, patient education, patient expectations, patient satisfaction, surgery
    National Category
    Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105225 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12552 (DOI)000343857700020 ()24476393 (PubMedID)
    Projects
    EEPO
    Available from: 2014-03-13 Created: 2014-03-13 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Knowledge expectations, self-care, and health complaints of heart failure patients scheduled for cardiac resynchronization therapy implantation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knowledge expectations, self-care, and health complaints of heart failure patients scheduled for cardiac resynchronization therapy implantation
    2015 (English)In: Patient Preference and Adherence, ISSN 1177-889X, E-ISSN 1177-889X, Vol. 9, p. 913-921Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe what knowledge heart failure patients expect to acquire in relation to their upcoming cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device implantation, to describe their self-care and health complaints, and to explore the relationship between knowledge expectations and self-care, health complaints, and background factors. Patients and methods: Cross-sectional multicenter study with 104 patients scheduled for a first-time, elective CRT implantation in Swedish and Icelandic hospitals. Data were collected with the Knowledge Expectations of hospital patient Scale, European Heart Failure Self-care Behavior Scale, and Adjusted Postoperative Recovery Profile. Results: Patients expected most knowledge related to their disease and its treatment (median 4.0, interquartile range 0.13) and least on social issues (median 3.5, interquartile range 0.83). Their self-care was average (standardized mean 51.0 +/- 19.6) before the procedure. Patients had on average 8.2 (+/- 4.7) health complaints and rated fatigue and sexual problems as the most severe. Age was independently associated with knowledge expectations (Exp beta 0.049, P= 0.033). Conclusion: Heart failure patients waiting for a CRT device implantation have high expectations for multiple aspects of knowledge, including self-care issues, before their procedure. These expectations are similar to those of other surgical patients and they increase with age.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Dove Medical Press, 2015
    Keywords
    cardiac devices; CRT treatment; patient education
    National Category
    Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120368 (URN)10.2147/PPA.S83069 (DOI)000357535000001 ()26170641 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Landspitali University Hospital Research Fund, Landspitali - The National University Hospital of Iceland; Icelandic Nurses Association Research Fund; Ingibjorg Magnusdottir in Iceland; Medtronic-Vingmed AB; St. Jude Medical Sweden AB in Sweden

    Available from: 2015-07-31 Created: 2015-07-31 Last updated: 2019-06-27
    3. Perceptions about traditional and novel methods to learn about post-operative pain management: - a qualitative study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions about traditional and novel methods to learn about post-operative pain management: - a qualitative study.
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 2672-2683Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore the perceptions of surgical patients about traditional and novel methods to learn about post-operative pain management.Background: Patient education is an important part of post-operative care. Contemporary technology offers new ways for patients to learn about self-care, although face-to-face discussions and brochures are the most common methods of delivering education in nursing practice.Design: A qualitative design with a vignette and semi-structured interviews used for data collection.Methods: A purposeful sample of 13 post-surgical patients, who had been discharged from hospital, was recruited during 2013 - 2014. The patients were given a vignette about anticipated hospital discharge after surgery with four different options for communication (face-to-face, brochure, website, serious game) to learn about post-operative pain management. They were asked to rank their preferred method of learning and thereafter to reflect on their choices. Data were analysed using an inductive content analysis approach.Findings: Patients preferred face-to-face education with a nurse, followed by brochures and websites, while games were least preferred. Two categories, each with two sub-categories, emerged from the data. These conceptualised the factors affecting patients' perceptions: 1) 'Trusting the source', sub-categorised into 'Being familiar with the method' and 'Having own prejudgments'; and 2) 'Being motivated to learn' sub-categorised into 'Managing an impaired cognition' and 'Aspiring for increased knowledge'.Conclusion: In order to implement successfully novel educational methods into post-operative care, healthcare professionals need to be aware of the factors influencing patients' perceptions abouthow to learn, such as trust and motivation.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
    Keywords
    Content analysis; educational methods; nursing; patient education; patient learning; post-operative self-care; vignettes
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129199 (URN)10.1111/jan.13021 (DOI)000386079500010 ()27205900 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Landspitali University Hospital Research Fund; Icelandic Nurses Association Research Fund

    Available from: 2016-06-13 Created: 2016-06-13 Last updated: 2019-06-27
  • 11.
    Jönsson, Anna K
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Schioler, L.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Lesen, E.
    Nordic Health Econ AB, Sweden .
    Andersson Sundell, K.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden Nordic School Public Heatlh, Sweden .
    Mardby, A-C
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Influence of refill adherence method when comparing level of adherence for different dosing regimens2014In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 70, no 5, p. 589-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To examine the impact of two methods when estimating refill adherence in patients using bisphosphonates with different dosing regimens. In the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, 18,203 new users of bisphosphonates aged 18-85 years were identified between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2007 and followed for a maximum of 2 years. The patients were categorised based on dosing regimen: one tablet daily, one tablet weekly, switching between these regimens, and other regimens. Refill adherence was estimated with Continuous measure of Medication Acquisition (CMA, adherent if CMA a parts per thousand yenaEuro parts per thousand 80 %) and the maximum gap method (adherent if gaps less than 45 days). Differences in adherence between patients in the groups were assessed with logistic regression models controlling for confounding factors. The proportion of patients classified as adherent was higher using CMA compared with patients classified as adherent using the maximum gap method. Patients on one tablet weekly had significantly lower adherence compared with patients on one tablet daily in the main analyses of both methods (the maximum gap method: 73 % vs. 80 %; adjusted OR = 0.71; 95 % CI 0.57-0.89 and CMA: 84 % vs. 88 %, adjusted OR = 0.75; 95 % CI 0.57-0.99). Patients using the other two dosing regimens had significantly lower adherence compared with patients on one tablet daily using both methods. Choice of method has an impact on the estimates of refill adherence to bisphosphonates. Patients on one tablet weekly dosing had lower adherence compared with patients on one tablet daily dosing using both methods.

  • 12.
    Kamekis, A.
    et al.
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Bertsias, A.
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Moschandreas, J.
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Petelos, E.
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Papadakaki, M.
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Tsiantou, V.
    University of Crete, Greece; National School Public Heatlh, Greece.
    Saridaki, A.
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Symvoulakis, E. K.
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Souliotis, K.
    National School Public Heatlh, Greece; University of Peloponnese, Greece; University of Crete, Greece.
    Papadakis, N.
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Martinez, L.
    Pierre and Marie Curie University, France.
    Agius, D.
    Mediterranean Institute Primary Care, Malta.
    Uncu, Y.
    Uludag University, Turkey.
    Sengezer, T.
    Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Turkey.
    Samoutis, G.
    University of Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Vlcek, J.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Abasaeed, A.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Merkouris, B.
    Greek Assoc Gen Practitioners, Greece.
    Lionis, C.
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Patients intention to consume prescribed and non-prescribed medicines: A study based on the theory of planned behaviour in selected European countries2018In: Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-4727, E-ISSN 1365-2710, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 26-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is known and objectivePolypharmacy has a significant impact on patients health with overall expenditure on over-the-counter (OTC) medicines representing a substantial burden in terms of cost of treatment. The aim of this study, which was conducted within the framework of a European Project funded by the European Union under the Seventh Framework Programme and was entitled OTC-SOCIOMED, was to report on possible determinants of patient behaviour regarding the consumption of medicines, and particularly OTCs, in the context of primary care. MethodsA multicentre, cross-sectional study was designed and implemented in well-defined primary healthcare settings in Cyprus, the Czech Republic, France, Greece, Malta and Turkey. Patients completed a questionnaire constructed on the basis of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), which was administered via face-to-face interviews. Results and discussionThe percentage of patients who had consumed prescribed medicines over a 6-month period was consistently high, ranging from 79% in the Czech Republic and 82% in Turkey to 97% in Malta and 100% in Cyprus. Reported non-prescribed medicine consumption ranged from 33% in Turkey to 92% in the Czech Republic and 97% in Cyprus. TPB behavioural antecedents explained 43% of the variability of patients intention to consume medicines in Malta and 24% in Greece, but only 3% in Turkey. Subjective norm was a significant predictor of the intention to consume medicines in all three countries (Greece, Malta and Turkey), whereas attitude towards consumption was a significant predictor of the expectation to consume medicines, if needed. What is new and conclusionThis study shows that parameters such as patients beliefs and influence from family and friends could be determining factors in explaining the high rates of medicine consumption. Factors that affect patients behavioural intention towards medicine consumption may assist in the formulation of evidence-based policy proposals and inform initiatives and interventions aimed at increasing the appropriate use of medicines.

  • 13.
    Khedidja, Hedna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hakkarainen, Katja M.
    EPID Research, Espoo, Finland, Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gyllensten, Hanna
    Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden, Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Andersson Sundell, Karolina
    Section of Social Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Petzold, Max
    Centre for Applied Biostatistics, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Adherence to Antihypertensive Therapy and Elevated Blood Pressure: Should We Consider the Use of Multiple Medications?2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 9, article id e0137451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Although a majority of patients with hypertension require a multidrug therapy, this is rarely considered when measuring adherence from refill data. Moreover, investigating the association between refill non-adherence to antihypertensive therapy (AHT) and elevated blood pressure (BP) has been advocated.

    Objective

    Identify factors associated with non-adherence to AHT, considering the multidrug therapy, and investigate the association between non-adherence to AHT and elevated BP.

    Methods

    A retrospective cohort study including patients with hypertension, identified from a random sample of 5025 Swedish adults. Two measures of adherence were estimated by the proportion of days covered method (PDC≥80%): (1) Adherence to any antihypertensive medication and, (2) adherence to the full AHT regimen. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to investigate the association between sociodemographic factors (age, sex, education, income), clinical factors (user profile, number of antihypertensive medications, healthcare use, cardiovascular comorbidities) and non-adherence. Moreover, the association between non-adherence (long-term and a month prior to BP measurement) and elevated BP was investigated.

    Results

    Non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication was higher among persons < 65 years (Odds Ratio, OR 2.75 [95% CI, 1.18–6.43]) and with the lowest income (OR 2.05 [95% CI, 1.01–4.16]). Non-adherence to the full AHT regimen was higher among new users (OR 2.04 [95% CI, 1.32–3.15]), persons using specialized healthcare (OR 1.63, [95% CI, 1.14–2.32]), and having multiple antihypertensive medications (OR 1.85 [95% CI, 1.25–2.75] and OR 5.22 [95% CI, 3.48–7.83], for 2 and ≥3 antihypertensive medications, respectively). Non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication a month prior to healthcare visit was associated with elevated BP.

    Conclusion

    Sociodemographic factors were associated with non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication while clinical factors with non-adherence to the full AHT regimen. These differing findings support considering the use of multiple antihypertensive medications when measuring refill adherence. Monitoring patients' refill adherence prior to healthcare visit may facilitate interpreting elevated BP.

  • 14.
    Levi, Richard
    et al.
    Solberga Project/Karolinska Institute and Centre for Neurotraumatology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hultling, C
    Solberga Project/Karolinska Institute and Centre for Neurotraumatology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westgren, N
    Solberga Project/Karolinska Institute and Centre for Neurotraumatology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A computer assisted follow up system for spinal cord injury patients.1994In: Paraplegia, ISSN 0031-1758, Vol. 32, no 11, p. 736-742Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The comprehensive care of patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCI) necessitates, among other things, a structured, life-long follow up. The high consumption of medical care in chronic SCI patients, often a result of diseases affecting many different organ systems, soon causes the cumulated medical documentation to be extensive and therefore hard to survey. The possibilities for rational patient management, adequate quality assurance, and clinical research may improve considerably by computerisation of medical records. A computerised medical records system for SCI has recently been developed, using a semistructured medical record format for data input and a medical entity dictionary for facilitated data storage and retrieval. The principles for developing this computer-assisted follow up system are described.

  • 15.
    Malmqvist, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    International clinical research and the problem of benefiting from injustice2016In: Bodily exchanges, bioethics and border crossing: perspectives on giving, selling and sharing bodies / [ed] Erik Malmqvist & Kristin Zeiler, Abingdon: Routledge, 2016, p. 169-184Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical trials are increasingly “offshored” to developing countries. Many participants in these trials can plausibly be regarded as victims of deep structural injustices, e.g. severe avoidable poverty and lack of access to healthcare. This chapter discusses whether patients who benefit from drugs developed among the global poor have any special responsibility to remedy their unjust circumstances. More precisely, it examines whether such a responsibility can be grounded in the fact that these patients are beneficiaries of injustice. Finding no justification for singling out this group, the author ends by exploring the idea that the responsibility to remedy structural injustice is a more widely shared one. 

  • 16.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Borgstedt-Risberg, Madeleine
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Soop, Michael
    Natl Board Hlth and Welf, Sweden.
    Nylen, Urban
    Natl Board Hlth and Welf, Sweden.
    Alenius, Carina
    Swedish Assoc Local Author and Reg, Sweden.
    Rutberg, Hans
    Swedish Assoc Local Author and Reg, Sweden.
    Incidence of adverse events in Sweden during 2013-2016: a cohort study describing the implementation of a national trigger tool2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 3, article id e020833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To describe the implementation of a trigger tool in Sweden and present the national incidence of adverse events (AEs) over a 4-year period during which an ongoing national patient safety initiative was terminated. Design Cohort study using retrospective record review based on a trigger tool methodology. Setting and participants Patients amp;gt;= 18 years admitted to all somatic acute care hospitals in Sweden from 2013 to 2016 were randomised into the study. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome rneasure was the incidence of AEs, and secondary measures were type of injury, severity of harm, preventability of AEs, estimated healthcare cost of AEs and incidence of AEs in patients cared for in another type of unit than the one specialised for their medical needs (off-site). Results In a review of 64 917 admissions, the average AE rates in 2014 (11.6%), 2015(10.9%) and 2016 (11.4%) were significantly lower than in 2013 (13.1 %). The decrease in the AE rates was seen in different age groups, in both genders and for preventable and non-preventable AEs. The decrease comprised only the least severe AEs. The types of AEs that decreased were hospital-acquired infections, urinary bladder distention and compromised vital signs. Patients cared for off-site had 84% more preventable AEs than patients cared for in the appropriate units. The cost of increased length of stay associated with preventable AEs corresponded to 13%-14% of the total cost of somatic hospital care in Sweden. Conclusions The rate of AEs in Swedish somatic hospitals has decreased from 2013 to 2016. Retrospective record review can be used to monitor patient safety over time, to assess the effects of national patient safety interventions and analyse challenges to patient safety such as the increasing care of patients off-site. It was found that the economic burden of preventable AEs is high.

  • 17.
    Pestoff, Rebecka
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ingvoldstad, Charlotta
    CLINTECH, Obstretrics and Gynaecology, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    Skirton, Heather
    Department of Applied Health Genetics, Plymouth University, Plymouth, UK.
    Genetic counsellors in Sweden: their role and added value in the clinical setting.2016In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 350-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic testing is becoming more commonplace in general and specialist health care and should always be accompanied by genetic counselling, according to Swedish law. Genetic counsellors are members of the multi-disciplinary team providing genetic counselling. This study examined the role and added value of genetic counsellors in Sweden, using a cross-sectional on-line survey. The findings showed that the genetic counsellors added value in the clinical setting by acting as the 'spider-in-the-web' regarding case management, having a more holistic, ethical and psychological perspective, being able to offer continuous support and build a relationship with the patient, and being more accessible than medical geneticists. The main difference between a genetic counsellor and medical geneticist was that the doctor had the main medical responsibility. Thus genetic counsellors in Sweden contribute substantially to the care of patients in the clinical genetic setting.

  • 18.
    Ridelberg, Mikaela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roback, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Patient safety work in Sweden: quantitative and qualitative analysis of annual patient safety reports.2016In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 16, no 98, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There is widespread recognition of the problem of unsafe care and extensive efforts have been made over the last 15 years to improve patient safety. In Sweden, a new patient safety law obliges the 21 county councils to assemble a yearly patient safety report (PSR). The aim of this study was to describe the patient safety work carried out in Sweden by analysing the PSRs with regard to the structure, process and result elements reported, and to investigate the perceived usefulness of the PSRs as a tool to achieve improved patient safety.

    Methods

    The study was based on two sources of data: patient safety reports obtained from county councils in Sweden published in 2014 and a survey of health care practitioners with strategic positions in patient safety work, acting as key informants for their county councils. Answers to open-ended questions were analysed using conventional content analysis.

    Results

    A total of 14 structure elements, 31 process elements and 23 outcome elements were identified. The most frequently reported structure elements were groups devoted to working with antibiotics issues and electronic incident reporting systems. The PSRs were perceived to provide a structure for patient safety work, enhance the focus on patient safety and contribute to learning about patient safety.

    Conclusion

    Patient safety work carried out in Sweden, as described in annual PSRs, features a wide range of structure, process and result elements. According to health care practitioners with strategic positions in the county councils’ patient safety work, the PSRs are perceived as useful at various system levels.

  • 19.
    Samuelsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Colnerud, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Student Teachers’ Perceptions Regarding the Challenges of Leadership2015In: Teaching for tomorrow today / [ed] Dawn Garbett & Alan Ovens, Auckland: International Association of Teachers and Teaching (ISATT) and Edify Ltd , 2015, 1, p. 312-320Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching is the only profession in which the practitioner themselves has to create the conditions required in order to execute their professional duties. What this means is that teachers themselves have to organise and lead the work so that teaching and learning are made possible. For example, this can be compared with the medical profession, in which several other professional groups are involved in the preparations ahead of the doctor's meeting with the patient. These can include receptionists, nurses and laboratory assistants. The doctor's meeting with the patient is structured in a way that aims to place greater focus on the patient's problem and give them the opportunity to see more patients. Furthermore, professions that deal with adults can expect their patients or clients to remain loyal to the established, profession-specific structure.

    Schools are, of course, organised according to a certain structure. However, the fact that there are a large number of pupils, who are young, have varied needs and different attitudes to being forced to be there, requires the teacher to exercise leadership; leadership they often have to master alone. Consequently, student teachers are not required simply to develop their knowledge of the subject, their didactic proficiency and their interpersonal skills, but must also develop a type of leadership that forms the basis of their ability to practice their profession. This study uses interviews to investigate student teacher's perceptions regarding leadership in the classroom – what it encompasses, what is required and which problems they predict will arise in future.

  • 20.
    Sarkanen, Tomi
    et al.
    Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Niemelä, Valter
    Uppsala , Sweden.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Partinen, Markku
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Psychosis in patients with narcolepsy as an adverse effect of sodium oxybate.2014In: Frontiers in neurology, ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 5, p. 136-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Hypnagogic and hypnopompic hallucinations are characteristic symptoms of narcolepsy, as are excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, and sleep paralysis. Narcolepsy patients may also experience daytime hallucinations unrelated to sleep-wake transitions. The effect of medication on hallucinations is of interest since treatment of narcolepsy may provoke psychotic symptoms. We aim to analyze the relation between sodium oxybate (SXB) treatment and psychotic symptoms in narcolepsy patients. Furthermore, we analyze the characteristics of hallucinations to determine their nature as mainly psychotic or hypnagogic and raise a discussion about whether SXB causes psychosis or if psychosis occurs as an endogenous complication in narcolepsy.

    METHOD: We present altogether four patients with narcolepsy who experienced psychotic symptoms during treatment with SXB. In addition, we searched the literature for descriptions of hallucinations in narcolepsy and similarities and differences with psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia.

    RESULTS: Three out of four patients had hallucinations typical for psychosis and one had symptoms that resembled aggravated hypnagogic hallucinations. Two patients also had delusional symptoms primarily associated with mental disorders. Tapering down SXB was tried and helped in two out of four cases. Adding antipsychotic treatment (risperidone) alleviated psychotic symptoms in two cases.

    CONCLUSION: Psychotic symptoms in narcolepsy may appear during SXB treatment. Hallucinations resemble those seen in schizophrenia; however, the insight that symptoms are delusional is usually preserved. In case of SXB-induced psychotic symptoms or hallucinations, reducing SXB dose or adding antipsychotic medication can be tried.

  • 21.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina Görel Ingegerd
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Unbeck, Maria
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lindblad, Marlene
    Royal Inst Technol, Sweden; Ersta Skondal Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Adverse events in patients in home healthcare: a retrospective record review using trigger tool methodology2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 1, article id e019267Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Home healthcare is an increasingly common part of healthcare. The patients are often aged, frail and have multiple diseases, and multiple caregivers are involved in their treatment. This study explores the origin, incidence, types and preventability of adverse events (AEs) that occur in patients receiving home healthcare. Design A study using retrospective record review and trigger tool methodology. Setting and methods Ten teams with experience of home healthcare from nine regions across Sweden reviewed home healthcare records in a two-stage procedure using 38 predefined triggers in four modules. A random sample of records from 600 patients (aged 18 years or older) receiving home healthcare during 2015 were reviewed. Primary and secondary outcome measures The cumulative incidence of AEs found in patients receiving home healthcare; secondary measures were origin, types, severity of harm and preventability of the AEs. Results The patients were aged 20-79 years, 280 men and 320 women. The review teams identified 356 AEs in 226 (37.7%; 95% CI 33.0 to 42.8) of the home healthcare records. Of these, 255 (71.6%; 950/s CI 63.2 to 80.8) were assessed as being preventable, and most (246, 69.1%; 95% CI 60.9 to 78.2) required extra healthcare visits or led to a prolonged period of healthcare. Most of the AEs (271, 76.1%; 95% CI 67.5 to 85.6) originated in home healthcare; the rest were detected during home healthcare but were related to care outside home healthcare. The most common AEs were healthcare-associated infections, falls and pressure ulcers. Conclusions AEs in patients receiving home healthcare are common, mostly preventable and often cause temporary harm requiring extra healthcare resources. The most frequent types of AEs must be addressed and reduced through improvements in interprotessional collaboration. This is an important area for future studies.

  • 22.
    Schjøtt, Jan
    et al.
    Section of Clinical Pharmacology, Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021 Bergen, Norway. jan.didrik.schjott@helse-bergen.no; Institute of Clinical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, 5021 Bergen, Norway.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Damkier, Per
    Department of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology, Odense University Hospital, 5000 Odense, Denmark. pdamkier@health.sdu.dk; Department of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, 5230 Odense, Denmark.
    Reppe, Linda Amundstuen
    Pharmacy Division, Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Nord University, Norway.
    Kampmann, Jens Peter
    Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Bispebjerg University Hospital, 2400 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Christensen, Hanne Rolighed
    Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Bispebjerg University Hospital, 2400 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Spigset, Olav
    Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. olav.spigset@legemidler.no; Regional Medicines Information and Pharmacovigilance Centre (RELIS Midt-Norge), Department of Clinical Pharmacology, St. Olav University Hospital, 7006 Trondheim, Norway.
    Use of References in Responses from Scandinavian Drug Information Centres2018In: Medicines (Basel, Switzerland), ISSN 2305-6320, Vol. 5, no 3, article id 66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare use of references in responses from Scandinavian drug information centres (DICs). Methods: Six different fictitious drug-related queries were sent to each of seven Scandinavian DICs. The six queries concerned adverse effects, pharmacokinetics, pregnancy, complementary medicine, polypharmacy, and breast feeding. References in the responses were categorised into five types of drug information sources: primary (original studies), secondary (reviews), tertiary (drug monographs, handbooks, etc.), DIC database, or personal communication. Results: Two hundred and forty-four references were used in the 42 responses. The mean number of references varied from 3.0 to 10.6 for the six queries. The largest difference between centres with regard to number of references used (range 1?17) was found for the query on complementary medicine. In total, 124 references (50.8%) were tertiary, and only 10 of the 42 responses (23.8%) did not have any tertiary references included. Complementary medicine, breast feeding, and pregnancy were query types associated with relatively frequent use of primary references. Use of DIC database was not uncommon, but personal communications were seldom used. Conclusions: Scandinavian DICs differ substantially in number and type of references to identical drug-related queries. Tertiary sources are mainly preferred irrespective of type of query.

  • 23.
    Sposato, Niklas S.
    et al.
    Scandinavian School of Osteopathy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjerså, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment in Surgical Care: Short Review of Research Publications in Osteopathic Journals During the Period 1990 to 20172018In: Journal of evidence-based integrative medicine, ISSN 2515-690X, Vol. 23Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing trend in surgical care is the investigation and incorporation of multimodal interventions into standardized programs. Additionally, manual therapies such as osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) are being used with patients in surgical care. Yet the scientific dialogue and the use of OMT in surgical care are currently insubstantial.

  • 24.
    Stevenson, Jean E
    et al.
    University of Sheffield, UK; Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Israelsson, Johan
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Gunilla C
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Petersson, Göran I
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Bath, Peter A
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic healthrecords in patients who suffered inhospital cardiac arrest2016In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 21-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPAC™ Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety.

  • 25. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Tjäderborn, Micaela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Psychoactive prescription drug use disorders, misuse and abuse: Pharmacoepidemiological aspects2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a widespread and increasing use of psychoactive prescription drugs, such as opioid analgesics, anxiolytics, hypnotics and anti-epileptics, but their use is associated with a risk of drug use disorder, misuse and abuse. Today, these are globally recognized and emerging public health concerns.

    Aim: The aim of this thesis is to estimate the prevalence of psychoactive prescription drug (PPD) use disorders, misuse and abuse, and to investigate the association with some potential risk factors.

    Methods: A study using register data from forensic cause of death investigations investigated and described cases of fatal unintentional intoxication with tramadol (Study I). Based on register data on spontaneously reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reported cases of tramadol dependence were investigated and summarised (Study II). In a study in suspected drug-impaired drivers with a toxicology analysis confirming the intake of one out of five pre-specified PPDs, the prevalence of non-prescribed use was assessed and associated factors were investigated (Study III). From a cohort of patients initiating prescribed treatment with pregabalin, using data on prescription fills, a study investigated longitudinal utilisation patterns during five years with regards to use of the drug above the maximum approved daily dose (MAD), and factors associated with the utilisation patterns (Study IV).

    Results: In the first study, 17 cases of unintentional intoxications were identified, of which more concerned men, the median age was 44 years and the majority used multiple psychoactive substances (alcohol, illicit drugs and prescription drugs). The second study identified 104 spontaneously reported cases of tramadol dependence, in which more concerned women, the median age was 45 years, and a third reported a history of substance abuse and 40% of past psychoactive medication use. In the third study, more than half of the individuals suspected of drug-impaired driving used the drug without a recent prescription. Non prescribed use was most frequent in users of benzodiazepines and tramadol, and was more likely in younger individuals and in multiple-substance users. In the last paper five longitudinal utilisation patterns were found in pregabalin users, with two patterns associated with a particularly high risk of doses above the maximum approved dosing recommendation. This pattern of use was associated with male sex, younger age, non-urban residency and a recent prescribed treatment with an antiepileptic or opioid analgesic drug.

    Conclusions: This thesis shows that psychoactive prescription drug use disorders, misuse and abuse occur and may have serious and even fatal consequences. The prevalence varies between different drugs and populations. Abuse and misuse seem to be more common in young people. Fatal intoxications and misuse of prescribed drugs may be more common in men, while drug use disorders following prescribed treatment may be more common in women and non-prescribed use equally distributed between women and men. Individuals with a history of mental illness, substance use disorder or abuse, or of past use of psychoactive medications are likely important risk groups. In summary, the findings suggest a potential for improvements in the utilisation of psychoactive prescription drugs. The results may be useful in the planning of clinical and regulatory preventive interventions to promote the rational, individualised and safe use of such drugs.

    List of papers
    1. Fatal unintentional intoxications with tramadol during 1995-2005
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fatal unintentional intoxications with tramadol during 1995-2005
    2007 (English)In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 173, no 2-3, p. 107-111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Tramadol is an extensively used centrally acting analgesic and is considered a safe drug devoid of many serious adverse effects of traditional opioids. However, recently, toxicity and an abuse potential of tramadol have been reported. This study examined fatal unintentional tramadol intoxications among Swedish forensic autopsy cases between 1995 and 2005. All fatal intoxications were selected, in which toxic concentrations of tramadol (>1 μg/g femoral blood) had been detected, and where the forensic pathologist considered the intoxication unintentional and the fatal outcome at least partly explained by tramadol. Toxicology analyses, police reports, autopsy protocols and medical records were scrutinized. A total of 17 cases (eleven men and six women) of fatal unintentional tramadol intoxications were identified. For these cases the median age was 44 years (range 18-78 years) and the median tramadol concentration was 2.0 μg/g (range 1.1-12.0 μg/g). Other pharmaceutical substances, illicit drugs or ethanol were detected in addition to tramadol in all of these cases. In fact, intoxication with multiple drugs was considered the cause of death in 10 (59%) cases. However, in seven cases tramadol was the only substance present in toxic concentrations. A history of substance abuse was identified in 14 (82%) subjects and a present tramadol abuse in 8 (47%). These results suggest that fatal intoxications with tramadol may occur unintentionally and that subjects with a history of substance abuse may be at certain risk. Precaution is therefore warranted when prescribing tramadol in such patients. © 2007 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-40882 (URN)10.1016/j.forsciint.2007.02.007 (DOI)54460 (Local ID)54460 (Archive number)54460 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Tramadol dependence: a survey of spontaneously reported cases in Sweden.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tramadol dependence: a survey of spontaneously reported cases in Sweden.
    2009 (English)In: Pharmacoepidemiology and drug safety, ISSN 1099-1557Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Tramadol is a weak opioid analgesic, which is generally considered to be safe. However, conflicting data exist on the dependence potential of tramadol. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate occurrence of tramadol dependence and associated risk factors using spontaneously reported adverse drug reactions. METHODS: The Swedish database for spontaneously reported adverse drug reactions, Swedish Drug Information System (SweDIS), was searched for reports on tramadol dependence from 1 January 1995 until 31 December 2006. Selection was conducted based on the DSM-IV definition of dependence. Available information was scrutinised and registered and then presented descriptively. RESULTS: A total of 104 reports of tramadol dependence were identified, of which 60 (58%) concerned women. The median age (range) was 45 (15-84) years. Information on a history of substance abuse was present in 31 patients (30%) and 41 patients (39%) had a documented past or current use of a drug of abuse. Prescribed doses of tramadol ranged between 50-800 mg/day, and ingested doses between 50-4000 mg/day. Time of onset ranged from some weeks up to 4 years. In 72 (69%) cases the reaction was classified as serious, mainly due to hospitalisations for detoxification or discontinuation of tramadol. CONCLUSIONS: There is an occurrence of tramadol dependence in association with analgesic treatment within the recommended dose range. In susceptible patients a severe and serious dependence syndrome may develop. A history of abuse or use of a drug of abuse seems to be an important risk factor. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    Keywords
    drug dependence; spontaneous reporting system; substance abuse; tramadol
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-51223 (URN)10.1002/pds.1838 (DOI)19827010 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-10-21 Created: 2009-10-21 Last updated: 2016-08-23
    3. Non-prescribed use of psychoactive prescription drugs among drug-impaired drivers in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-prescribed use of psychoactive prescription drugs among drug-impaired drivers in Sweden
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 161, p. 77-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To determine the prevalence of non-prescribed drug use among subjects suspected of drug impaired driving with a psychoactive prescription drug, and to identify associated factors. Methods: Subjects investigated for drug-impaired driving in Sweden during 2006-2009 with a confirmed intake of diazepam, flunitrazepam, tramadol, zolpidem or zopiclone were identified using the Swedish Forensic Toxicology Database. Information on dispensed prescription drugs was retrieved from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Non-prescribed use was our outcome, defined as a psychoactive prescription drug intake confirmed by toxicological analysis in a subject by whom it was not dispensed in the 12 months preceding the sampling. Prevalence proportions were calculated for each drug and logistic regression was used to identify associated factors. Results: In total, 2225 subjects were included. The median age (range) was 34 (15-80) years and 1864 (83.8%) subjects were male. Non-prescribed use was found in 1513 subjects (58.7%); for flunitrazepam 103 (76.3%), diazepam 1098 (74.1%), tramadol 192 (40.3%), zopiclone 60 (29.7%), and zolpidem 60 (21.2%) subjects, respectively. Younger age and multiple-substance use were associated with non-prescribed use, whereas ongoing treatment with other psychoactive drugs was negatively associated with non prescribed use. Conclusions: Non-prescribed use of psychoactive prescription drugs was common in subjects suspected of drug-impaired driving and was more frequent for benzodiazepines and tramadol compared to zolpidem and zopiclone. The young and multi-substance users were more likely, whereas subjects with ongoing prescribed treatment with other psychoactive drugs were less likely, to use non-prescribed drugs.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2016
    Keywords
    Prescription drug diversion; Non-prescribed use; Drug-impaired driving; Drug dispensing; Pharmacoepidemiology
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127559 (URN)10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.01.031 (DOI)000373419100011 ()26875672 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden [LIO-131751]; Forensic Science Centre, Sweden [CFV 121218]; Linkoping University, Sweden [LIU 2009-01356]

    Available from: 2016-05-04 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2017-04-24
  • 26.
    Tyrstrup, M.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    André, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Brorsson, A.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Ctr Primary Hlth Care Res, Sweden.
    Grondal, H.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Strandberg, E-L
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Hedin, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Lund Univ, Sweden; Fururum, Sweden.
    A study of guidelines for respiratory tract infections and their references from Swedish GPs: a qualitative analysis2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 83-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: National guidelines are important instruments in reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions. Low adherence to guidelines is an acknowledged problem that needs to be addressed.

    Method: We evaluated established characteristics for guidelines in the guidelines for lower respiratory tract infection, acute otitis media and pharyngotonsillitis in primary care. We studied how doctors used these guidelines by analysing interviews with 29 general practitioners (GPs) in Sweden.

    Results: We found important between-guidelines differences, which we believe affects adherence. The GPs reported persistent preconceptions about diagnosis and treatment, which we believe reduces their adherence to the guidelines.

    Conclusion: To increase adherence, it is important to consider doctors’ preconceptions when creating new guidelines.

  • 27.
    Wass, Sofie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Same, same but different: Perceptions of patients' online access to electronic health records among healthcare professionals2019In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1538-1548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we explore how healthcare professionals in primary care and outpatient clinics perceive the outcomes of giving patients online access to their electronic health records. The study was carried out as a case study and included a workshop, six interviews and a survey that was answered by 146 healthcare professionals. The results indicate that professionals working in primary care perceive that an increase in information-sharing with patients can increase adherence, clarify important information to the patient and allow the patient to quality-control documented information. Professionals at outpatient clinics seem less convinced about the benefits of patient accessible electronic health records and have concerns about how patients manage the information that they are given access to. However, the patient accessible electronic health record has not led to a change in documentation procedures among the majority of the professionals. While the findings can be connected to the context of outpatient clinics and primary care units, other contextual factors might influence the results and more in-depth studies are therefore needed to clarify the concerns.

  • 28.
    Wass, Sofie
    et al.
    Jönköping Univ, Sweden.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Jönköping Univ, Sweden.
    Ros, Axel
    Jönköping Univ, Sweden.
    Exploring patients perceptions of accessing electronic health records: Innovation in healthcare2019In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 203-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The more widespread implementation of electronic health records has led to new ways of providing access to healthcare information, allowing patients to view their medical notes, test results, medicines and so on. In this article, we explore how patients perceive the possibility to access their electronic health record online and whether this influences patient involvement. The study includes interviews with nine patients and a survey answered by 56 patients. Our results show that patients perceive healthcare information to be more accessible and that electronic health record accessibility improves recall, understanding and patient involvement. However, to achieve the goal of involving patients as active decision-makers in their own treatment, electronic health records need to be fully available and test results, referrals and information on drug interactions need to be offered. As patient access to electronic health records spreads, it is important to gain a deeper understanding of how documentation practices can be changed to serve healthcare professionals and patients.

  • 29.
    Wretborn, Jens
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Emergency Medicine in Linköping.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Wilhelms, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Emergency Medicine in Linköping.
    Emergency Department Workload and Crowding During a Major Electronic Health Record Breakdown2019In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, FRONTIERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH, Vol. 7, article id 267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Emergency Departments (EDs) today rely heavily on Electronic Health Records (EHRs) and associated support systems. EHR updates are known to be associated with adverse events, but reports on the consequences of breakdowns in EDs are lacking.

    Objectives: To describe the effects on workload, occupancy, patient Length Of Stay (LOS), and admissions at three EDs (a regional trauma center, a community hospital and a rural community hospital) during a 96 h period of EHR downtime, of which 48 h represented an unexpected breakdown.

    Methods: Assessments of workload, on a scale from 1 (no workload) to 6 (very high workload), were obtained from all staff before, during and after the downtime period. Occupancy, LOS and hospital admissions were extracted from data recorded in the fallback system at each ED during the downtime, and compared with the period before and after (uptime).

    Results: Workload increased considerably at two EDs during the downtime whereas the third ED lacked resources to assess workload due to the breakdown. The proportion of assessments 4 were 28.5% during uptime compared to 38.4% during downtime at the regional trauma center ED (difference 9.9%, p = 0.006, 95% CI 2.7–17%), and 22.9% compared to 41% at the rural community ED (difference 18.1%, p = 0.0002, 95%CI 7.9–28.3%). Median LOS increased by 19 min (3:56 vs. 4:15, p < 0.004) at the regional trauma center ED, by 76 min (3:34 vs. 4:50, p < 0.001) at the community ED and was unaltered at the rural community ED (2:47 vs. 2:51, p = 0.3) during downtime. Occupancy increased significantly at the community ED (1.59 vs. 0.71, p < 0.0001). Admissions rates remained unchanged during the breakdown. Fallback systems and initiatives to manage the effects of the breakdown differed between the EDs.

    Conclusions: EHR downtime or unexpected breakdowns increased staff workload, and had variable effects on ED crowding as measured by LOS and occupancy. Additional staff and digital fallback systems may reduce the effects on ED crowding, but this descriptive study cannot determine causality.

  • 30.
    Yates, M.
    et al.
    Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, England; University of East Anglia, England.
    Watts, R. A.
    University of East Anglia, England; Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust, England.
    Bajema, I. M.
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Cid, M. C.
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Crestani, B.
    Bichat Claude Bernard University Hospital, France.
    Hauser, T.
    Immunol Zentrum Zurich, Switzerland.
    Hellmich, B.
    Kreiskliniken Esslingen, Germany.
    Holle, J. U.
    Rheumazentrum Schleswig Holstein Mitte, Germany.
    Laudien, M.
    University of Kiel, Germany.
    Little, M. A.
    Tallaght Hospital, Ireland.
    Luqmani, R. A.
    University of Oxford, England.
    Mahr, A.
    University of Paris 07, France.
    Merkel, P. A.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA; University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Mills, J.
    Vasculitis UK, England.
    Mooney, J.
    Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, England.
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Tesar, V.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Westman, K.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Vaglio, A.
    University Hospital Parma, Italy.
    Yalcindag, N.
    Ankara University, Turkey.
    Jayne, D. R.
    Addenbrookes Hospital, England.
    Mukhtyar, C.
    Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, England.
    EULAR/ERA-EDTA recommendations for the management of ANCA-associated vasculitis2016In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 75, no 9, p. 1583-1594Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the 2009 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) have been updated. The 2009 recommendations were on the management of primary small and medium vessel vasculitis. The 2015 update has been developed by an international task force representing EULAR, the European Renal Association and the European Vasculitis Society (EUVAS). The recommendations are based upon evidence from systematic literature reviews, as well as expert opinion where appropriate. The evidence presented was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus-finding and voting process. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendations were derived and levels of agreement (strengths of recommendations) determined. In addition to the voting by the task force members, the relevance of the recommendations was assessed by an online voting survey among members of EUVAS. Fifteen recommendations were developed, covering general aspects, such as attaining remission and the need for shared decision making between clinicians and patients. More specific items relate to starting immunosuppressive therapy in combination with glucocorticoids to induce remission, followed by a period of remission maintenance; for remission induction in life-threatening or organ-threatening AAV, cyclophosphamide and rituximab are considered to have similar efficacy; plasma exchange which is recommended, where licensed, in the setting of rapidly progressive renal failure or severe diffuse pulmonary haemorrhage. These recommendations are intended for use by healthcare professionals, doctors in specialist training, medical students, pharmaceutical industries and drug regulatory organisations.

  • 31.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Relational ontology and ethics in online organ solicitation: the problem of sharing one's body when being touched online2016In: Bodily exchanges, bioethics and border crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies / [ed] Erik Malmqvist and Kristin Zeiler, Abingdon: Routledge, 2016, p. 119-134Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 31 of 31
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