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  • 1.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Lidocaine infusion has a 25% opioid-sparing effect on background pain after burns: A prospective, randomised, double-blind, controlled trial2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The pain of a burn mainly results from the inflammatory cascade that is induced by the injured tissue, and is classified as background, breakthrough, procedural and postoperative pain. High doses of opioids are usually needed to treat background pain, so its management includes a combination of types of analgesia to reduce the side effects. Lidocaine given intravenously has been shown in two small, uncontrolled studies to have an appreciable effect on pain after burns.

    Objectives

    In this prospective double-blind controlled trial we aimed to examine and quantify the opioid-sparing effect of a continuous infusion of lidocaine for the treatment of background pain during the early period after a burn.

    Methods

    Adult patients injured with burns of >10 total body surface area burned (TBSA%) and treated with a morphine based patient-controlled analgesia device (PCA) were randomised to have either lidocaine infusion starting with a bolus dose (1 mg lidocaine/kg) followed by continuous infusion (180 mg lidocaine/hour) or a placebo infusion, for seven consecutive days. Total daily consumption of opioids (mg) and amount of pain (visual analogue score, VAS) were recorded.

    Results

    We included 19 patients, 10 of whom were given a lidocaine infusion. There were no differences between groups in VAS, TBSA%, time of enrolment to the study since the initial burn, or duration of hospital stay. The opioid consumption in the lidocaine group declined by roughly 25% during the period of the study.

    Conclusion

    An intravenous infusion of lidocaine was safe and had an opioid-sparing effect when treating background pain in burns.

  • 2.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Surg Dept, Plast Surg Unit, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department Suez, Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Evaluation of Glandular Liposculpture as a Single Treatment for Grades I and II Gynaecomastia2018In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 1222-1230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Gynaecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast, of which the psychological burden on the patient can be considerable, with the increased risk of disorders such as depression, anxiety, and social phobia. Minimal scarring can be achieved by liposuction alone, though it is known to have a limited effect on the dense glandular and fibroconnective tissues. We know of few studies published on “liposuction alone”, so we designed this study to evaluate the outcome of combining liposuction with glandular liposculpturing through two axillary incisions as a single treatment for the management of grades I and II gynaecomastia.

    Methods

    We made a retrospective analysis of 18 patients with grade I or II gynaecomastia who were operated on by combined liposuction and glandular liposculpturing using a fat disruptor cannula, without glandular excision, during the period 2014–2016. Patient satisfaction was assessed using the Breast Evaluation Questionnaire (BEQ), which is a 5-point Likert scale (1 = very dissatisfied; 2 = dissatisfied; 3 = neither; 4 = satisfied; 5 = very satisfied). The post-operative aesthetic appearance of the chest was evaluated by five independent observers on a scale from 1 to 5 (5 = considerable improvement).

    Results

    The patient mean (SD) overall satisfaction score was 4.7 (0.7), in which 92% of the responders were “satisfied” to “very satisfied”. The mean (SD) BEQ for all questions answered increased from 2.1 (0.2) “dissatisfied” preoperatively to 4.1 (0.2) “satisfied” post-operatively. The observers’ mean (SD) rate for the improvement in the shape of the front chest wall was 4.1 (0.7). No haematomas were recorded, one patient developed a wound infection, and two patients complained of remnants of tissue. The median (IQR) body mass index was 27.4 (26.7–29.4), 11 patients had gynaecomastia grade I, and 7 patients grade II. The median (IQR) volume of aspirated fat was 700 ml (650–800), operating time was 67 (65–75) minutes, 14 patients had general anaesthesia, and hospital charges were US$ 538 (481–594).

    Conclusions

    Combined liposuction and liposculpturing using the fat disruptor cannula resulted in satisfied patients and acceptable outcomes according to the observers’ ratings. It could be a useful alternative with an outcome that corresponds to that of more expensive methods.

  • 3.
    Alkaissi, Aidah
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Postoperative Symptoms After Gynaecological Surgery: How They Are Influenced by Prophylactic Antiemetics Sensory Stimulation (P6-Acupressure)2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Symptoms after surgery and anaesthesia influence the patient´s ability to resume daily activities. If postoperative symptoms are controlled rehabilitation may be accelerated. The aims of this dissertation were to identify disturbing symptoms reported by patients after gynaecological surgery, to investigate what effect prohylactic treatment with antiemetics has on these symptoms and whether or not sensory simulation of the P6-acupressure has an effect on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and motion sickness.

    Methods: Total 1138 women participated in three clinical trials (Studies I, II, III) and one experimental study (Study IV). A questionnaire investigating postoperative symptoms was constructed and validated. The questionnaire was used in a prospective, consecutive, doubleblind, randomised, multicentre, and controlled study to identify incidence, and intensity of postoperative symptoms and the effect of common antiemetics (droperidol and granisetron) (Study III). The patients were followed for 24 h. In two studies (I, II) P6-acupressure was compared (prospective, double-blind, ransomised, controlled) with placebo acupressure and a reference group where the effect on PONV was followed over 24 h. The effect of P6-acupressure and placebo acupressure on motion sickness induced by a nauseogenic motion challenge was studied (Study III).

    Results: A high incidence and severity of postoperative symptoms were found after gynaecological surgery in a group with a high risk (>30%) for PONV. Sixty-four per cent (107/165) of the patients experienced disturbing symptoms after surgery and 46 % (76/165) scored their symptoms as moderate to very severe. Fourty-eight per cent (79/165) had two or more symptoms. A higher incidence of symptoms were reported in the groups with prophylactic treatment, granisetron 74% (123/165) and droperidol 80% (133/165) compared to the control group 41% (69/165) (P <0.05). The relative risk reduction for PONV with granisetron or droperidol prophylaxis is 27% respective 22%. The relative risk increase for headache is 63% after granisetron, and 44% for difficulty with accommodation after droperidol. Less PONV was seen after P6-acupressure, 33% (44/135) compared to reference group 46% (63/136) (p = 0.019), number needed to treat (NNT) was 7 [95% confidence interval (CI) 4- 6]. When comparing laparoscopic and vaginal surgery (subgroup analysis) the main effect was in the vaginal group (day-case surgery), 36% (27/75) in the reference group to 27% (23/86) in the placebo group and to 20% (17/84) in the P6-acupressure group, (P = 0.017), NNT for the vaginal group was 6 [95% CI 3-18]. P6-acupressure increased time to nausea after a laboratory motion challenge and reduced the total number of symptoms reported (p <0.009).

    Conclusions: There is no clinical efficacy in the form of reduced postoperative symptoms after prophylactic antiemetics (droperidol and granisetron) in females with a high risk (>30%) for PONV undergoing gynaecological surgery. P6-acupressure reduces the incidence of PONV after gynaecological surgery in females with a high (>30%) risk for PONV. The effect seems to be most prominent after vaginal surgery. P6-acupressure increased tolerance to experimental nausogenic stimuli and reduced the total number of symptoms reported in females with a history of motion sickness.

    List of papers
    1. Effect and placebo effect of acupressure (P6) on nausea and vomiting after outpatientgynaecological surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect and placebo effect of acupressure (P6) on nausea and vomiting after outpatientgynaecological surgery
    1999 (English)In: Acta anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 270-274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Acupuncture and acupressure have previously been reported to possess antiemetic effect. We wanted to investigate the "true" and placebo effect of acupressure in prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty women undergoing outpatient minor gynaecological surgery were entered into a double-blind and randomised study. One group received acupressure with bilateral stimulation of P6 (A), a second group received bilateral placebo stimulation (P) and a third group received no acupressure wrist band and served as a reference group (R). PONV was evaluated as number of patients with complete response (no PONV), nausea only or vomiting. In addition, the need for rescue antiemetic medication and nausea after 24 h was registered. RESULTS: Complete response was obtained in 11, 11 and 9 patients in groups, A, P and R, respectively. Nine, 7 and 6 patients had nausea before discharge home, and 1, 1 and 8 patients were nauseated (8 vs 1 patient: P < 0.05) 24 h after operation in A, P and R groups, respectively. When compared to placebo acupressure (2 patients vomited and 5 needed rescue), significantly (P < 0.05) fewer needed rescue antiemetic medication after acupressure at P6 (no vomiting or rescue medication). When compared to the observation group (5 vomited and 4 needed rescue antiemetics), significantly fewer vomited after acupressure (P < 0.05) CONCLUSION: In patients undergoing brief gynaecological surgery, placebo effect of acupressure decreased nausea after 24 h but vomiting and need of rescue antiemetics was reduced only by acupressure with the correct P6 point stimulation.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13648 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-20 Created: 2004-05-20 Last updated: 2009-08-17
    2. P6 acupressure may relieve nausea and vomiting after gynecological surgery: an effectiveness study in 410 women
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>P6 acupressure may relieve nausea and vomiting after gynecological surgery: an effectiveness study in 410 women
    Show others...
    2002 (English)In: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, ISSN 0832-610X, Vol. 49, no 10, p. 1034-1039Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of sensory stimulation of the P6 point on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) after gynecological surgery in the everyday clinical setting (effectiveness study).

    Methods: Four hundred and ten women undergoing general anesthesia for elective gynecological surgery were included in a prospective, consecutive, randomized, multicentre, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial with a reference group. One group was given bilateral P6 acupressure (n = 135), a second group similar pressure on bilateral non-acupressure points (n = 139), and a third group (n = 136) served as reference group. Nausea (scale 0–6), vomiting, pain, and satisfaction with the treatment were recorded. Primary outcome was complete response, i.e., no nausea, vomiting or rescue medication for 24 hr. Results were analyzed by applying logistic regression with indicators of treatments, type of operation and risk score for PONV as explanatory variables.

    Results: Complete response was more frequent in the P6 acupressure group than in the reference group (P = 0.0194) Conversely, the incidence of PONV was 46% in the reference group, 38% after pressure on a non-acupoint and 33% after P6 acupressure. The decrease from 46% to 33% was statistically significant. When considering vaginal cases separately, the decrease in PONV was from 36% to 20% (P = 0.0168). The corresponding decrease from 59% to 55% in the laparoscopic surgery group was not statistically significant.

    Conclusion: P6 acupressure is a non-invasive method that may have a place as prophylactic antiemetic therapy during gynecological surgery.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13649 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-20 Created: 2004-05-20 Last updated: 2009-08-17
    3. Disturbing postoperative symptoms are not reduced by prophylactic antiemetric treatment in patients at high risk for post-operative nausea and vomiting
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disturbing postoperative symptoms are not reduced by prophylactic antiemetric treatment in patients at high risk for post-operative nausea and vomiting
    Show others...
    2004 (English)In: Acta anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 761-71Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To give prophylactics or timely treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is the question. We compared the intensity and number of disturbing post-operative symptoms (i.e. pain, PONV, headache, fatigue, etc.) after prophylactic antiemetic treatment in a group of patients with >30% risk for post-operative vomiting. METHODS: Four hundred and ninety-five patients, from three hospitals, planned for gynaecological surgery were randomized double blind. They were given granisetron 3 mg, droperidol 1.25 mg or no prophylactic antiemetic. Post-operative symptoms were followed for 24 h using a questionnaire. Symptoms were analyzed both according to their intensity and in a dichotomous fashion. RESULTS: The intensity of different symptoms differed depending on whether droperidol, granisetron or no antiemetic had been given (P = 0.005) but the overall incidence of moderate to very severe symptoms was similar in all groups. No group fared better in general. The total number of symptoms was higher in the groups given prophylactic treatment (P < 0.05). The relative risk reduction for PONV with granisetron or droperidol prophylaxis was 27%[95% confidence interval (CI) 8-43] and 22% (2-38), respectively. The NNT (number needed to treat) for granisetron (0-24 h) was 7 and for droperidol 8. The NNH (number needed to harm) (0-24 h) for headache and visual disturbances was 6 and 13 (NS) for granisteron and, 50 (NS) and 6 for droperidol. CONCLUSION: The intensity of symptoms or the total number of disturbing symptoms did not decrease after prophylactic antiemetic treatment in a group of patients, but the profile of disturbing symptoms changed. The relevance of post-operative symptoms in terms of patients' well-being needs to be addressed.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13650 (URN)10.1111/j.0001-5172.2004.00403.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2004-05-20 Created: 2004-05-20 Last updated: 2009-10-14
    4. P6 acupressure increases tolerance to nausogenic motion stimulation in women with high risk for PONV
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>P6 acupressure increases tolerance to nausogenic motion stimulation in women with high risk for PONV
    2005 (English)In: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, ISSN 1496-8975, Vol. 52, p. 703-709Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In a previous study we noticed that P6 acupressure decreased postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) more markedly after discharge. As motion sickness susceptibility is increased by, for example, opioids we hypothesized that P6 acu-pressure decreased PONV by decreasing motion sickness susceptibility. We studied time to nausea by a laboratory motion challenge in a group of volunteers, during P6 and placebo acupressure.

    Methods: 60 women with high and low susceptibilities for motion sickness participated in a randomized and double-blind study with an active P6 acupressure, placebo acupressure, and a control group (n = 20 in each group). The risk score for PONV was over 50%. The motion challenge was by eccentric rotation in a chair, blindfolded and with chin to chest movements of the head. The challenge was stopped when women reported moderate nausea. Symptoms were recorded.

    Results: Mean time to moderate nausea was longer in the P6 acu-pressure group compared to the control group. P6 acupressure = 352 (259–445), mean (95% confidence interval) in seconds, control = 151 (121–181) and placebo acupressure = 280 (161–340); (P = 0.006). No difference was found between P6 and placebo acupressure or placebo acupressure and control groups. Previous severity of motion sickness did not influence time to nausea (P = 0.107). The cumulative number of symptoms differed between the three groups (P < 0.05). Fewer symptoms were reported in the P6 acupressure compared to the control group P < 0.009. Overall, P6 acupressure was only marginally more effective than placebo acupressure on the forearms.

    Conclusion: In females with a history of motion sickness P6 acu-pressure increased tolerance to experimental nauseogenic stimuli, and reduced the total number of symptoms reported.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13651 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-20 Created: 2004-05-20 Last updated: 2009-08-17
  • 4.
    Andersson, E
    et al.
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rackauskaite, D
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Csajbók, L
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öst, M
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nellgård, B
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A prospective outcome study observing patients with severe traumatic brain injury over 10-15 years2017In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 502-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) can be divided into primary and secondary injuries. Intensive care protocols focus on preventing secondary injuries. This prospective cohort study was initiated to investigate outcome, including mortality, in patients treated according to the Lund Concept after a sTBI covering 10-15 years post-trauma.

    METHODS: Patients were included during 2000-2004 when admitted to the neurointensive care unit, Sahlgrenska University Hospital. Inclusion criteria were: Glasgow coma scale score of ≤8, need for artificial ventilation and intracranial monitoring. Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) was used to evaluate outcome both at 1-year and 10-15 years post-trauma.

    RESULTS: Ninety-five patients, (27 female and 68 male), were initially included. Both improvement and deterioration were noted between 1- and 10-15 years post-injury. Mortality rate (34/95) was higher in the studied population vs. a matched Swedish population, (Standard mortality rate (SMR) 9.5; P < 0.0001). When dividing the cohort into Good (GOS 4-5) and Poor (GOS 2-3) outcome at 1-year, only patients with Poor outcome had a higher mortality rate than the matched population (SMR 7.3; P < 0.0001). Further, good outcome (high GOS) at 1-year was associated with high GOS 10-15 years post-trauma (P < 0.0001). Finally, a majority of patients demonstrated symptoms of mental fatigue.

    CONCLUSION: This indicates that patients with severe traumatic brain injury with Good outcome at 1-year have similar survival probability as a matched Swedish population and that high Glasgow outcome scale at 1-year is related to good long-term outcome. Our results further emphasise the advantage of the Lund concept.

  • 5.
    Antepohl, Wolfram
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Interleukin-8 is elevated in cerebrospinal fluid following high-voltage electrical injury with late-onset paraplegia suggesting neuronal damage at the microlevel as causative factor2010In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 36, no 3, p. e7-e9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The patient, a 31-year-old male, sustained an electric burn injury (16 kV, AC/DC) while working with electric power lines. He was acutely admitted to a national burn center in Southeast Sweden, where burns equalling 29% of the total body surface area were noted. The burns were located at the front of the abdomen, upper arms bilaterally, and the left hip region, and the lesions were estimated to be mainly of the dermal type, what was believed initially to be caused mainly by an electric flash. There were no obvious entry or exit sites of the electric current. However, myoglobin in plasma was elevated as a sign of muscular degradation, suggesting that at least some current had passed through the tissues. According to the paramedic report there was an episode of a few minutes of unconsciousness immediately after the injury, but the patient was fully awake and alert on admission. There was no concomitant trauma.

  • 6.
    Azman, Josip
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Rijeka University Hospital, Croatia; Rijeka University Hospital, Croatia.
    Stopar Pintaric, Tatjana
    University of Medical Centre Ljubljana, Slovenia; University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Cvetko, Erika
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Vlassakov, Kamen
    Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Ultrasound-Guided Glossopharyngeal Nerve Block A Cadaver and a Volunteer Sonoanatomy Study2017In: Regional anesthesia and pain medicine, ISSN 1098-7339, E-ISSN 1532-8651, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 252-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives: Glossopharyngeal nerve (GPN) blocks are usually performed by topical, intraoral, or peristyloid approaches, which carry significant complication risks due to the proximity of important neurovascular structures. This study presents a proof of concept for a new ultrasound (US)-guided technique, which would block the GPN distally, in the parapharyngeal space, away from the immediate vicinity of high-risk collateral structures. Methods: Five cadaver heads were dissected, and the location of theGPN was explored bilaterally. In 40 healthy volunteers (20 men and 20 women; median age, 35.5 years [range, 24-69 years]) parapharyngeal sonograms were obtained, saved, and analyzed. To assess the technical feasibility of a distal GPN block in the parapharyngeal space, unilateral US-guided dye injections were performed in 3 fresh cadavers, followed by dissections. Results: The GPN was consistently identified between the stylopharyngeal and middle pharyngeal constrictor muscles in all cadaver specimens. The median distance between the GPN and the ipsilateral greater horn of the hyoid bone was 2.4 cm (range, 2.3-2.7 cm) on the right and 2.6 cm (range, 2.3-2.9 cm) on the left. The mean skin-to pharyngealwall distances in the volunteers were 2.03 (SD, 0.41) cm on the right and 2.02 (SD, 0.45) cm on the left. The mean hyoid bone-to-pharyngeal wall distances were 2.04 (SD, 0.35) cm (right) and 2.07 (SD, 0.35) cm (left). The fresh cadaver dissections demonstrated dye deposition adjacent to theGPNin the parapharyngeal space in all specimens. Conclusions: Based on our anatomical results in cadavers and healthy volunteers, we submit that successful and safe blockade of the distal GPN at the pharyngealwall level is technically feasible under US guidance.

  • 7.
    Bahlmann, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Goal-directed fluid therapy during major abdominal surgery2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Both hypo- and hypervolemia increase the risk for postoperative complications after major abdominal surgery. Fluid needs vary amongst patients depending on differences in preoperative dehydration, intraoperative physiology and surgical characteristics. Goal-directed fluid therapy (GDFT) aims to target the right amount of fluid administration in each patient by evaluating the effect of fluid boluses on haemodynamic parameters such as stroke volume. It has been shown to reduce postoperative morbidity and is generally recommended for high-risk surgery. The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate whether more simple devices for GDFT result in clinical benefit, thus facilitating the application of GDFT in more patients.

    Aim: To compare performance and clinical benefit of pleth variability index (PVI), a noninvasive, easy-to-use device for GDFT, with the reference method of oesophageal Doppler; to evaluate methods for measuring preoperative dehydration and its effect on fluid handling by the body; and to confirm the expected clinical benefits of GDFT in patients undergoing oesophageal resection, a high risk procedure.

    Methods: In Studies I-III 150 patients scheduled for open abdominal surgery of at least 2 hrs were randomised to GDFT with either PVI or oesophageal Doppler. In the first half of the cohort, both monitors were connected to compare intraoperative performance. In 30 patients preoperative dehydration was analysed. In study IV 64 patients undergoing oesophageal resection were randomised to GDFT using pulse contour analysis or standard treatment.

    Results: The concordance between PVI and oesophageal Doppler for indicating the need for and effect of a fluid bolus was low, and both had only limited capacity to predict the effect of a fluid bolus. Both methods resulted in comparable amounts of fluid being administered and similar clinical outcome. Preoperative dehydration was limited but did impact on fluid handling. Patients receiving GDFT during oesophageal resection received more fluid and more dobutamine compared to controls, but this did not result in any clinical benefit.

    Conclusions: There are methodological issues as well as uncertainties about the clinical benefit of GDFT. We cannot recommend a strict application of any GDFT strategy, but suggest that its components should be incorporated in a more encompassing assessment of a patient’s fluid needs. The measurement, impact and treatment of preoperative dehydration need to be further clarified.

    List of papers
    1. Agreement between Pleth Variability Index and oesophageal Doppler to predict fluid responsiveness
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Agreement between Pleth Variability Index and oesophageal Doppler to predict fluid responsiveness
    2016 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 183-192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Optimisation of stroke volume using oesophageal Doppler is an established technique to guide intraoperative fluid therapy. The method has practical limitations and therefore alternative indices of fluid responsiveness, such as ventilator-induced variation in the pulse oximetric signal (Pleth Variability Index (PVI)) could be considered. We hypothesised that both methods predict fluid responsiveness in a similar way. Methods: Seventy-five patients scheduled for open major abdominal surgery were randomised to fluid optimisation using fluid bolus algorithms based on either PVI (n = 35) or Doppler (n = 39). All patients were monitored with both methods; the non-guiding method was blind. Primary endpoint was the concordance between the methods to predict fluid responsiveness. We also analysed the ability of each method to predict a stroke volume increase &gt;= 10% after a fluid bolus, as well as the accumulated intraoperative bolus fluid volume. Results: PVI indicated a need for fluid in one-third of the situations when Doppler did so, Cohens kappa = 0.03. A fluid bolus indicated by the PVI algorithm increased stroke volume by &gt;= 10% in half the situations. The same was found for the Doppler algorithm. The mean total bolus volume given was 878 ml when the fluid management was governed by PVI compared to 826 ml with Doppler (P = 0.71). Conclusion: PVI-and Doppler-based stroke volume optimisations agreed poorly, which did not affect the amount of fluid administered. None of the algorithms showed a good ability to predict fluid responsiveness. Our results do not support the fluid responsiveness concept.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016
    National Category
    Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124622 (URN)10.1111/aas.12632 (DOI)000368139700006 ()26373826 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Linkoping University Hospital; County Council of Ostergotland

    Available from: 2016-02-09 Created: 2016-02-08 Last updated: 2019-04-10
    2. Dehydration and fluid volume kinetics before major open abdominal surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dehydration and fluid volume kinetics before major open abdominal surgery
    2014 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 58, no 10, p. 1258-1266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Assessment of dehydration in the preoperative setting is of potential clinical value. The present study uses urine analysis and plasma volume kinetics, which have both been validated against induced changes in body water in volunteers, to study the incidence and severity of dehydration before open abdominal surgery begins. Methods: Thirty patients (mean age 64 years) had their urine analysed before major elective open abdominal surgery for colour, specific weight, osmolality and creatinine. The results were scored and the mean taken to represent a dehydration index. Thereafter, the patients received an infusion of 5ml/kg of Ringers acetate intravenously for over 15min. Blood was sampled for 70min and the blood haemoglobin concentration used to estimate the plasma volume kinetics. Results: Distribution of fluid occurred more slowly (Pless than0.01) and the elimination half-life was twice as long (median 40min, not significant) in the 11 patients (37%) diagnosed to be moderately dehydrated as compared with euhydrated patients. The dehydration index indicated that the fluid deficit in these patients corresponded to 2.5% of the body weight, whereas the deficit in the others was 1%. In contrast, the 11 patients who later developed postoperative nausea and vomiting had a very short elimination half-life, only 9min (median, Pless than0.01). These patients were usually euhydrated but had microalbuminuria (Pless than0.03) and higher natriuresis (Pless than0.01). Conclusions: The degree of dehydration before major surgery was modest as evidenced both by urine sampling and volume kinetic analysis.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112464 (URN)10.1111/aas.12416 (DOI)000343826500010 ()25307711 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland [LiO-314271, LiO-357621]

    Available from: 2014-11-28 Created: 2014-11-28 Last updated: 2019-04-10Bibliographically approved
    3. Pleth variability index or stroke volume optimization during open abdominal surgery: a randomized controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pleth variability index or stroke volume optimization during open abdominal surgery: a randomized controlled trial
    2018 (English)In: BMC Anesthesiology, ISSN 1471-2253, E-ISSN 1471-2253, Vol. 18, article id 115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The impact of Goal Directed Fluid Therapy (GDFT) based on the non-invasive Pleth Variability Index (PVI) on clinical outcome after abdominal surgery has only sparingly been explored. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of intraoperative GDFT guided by PVI to a control group using esophageal Doppler on the incidence of complications and length of hospital stay after major abdominal surgery. We hypothesized that there would be no difference between the groups. Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial in a Swedish university hospital between November 2011 and January 2015; 150 patients scheduled for open abdominal surgery lasting 2 h or more were included. Exclusion criteria included hepatic resection or severe cardiac arrhythmia. The patients were randomized 1: 1 to either the intervention group or the control group. The intervention group received intraoperative GDFT by administering fluid boluses of 3 ml/kg tetrastarch aiming at a PVI value below 10%, while GDFT in the control group aimed for optimization of stroke volume as assessed with esophageal Doppler. Blinded observers assessed complications until postoperative day 30 using pre-defined definitions, as well as length of hospital stay. Results: One hundred and-fifty patients were randomized and 146 patients were available for the final data analysis. Median duration of surgery was 3 h. A total of 64 complications occurred in the PVI group (N = 74) and 70 in the Doppler group (N = 72) (p = 0.93). Median (IQR) length of stay was 8.0 (8.0) days in the PVI group and 8.0 (9.5) in the Doppler group (P = 0.57). Conclusions: No difference in clinical outcome, as defined by number of postoperative complications, and length of hospital stay, was found when goal directed fluid therapy was applied using PVI as an alternative to esophageal Doppler. PVI appears to be an acceptable alternative to esophageal Doppler for goal directed fluid therapy during major open abdominal surgery.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BMC, 2018
    Keywords
    Doppler ultrasonography; Fluid therapy; Laparotomy; Photoplethysmography; Stroke volume; Complications
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150857 (URN)10.1186/s12871-018-0579-4 (DOI)000442038200002 ()30121072 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University Hospital Linkoping, Sweden; Region Ostergotland

    Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2019-04-30
    4. Goal-directed therapy during transthoracic oesophageal resection does not improve outcome: Randomised controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Goal-directed therapy during transthoracic oesophageal resection does not improve outcome: Randomised controlled trial
    2019 (English)In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Goal-directed therapy (GDT) is expected to be of highest benefit in high-risk surgery. Therefore, GDT is recommended during oesophageal resection, which carries a high risk of postoperative complications.

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to confirm the hypothesis that GDT during oesophageal resection improves outcome compared with standard care.

    DESIGN: A randomised controlled study.

    SETTING: Two Swedish university hospitals, between October 2011 and October 2015.

    PATIENTS: Sixty-four patients scheduled for elective transthoracic oesophageal resection were randomised. Exclusion criteria included colonic interposition and significant aortic or mitral valve insufficiency.

    INTERVENTION: A three-step GDT protocol included stroke volume optimisation using colloid boluses as assessed by pulse-contour analysis, dobutamine infusion if cardiac index was below 2.5 l min m and norepinephrine infusion if mean arterial blood pressure was below 65 mmHg.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The incidence of complications per patient at 5 and 30 days postoperatively as assessed using a predefined list.

    RESULTS: Fifty-nine patients were available for analysis. Patients in the intervention group received more colloid fluid (2190 ± 875 vs. 1596 ± 759 ml, P < 0.01) and dobutamine more frequently (27/30 vs. 9/29, P < 0.01). The median [interquartile range, IQR] incidence of complications per patient 5 days after surgery was 2 [0 to 3] in the intervention group and 1 [0 to 2] in the control group (P = 0.10), and after 30 days 4 [2 to 6] in the intervention group and 2 [1 to 4] in the control group (P = 0.10).

    CONCLUSION: Goal-directed therapy during oesophageal resection did not result in a reduction of the incidence of postoperative complications.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01416077.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2019
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156264 (URN)10.1097/EJA.0000000000000908 (DOI)000462763800010 ()30431499 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059795456 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Linkoping Medical Society

    Available from: 2019-04-10 Created: 2019-04-10 Last updated: 2019-04-18Bibliographically approved
  • 8.
    Bahlmann, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Hahn, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Södertälje Hosp, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Pleth variability index or stroke volume optimization during open abdominal surgery: a randomized controlled trial2018In: BMC Anesthesiology, ISSN 1471-2253, E-ISSN 1471-2253, Vol. 18, article id 115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The impact of Goal Directed Fluid Therapy (GDFT) based on the non-invasive Pleth Variability Index (PVI) on clinical outcome after abdominal surgery has only sparingly been explored. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of intraoperative GDFT guided by PVI to a control group using esophageal Doppler on the incidence of complications and length of hospital stay after major abdominal surgery. We hypothesized that there would be no difference between the groups. Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial in a Swedish university hospital between November 2011 and January 2015; 150 patients scheduled for open abdominal surgery lasting 2 h or more were included. Exclusion criteria included hepatic resection or severe cardiac arrhythmia. The patients were randomized 1: 1 to either the intervention group or the control group. The intervention group received intraoperative GDFT by administering fluid boluses of 3 ml/kg tetrastarch aiming at a PVI value below 10%, while GDFT in the control group aimed for optimization of stroke volume as assessed with esophageal Doppler. Blinded observers assessed complications until postoperative day 30 using pre-defined definitions, as well as length of hospital stay. Results: One hundred and-fifty patients were randomized and 146 patients were available for the final data analysis. Median duration of surgery was 3 h. A total of 64 complications occurred in the PVI group (N = 74) and 70 in the Doppler group (N = 72) (p = 0.93). Median (IQR) length of stay was 8.0 (8.0) days in the PVI group and 8.0 (9.5) in the Doppler group (P = 0.57). Conclusions: No difference in clinical outcome, as defined by number of postoperative complications, and length of hospital stay, was found when goal directed fluid therapy was applied using PVI as an alternative to esophageal Doppler. PVI appears to be an acceptable alternative to esophageal Doppler for goal directed fluid therapy during major open abdominal surgery.

  • 9.
    Bahlmann, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Halldestam, Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Goal-directed therapy during transthoracic oesophageal resection does not improve outcome: Randomised controlled trial2019In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Goal-directed therapy (GDT) is expected to be of highest benefit in high-risk surgery. Therefore, GDT is recommended during oesophageal resection, which carries a high risk of postoperative complications.

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to confirm the hypothesis that GDT during oesophageal resection improves outcome compared with standard care.

    DESIGN: A randomised controlled study.

    SETTING: Two Swedish university hospitals, between October 2011 and October 2015.

    PATIENTS: Sixty-four patients scheduled for elective transthoracic oesophageal resection were randomised. Exclusion criteria included colonic interposition and significant aortic or mitral valve insufficiency.

    INTERVENTION: A three-step GDT protocol included stroke volume optimisation using colloid boluses as assessed by pulse-contour analysis, dobutamine infusion if cardiac index was below 2.5 l min m and norepinephrine infusion if mean arterial blood pressure was below 65 mmHg.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The incidence of complications per patient at 5 and 30 days postoperatively as assessed using a predefined list.

    RESULTS: Fifty-nine patients were available for analysis. Patients in the intervention group received more colloid fluid (2190 ± 875 vs. 1596 ± 759 ml, P < 0.01) and dobutamine more frequently (27/30 vs. 9/29, P < 0.01). The median [interquartile range, IQR] incidence of complications per patient 5 days after surgery was 2 [0 to 3] in the intervention group and 1 [0 to 2] in the control group (P = 0.10), and after 30 days 4 [2 to 6] in the intervention group and 2 [1 to 4] in the control group (P = 0.10).

    CONCLUSION: Goal-directed therapy during oesophageal resection did not result in a reduction of the incidence of postoperative complications.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01416077.

  • 10.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cardiovascular response to hyperoxemia, hemodilution and burns: a clinical and experimental study2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The last decades less invasive monitoring and analytical tools have been developed for the evaluation of myocardial mechanics in clinical praxis. In critical care, these are longed-for complements to pulmonary artery catheter monitoring, additionally offering previously inaccessible information. This work is aimed, during fluid-replacement and oxygen therapy, to determine the physiological interface of ventricular and vascular mechanical properties, which result in the transfer of blood from the heart to appropriate circulatory beds. In prospective clinical studies we investigated previously cardiovascular healthy adults during hyperoxemia, and during preoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution or early fluid resuscitation of severe burn victims. Echocardiography was used in all studies, transthoracic for healthy volunteers and transesophageal for patients. For vascular parameters and for control purposes pulmonary artery Swan-Ganz catheter, calibrated external pulse recordings, whole body impedance cardiography, and transpulmonel thermodilution method were applied.

    We detected no significant change in blood pressure or heart rate, the two most often used parameters for patient monitoring. During preoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution a reduction of hemoglobin to 80 g/l did not compromise systolic or diastolic myocardial function. Cardiac volumes and flow increased with a concomitant fall in systemic vascular resistance while oxygen delivery seemed maintained. Supplemental oxygen therapy resulted in a linear dose-response between arterial oxygen and cardiovascular parameters, suggesting a direct vascular effect. Cardiac flow decreased and vascular resistance increased from hyperoxemia, and a decrease of venous return implied extracardial blood-pooling. Severe burns result in hypovolemic shock if not properly treated. The commonly used Parkland fluid replacement strategy, with urinary output and mean arterial pressure as endpoints, has recently been questioned. Applying this strategy, only transient early central hypovolemia was recorded, while dimensional preload, global left ventricular systolic function and oxygen delivery or consumption remained within normal ranges during the first 36 hours after accident. Signs of restrictive left ventricular diastolic function were detected in all patients and regional unstable systolic dysfunction was recognized in every other patient, and was consistent with myocardial marker leakage. Severe burns thereby cause myocardial stiffness and systolic regional dysfunction, which may not be prevented only by central normovolemia and adequate oxygenation.

    List of papers
    1. Transesophageal echocardiographic hemodynamic monitoring during preoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transesophageal echocardiographic hemodynamic monitoring during preoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution
    2000 (English)In: Anesthesiology, ISSN 0003-3022, Vol. 92, no 5, p. 1250-1256Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Preoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution may compromise oxygen transport. The aims of our study were to describe the hemodynamic effects of normovolemic hemodilution and to determine its effect on systolic and diastolic cardiac function by multiplane transesophageal echocardiography.

    Methods: In eight anesthetized patients (aged 13-51 yr) without heart disease, hemoglobin was reduced in steps from 123 ± 8 (mean ± SD) to 98 ± 3 and to 79 ± 5 g/l. Hemodynamic measurements (intravascular pressures, thermodilution cardiac output, and echocardiographic recordings) were obtained during a stabilization period and at each level of hemodilution. Left ventricular wall motion was monitored continuously, and Doppler variables, annular motion, and changes in ejection fractional area were analyzed off-line.

    Results: During hemodilution, cardiac output by thermodilution increased by 16 ± 7% and 26 ± 10%, corresponding well to the increase in cardiac output as measured by Doppler (difference, 0.32 ± 1.2 l/min). Systemic vascular resistance fell 16 ± 14% and 23 ± 9% and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure increased slightly (2 ± 2 mmHg), whereas other pressures, heart rate, wall motion, and diastolic Doppler variables remained unchanged. Ejection fractional area change increased from 44 ± 7% to 54 ± 10% and 60 ± 9% as a result of reduced end-systolic and increased end-diastolic left ventricular areas.

    Conclusions: A reduction in hemoglobin to 80 g/l during acute normovolemic hemodilution does not normally compromise systolic or diastolic myocardial function as determined by transesophageal echocardiography. Preload, left ventricular ejection fraction, and cardiac output increase with a concomitant fall in systemic vascular resistance.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12898 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-01-28 Created: 2008-01-28 Last updated: 2018-01-25
    2. Human cardiovascular dose-response to supplemental oxygen
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human cardiovascular dose-response to supplemental oxygen
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 191, no 1, p. 15-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to examine the central and peripheral cardiovascular adaptation and its coupling during increasing levels of hyperoxaemia. We hypothesized a dose-related effect of hyperoxaemia on left ventricular performance and the vascular properties of the arterial tree.

    Methods: Oscillometrically calibrated arterial subclavian pulse trace data were combined with echocardiographic recordings to obtain non-invasive estimates of left ventricular volumes, aortic root pressure and flow data. For complementary vascular parameters and control purposes whole-body impedance cardiography was applied. In nine (seven males) supine, resting healthy volunteers, aged 23–48 years, data was collected after 15 min of air breathing and at increasing transcutaneous oxygen tensions (20, 40 and 60 kPa), accomplished by a two group, random order and blinded hyperoxemic protocol.

    Results: Left ventricular stroke volume [86 ± 13 to 75 ± 9 mL (mean ± SD)] and end-diastolic area (19.3 ± 4.4 to 16.8 ± 4.3 cm2) declined (P < 0.05), and showed a linear, negative dose–response relationship to increasing arterial oxygen levels in a regression model. Peripheral resistance and characteristic impedance increased in a similar manner. Heart rate, left ventricular fractional area change, end-systolic area, mean arterial pressure, arterial compliance or carbon dioxide levels did not change.

    Conclusion: There is a linear dose–response relationship between arterial oxygen and cardiovascular parameters when the systemic oxygen tension increases above normal. A direct effect of supplemental oxygen on the vessels may therefore not be excluded. Proximal aortic and peripheral resistance increases from hyperoxaemia, but a decrease of venous return implies extra cardiac blood-pooling and compensatory relaxation of the capacitance vessels.

    Keywords
    arterial compliance, end-diastolic area, hyperoxaemia, hyperoxia, normocapnia, stroke volume, vascular resistance
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12899 (URN)10.1111/j.1748-1716.2007.01710.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-01-28 Created: 2008-01-28 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    3. Hemodynamic Changes During Resuscitation After Burns Using the Parkland Formula
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hemodynamic Changes During Resuscitation After Burns Using the Parkland Formula
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Journal of Trauma, ISSN 0022-5282, E-ISSN 1529-8809, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Parkland formula (2-4 mL/kg/burned area of total body surface area %) with urine output and mean arterial pressure (MAP) as endpoints; for the fluid resuscitation in burns is recommended all over the world. There has recently been a discussion on whether central circulatory endpoints should be used instead, and also whether volumes of fluid should be larger. Despite this, there are few central hemodynamic data available in the literature about the results when the formula is used correctly.

    Methods: Ten burned patients, admitted to our unit early, and with a burned area of >20% of total body sur-face area were investigated at 12, 24, and 36 hours after injury. Using transesophageal echocardiography, pulmonary artery catheterization, and transpulmonary thermodilution to monitor them, we evaluated the cardiovascular coupling when urinary output and MAP were used as endpoints.

    Results: Oxygen transport variables, heart rate, MAP, and left ventricular fractional area, did not change significantly during fluid resuscitation. Left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic area and global end-diastolic volume index increased from subnormal values at 12 hours to normal ranges at 24 hours after the burn. Extravascular lung intrathoracal blood volume ratio was increased 12 hours after the burn.

    Conclusions: Preload variables, global systolic function, and oxygen transport recorded simultaneously by three separate methods showed no need to increase the total fluid volume within 36 hours of a major burn. Early (12 hours) signs of central circulatory hypovolemia, however, support more rapid infusion of fluid at the beginning of treatment.

    Keywords
    Cardiovascular coupling, Echocardiography, Hemodynamic monitoring, Fractional area change, Global end-diastolic volume
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17146 (URN)10.1097/TA.0b013e318165c822 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-03-07 Created: 2009-03-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. Cardiac dysfunction after burns
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiac dysfunction after burns
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 603-609Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Using transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) we investigated the occurrence, and the association of possible abnormalities of motion of the regional wall of the heart (WMA) or diastolic dysfunction with raised troponin concentrations, or both during fluid resuscitation in patients with severe burns.

    Patients and methods

    Ten consecutive adults (aged 36–89 years, two women) with burns exceeding 20% total burned body surface area who needed mechanical ventilation were studied. Their mean Baux index was 92.7, and they were resuscitated according to the Parkland formula. Thirty series of TEE examinations and simultaneous laboratory tests for myocyte damage were done 12, 24, and 36 h after the burn.

    Results

    Half (n = 5) the patients had varying grades of leakage of the marker that correlated with changeable WMA at 12, 24 and 36 h after the burn (p ≤ 0.001, 0.044 and 0.02, respectively). No patient had WMA and normal concentrations of biomarkers or vice versa. The mitral deceleration time was short, but left ventricular filling velocity increased together with stroke volume.

    Conclusion

    Acute myocardial damage recorded by both echocardiography and leakage of troponin was common, and there was a close correlation between them. This is true also when global systolic function is not deteriorated. The mitral flow Doppler pattern suggested restrictive left ventricular diastolic function.

    Keywords
    Diastolic and regional systolic dysfunction; Echocardiography; Myocardial injury; Fluid resuscitation in burns; Myocardial infarction; Troponin
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12901 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2007.11.013 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-01-28 Created: 2008-01-28 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 11.
    Bergek, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Zdolsek, Joachim H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Hahn, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Research Unit, Södertälje Hospital, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Non-invasive blood haemoglobin and plethysmographic variability index during brachial plexus block2015In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 114, no 5, p. 812-817Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Plethysmographic measurement of haemoglobin concentration (SpHb  ), pleth variability index (PVI), and perfusion index (PI) with the Radical-7 apparatus is growing in popularity. Previous studies have indicated that SpHb  has poor precision, particularly when PI is low. We wanted to study the effects of a sympathetic block on these measurements.

    Methods Twenty patients underwent hand surgery under brachial plexus block with one Radical-7 applied to each arm. Measurements were taken up to 20 min after the block had been initiated. Venous blood samples were also drawn from the non-blocked arm.

    Results During the last 10 min of the study, SpHb  had increased by 8.6%. The PVI decreased by 54%, and PI increased by 188% in the blocked arm (median values). All these changes were statistically significant. In the non-blocked arm, these parameters did not change significantly.

    Conclusions Brachial plexus block significantly altered SpHb  , PVI, and PI, which indicates that regional nervous control of the arm greatly affects plethysmographic measurements obtained by the Radical-7. After the brachial plexus block, SpHb  increased and PVI decreased.

  • 12.
    Bjerså, Kristofer
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sachs, Chatharina
    Scandinavian College of Osteopathy, Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    Hyltander, Anders
    Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Department of Surgery, Östra Sjukhuset, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fagevik Olsén, Monika
    Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital; Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Osteopathic intervention for chronic pain, remaining thoracic stiffness and breathing impairment after thoracoabdominal oesophagus resection: A single subject design study2013In: International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, ISSN 1746-0689, E-ISSN 1878-0164, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 68-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Thoracic surgery can cause negative effects such as chronic pain, impaired thorax movement and/or impaired breathing. There are indications that manual therapies, such as osteopathy, may be beneficial for these conditions.

    Objective

    To investigate effects of osteopathic intervention on chronic pain and remaining limitations to thoracic range of motion and breathing in patients who had undergone thoracoabdominal resection of the oesophagus.

    Design

    In a single-subject research design (Aa-B-Ab), 8 participants with chronic postoperative thoracic pain, stiffness and/or breathing impairment after standardized oesophagus resection were given 10 sessions of osteopathic treatment of 45 min. Expiratory vital capacity, thorax mobility, pain experience, and subjective perception of treatment were measured on three occasions during each phase. The two-standard deviation band method was used to indicate significant change.

    Results

    A significantly increased range of motion in the thorax was observed in thoracic excursion and in lateral flexion. A positive change in pain was also noted. The results in expiratory vital capacity were contradictory. The participants were generally positive toward the treatment given.

    Conclusion

    Osteopathic intervention may affect thoracic impairment and pain among people with chronic pain and impaired thoracic range of motion after thoracoabdominal resection of the oesophagus

  • 13.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Lund, Irene
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Anér, Staffan
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phantom phenomena – Their perceived qualities and consequences from the patient’s perspective2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 134-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim: The curious phenomenon phantom limbs early became the object of research, and its underlying mechanisms have been discussed over the years. The complex nature of phantom phenom- ena makes interpretation of the results ambiguous, regarding both prevalence and the accompanying suffering. There is a lack of knowledge about how amputees experience the meaning and consequences of phantom phenomena. The present aim, therefore, was to investigate how individuals, in an interview situation, described the qualities of possible perceived phantom phenomena, and how their experience affected their lives one month after the amputation/mastectomy.

    Methods: Twenty-eight women and men who had undergone a limb amputation or mastectomy were interviewed. The focused, narrative-oriented interviews were transcribed verbatim and the scripts were analysed with content analysis.Results: One month after the amputation the informants described and related their phantom pain and phantom sensations in sensory-discriminative, motivational-affective and cognitive-evaluative dimen- sions. The phantom sensations were experienced mainly as more agonizing than the phantom pain.

    Despite both the high intensity of and the high annoyance at the phantom pain and phantom sensations, a majority felt that the phantom phenomena were not a hindrance in their attempts to recapture ordinary life. But when the hindrance was evaluated as high, the annoyance was evaluated as the highest possible for both phenomena or for the phantom sensations alone, never for phantom pain alone. The interviewees’ reported attitudes of hindrance were also described and estimated in the light of their sociocultural circumstances. Thus, other preceding and/or co-existent pain conditions as well as factors such as pre- operative information, the respondents’ views on pain treatment, and their knowledge and understanding of phantom phenomena were mentioned and related to the pain-producing situation.

    Two-thirds of the interviewees had received post-surgical information and for some, the phenomena were well-known from earlier experience. A majority applied some version of the medical explanation model, irrespective of age or level of education. However neither information nor medical explanation, or both, sufficed for them to understand their own phantom phenomena. Thus, differences between the concepts explanation and understanding seemed significant for the annoyance related to the phantom phenomena.

    Regarding background data: (i) the majority of the interviewees had had pre-amputation pain prob- lems; (ii) the breast-cancer phantoms differed in several ways; (iii) there were some age and gender differences in the descriptions of hindrance.Conclusions and implications: These findings highlight the importance of observing the individual approach to the phenomena as a process of evaluation and selection. In addition, experience and under- standing of the phantoms also have sociocultural aspects. There follows the need for individualized communication and information from the clinician, and for incorporating a socioscientific and meaning- centred approach in future studies. The present insights could also be of value in other iatrogenic pain conditions. 

  • 14.
    Björnström-Karlsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Turina, Dean
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strid, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Orexin A Inhibits Propofol-Induced Neurite Retraction by a Phospholipase D/Protein Kinase C-epsilon-Dependent Mechanism in Neurons2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 5, p. e0097129-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The intravenous anaesthetic propofol retracts neurites and reverses the transport of vesicles in rat cortical neurons. Orexin A (OA) is an endogenous neuropeptide regulating wakefulness and may counterbalance anaesthesia. We aim to investigate if OA interacts with anaesthetics by inhibition of the propofol-induced neurite retraction. Methods: In primary cortical cell cultures from newborn rats brains, live cell light microscopy was used to measure neurite retraction after propofol (2 mu M) treatment with or without OA (10 nM) application. The intracellular signalling involved was tested using a protein kinase C (PKC) activator [phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)] and inhibitors of Rho-kinase (HA-1077), phospholipase D (PLD) [5-fluoro-2-indolyl des-chlorohalopemide (FIPI)], PKC (staurosporine), and a PKC epsilon translocation inhibitor peptide. Changes in PKC epsilon Ser(729) phosphorylation were detected with Western blot. Results: The neurite retraction induced by propofol is blocked by Rho-kinase and PMA. OA blocks neurite retraction induced by propofol, and this inhibitory effect could be prevented by FIPI, staurosporine and PKC epsilon translocation inhibitor peptide. OA increases via PLD and propofol decreases PKC epsilon Ser(729) phosphorylation, a crucial step in the activation of PKC epsilon. Conclusions: Rho-kinase is essential for propofol-induced neurite retraction in cortical neuronal cells. Activation of PKC inhibits neurite retraction caused by propofol. OA blocks propofol-induced neurite retraction by a PLD/PKC epsilon-mediated pathway, and PKC epsilon maybe the key enzyme where the wakefulness and anaesthesia signal pathways converge.

  • 15.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Dags att folkbilda om smärta2016In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 10 AprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gender differences in dispensed analgesics in Sweden during 2006-2015 - an observational, nationwide, whole-population study2018In: International Journal of Women's Health, ISSN 1179-1411, E-ISSN 1179-1411, Vol. 10, p. 55-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A potentially illuminating way of looking at gender differences in health and disease is to study differences in drug utilization. The aim of this study was to describe gender differences in dispensed analgesics (including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]) in Sweden during 2006-2015.

  • 17.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Lättläst översikt om smärta2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, article id 112:DSUTArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Synliggör den osynliga smärtan2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    The Cerebrospinal Fluid in Severe Pain Conditions: Clinical, Pharmacological and Proteomic Aspects2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The treatment of both cancer pain and non-cancer chronic pain is still suboptimal. The overall aim of this PhD thesis was to conduct translational pain research at the interface between clinical pain medicine and the field of human proteomics, using the practice of intrathecal analgesia at our institution as a starting point. Hence, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is at the centre of the present dissertation, both as a target for infusing analgesics (Papers I and II – clinical and pharmacological aspects) and as an important biofluid for human biomarker studies (Papers III and IV – proteomic aspects). In Paper I, 28 cases of intrathecal analgesia in cancer patients were prospectively followed. Movement-evoked breakthrough pain remained a major clinical problem throughout the study month despite otherwise successful intrathecal analgesia (defined as good control of spontaneous resting pain paralleled by a marked decrease of concomitant systemic opioid doses). This study therefore illustrates the importance of considering not only spontaneous resting pain but also movement-evoked breakthrough pain.

    In Paper II, an expert-based algorithm for trialing the intrathecal analgesic ziconotide by bolus injections was evaluated in an open-label study of 23 patients with chronic neuropathic pain. We found few responders (13%) according to the strict criteria of the algorithm, but ziconotide bolus injection trialing seems feasible. The predictive power of ziconotide bolus trialing remains unclear, and the pharmacological profile of ziconotide (with very slow tissue penetration due to high hydrophilicity) calls the rationale for ziconotide bolus trialing into question.

    In Paper III, we found low levels of beta-endorphin in the CSF of chronic neuropathic pain patients (n=15) compared to healthy controls (n=19). We speculate that this might indicate dysfunctional top-down control of nociception. Substance P levels in the CSF did not differ by univariate statistics. In Paper IV, the CSF proteome of 11 patients with chronic neuropathic pain and 11 healthy controls was exploratively studied, combining gel-based proteomics with multivariate data analysis. After eliminating four proteins associated with age, 32 proteins were found to highly discriminate between groups. Among these, the seven proteins having the highest discriminatory power between patients and controls were: one isoform of angiotensinogen, two isoforms of alpha-1-antitrypsin, three isoforms of haptoglobin, and one isoform of pigment epithelium-derived factor.

    In conclusion, this PhD thesis demonstrates the fruitfulness of studying the CSF, both as a target for infusing analgesics and as a potential mirror of the neurobiological processes involved in pathological pain conditions. The thesis points to the need for more research into the mechanisms of different pain conditions, in order to hopefully achieve the vision of mechanism-based pain diagnoses.

    List of papers
    1. Movement-evoked breakthrough cancer pain despite intrathecal analgesia: a prospective series
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Movement-evoked breakthrough cancer pain despite intrathecal analgesia: a prospective series
    2011 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 55, no 9, p. 1139-1146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Intrathecal analgesia (ITA) is a valuable treatment option for intractable cancer-related pain. However, the issue of movement-evoked breakthrough pain (BTP) has not been specifically investigated in the ITA setting. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of ITA on spontaneous resting pain intensity (SRPI), doses of non-ITA opioids, and specifically on movement-evoked pain intensity (MEPI). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: We prospectively studied 28 consecutive patients who graded SRPI and MEPI on a 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS) at the time of ITA procedure, after 1 week, and after 1 month. Mild pain was defined as NRS andlt;= 3 and severe pain as NRS andgt;= 7. Concomitant doses of opioids were registered. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: After 1 week, no patient had severe SRPI compared with 31% before ITA, and the proportion of patients with mild SRPI had increased from 27% to 76%. Meanwhile, the median daily dose of non-ITA opioids decreased from 575 to 120 mg of oral morphine equivalents. The effect on SRPI and on doses of non-ITA opioids remained essentially unchanged during the study month, but the proportion of patients having severe MEPI did not change significantly: 44% still had severe MEPI after 1 week and 40% after 1 month. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Movement-evoked BTP was a major clinical problem throughout the study month despite otherwise successful ITA. Improving the quality of life of patients with intractable cancer-related pain should include developing strategies to better deal with movement-evoked BTP.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2011
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-71376 (URN)10.1111/j.1399-6576.2011.02510.x (DOI)000295102500015 ()
    Available from: 2011-10-14 Created: 2011-10-14 Last updated: 2017-12-08
    2. Ziconotide Trialing by Intrathecal Bolus Injections: An Open-Label Non-Randomized Clinical Trial in Postoperative/Posttraumatic Neuropathic Pain Patients Refractory to Conventional Treatment
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ziconotide Trialing by Intrathecal Bolus Injections: An Open-Label Non-Randomized Clinical Trial in Postoperative/Posttraumatic Neuropathic Pain Patients Refractory to Conventional Treatment
    2015 (English)In: Neuromodulation (Malden, Mass.), ISSN 1094-7159, E-ISSN 1525-1403, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 404-413Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this open-label, non-randomized, clinical trial was to evaluate the feasibility of trialing ziconotide by intrathecal bolus injections. Material and Methods: Twenty-three patients, who had peripheral neuropathic pain refractory to pharmacological treatment and were under consideration for Spinal Cord Stimulation, received up to three ziconotide bolus injections according to a comprehensive algorithm. After a first injection of 2.5g, the patients progressed in the algorithm depending on the presence or absence of pain reduction and significant adverse events. A patient was considered a "responder" if experiencing pain reduction and no significant adverse event on two consecutive occasions at the same dosage. Results: We found a low proportion of responders (13%). However 30% of patients experienced greater than= 30% pain reduction on a least one injection, yielding a number needed to treat of similar to 3 for clinically significant pain relief. Pain intensity changed significantly over time (0-6h) (p = 0.047) after a mean ziconotide dose of 2.75 mu g. Adverse events were as expected, and no serious adverse event occurred. We did not find any statistical association between response to Spinal Cord Stimulation and response to ziconotide. Conclusions: Ziconotide bolus injection trialing seems feasible, but the proportion of responders in the present study was low. Adverse events were as expected, and no serious adverse event occurred. The predictive power of ziconotide bolus trialing remains unclear, and the pharmacological profile of ziconotide (slow tissue penetration due to high hydrophilicity) calls the rationale for bolus trialing into question.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley, 2015
    Keywords
    Bolus; intrathecal; spinal; trialing; ziconotide
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine Basic Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120352 (URN)10.1111/ner.12293 (DOI)000357388400010 ()25879804 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland; Swedish Research Council

    Available from: 2015-07-31 Created: 2015-07-31 Last updated: 2018-01-11
    3. Do low levels of Beta-endorphin in the cerebrospinal fluid indicate defective top-down inhibition in patients with chronic neuropathic pain? A cross-sectional, comparative study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do low levels of Beta-endorphin in the cerebrospinal fluid indicate defective top-down inhibition in patients with chronic neuropathic pain? A cross-sectional, comparative study
    2014 (English)In: Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.), ISSN 1526-2375, E-ISSN 1526-4637, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 111-119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Pain medicine still lacks mechanism-specific biomarkers to guide diagnosis and treatment, and defective top-down modulation is an important factor in the pathophysiology of chronic pain conditions. Using modern analytical tools and advanced multivariate statistical analysis, the aim of this study was to revisit two classical potential biomarkers of pro- and anti-nociception in humans (substance P and beta-endorphin), focusing particularly on the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

    Design

    Cross-sectional, comparative, observational study.

    Subjects

    Patients with chronic, post-traumatic and/or post-surgical, neuropathic pain refractory to conventional treatment (N = 15) and healthy controls (N = 19) were included.

    Methods

    Samples were taken from CSF and blood, and levels of substance P and beta-endorphin were investigated using a Luminex technology kit.

    Results

    We found low levels of beta-endorphin in the CSF of neuropathic pain patients (66 ± 11 pcg/mL) compared with healthy controls (115 ± 14 pcg/mL) (P = 0.017). Substance P levels in the CSF did not differ (20 ± 2 pcg/mL, 26 ± 2, P = 0.08). However, our multivariate data analysis showed that belonging to the patient group was associated with low levels of both substances in the CSF. A higher correlation between the levels of beta-endorphin and substance P in CSF was found in healthy controls than in patients (rs = 0.725, P < 0.001 vs rs = 0.574, P = 0.032).

    Conclusions

    Patients with chronic neuropathic pain due to trauma or surgery had low levels of beta-endorphin in the CSF. We speculate that this could indicate a defective top-down modulation of pain in chronic neuropathic pain. Our results also illustrate the importance of taking a system-wide, multivariate approach when searching for biomarkers.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
    Keywords
    Beta-Endorphin; Biomarker; Cerebrospinal Fluid; Neuropathic; Pain; Substance P
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104231 (URN)10.1111/pme.12248 (DOI)000329756400011 ()
    Available from: 2014-02-12 Created: 2014-02-12 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Multivariate proteomic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with peripheral neuropathic pain and healthy controls: a hypothesis-generating pilot study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multivariate proteomic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with peripheral neuropathic pain and healthy controls: a hypothesis-generating pilot study
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 8, p. 321-333Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Pain medicine lacks objective biomarkers to guide diagnosis and treatment. Combining two-dimensional gel proteomics with multivariate data analysis by projection, we exploratively analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid of eleven patients with severe peripheral neuropathic pain due to trauma and/or surgery refractory to conventional treatment and eleven healthy controls. Using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, we identified a panel of 36 proteins highly discriminating between the two groups. Due to a possible confounding effect of age, a new model with age as outcome variable was computed for patients (n=11), and four out of 36 protein spots were excluded due to a probable influence of age. Of the 32 remaining proteins, the following seven had the highest discriminatory power between the two groups: an isoform of angiotensinogen (upregulated in patients), two isoforms of alpha-1-antitrypsin (downregulated in patients), three isoforms of haptoglobin (upregulated in patients), and one isoform of pigment epithelium-derived factor (downregulated in patients). It has recently been hypothesized that the renin–angiotensin system may play a role in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, and a clinical trial of an angiotensin II receptor antagonist was recently published. It is noteworthy that when searching for neuropathic pain biomarkers with a purely explorative methodology, it was indeed a renin–angiotensin system protein that had the highest discriminatory power between patients and controls in the present study. The results from this hypothesis-generating pilot study have to be confirmed in larger, hypothesis-driven studies with age-matched controls, but the present study illustrates the fruitfulness of combining proteomics with multivariate data analysis in hypothesis-generating pain biomarker studies in humans.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Dovepress, 2015
    Keywords
    Cerebrospinal fluid, multivariate data analysis, neuropathic pain, proteomics
    National Category
    Nursing Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121493 (URN)10.2147/JPR.S82970 (DOI)000364718500002 ()26170714 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council; Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research [2010-0913]; County Council of Ostergotland (Sinnescentrum); Halsofonden foundation

    Available from: 2015-09-22 Created: 2015-09-22 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
  • 20.
    Cecconi, M
    et al.
    1Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, St George’s Hospital and St George’s University of London, London, UK,.
    Hochrieser, H
    Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems .
    Chew, Michelle
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care and Institute of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Grocott, M
    Anaesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK, .
    Hoeft, A
    Department of Anaesthesiology, University of Bonn,Bonn, Germany, .
    Hoste, A
    Intensive Care Unit, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Jammer, I
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen 5021, Norway .
    Posch, M
    Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, .
    Metnitz, P
    Clinical Department of General Anaesthesiology, Emergency- and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, LKH - University Hospital of Graz, Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Pelosi, P
    9Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, IRCCS San Martino IST, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy .
    Moreno, R
    Hospital de São José, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central, EPE, UCINC, Lisbon, Portugal .
    Pearse, R M
    Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK, .
    Vincent, J L
    Department of Intensive Care, Erasme Hospital Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium .
    Rhodes, A
    Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, St George’s Hospital and St George’s University of London, London, UK.
    Preoperative abnormalities in serum sodium concentrations are associated with higher in-hospital mortality in patients undergoing major surgery.2016In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 116, no 1, p. 63-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Abnormal serum sodium concentrations are common in patients presenting for surgery. It remains unclear whether these abnormalities are independent risk factors for postoperative mortality.

    METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of the European Surgical Outcome Study (EuSOS) that provided data describing 46 539 patients undergoing inpatient non-cardiac surgery. Patients were included in this study if they had a recorded value of preoperative serum sodium within the 28 days immediately before surgery. Data describing preoperative risk factors and serum sodium concentrations were analysed to investigate the relationship with in-hospital mortality using univariate and multivariate logistic regression techniques.

    RESULTS: Of 35 816 (77.0%) patients from the EuSOS database, 21 943 (61.3%) had normal values of serum sodium (138-142 mmol litre(-1)) before surgery, 8538 (23.8%) had hyponatraemia (serum sodium ≤137 mmol litre(-1)) and 5335 (14.9%) had hypernatraemia (serum sodium ≥143 mmol litre(-1)). After adjustment for potential confounding factors, moderate to severe hypernatraemia (serum sodium concentration ≥150 mmol litre(-1)) was independently associated with mortality [odds ratio 3.4 (95% confidence interval 2.0-6.0), P<0.0001]. Hyponatraemia was not associated with mortality.

    CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative abnormalities in serum sodium concentrations are common, and hypernatraemia is associated with increased mortality after surgery. Abnormalities of serum sodium concentration may be an important biomarker of perioperative risk resulting from co-morbid disease.

  • 21.
    Chen, Ke-Ling
    et al.
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Lv, Zhao-Ying
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Hong-Wei
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Yong
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Long, Fei-Wu
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Bin
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Peng, Zhi-Hai
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Zong-Guang
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Li, Yuan
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Effects of Tocilizumab on Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis and Associated Acute Lung Injury2016In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 44, no 8, p. E664-E677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the therapeutic effects of tocilizumab, an antibody against interleukin-6 receptor, on experimental severe acute pancreatitis and associated acute lung injury. The optimal dose of tocilizumab and the activation of interleukin-6 inflammatory signaling were also investigated. Design: Randomized experiment. Setting: Research laboratory at a university hospital. Subject: Experimental severe acute pancreatitis in rats. Interventions: Severe acute pancreatitis was induced by retrograde injection of sodium taurocholate (50 mg/kg) into the biliopancreatic duct. In dose-study, rats were administered with different doses of tocilizumab (1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 mg/kg) through the tail vein after severe acute pancreatitis induction. In safety-study, rats without severe acute pancreatitis induction were treated with high doses of tocilizumab (8, 16, 32, and 64 mg/kg). Serum and tissue samples of rats in time-study were collected for biomolecular and histologic evaluations at different time points (2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 hr). Measurements and Main Results: 1) Under the administration of tocilizumab, histopathological scores of pancreas and lung were decreased, and severity parameters related to severe acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury, including serum amylase, C-reactive protein, lung surfactant protein level, and myeloperoxidase activity, were all significant alleviated in rat models. 2) Dose-study demonstrated that 2 mg/kg tocilizumab was the optimal treatment dose. 3) Basing on multi-organ pathologic evaluation, physiological and biochemical data, no adverse effect and toxicity of tocilizumab were observed in safety-study. 4) Pancreatic nuclear factor-kappa B and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 were deactivated, and the serum chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 was down-regulated after tocilizumab administration. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated tocilizumab, as a marketed drug commonly used for immune-mediated diseases, was safe and effective for the treatment of experimental severe acute pancreatitis and associated acute lung injury. Our findings provide experimental evidences for potential clinical application of tocilizumab in severe acute pancreatitis and associated complications.

  • 22.
    Chew, Michelle
    Operations- och intensivvårdskliniken, Hallands sjukhus, Halmstad.
    Snabb behandling vid septisk chock räddar liv: Även om "early goal-directed therapy"-protokoll inte ger effekt i nya studier2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, no 112, p. 1-2, article id DFUCArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Chew, Michelle S
    et al.
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Hallands sjukhus Halmstad.
    Mangelus, Claes
    From the Swedish Perioperative Register, Uppsala Clinical Research Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Enlund, Gunnar
    From the Swedish Perioperative Register, Uppsala Clinical Research Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Spetz, Peter
    From the Swedish Perioperative Register, Uppsala Clinical Research Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lyckner, Sara
    From the Swedish Perioperative Register, Uppsala Clinical Research Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Surgery was successful--but how did it go for the patient? Experiences from and hopes for the Swedish Perioperative Register.2015In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 453-454Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    De Geer, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Cardiac dysfunction in septic shock: Observational studies on characteristics and outcome2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cardiac dysfunction is a well-known complication of sepsis, but its characteristics and consequences, especially on a longer term, remain unclear. The aim of this thesis was to study the characteristics and the implications of cardiac dysfunction for outcome in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with septic shock.

    Purpose: First, to assess the ability of a cardiac biomarker to predict outcome in ICU patients. Second, to characterise cardiac dysfunction in septic shock using speckle tracking echocardiography. Third, to investigate the reliability of echocardiographic methods used to describe cardiac dysfunction in septic shock. Fourth, to study long-term cardiac outcome in severe sepsis and septic shock patients.

    Materials and methods: The cardiac biomarker amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) was collected in 481 patients on ICU admission and its ability to predict death was assessed. In 50 patients with septic shock, echocardiography was performed on ICU admission and was repeated during and after ICU stay. Measurements of cardiac strain using speckle tracking echocardiography were assessed in relation to other echocardiographic function parameters, NT-proBNP and severity of illness scores, and their change over time was analysed. Echocardiograms from patients with septic shock were independently evaluated by two physicians and the results analysed regarding measurement variability. A nationwide-registry-based open cohort of 9,520 severe sepsis and septic shock ICU patients discharged alive from the ICU was analysed together with a non-septic control group matched for age, sex and severity of illness. In patients who died after ICU discharge, information on causes of death was collected.

    Results: A discriminatory level of significance of NT-proBNP on ICU admission was identified at ≥1,380 ng/L, above which NT-proBNP was an independent predictor of death. With increasing levels of NT-proBNP, patients were more severely ill, had a longer ICU stay and were more often admitted with septic shock. Cardiac strain was frequently impaired in septic shock patients but was not superior to other echocardiographic measurements in detecting cardiac dysfunction. Cardiac strain correlated with other echocardiographic function parameters and with NT-proBNP, and was the least user-dependent echocardiographic parameter in septic shock patients. Cardiac strain remained unchanged over time, did not differ between survivors and non-survivors and could not predict an increased risk of death. During a follow-up of up to nearly 6 years after ICU discharge, 3,954 (42%) of sepsis patients died, 654 (17%) with cardiac failure as the cause of death. With increasing severity of illness on admission, the risk of death with cardiac failure as the cause of death after ICU discharge increased. In comparison to other ICU patients with similar severity of illness, however, the risk of death due to cardiac was not increased in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock.

    Conclusions: Laboratory or echocardiographic signs of cardiac dysfunction are commonly seen in ICU patients in general and in septic shock patients in particular. The assessment of cardiac dysfunction in patients with septic shock is, however, complicated by pre-existing comorbidities, by treatment given in the ICU and by critical illness in itself. Signs of cardiac dysfunction, and the increasing risk of death related to cardiac failure seen after remission of sepsis, may therefore be reflections of critical illness per se, rather than of sepsis.

    List of papers
    1. Amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide as a predictor of outcome in patients admitted to intensive care. A prospective observational study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide as a predictor of outcome in patients admitted to intensive care. A prospective observational study
    2012 (English)In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 275-279Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Amino-terminal pro-brain-type natriuretic peptide is known to predict outcome in patients with heart failure, but its role in an intensive care setting is not yet fully established. Objective: To assess the incidence of elevated amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) on admission to intensive care and its relation to death in the ICU and within 30 days. Design: Prospective, observational cohort study. Setting: A mixed noncardiothoracic tertiary ICU in Sweden. Patients and main outcome measures NT-pro-BNP was collected from 481 consecutive patients on admission to intensive care, in addition to data on patient characteristics and outcome. A receiver-operating characteristic curve was used to identify a discriminatory level of significance, a stepwise logistic regression analysis to correct for other clinical factors and a Kaplan-Meier analysis to assess survival. The correlation between Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) 3, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score (SOFA) and NT-pro-BNP was analysed using Spearmans correlation test. Quartiles of NT-pro-BNP elevation were compared for baseline data and outcome using a logistic regression model. Results: An NT-pro-BNP more than 1380 ng l(-1) on admission was an independent predictor of death in the ICU and within 30 days [odds ratio (OR) 2.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.5 to 4.4] and was present in 44% of patients. Thirty-three percent of patients with NT-pro-BNP more than 1380 ng l(-1), and 14.6% of patients below that threshold died within 30 days (log rank P 0.005). NT-pro-BNP correlated moderately with SAPS 3 and with SOFA on admission (Spearmans rho 0.5552 and 0.5129, respectively). In quartiles of NT-pro-BNP elevation on admission, severity of illness and mortality increased significantly (30-day mortality 36.1%; OR 3.9; 95% CI, 2.0 to 7.3 in the quartile with the highest values, vs. 12.8% in the lowest quartile). Conclusion: We conclude that NT-pro-BNP is commonly elevated on admission to intensive care, that it increases with severity of illness and that it is an independent predictor of mortality.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins / Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
    Keywords
    brain natriuretic peptide, intensive care, survival rate
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78569 (URN)10.1097/EJA.0b013e32835470a8 (DOI)000304436100005 ()
    Available from: 2012-06-15 Created: 2012-06-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    2. Strain echocardiography in septic shock - a comparison with systolic and diastolic function parameters, cardiac biomarkers and outcome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strain echocardiography in septic shock - a comparison with systolic and diastolic function parameters, cardiac biomarkers and outcome
    2015 (English)In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Myocardial dysfunction is a well-known complication in septic shock but its characteristics and frequency remains elusive. Here, we evaluate global longitudinal peak strain (GLPS) of the left ventricle as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in septic shock.

    METHODS: Fifty adult patients with septic shock admitted to a general intensive care unit were included. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed on the first day, and repeated during and after ICU stay. Laboratory and clinical data and data on outcome were collected daily from admission and up to 7 days, shorter in cases of death or ICU discharge. The correlation of GLPS to left ventricular systolic and diastolic function parameters, cardiac biomarkers and clinical data were compared using Spearman's correlation test and linear regression analysis, and the ability of GLPS to predict outcome was evaluated using a logistic regression model.

    RESULTS: On the day of admission, there was a strong correlation and co-linearity of GLPS to left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), mitral annular motion velocity (é) and to amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) (Spearman's ρ -0.70, -0.53 and 0.54, and R(2) 0.49, 0.20 and 0.24, respectively). In LVEF and NT-proBNP there was a significant improvement during the study period (analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures, p = 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively), but not in GLPS, which remained unchanged over time (p = 0.10). GLPS did not correlate to the improvement in clinical characteristics over time, did not differ significantly between survivors and non-survivors (-17.4 (-20.5-(-13.7)) vs. -14.7 (-19.0 - (-10.6)), p = 0.11), and could not predict mortality.

    CONCLUSIONS: GLPS is frequently reduced in septic shock patients, alone or in combination with reduced LVEF and/or é. It correlates with LVEF, é and NT-proBNP, and remains affected over time. GLPS may provide further understanding on the character of myocardial dysfunction in septic shock.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2015
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115750 (URN)10.1186/s13054-015-0857-1 (DOI)000352053300001 ()25777932 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-03-18 Created: 2015-03-18 Last updated: 2017-12-04
    3. Variability in echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular function in septic shock patients
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Variability in echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular function in septic shock patients
    2015 (English)In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 19-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Echocardiography is increasingly used for haemodynamic evaluation and titration of therapy in intensive care, warranting reliable and reproducible measurements. The aim of this study was to evaluate the observer dependence of echocardiographic findings of left ventricular (LV) diastolic and systolic dysfunction in patients with septic shock.

    METHODS: Echocardiograms performed in 47 adult patients admitted with septic shock to a general intensive care unit (ICU) were independently evaluated by one cardiologist and one intensivist for the following signs: decreased diastolic tissue velocity of the base of the LV septum (e), increased early mitral inflow (E) to e ratio (E/e), decreased LV ejection fraction (EF) and decreased LV global longitudinal peak strain (GLPS). Diastolic dysfunction was defined as e <8.0cm/s and/or E/e [greater than or equal to]15 and systolic dysfunction as EF <50% and/or GLPS>15%. Ten randomly selected examinations were re-analysed two months later. Pearson’s r was used to test the correlation and Bland-Altman plots to assess the agreement between observers. Kappa statistics were used to test the consistency between readers and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for inter- and intraobserver variability.

    RESULTS: In 44 patients (94%), image quality was sufficient for echocardiographic measurements. The agreement between observers was moderate (k=0.60 for e, k=0.50 for E/e and k=0.60 for EF) to good (k=0.71 for GLPS). Pearson’s r was 0.76 for e, 0.85 for E/e, 0.78 for EF and 0.84 for GLPS (p<0.001 for all four). The ICC between observers for e was very good (0.85; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73-0.92), good for E/e (0.70; 95% CI 0.45 - 0.84), very good for EF (0.87; 95% CI 0.77 - 0.93), excellent for GLPS (0.91; 95% CI 0.74 - 0.95), and very good for all measures repeated by one of the observers. On Bland-Altman analysis, the mean differences and 95% limits of agreement for e, E/e, EF and GLPS were 0.01 (0.04 - 0.07), 2.0 (14.2 - 18.1), 0.86 (16 - 14.3) and 0.04 (5.04 - 5.12), respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS: Moderate observer-related differences in assessing LV dysfunction were seen. GLPS is the least user dependent and most reproducible echocardiographic measurement of LV function in septic shock.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2015
    National Category
    Nursing Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117725 (URN)10.1186/s12947-015-0015-6 (DOI)000352845000001 ()25880324 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-05-07 Created: 2015-05-07 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    4. Cardiac mortality after severe sepsis and septic shock: A nationwide observational cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiac mortality after severe sepsis and septic shock: A nationwide observational cohort study
    2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Cardiac dysfunction is a well-known complication of sepsis, but its long-term consequences remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate cardiac outcome after sepsis by assessing causes of death in a nationwide register-based cohort.

    Methods: A cohort of 9,520 severe sepsis and septic shock intensive care (ICU) patients without preceding severe cardiac failure and discharged alive from the ICU was collected from the Swedish Intensive Care Registry (SIR) from 2008 to 2013, together with a nonseptic control group (n = 4,577). Patients were matched according to age, sex and severity of illness. Information on cause of death after ICU discharge was sought in the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare’s Cause of Death Registry.

    Results: After ICU discharge, 3,954 (42%) of severe sepsis or septic shock patients died. In 654 (16%) of these, cardiac failure was registered as the cause of death. The follow-up time was 17,693 person-years (median 583 days/person; maximum 5.7 years) and the median (IQR) time from ICU discharge to cardiac failure-related death 81 (17 - 379) days. With increasing severity of illness (quartiles of SAPS3), the hazard rate for cardiac failure-related death increased (hazard ratio (HR) 1.58 (95% CI 1.19 - 2.09, p <0.001) in the highest quartile compared to the lowest). In a matched comparison between severe sepsis or septic shock patients and controls, survival was similar, and the hazard rate for cardiac failurerelated death did not differ between groups (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.88 – 1.10, p = 0.62).

    Conclusions: The risk of death with cardiac failure as the cause of death after severe sepsis or septic shock increases with severity of illness on admission. Patients with severe sepsis or septic shock are not, however, at an increased risk of death with cardiac failure as the cause of death when compared to other ICU patients with similar severity of illness.

    Keywords
    Shock, septic; Heart failure; Intensive care; Outcome
    National Category
    Nursing Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122757 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-11-20 Created: 2015-11-20 Last updated: 2015-11-20Bibliographically approved
  • 25.
    de Geer, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Oscarsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Lung ultrasound in quantifying lung water in septic shock patients2015In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 140-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantification of lung ultrasound (LUS) artifacts (B-lines) is used to assess pulmonary congestion in emergency medicine and cardiology [1,2]. We investigated B-lines in relation to extravascular lung-water index (EVLWI) from invasive transpulmonary thermodilution in septic shock patients. Our aim was to evaluate the role of LUS in an intensive care setting.

  • 26.
    de Geer, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Walther, Sten M.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    No association with cardiac death after sepsis: A nationwide observational cohort study2019In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 344-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac dysfunction is a well-known complication of sepsis, but its long-term consequences and implications for patients remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate cardiac outcome in sepsis by assessing causes of death up to 2 years after treatment in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in a nationwide register-based cohort collected from the Swedish Intensive Care Registry.

    METHODS: A cohort of 13 669 sepsis and septic shock ICU patients from 2008 to 2014 was collected together with a non-septic control group, matched regarding age, sex and severity of illness (n = 6582), and all without preceding severe cardiac disease. For a large proportion of the severe sepsis and septic shock patients (n = 7087), no matches were found. Information on causes of death up to 2 years after ICU admission was sought in the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare's Cause of Death Registry.

    RESULTS: Intensive Care Unit mortality was nearly identical in a matched comparison of sepsis patients to controls (24% in both groups) but higher in more severely ill sepsis patients for whom no matches were found (33% vs 24%, P < 0.001). There was no association of sepsis to cardiac deaths in the first month (OR 1.03, 95%CI 0.87 to 1.20, P = 0.76) nor up to 2 years after ICU admission (OR 1.01, 95%CI 0.82 to 1.25, P = 0.94) in an adjusted between-group comparison.

    CONCLUSIONS: There was no association with an increased risk of death related to cardiac disease in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock when compared to other ICU patients with similar severity of illness.

  • 27.
    De Hert, Stefan
    et al.
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Staender, Sven
    Reg Hosp Mannedorf Zurich, Switzerland; Paracelsus Med Univ Salzburg, Austria.
    Fritsch, Gerhard
    Paracelsus Med Univ Salzburg, Austria; AUVA Traumactr Vienna, Austria.
    Hinkelbein, Jochen
    Univ Hosp Cologne, Germany.
    Afshari, Arash
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bettelli, Gabriella
    Univ San Marino, San Marino.
    Bock, Matthias
    Paracelsus Med Univ Salzburg, Austria; Merano Hosp Franz Tappeiner, Italy.
    Chew, Michelle
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Coburn, Mark
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Germany.
    De Robertis, Edoardo
    Univ Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Drinhaus, Hendrik
    Univ Hosp Cologne, Germany.
    Feldheiser, Aarne
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Geldner, Gotz
    RKH Klinikum Ludwigsburg, Germany.
    Lahner, Daniel
    AUVA Traumactr Vienna, Austria; Ludwig Boltzmann Inst Expt and Clin Traumatol, Austria.
    Macas, Andrius
    Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Lithuania.
    Neuhaus, Christopher
    Univ Hosp Heidelberg, Germany.
    Rauch, Simon
    Merano Hosp Franz Tappeiner, Italy; EURAC Res, Italy.
    Santos-Ampuero, Maria Angeles
    Hosp Schwyz, Switzerland.
    Solca, Maurizio
    Danube Univ Krems, Austria.
    Tanha, Nima
    Not Found:Linkoping Univ, Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia and Intens Care, Linkoping, Sweden; Linkoping Univ, Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Med and Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Traskaite, Vilma
    Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Lithuania.
    Wagner, Gernot
    Danube Univ Krems, Austria.
    Wappler, Frank
    Univ Witten Herdecke, Germany.
    Pre-operative evaluation of adults undergoing elective noncardiac surgery Updated guideline from the European Society of Anaesthesiology2018In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 407-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this update of the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) guidelines on the pre-operative evaluation of the adult undergoing noncardiac surgery is to present recommendations based on the available relevant clinical evidence. Well performed randomised studies on the topic are limited and therefore many recommendations rely to a large extent on expert opinion and may need to be adapted specifically to the healthcare systems of individual countries. This article aims to provide an overview of current knowledge on the subject with an assessment of the quality of the evidence in order to allow anaesthesiologists all over Europe to integrate - wherever possible - this knowledge into daily patient care. The Guidelines Committee of the ESA formed a task force comprising members of the previous task force, members of ESA scientific subcommittees and an open call for volunteers was made to all individual active members of the ESA and national societies. Electronic databases were searched from July 2010 (end of the literature search of the previous ESA guidelines on pre-operative evaluation) to May 2016 without language restrictions. A total of 34066 abtracts were screened from which 2536 were included for further analysis. Relevant systematic reviews with meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional surveys were selected. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used to assess the level of evidence and to grade recommendations. The final draft guideline was posted on the ESA website for 4 weeks and the link was sent to all ESA members, individual or national (thus including most European national anaesthesia societies). Comments were collated and the guidelines amended as appropriate. When the final draft was complete, the Guidelines Committee and ESA Board ratified the guidelines.

  • 28.
    Dhanani, Jayesh A
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. jadhanani@hotmail.com; Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. jadhanani@hotmail.com; Critical Care Research Group, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Cohen, Jeremy
    Faculty of Medicine, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Brisbane, Australia.
    Parker, Suzanne L
    Faculty of Medicine, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Chan, Hak-Kim
    Advanced Drug Delivery Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Tang, Patricia
    Advanced Drug Delivery Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Ahern, Benjamin J
    Faculty of Science, School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, Australia.
    Khan, Adeel
    Faculty of Science, School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, Australia.
    Bhatt, Manoj
    Department of Nuclear Medicine and Specialised PET Services Queensland, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Herston, Queensland, Australia; School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia.
    Goodman, Steven
    Department of Nuclear Medicine and Specialised PET Services Queensland, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
    Diab, Sara
    Critical Care Research Group, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Chaudhary, Jivesh
    Critical Care Research Group, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Lipman, Jeffrey
    Faculty of Medicine, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Brisbane, Australia; Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Wallis, Steven C
    Faculty of Medicine, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Barnett, Adrian
    Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation and School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Brisbane, Australia.
    Chew, Michelle S
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Fraser, John F
    Critical Care Research Group, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Roberts, Jason A
    Faculty of Medicine, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Brisbane, Australia; Centre for Translational Anti-infective Pharmacodynamics, School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Pharmacy, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Brisbane, Australia.
    A research pathway for the study of the delivery and disposition of nebulised antibiotics: an incremental approach from in vitro to large animal models2018In: Intensive Care Medicine Experimental, ISSN 1646-2335, E-ISSN 2197-425X, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nebulised antibiotics are frequently used for the prevention or treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Many factors may influence pulmonary drug concentrations with inaccurate dosing schedules potentially leading to therapeutic failure and/or the emergence of antibiotic resistance. We describe a research pathway for studying the pharmacokinetics of a nebulised antibiotic during mechanical ventilation using in vitro methods and ovine models, using tobramycin as the study antibiotic.

  • 29.
    Dhanani, Jayesh A.
    et al.
    Univ Queensland, Australia; Royal Brisbane and Womens Hosp, Australia.
    Diab, Sara
    Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Chaudhary, Jivesh
    Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Cohen, Jeremy
    Univ Queensland, Australia; Royal Brisbane and Womens Hosp, Australia.
    Parker, Suzanne L.
    Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Wallis, Steven C.
    Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Boidin, Clement
    Univ Queensland, Australia; Civil Hosp Lyon, France; Claude Bernard Univ Lyon 1, France.
    Barnett, Adrian
    Queensland Univ Technol, Australia; Queensland Univ Technol, Australia.
    Chew, Michelle
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Roberts, Jason A.
    Univ Queensland, Australia; Royal Brisbane and Womens Hosp, Australia; Royal Brisbane and Womens Hosp, Australia.
    Fraser, John F.
    Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Lung Pharmacokinetics of Tobramycin by Intravenous and Nebulized Dosing in a Mechanically Ventilated Healthy Ovine Model2019In: Anesthesiology, ISSN 0003-3022, E-ISSN 1528-1175, Vol. 131, no 2, p. 344-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Editors PerspectiveWhat We Already Know about This Topic For most bacterial pneumonia, the lung interstitium is considered to be the site of infection, and adequate antibiotic concentrations are important for drug effect Despite systemic antibiotic therapy, therapeutic failure is common, perhaps due to poor lung penetration, and resulting low interstitial space fluid antibiotic concentrations Increasing systemic antibiotic doses in order to increase interstitial space fluid antibiotic concentrations could lead to toxicities such as nephrotoxicity What This Article Tells Us That Is New In a mechanically ventilated healthy large animal model, nebulized tobramycin produced higher peak lung interstitial space fluid concentrations, as well as higher initial epithelial lining fluid concentrations, with lower plasma concentrations than were observed after intravenous administration due to more extensive lung penetration Background: Nebulized antibiotics may be used to treat ventilator-associated pneumonia. In previous pharmacokinetic studies, lung interstitial space fluid concentrations have never been reported. The aim of the study was to compare intravenous and nebulized tobramycin concentrations in the lung interstitial space fluid, epithelial lining fluid, and plasma in mechanically ventilated sheep with healthy lungs. Methods: Ten anesthetized and mechanically ventilated healthy ewes underwent surgical insertion of microdialysis catheters in upper and lower lobes of both lungs and the jugular vein. Five ewes were given intravenous tobramycin 400 mg, and five were given nebulized tobramycin 400 mg. Microdialysis samples were collected every 20 min for 8 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed at 1 and 6 h. Results: The peak lung interstitial space fluid concentrations were lower with intravenous tobramycin 20.2 mg/l (interquartile range, 12 mg/l, 26.2 mg/l) versus the nebulized route 48.3 mg/l (interquartile range, 8.7 mg/l, 513 mg/l), P = 0.002. For nebulized tobramycin, the median epithelial lining fluid concentrations were higher than the interstitial space fluid concentrations at 1 h (1,637; interquartile range, 650, 1,781, vs. 16 mg/l, interquartile range, 7, 86, P amp;lt; 0.001) and 6 h (48, interquartile range, 17, 93, vs. 4 mg/l, interquartile range, 2, 9, P amp;lt; 0.001). For intravenous tobramycin, the median epithelial lining fluid concentrations were lower than the interstitial space fluid concentrations at 1 h (0.19, interquartile range, 0.11, 0.31, vs. 18.5 mg/l, interquartile range, 9.8, 23.4, P amp;lt; 0.001) and 6 h (0.34, interquartile range, 0.2, 0.48, vs. 3.2 mg/l, interquartile range, 0.9, 4.4, P amp;lt; 0.001). Conclusions: Compared with intravenous tobramycin, nebulized tobramycin achieved higher lung interstitial fluid and epithelial lining fluid concentrations without increasing systemic concentrations.

  • 30.
    Elawa, Sherif
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Intestinal obstruction following harvest of VRAM-flap for reconstruction of a large perineal defect2015In: Case Reports in Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2332-0885, Vol. 2, no 3-4, p. 88-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A patient with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum was operated with abdominoperineal resection and perineal reconstruction with a vertical rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. Six days postoperatively, there was herniation of the small bowel, between the anterior and posterior rectus sheaths, to a subcutaneous location.

  • 31.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Changes in patterns of treatment of burned children at the Linkoping Burn Centre, Sweden, 2009-20142017In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 1111-1119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Children are a relatively large group among patients with burns in Sweden. We changed the management of childrens burns to a flexible, outpatient-based plan. The aim was to follow up the outpatient management for childrens burns during the period 20092014, and track it, to find out to what extent the patients had been treated flexibly as outpatients, and to clarify the reasons behind those who did not fit in the plan. Methods: Descriptive retrospective analysis dividing the patients into three groups: inpatients only, flexible management, and outpatients. Other variables recorded included: age, sex, percentage total body surface area burned (TBSA%), percentage full thickness burn (FTB%), cause of burn, county of residence, operations required, number of visits to the outpatient department, costs, and duration of overnight stay in the hospital. Results: The study group included 620 children: nine were managed strictly as inpatients, 204 as flexible outpatients, and 407 strictly as outpatients. Among the total there were 269 children who came from remote areas (43%), and of these 260 were treated as outpatients and flexible outpatients. Median TBSA% in the whole group was 1 (10th-90th centile 0-9) with the biggest median TBSA% 12 (5-38) in the inpatient group. The most common cause of injury was scalds (332/620,-54%). Costs/patient (US$) was lower in the flexible outpatient group than in the inpatient group (median 10 557 (3213-35802) and 35343 (7344-66554), respectively). Conclusion: Based on the results, we expect that the flexible outpatient treatment plan for children with minor to moderate burns can be expanded in the future. The results encourage us to continue the service and to further reduce duration of stay in hospital below the level already achieved (25% of the whole period of care). (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 32.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Latini, Francesco
    Department of Neuroscience, Section of Neurosurgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Neuroscience, Section of Neurology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Neuroimaging in the Kleine-Levin Syndrome2018In: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports, ISSN 1528-4042, E-ISSN 1534-6293, Vol. 18, no 9, article id 58Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose was to review the most recent literature on neuroimaging in the Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS). We aimed to investigate if frontotemporal and thalamic dysfunction are key KLS signatures, and if recent research indicates other brain networks of interest that elucidate KLS symptomatology and aetiology. In a comprehensive literature search, we found 12 original articles published 2013-2018. Most studies report deviations related to cerebral perfusion, glucose metabolism, or blood-oxygen-level-dependent responses in frontotemporal areas and/or the thalamus. Studies also report dysfunction in the temporoparietal junction and the oculomotor network that also were related to clinical parameters. We discuss these findings based on recent research on thalamocortical networks and brain stem white matter tracts. The hypothesis of frontotemporal and thalamic involvement in KLS was confirmed, and additional findings in the temporoparietal junction and the oculomotor system suggest a broader network involvement, which can be investigated by future high-resolution and multimodal imaging.

  • 33.
    Fredriksson, Alexandru Grigorescu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Trzebiatowska-Krzynska, Aleksandra
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Turbulent kinetic energy in the right ventricle: Potential MR marker for risk stratification of adults with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot2018In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 1043-1053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess right ventricular (RV) turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in patients with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot (rToF) and a spectrum of pulmonary regurgitation (PR), as well as to investigate the relationship between these 4D flow markers and RV remodeling.

    Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with rToF and 10 healthy controls were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups based on PR fraction: one lower PR fraction group (11%) and one higher PR fraction group (>11%). Field strength/sequences: 3D cine phase contrast (4D flow), 2D cine phase contrast (2D flow), and balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) at 1.5T. Assessment: The RV volume was segmented in the morphologic short-axis images and TKE parameters were computed inside the segmented RV volume throughout diastole. Statistical tests: One-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post-hoc test; unpaired t-test; Pearson correlation coefficients; simple and stepwise multiple regression models; intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC).

    Results: The higher PR fraction group had more remodeled RVs (140 6 25 vs. 107 6 22 [lower PR fraction, P < 0.01] and 93 6 15 ml/m2[healthy, P < 0.001] for RV end-diastolic volume index [RVEDVI]) and higher TKE values (5.95 6 3.15 vs. 2.23 6 0.81 [lower PR fraction, P < 0.01] and 1.91 6 0.78 mJ [healthy, P < 0.001] for Peak Total RV TKE). Multiple regression analysis between RVEDVI and 4D/2D flow parameters showed that Peak Total RV TKE was the strongest predictor of RVEDVI (R25 0.47, P 5 0.002).

    Conclusion: The 4D flow-specific TKE markers showed a slightly stronger association with RV remodeling than conventional 2D flow PR parameters. These results suggest novel hemodynamic aspects of PR in the development of late complications after ToF repair.

  • 34.
    Golster, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Seven years of patient-controlled epidural analgesia in a Swedish hospital A prospective survey2014In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 31, no 11, p. 589-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Epidural analgesia for postoperative pain relief needs to be monitored regularly in order to evaluate benefits and avoid potential hazards. OBJECTIVES To evaluate efficacy and safety profile of a ward- based regimen for postoperative epidural analgesia combining patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) and continuous epidural infusion (CEI). DESIGN We conducted a prospective survey in all patients who received postoperative epidural analgesia between March 2004 and February 2011. PATIENTS We analysed 4663 patients undergoing elective and acute surgery. SETTING University hospital in Sweden. RESULTS The median level of catheter insertion ranged from T8 in high abdominal surgery to T11 in gynaecological surgery. Mean infusion rate was 5.4 +/- 1.6ml h (-1) and was adjusted for age. Mean duration was 3.3 +/- 2.1 days. Eighty-seven percent of the patients rated satisfaction 8 to 10 out of 10 on a post-treatment scale. Reasons for termination were elective in 77.1%, due to inadequate pain relief in 11.4%, due to suspected infection in 0.7% and due to other causes in 10.9%. Of the latter, dislodgement of the catheter (4.0%) and leakage from the puncture site (1.4%) dominated. Catheter reinsertion was performed in 5.3% of the patients, and in 5.0%, the treatment was converted into an intravenous (i. v.) morphine patientcontrolled analgesia regimen. The incidence of motor blockade was 1.7%, sedation 2.1%, nausea 12.8% and pruritus 18.8%. Bolus doses accounted for 16% of the total infusion volume. No epidural haematoma was seen. One epidural abscess requiring antibiotic treatment occurred. CONCLUSION Our prospective survey indicates that PCEA in combination with CEI is effective and relatively well tolerated. The incidence of side effects is generally low and severe adverse events very rare.

  • 35.
    Grossmann, Benjamin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Procedural sedation: Aspects on methods, safety and effectiveness2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Safety and effectiveness are fundamental principles within the healthcare sector to provide quality of care and health improvement for patients. By ensuring that care is provided based on evidence-based knowledge, risks and complications can be minimised and the use of scarce resources optimised. An increasing demand for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures challenges the traditional methods for sedation regarding safety and effectiveness. It is desirable that the fundamental principles are improved when refining existing or developing new sedation methods. In this doctoral thesis, safety and effectiveness were evaluated for adult patient-controlled sedation (PCS) using propofol during two endoscopic procedures: endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) and flexible bronchoscopy (FB); and different doses of rectal racemic ketamine for paediatric (< 4 years) burn wound care.

    Methods: Data on vital functions, sedation level, safety interventions, procedure feasibility, patient-reported outcome and experience measures, and recovery, from three clinical randomised controlled trials were collected. Costs of sedation for the endoscopic procedures were compiled in a cost-analysis study.

    Results: PCS with propofol and bedside anaesthetic personnel was shown to be a safe and effective alternative method of sedation during ERCP and FB compared with intravenous sedation with midazolam. The PCS method gives stable cardiorespiratory conditions with few adverse events and interventions, with a low risk of oversedation. PCS offers similar (FB) or better (ERCP) procedure feasibility and patient satisfaction during the procedures than midazolam. Recovery after PCS is quick, minimises the risk for prolonged hospitalisation and is thereby a potential cost-saving sedation method. The optimal dose of rectal racemic ketamine, 6 mg/kg with the addition of 0.5 mg/kg midazolam during severely painful procedures, gives minimal risk for outbreaks of pain, offers stable vital signs conditions and allows rapid recovery without affecting procedure feasibility.

    Conclusions: The sedation method can be adjusted to type of procedure and patient population. PCS with propofol offers an alternative and reliable method for adult sedation during endoscopic procedures, whereas rectal racemic ketamine combined with midazolam provides good conditions for burn care dressing procedures in young children.

    List of papers
    1. Sedation during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: A randomised controlled study of patient-controlled propofol sedation and that given by a nurse anaesthetist
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sedation during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: A randomised controlled study of patient-controlled propofol sedation and that given by a nurse anaesthetist
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 50, no 10, p. 1285-1292Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Different regimens are used for sedation during ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography). Our objectives were to compare safety, ease of treatment, time to recovery and patients’ experiences using PCS (patient-controlled sedation) with propofol as well as sedation given by a nurse anaesthetist (ACS) with propofol or midazolam during ERCP.

    Material and methods: The study included 281 adults in 301 procedures. The PCS group (n=101) delivered bolus doses of 5 mg of propofol according to their need for sedation. The ACS group (n=100) had 2-8 mg/kg/hour of propofol infused, with the target for sedation being Level 3 of the Observer’s Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scale (OAA/S). The control group was given 2-3 mg of midazolam for induction and additional 1 mg if required.

    Results: PCS and ACS increased the ease of the procedure and reduced the numbers of sedation failures compared to midazolam sedation (ACS n=0; PCS n=4; midazolam n=20). The ACS group had more deeply sedated patients (OAA/S Level 2), desaturations and obstructed airways than the PCS and midazolam groups. Over 90% of all patients had recovered (Aldrete score≥9) by the time they returned to the ward. PCS resulted in the least fatigue and pain after the procedure. Patients’ preference for PCS and ACS were the same.

    Conclusion: PCS with propofol is superior to midazolam and comparable to ACS. PCS resulted in a rapid recovery, tended to be the safest and was almost as effective as ACS in ensuring a successful examination.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2015
    Keywords
    Conscious sedation, propofol, Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112371 (URN)10.3109/00365521.2015.1038848 (DOI)000361324600013 ()
    Available from: 2014-11-24 Created: 2014-11-24 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Rectal ketamine during paediatric burn wound dressing procedures: a randomised dose-finding study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rectal ketamine during paediatric burn wound dressing procedures: a randomised dose-finding study
    2019 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1081-1088Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Worldwide, ketamine is used during paediatric procedures, but no recommendations are available regarding a suitable dose for rectal administration during procedures involving high levels of pain and/or anxiety such as burn wound dressing change.

    Methods

    We evaluated three different single doses of rectally administered racemic ketamine mixed with a fixed dose of 0.5 mg/kg of midazolam. In total, 90 children – aged 6 months to 4 years – were randomised 1:1:1 to receive 4 mg/kg (K-4 group), 6 mg/kg (K-6 group) or 8 mg/kg (K-8 group) of racemic ketamine for a maximum of three consecutive procedures. Primary outcome measure was procedural pain evaluated by Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) behavioural scale. Secondary outcome included feasibility and recovery time. Patient safety was evaluated using surrogate outcomes.

    Results

    In total, 201 procedures in 90 children aged 19 ± 8 months were completed. The median maximum pain was FLACC 0 in all groups (p = 0.141). The feasibility was better for groups K-6 (p = 0.049) and K-8 (p = 0.027) compared with K-4, and the mean recovery time was the longest for group K-8 (36 ± 22 min) compared with groups K-4 (25 ± 15 min; p = 0.003) and K-6 (27 ± 20 min; p = 0.025). Median maximum sedation measured by the University of Michigan Sedation Scale (UMSS) was higher in group K-8 compared with group K-4 (p < 0.0001) and K-6 (p = 0.023). One child in group K-8 had a study drug-related serious adverse event — laryngospasm/airway obstruction. No rescue analgosedative medication was administered for group K-6.

    Conclusions

    A rectally administered mixture of racemic ketamine (6 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) during paediatric burn dressing procedures with a duration of approximately 30 min provides optimal conditions regarding pain relief, feasibility, recovery time and patient safety, with no need for rescue analgosedative medication.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Pergamon Press, 2019
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156837 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2018.12.012 (DOI)000470856100010 ()31060760 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065014700 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2019-05-14 Created: 2019-05-14 Last updated: 2019-07-15Bibliographically approved
  • 36.
    Grossmann, Benjamin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Oskar
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patient-kontrollerad epidural analgesi (PCEA) med bupivacaine, fentanyl och epinephrine som postoperativ smärtlindring: en retrospektiv studie2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion: Patientkontrollerad epidural smärtlindring (PCEA) är idag en vedertagen metod för postoperativ smärtlindring med få komplikationer. Försök har gjorts för att titrera fram den mest gynnsamma kombinationen med fokus på att maximera smärtlindringen och minimera sidoeffekterna. Syftet med studien är att identifiera smärta, sidoeffekter och behandlingstid samt patientens subjektiva skattning av smärtlindring vid postoperativ PCEA-behandling med bupivacaine, fentanyl och epinephrine.

    Metod: Studien är retrospektiv inkluderande 1088 patienter vilka postoperativt behandlats med PCEA och kombinationslösningen bupivacaine (1mg/ml), fentanyl (2μg/ml) och epinephrine (2μg/ml). Studien har undersökt skillnaden mellan kön, ålder och typ av kirurgi avseende smärta i vila respektive smärta vid mobilisering/hosta, infusionshastighet, givna och begärda bolusdoser, behandlingstid, sidoeffekter samt patientens subjektiva skattning av smärtlindringen.

    Resultat: Smärta i vila och vid mobilisering/hosta var under de studerade dygnen generellt låg, smärtan kulminerade under dygn 2. De yngre patienterna visade sig skatta smärta högre under behandlingstiden. Studien visade att smärta vid mobilisering/hosta var högre vid längre behandlingstid. Kvinnor hade mer illamående och klåda, vilket inte entydigt påverkade behandlingstiden. Patienter vilka hade haft smärta både i vila och vid mobilisering/hosta skattade ett lägre betyg gällande smärtlindringen vid hemgång. Andelen patienter som avslutade PCEA-behandlingen relaterat till minskat behov var 78%.

    Konklusion: Patienterna upplevde att den postoperativa smärtlindringen med PCEA med kombinationslösningen var mycket god. Typ av kirurgi, kön och smärta vid mobilisering/hosta visade sig påverka behandlingstiden. Förekomsten av sidoeffekter var hög men påverkade inte patientens betyg negativt. Smärtan hos patienterna var generellt låg.

  • 37.
    Grossmann, Benjamin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Rectal ketamine during paediatric burn wound dressing procedures: a randomised dose-finding study2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1081-1088Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Worldwide, ketamine is used during paediatric procedures, but no recommendations are available regarding a suitable dose for rectal administration during procedures involving high levels of pain and/or anxiety such as burn wound dressing change.

    Methods

    We evaluated three different single doses of rectally administered racemic ketamine mixed with a fixed dose of 0.5 mg/kg of midazolam. In total, 90 children – aged 6 months to 4 years – were randomised 1:1:1 to receive 4 mg/kg (K-4 group), 6 mg/kg (K-6 group) or 8 mg/kg (K-8 group) of racemic ketamine for a maximum of three consecutive procedures. Primary outcome measure was procedural pain evaluated by Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) behavioural scale. Secondary outcome included feasibility and recovery time. Patient safety was evaluated using surrogate outcomes.

    Results

    In total, 201 procedures in 90 children aged 19 ± 8 months were completed. The median maximum pain was FLACC 0 in all groups (p = 0.141). The feasibility was better for groups K-6 (p = 0.049) and K-8 (p = 0.027) compared with K-4, and the mean recovery time was the longest for group K-8 (36 ± 22 min) compared with groups K-4 (25 ± 15 min; p = 0.003) and K-6 (27 ± 20 min; p = 0.025). Median maximum sedation measured by the University of Michigan Sedation Scale (UMSS) was higher in group K-8 compared with group K-4 (p < 0.0001) and K-6 (p = 0.023). One child in group K-8 had a study drug-related serious adverse event — laryngospasm/airway obstruction. No rescue analgosedative medication was administered for group K-6.

    Conclusions

    A rectally administered mixture of racemic ketamine (6 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) during paediatric burn dressing procedures with a duration of approximately 30 min provides optimal conditions regarding pain relief, feasibility, recovery time and patient safety, with no need for rescue analgosedative medication.

  • 38.
    Hahn, R. G.
    et al.
    Research Unit, Södertälje Hospital, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Nephrocheck® results should be corrected for dilution2017In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 261-262Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 39.
    Hahn, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Bahlmann, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Dehydration and fluid volume kinetics before major open abdominal surgery2014In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 58, no 10, p. 1258-1266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Assessment of dehydration in the preoperative setting is of potential clinical value. The present study uses urine analysis and plasma volume kinetics, which have both been validated against induced changes in body water in volunteers, to study the incidence and severity of dehydration before open abdominal surgery begins. Methods: Thirty patients (mean age 64 years) had their urine analysed before major elective open abdominal surgery for colour, specific weight, osmolality and creatinine. The results were scored and the mean taken to represent a dehydration index. Thereafter, the patients received an infusion of 5ml/kg of Ringers acetate intravenously for over 15min. Blood was sampled for 70min and the blood haemoglobin concentration used to estimate the plasma volume kinetics. Results: Distribution of fluid occurred more slowly (Pless than0.01) and the elimination half-life was twice as long (median 40min, not significant) in the 11 patients (37%) diagnosed to be moderately dehydrated as compared with euhydrated patients. The dehydration index indicated that the fluid deficit in these patients corresponded to 2.5% of the body weight, whereas the deficit in the others was 1%. In contrast, the 11 patients who later developed postoperative nausea and vomiting had a very short elimination half-life, only 9min (median, Pless than0.01). These patients were usually euhydrated but had microalbuminuria (Pless than0.03) and higher natriuresis (Pless than0.01). Conclusions: The degree of dehydration before major surgery was modest as evidenced both by urine sampling and volume kinetic analysis.

  • 40.
    Hahn, Robert G.
    et al.
    Research Unit, Södertälje Hospital, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Bahlmann, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Preoperative fluid retention increases blood loss during major open abdominal surgery2017In: Perioperative Medicine, ISSN 0908-6919, E-ISSN 2047-0525, Vol. 6, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Quantification of renal fluid conservation is possible by urine analysis, and the results can indicate dehydration. The present report sought to determine whether this fluid retention correlates with fluid requirements during major abdominal surgeries that have estimated operating times ≥ 2 h.

    Methods

    Urine colour, specific weight, osmolality and creatinine concentration were used to calculate a composite “fluid retention index” (FRI) in 97 patients prior to major abdominal surgery. Goal-directed fluid volume optimization, with hydroxyethyl starch supplemented with a background administration of crystalloid fluid, was used.

    Results

    The median preoperative FRI was 3.0. Fluid retention, considered as present when FRI ≥ 3.5, was found in 37% of the patients. Fluid retention was followed by a significantly larger blood loss (+ 125%; 450 vs. 200 ml), higher haemorrhage rate (+ 41%; 123 vs. 87 ml/h) and greater need for both colloid (+ 43%; 1.43 vs. 1.00 l) and crystalloid (+ 18%; 1.28 vs. 1.08 l) fluids. Despite the larger blood loss, the total fluid balance was more positive after surgery in the dehydrated patients (+ 26%; 1.91 vs. 1.51 l; P < 0.02).

    Conclusions

    Preoperative fluid retention, as detected in a urine sample, was associated with a greater blood loss and a more positive fluid balance during major abdominal surgery.

  • 41.
    Hahn, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Li, Yuhong
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Non-invasive monitoring of blood haemoglobin for analysis of fluid volume kinetics2010In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 1233-1240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A commercially available pulse oximeter that reports blood haemoglobin (Hb) concentration is evaluated. This study considers whether this device can provide serial Hb data that would be sufficiently reliable for volume kinetic analysis of infusion fluids.

    Methods: Forty infusions of 5 or 10 ml/kg of acetated Ringer's solution were given over 15 min in 10 healthy volunteers. Hb was measured on 17 different occasions over 120 min using the Radical 7 pulse oximeter and compared with the result of invasive blood sampling (control). A one-volume kinetic model was applied to each data series. The pulse oximeter also reported the perfusion index (PI).

    Results: The median deviation between the 680 invasive and non-invasive Hb samples (the accuracy) was 1.6% and the absolute median deviation (precision) was 4.6%. Between-subject factors explained half of the variation in the difference between non-invasive vs. invasive sampling.

    Ten of the 40 non-invasive series of Hb values were discarded from kinetic analysis due to poor quality. The remaining 30 series showed a smaller distribution volume for the infused fluid when kinetic analysis was based on the non-invasive method (3.0 vs. 5.3 l; P<0.001). This was due to co-variance with the PI, which exaggerated the decrease in Hb caused by the infusions. The non-invasive method might provide useful kinetic data at the group level, but individual curves deviated too much from the invasive data to be reliable.

    Conclusions: Non-invasive measurement of the Hb concentration during volume loading could not provide useful kinetic data for individuals.

  • 42.
    Hahn, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Lyons, Gordon
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The half-life of infusion fluids An educational review2016In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 475-482Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An understanding of the half-life (T-1/2) of infused fluids can help prevent iatrogenic problems such as volume overload and postoperative interstitial oedema. Simulations show that a prolongation of the T-1/2 for crystalloid fluid increases the plasma volume and promotes accumulation of fluid in the interstitial fluid space. The T-1/2 for crystalloids is usually 20 to 40 min in conscious humans but might extend to 80 min or longer in the presence of preoperative stress, dehydration, blood loss of amp;lt;1 l or pregnancy. The longest T-1/2 measured amounts to between 3 and 8 h and occurs during surgery and general anaesthesia with mechanical ventilation. This situation lasts as long as the anaesthesia. The mechanisms for the long T-1/2 are only partly understood, but involve adrenergic receptors and increased renin and aldosterone release. In contrast, the T-1/2 during the postoperative period is usually short, about 15 to 20 min, at least in response to new fluid. The commonly used colloid fluids have an intravascular persistence T-1/2 of 2 to 3 h, which is shortened by inflammation. The fact that the elimination T-1/2 of the infused macromolecules is 2 to 6 times longer shows that they also reside outside the bloodstream. With a colloid, fluid volume is eliminated in line with its intravascular persistence, but there is insufficient data to know if this is the same in the clinical setting.

  • 43.
    Helleberg, Johan
    et al.
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Sweden.
    Bartha, Erzebeth
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Sweden.
    Ahlstrand, Rebecka
    Örebro universitetssjukhus, Sweden.
    Bell, Max
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Sweden.
    Björne, Håkan
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Sweden.
    Brattström, Olof
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Semenas, Ergidius
    Akademiska sjukhuset Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stjernkvist, Paula
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Sweden.
    Kalman, Sigridur
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Sweden.
    Validation and recalibration of the Surgical Outcome Risk Tool in a high risk Swedish cohort2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Ho, Loretta
    et al.
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Lau, Lawrence
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Churilov, Leonid
    Melbourne Brain Centre, Australia.
    Riedel, Bernhard
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    McNicol, Larry
    Austin Hospital, Australia; University of Melbourne, Australia; University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Hahn, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Weinberg, Laurence
    University of Melbourne, Australia; Austin Hospital, Australia.
    Comparative Evaluation of Crystalloid Resuscitation Rate in a Human Model of Compensated Haemorrhagic Shock2016In: Shock, ISSN 1073-2322, E-ISSN 1540-0514, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 149-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:The most effective rate of fluid resuscitation in haemorrhagic shock is unknown.Methods:We performed a randomized crossover pilot study in a healthy volunteer model of compensated haemorrhagic shock. Following venesection of 15mL/kg of blood, participants were randomized to 20mL/kg of crystalloid over 10 min (FAST treatment) or 30 min (SLOW treatment). The primary end point was oxygen delivery (DO2). Secondary end points included pressure and flow-based haemodynamic variables, blood volume expansion, and clinical biochemistry.Results:Nine normotensive healthy adult volunteers participated. No significant differences were observed in DO2 and biochemical variables between the SLOW and FAST groups. Blood volume was reduced by 16% following venesection, with a corresponding 5% reduction in cardiac index (CI) (Pamp;lt;0.001). Immediately following resuscitation the increase in blood volume corresponded to 54% of the infused volume under FAST treatment and 69% of the infused volume under SLOW treatment (P=0.03). This blood volume expansion attenuated with time to 24% and 25% of the infused volume 30 min postinfusion. During fluid resuscitation, blood pressure was higher under FAST treatment. However, CI paradoxically decreased in most participants during the resuscitation phase; a finding not observed under SLOW treatment.Conclusion:FAST or SLOW fluid resuscitation had no significant impact on DO2 between treatment groups. In both groups, changes in CI and blood pressure did not reflect the magnitude of intravascular blood volume deficit. Crystalloid resuscitation expanded intravascular blood volume by approximately 25%.

  • 45.
    Hultkvist, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Implications of myocardial dysfunction before and after aortic valve intervention2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Postoperative heart failure in the setting of aortic valve surgery results in poor long-term survival. We hypothesized that there could be a myocardial factor that is not addressed by risk scores currently available. We speculated that this myocardial factor could be diastolic dysfunction. By evaluating postoperative heart failure, the EuroSCORE, the NT-proBNP level, and diastolic function, we might achieve a deeper understanding of the outcome for individuals with postoperative heart failure.

    METHODS

    This research project was built upon four cohort studies. The first two studies (I and II) were retrospective in nature, and studies III and IV were prospective, observational, and longitudinal. All work was based on data from clinical and national databases. In Study I, we compared the outcome of patients with or without postoperative heart failure, evaluated according to the preoperative risk score. In Study II, we explored the effect of underlying heart disease on the preoperative level of NT-proBNP and the relationships between NT-proBNP and severe postoperative heart failure and short-term mortality. In Study III, we described the dynamics

    of NT-proBNP, from a preoperative evaluation to a six-month follow-up, in patients that underwent one of two different procedures: a surgical aortic valve replacement and a transcatheter implantation. We related both pre- and postprocedural NT-proBNP levels to one-year mortality. In Study IV, we evaluated diastolic function in patients that underwent surgical aortic valve replacement and its influence on outcome. We also evaluated NT-proBNP levels and postoperative heart failure as predictors of long-term mortality.

    RESULTS

    Study I

    This study included 397 patients that underwent isolated surgical aortic valve replacements. Of these, 45 patients (11%) were treated for postoperative heart failure. With an average follow-up of 8.1 years (range 5.2-11.2), among patients at low risk (EuroSCORE≤7), the crude five-year survival rates were 58% in patients with postoperative heart failure and 89% in those without postoperative heart failure (p<0.001). Among patients with postoperative heart failure, those classified as low risk had the same poor long-term prognosis as those classified as high risk (EuroSCORE>7). In the high risk group, survival rates were similar between patients with or without postoperative heart failure (57% vs. 64%; p=0.60).

    Study II

    This study included a cohort of 2978 patients with coronary artery disease, aortic stenosis, and mitral regurgitation. Preoperative NTproBNP levels were found to be 1.7-fold higher in patients with aortic stenosis than in patients with coronary artery disease and 1.4-fold higher in patients with mitral regurgitation than in patients with coronary disease. The power of preoperative NT-proBNP for predicting severe postoperative heart conditions was good among patients with coronary heart disease and patients with mitral regurgitation, but not as good among patients with aortic stenosis. NT-proBNP also showed good discriminating power for short-term mortality among patients with coronary artery disease. Moreover, NT-proBNP was found to be an independent predictor for both severe postoperative heart failure and short-term mortality in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Study III

    This study included 462 patients that underwent preoperative evaluations for aortic valve disease. Aortic valve interventions elicited a rise in NT-proBNP that was more pronounced in patients undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement compared to patients undergoing transcatheter valve implantation. No deterioration in NT-proBNP was observed during the waiting time before the intervention, despite a median duration of four months. At six months after the intervention, NT-proBNP levels had decreased to or below the preoperative levels in all groups. Among patients that received surgical aortic valve replacements, pre-and early postoperative NT-proBNP levels showed good discriminatory power for oneyear mortality. This discriminatory power was not observed among patients that had undergone a transcatheter procedure; those patients had higher levels of both pre- and postoperative NT-proBNP compared to patients that had undergone surgery.

    Study IV

    We evaluated 273 patients that underwent aortic valve surgery. High left ventricular filling pressure was present in 22% (n=54) of patients at the time of surgery. At six months after surgery, diastolic function deteriorated in 24/193 (12%) patients and improved in 27/54 (50%) patients. Diastolic dysfunction was not found to be associated with long-term mortality. However, both postoperative heart failure and preoperative NTproBNP levels were associated with increases in long-term mortality. In a multivariable Cox analysis, NT-proBNP remained predictive of long-term mortality.

    CONCLUSION

    Postoperative heart failure contributed to long-term mortality, even in patients considered to be at low risk preoperatively. Our results suggested that pressure overload, followed by a volume overload led to a NTproBNP response that was more pronounced than the ischemia response. Elevated levels of NT-proBNP were associated with both short- and long-term mortality. In these studies, we could not corroborate the notion that high left ventricular filling pressure was associated with long-term mortality.

    List of papers
    1. The combined impact of postoperative heart failure and euroScore on long-term outcome after surgery for aortic stenosis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The combined impact of postoperative heart failure and euroScore on long-term outcome after surgery for aortic stenosis
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Heart Valve Disease, ISSN 0966-8519, E-ISSN 2053-2644, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 633-638Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY:

    Although the EuroSCORE was developed for predicting operative mortality after cardiac surgery, it has also been shown to predict long-term mortality. It has been reported that postoperative heart failure (PHF) in association with surgery, albeit comparatively benign in the short term, has a profound impact on five-year survival after surgery for aortic stenosis (AS). The study aim was to determine the combined impact of EuroSCORE and PHF on long-term survival after isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) for AS.

    METHODS:

    A total of 397 patients (48% females; average age 70 +/- 10 years) who underwent AVR for AS at the authors' institution between 1995 and 2000 was studied. The cohort was subdivided according to the additive EuroSCORE into a high-risk group (EuroSCORE >7) and a low-risk group (EuroSCORE < or = 7), and further analyzed in relation to PHF.

    RESULTS:

    The average follow up was 8.1 years (range: 5.2-11.2 years). Forty-five patients (11%) were treated for procedure-associated PHF. Patients with or without PHF and a high-risk EuroSCORE had crude five-year survivals of 57% and 64%, respectively (p = 0.6), whereas those with or without PHF but with a low-risk EuroSCORE had crude five-year survivals of 58% and 89%, respectively (p = 0.0003).

    CONCLUSION:

    Both PHF and a high EuroSCORE were associated with poor long-term survival. The role of PHF per se for the long-term prognosis was illustrated by the fact that the negative impact on long-term survival was almost as profound in patients of the low-risk group as of the high-risk group.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-73431 (URN)000306675200005 ()22655493 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2012-01-03 Created: 2012-01-03 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Impact of underlying heart disease per se on the utility of preoperative NT-proBNP in adult cardiac surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of underlying heart disease per se on the utility of preoperative NT-proBNP in adult cardiac surgery
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e0192503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The primary aim was to investigate the role of underlying heart disease on preoperative NT-proBNP levels in patients admitted for adult cardiac surgery, after adjusting for the known confounders age, gender, obesity and renal function. The second aim was to investigate the predictive value of preoperative NT-proBNP with regard to severe postoperative heart failure (SPHF) and postoperative mortality. Methods A retrospective cohort study based on preoperative NT-proBNP measurements in an unselected cohort including all patients undergoing first time surgery for coronary artery disease (CAD; n = 2226), aortic stenosis (AS; n = 406) or mitral regurgitation (MR; n = 346) from April 2010 to August 2016 in the southeast region of Sweden (n = 2978). Concomitant procedures were not included, with the exception of Maze or tricuspid valve procedures. Results Preoperative NT-proBNP was 1.67 times (pamp;lt;0.0001) and 1.41 times (pamp;lt;0.0001) higher in patients with AS or MR respectively, than in patients with CAD after adjusting for confounders. NT-proBNP demonstrated significant discrimination with regard to SPHF in CAD (AUC = 0.79, 95% CI 0.73 +/- 0.85, pamp;lt;0.0001), MR (AUC = 0.80, 95% CI 0.72 +/- 0.87, pamp;lt;0.0001) and AS (AUC = 0.66, 95% CI 0.51 +/- 0.81, p = 0.047). In CAD patients NT-proBNP demonstrated significant discrimination with regard to postoperative 30-day or in-hospital mortality (AUC = 0.78; 95% CI 0.71 +/- 0.85, pamp;lt;0.0001). The number of deaths was too few in the AS and MR group to permit analysis. Elevated NT-proBNP emerged as an independent risk factor for SPHF, and postoperative mortality in CAD. Conclusions Patients with AS or MR have higher preoperative NT-proBNP than CAD patients even after adjusting for confounders. The predictive value of NT-proBNP with regard to SPHF was confirmed in CAD and MR patients but was less convincing in AS patients.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2018
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145771 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0192503 (DOI)000424517900085 ()29420603 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Region Ostergotland [LIO-443891]

    Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2019-05-13
    3. Rise and fall of NT-proBNP in aortic valve intervention.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rise and fall of NT-proBNP in aortic valve intervention.
    2018 (English)In: Open heart, E-ISSN 2053-3624, Vol. 5, no 1, article id e000739Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe the dynamics of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) from preoperative evaluation to 6-month follow-up in patients undergoing aortic valve intervention, and to evaluate NT-proBNP with regard to 1-year mortality.

    Methods: At preoperative evaluation, we prospectively included 462 patients accepted for aortic valve intervention. The median time to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR; n=336) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI; n=126) was 4 months. NT-proBNP was measured at enrolment for preoperative evaluation, on the day of surgery, postoperatively on day 1, day 3 and at the 6-month follow-up. Subgroups of patients undergoing SAVR with aortic regurgitation and aortic stenosis with and without coronary artery bypass were also analysed.

    Results: NT-proBNP remained stable in all subgroups during the preoperative waiting period, but displayed a substantial transient early postoperative increase with a peak on day 3 except in the TAVI group, which peaked on day 1. At the 6-month follow-up, NT-proBNP had decreased to or below the preoperative level in all groups. In the SAVR group, NT-proBNP preoperatively and on postoperative days 1 and 3 revealed significant discriminatory power with regard to 1-year mortality (area under the curve (AUC)=0.79, P=0.0001; AUC=0.71, P=0.03; and AUC=0.79, P=0.002, respectively). This was not found in the TAVI group, which had higher levels of NT-proBNP both preoperatively and at the 6-month follow-up compared with the SAVR group.

    Conclusions: The dynamic profile of NT-proBNP differed between patients undergoing TAVI and SAVR. NT-proBNP in the perioperative course was associated with increased risk of 1-year mortality in SAVR but not in TAVI.

    Keywords
    aortic valve disease, heart failure, surgery-valve
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149013 (URN)10.1136/openhrt-2017-000739 (DOI)29632678 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2018-06-25 Created: 2018-06-25 Last updated: 2019-05-13
  • 46.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Högstedt, Alexandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Skin glucose metabolism and microvascular blood flow during local insulin delivery and after an oral glucose load2016In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 597-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin causes capillary recruitment in muscle and adipose tissue, but the metabolic and microvascular effects of insulin in the skin have not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to measure glucose metabolism and microvascular blood flow in the skin during local insulin delivery and after an oral glucose load.

    METHODS: Microdialysis catheters were inserted intracutanously in human subjects. In eight subjects two microdialysis catheters were inserted, one perfused with insulin and one with control solution. First the local effects of insulin was studied, followed by a systemic provocation by an oral glucose load. Additionally, as control experiment, six subjects did not recieve local delivery of insulin or the oral glucose load. During microdialysis the local blood flow was measured by urea clearance and by laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI).

    RESULTS: Within 15 minutes of local insulin delivery, microvascular blood flow in the skin increased (urea clearance: P=.047, LSCI: P=.002) paralleled by increases in pyruvate (P=.01) and lactate (P=.04), indicating an increase in glucose uptake. An oral glucose load increased urea clearance from the catheters, indicating an increase in skin perfusion, although no perfusion changes were detected with LSCI. The concentration of glucose, pyruvate and lactate increased in the skin after the oral glucose load.

    CONCLUSION: Insulin has metabolic and vasodilatory effects in the skin both when given locally and after systemic delivery through an oral glucose load.

  • 47.
    Jammer, Ib
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Haukeland University Hospital,.
    Wickboldt, Nadine
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Sander, Michael
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Charite, Berlin, Germany.
    Smith, Andrew
    Royal Lancaster Infirmary, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.
    Schultz, Marcus J
    Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Pelosi, Paolo
    Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, IRCCS San Martino Hospital,University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy.
    Leva, Brigitte
    European Society of Anaesthesiology, Brussels, Belgium.
    Rhodes, Andrew
    Critical Care, St George’s Hospital, London, UK.
    Hoeft, Andreas
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn, Germany .
    Walder, Bernhard
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Chew, Michelle S
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Hallands Sjukhus, Halmstad, Sweden Institute of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Pearse, Rupert M
    Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.
    Standards for definitions and use of outcome measures for clinical effectiveness research in perioperative medicine: European Perioperative Clinical Outcome (EPCO) definitions2015In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 88-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for large trials that test the clinical effectiveness of interventions in the field of perioperative medicine. Clinical outcome measures used in such trials must be robust, clearly defined and patient-relevant. Our objective was to develop standards for the use of clinical outcome measures to strengthen the methodological quality of perioperative medicine research. A literature search was conducted using PubMed and opinion leaders worldwide were invited to nominate papers that they believed the group should consider. The full texts of relevant articles were reviewed by the taskforce members and then discussed to reach a consensus on the required standards. The report was then circulated to opinion leaders for comment and review. This report describes definitions for 22 individual adverse events with a system of severity grading for each. In addition, four composite outcome measures were identified, which were designed to evaluate postoperative outcomes. The group also agreed on standards for four outcome measures for the evaluation of healthcare resource use and quality of life. Guidance for use of these outcome measures is provided, with particular emphasis on appropriate duration of follow-up. This report provides clearly defined and patient-relevant outcome measures for large clinical trials in perioperative medicine. These outcome measures may also be of use in clinical audit. This report is intended to complement and not replace other related work to improve assessment of clinical outcomes following specific surgical procedures.

  • 48.
    Jawad, Monir
    et al.
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Central Hospital in Kristianstad, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Baigi, Amir
    Department of Primary Healthcare, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Oldner, Anders
    Department of Anaesthesiology, Karolinska University Hospital and Institute, Surgical Services and Intensive Care, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pearse, Rupert M
    Queen Mary University of London and Adult Critical Care Unit, Royal London Hospital, London, UK.
    Rhodes, Andrew
    Department of Intensive Care Medicine, St George's Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK.
    Seeman-Lodding, Helen
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Chew, Michelle S
    Institute of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund and the Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Halland Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Swedish surgical outcomes study (SweSOS): An observational study on 30-day and 1-year mortality after surgery.2016In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 317-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The European Surgical Outcomes Study (EuSOS) revealed large variations in outcomes among countries. In-hospital mortality and ICU admission rates in Sweden were low, going against the assumption that access to ICU improves outcome. Long-term mortality was not reported in EuSOS and is generally poorly described in the current literature.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of the Swedish subset of EuSOS and identify predictors of short and long-term mortality after surgery.

    DESIGN: An observational cohort study.

    SETTING: Six universities and two regional hospitals in Sweden.

    PATIENTS: A cohort of 1314 adult patients scheduled for surgery between 4 April and 11 April 2011.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: 30-day and 1-year mortality.

    RESULTS: A total of 303 patients were lost to follow-up, leaving 1011 for analysis; 69% of patients were classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists' physical status 1 or 2, and 68% of surgical procedures were elective. The median length of stay in postanaesthesia care units (PACUs) was 175 min (interquartile range 110-270); 6.6% of patients had PACU length of stay of more than 12 h and 3.6% of patients were admitted to the ICU postoperatively. Thirty-day mortality rate was 1.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-2.6] and 8.5% (CI 6.8-10.2) at 1 year (n = 18 and 86). The risk of death was higher than in an age and sex-matched population after 30 days (standardised mortality ratio 10.0, CI 5.9-15.8), and remained high after 1 year (standardised mortality ratio 3.9, CI 3.1-4.8). Factors predictive of 30-day mortality were age, American Society of Anesthesiologists' physical status, number of comorbidities, urgency of surgery and ICU admission. For 1-year mortality, age, number of comorbidities and urgency of surgery were independently predictive. ICU admission and long stay in PACU were not significant predictors of long-term mortality.

    CONCLUSION: Mortality rate increased almost five-fold at 1 year compared with 30-day mortality after surgery, demonstrating a significantly sustained long-term risk of death in this surgical population. In Sweden, factors associated with long-term postoperative mortality were age, number of comorbidities and surgical urgency.

  • 49.
    Johansson, Mats J.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Gas Exchange in the Normal Lung: Experimental studies on the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and body position2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The principal function of the lung is gas exchange requiring adequate ventilation and perfusion at the level of the alveoli. The efficiency of gas exchange is depending on the distributions of regional ventilation (V) and pulmonary blood flow (Q) and their correlation.

    AIMS: To validate a high-resolution method to quantify regional V and to investigate the combined effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and body position on distributions of regional V and Q in the normal lung with mechanical ventilation. To assess the matching of V and Q by calculating ventilation-perfusion ratio (V/Q) heterogeneity, determining the spatial distribution of V/Q and to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in regional V/Q matching.

    METHODS: Anesthetized mechanically ventilated sheep were studied in prone or supine position with different levels of PEEP (0, 10 and 20 cmH2O). Measurements of regional V were done by determining the deposition of a wet aerosol of fluorescent microspheres (FMS) with a median mass aerodynamic diameter of 1.1 μm, and validated against Technegas. Radioactive microspheres, 15 μm in diameter, were used for determining regional Q. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was inhibited with Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to evaluate the role of NO on regional V/Q matching. The right lung was dried at total lung capacity and diced in approx. 1000 regions tracking the spatial location of each region.

    RESULTS: The deposition of FMS mirrored regional deposition of Technegas and thus regional ventilation well. In prone, with PEEP, only a small dorsal redistribution of V but not of Q was observed. The vertical Q gradient was abolished with PEEP in prone position in conflict with the classical zonal model. In supine position both V and Q were distributed with a unimodal gradient and PEEP displaced the mode further dorsally. V/Q heterogeneity was greater in supine than in prone position with and without PEEP. Furthermore, PEEP generated regions with high V/Q in supine but not in prone position. Inhibition of NOS did not change the V/Q distribution in prone position.

    CONCLUSION: There were marked differences in redistribution of regional ventilation and regional pulmonary blood flow between prone and supine position when PEEP was applied. NO was not an active mechanism for V/Q matching in normal sheep lungs.

    List of papers
    1. Positive end-expiratory pressure affects regional redistribution of ventilation differently in prone and supine sheep
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Positive end-expiratory pressure affects regional redistribution of ventilation differently in prone and supine sheep
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    2004 (English)In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 2039-2044Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine interactions between positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and posture on regional distribution of ventilation and to compare measurements of regional ventilation with two aerosols: a wet fluorescent microsphere aerosol (FMS, median mass aerodynamic diameter 1.1 μm) and a dry 99mTc-labeled carbon particle aerosol (Technegas, TG, median mass aerodynamic diameter ≈0.1 μm). Design: Experimental study. Setting. Academic laboratory. Subjects: Anesthetized and mechanically ventilated sheep (n = 16). Interventions: Four conditions were studied: prone or supine posture with of without 10 cm H2O PEEP. Measurements and Main results: Comparisons of FMS and TG were made in five animals. The median correlation coefficient of the two ventilation tracers was .95 (range, .91-.96). The mean ventilation per unit weight of dry lung for horizontal planes was almost identical whether measured with TG or FMS. The distribution of ventilation was assessed by analyzing deposition of aerosol in about 1,000 lung regions per animal. Distribution of ventilation down the vertical axis was linear in prone (the slope indicated a dorsal-to-ventral three-fold difference in ventilation) but unimodal in supine animals with the mode in the center of the lung. Redistribution of ventilation with 10 PEEP differed between posture, shifting the mode in supine toward dependent lung regions while eliminating the dorsal-to-ventral gradient in prone. The regional heterogeneity in ventilation was greater in supine sheep at both levels of PEEP, and this was due mostly to greater isogravitational heterogeneity in supine than in prone position. Conclusions: The wet fluorescent microsphere aerosol was as reliable as Technegas for high-resolution measurements of regional ventilation. The markedly different effects of 10 PEEP in supine and prone sheep may have important implications for gas exchange both in noninjured and injured lungs.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24429 (URN)10.1097/01.CCM.0000142395.82277.6F (DOI)6535 (Local ID)6535 (Archive number)6535 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Marked differences between prone and supine sheep in effect of PEEP on perfusion distribution in zone II lung
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Marked differences between prone and supine sheep in effect of PEEP on perfusion distribution in zone II lung
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    2005 (English)In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 99, no 3, p. 909-914Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The classic four-zone model of lung blood flow distribution has been questioned. We asked whether the effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is different between the prone and supine position for lung tissue in the same zonal condition. Anesthetized and mechanically ventilated prone (n = 6) and supine (n = 5) sheep were studied at 0, 10, and 20 cmH2O PEEP. Perfusion was measured with intravenous infusion of radiolabeled 15-μm microspheres. The right lung was dried at total lung capacity and diced into pieces (≈1.5 cm3), keeping track of the spatial location of each piece. Radioactivity per unit weight was determined and normalized to the mean value for each condition and animal. In the supine posture, perfusion to nondependent lung regions decreased with little relative perfusion in nondependent horizontal lung planes at 10 and 20 cmH2O PEEP. In the prone position, the effect of PEEP was markedly different with substantial perfusion remaining in nondependent lung regions and even increasing in these regions with 20 cmH2O PEEP. Vertical blood flow gradients in zone II lung were large in supine, but surprisingly absent in prone, animals. Isogravitational perfusion heterogeneity was smaller in prone than in supine animals at all PEEP levels. Redistribution of pulmonary perfusion by PEEP ventilation in supine was largely as predicted by the zonal model in marked contrast to the findings in prone. The differences between postures in blood flow distribution within zone II strongly indicate that factors in addition to pulmonary arterial, venous, and alveolar pressure play important roles in determining perfusion distribution in the in situ lung. We suggest that regional variation in lung volume through the effect on vascular resistance is one such factor and that chest wall conformation and thoracic contents determine regional lung volume. Copyright © 2005 the American Physiological Society.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-29636 (URN)10.1152/japplphysiol.01388.2004 (DOI)15015 (Local ID)15015 (Archive number)15015 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    3. Minimal redistribution of regional ventilation-perfusion ratios by 10 and 20 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure in prone sheep
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Minimal redistribution of regional ventilation-perfusion ratios by 10 and 20 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure in prone sheep
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    2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has posture dependent effects on the distributions of ventilation (V) and perfusion (Q). We examined if redistribution of regional ventilation-perfusion ratios (V/Q) by PEEP was identical in prone and supine.

    Methods

    Mechanically ventilated sheep (n=16) were studied in prone or supine with 0, 10 and 20 cmH2O PEEP. V and Q were measured with a fluorescent microsphere aerosol and an intravenous infusion of microspheres, respectively. The right lung was dried at total lung capacity and diced into approx. 1000 regions tracking the spatial location of each region.

    Results

    In prone V/Q was close to unity in all horizontal planes with 0 PEEP and remained so with 10 and 20 PEEP. In supine V/Q was imperfect in the most dependent planes with 0 and 10 PEEP. V/Q approached unity in these planes when 20 PEEP was applied, but V/Q in non-dependent planes increased. The slope of the linear relationship between vertical height and V/Q was not different from zero at any PEEP in prone, but was larger than zero with all PEEP levels in supine. Mean V/Q heterogeneity (SDlogV/Q) was lower in prone at all PEEP levels (0 PEEP: 0.22 vs. 0.37,  10 PEEP: 0.21 vs. and 0.32 and 20 PEEP: 0.19 vs. 0.39, P<0.01).

    Conclusions

    Redistribution of regional V/Q was minimal in prone with PEEP and remained close to ideal in all horizontal planes. The absence of high V/Q with PEEP in prone may be clinically important when recruitment fails in the supine posture.

    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112360 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-11-24 Created: 2014-11-24 Last updated: 2014-11-24Bibliographically approved
    4. Inhibition of constitutive nitric oxide synthase does not influence ventilation: matching in normal prone adult sheep with mechanical ventilation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inhibition of constitutive nitric oxide synthase does not influence ventilation: matching in normal prone adult sheep with mechanical ventilation
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    2016 (English)In: Anesthesia and Analgesia, ISSN 0003-2999, E-ISSN 1526-7598, Vol. 123, no 6, p. 1492-1499Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Local formation of nitric oxide (NO) in the lung in proportion to ventilation, leading to vasodilation, is a putative mechanism behind ventilation- perfusion matching. We examined the role of local constitutive NO formation on regional distributions of ventilation (V) and perfusion (Q) and ventilation-perfusion matching (V/Q) in mechanically ventilated adult sheep with normal gas exchange.

    Methods

    V and Q were analyzed in lung regions (≈1.5 cm3) before and after inhibition of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) with Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (25 mg/kg) in seven prone sheep ventilated with PEEP. V and Q were measured using aerosolized fluorescent and infused radiolabeled microspheres, respectively. The animals were exsanguinated while deeply anaesthetized; lungs were excised, dried at total lung capacity and divided into cube units. The spatial location for each cube was tracked and fluorescence and radioactivity per unit weight determined.

    Results

    Pulmonary artery pressure increased significantly after L-NAME (from mean 16.6 to 23.6 mmHg, P<0.01) while there were no significant changes in PaO2, PaCO2 or SD log(V/Q). Distribution of V was not influenced by L-NAME but a small redistribution of Q from ventral to dorsal lung regions resulting in less heterogeneity in Q along the gravitational axis was seen (p<0.01). Perfusion to regions with the highest ventilation (5th quintile of the V distribution) remained unchanged with L-NAME.

    Conclusions

    There was minimal or no influence of cNOS inhibition by L-NAME on the distributions of V and Q, and V/Q in prone anesthetized and ventilated adult sheep with normal gas exchange.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
    National Category
    Surgery Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112361 (URN)10.1213/ANE.0000000000001556 (DOI)000388144000020 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linkoping University, Sweden; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Anders Jahres Foundation for Promotion of Sciences, Norway; AGA Gas AB, Lidingo, Sweden

    Vid tiden för disputationen förelåg publikationen som manuskript

    Available from: 2014-11-24 Created: 2014-11-24 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
  • 50.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    van der Wal, Martje H. L.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Waldréus, Nana
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Södertälje Sjukhus, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fluid restriction in patients with heart failure: how should we think?2016In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 301-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aim: Fluid restriction has long been considered one of the cornerstones in self-care management of patients with heart failure. The aim of this discussion paper is to discuss fluid restriction in heart failure and propose advice about fluid intake in heart failure patients. Results: Although there have been seven randomised studies on fluid restriction in heart failure patients, the effect of fluid restriction on its own were only evaluated in two studies. In both studies, a stringent fluid restriction compared to a liberal fluid intake was not more beneficial with regard to clinical stability or body weight. In the other studies fluid restriction was part of a larger study intervention including, for example, individualised dietary recommendations and follow-up by telephone. Thus, the effect of fluid restriction on its own has been poorly evaluated. Conclusion: Fluid restriction should not be recommended to all heart failure patients. However, temporary fluid restriction can be considered in decompensated heart failure and/or patients with hyponatremia. Tailored fluid restriction based on body weight (30 ml/kg per day) seems to be most reasonable. To increase adherence to temporary fluid restriction, education, support and planned evaluations can be recommended.

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