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  • 1.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Avdelningen för arbetsterapi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Self-efficacy and pain acceptance as mediators of the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities in women and men with rheumatoid arthritis2017Ingår i: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 31, nr 6, s. 824-834Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether personal factors (self-efficacy and pain acceptance) mediate the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities in persons with rheumatoid arthritis.

    METHODS: Persons with rheumatoid arthritis for at least four years (n = 737; 73% women) answered a questionnaire measuring self-efficacy, pain acceptance, performance of valued life activities, and self-rated pain. Relationships among these constructs were explored using univariate and multivariate analyses. Structural equation modelling was then used to examine the mediational role of personal factors on the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities.

    RESULTS: A direct negative association between pain and performance of valued life activities was identified (Beta = .34, P < .001). This suggests that people with rheumatoid arthritis who had higher levels of pain has increased difficulties in performing valued life activities. Self-efficacy and activity engagement component of pain acceptance mediated the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities, however the pain willingness component of pain acceptance did not influence participation in valued life activities.

    CONCLUSION: These findings highlight the importance of considering personal factors, such as pain acceptance and self-efficacy, in facilitating participation in valued life activities.

  • 2.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Njurmedicinska kliniken US. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för läkemedelsforskning.
    Lönn, Johanna
    Örebro Universitet, Sweden.
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Njurmedicinska kliniken US. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för läkemedelsforskning.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för kardiovaskulär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Department of Physiology, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Andersson, Bengt Andersson
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hahn-Zoric, Mirjana
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sclerostin, TNF-alpha and Interleukin-18 Correlate and are Together with Klotho Related to Other Growth Factors and Cytokines in Haemodialysis Patients2016Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 83, nr 1, s. 58-63Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with chronic renal failure are known to have renal osteodystrophy (bone disease) and increased calcification of vessels. A new marker of bone disease, sclerostin, the two pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-18 (IL-18), and the fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) receptor-associated marker Klotho were tested in 84 haemodialysis (HD) patients and in healthy controls. The patients had significantly higher levels of the three former markers than of the controls while Klotho was significantly higher in the controls. Low level, but significant, correlations were observed in the patient group when the levels of these four markers were compared to each other and to those of 5 cytokines and growth factors tested earlier; high-sensitive CRP (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator (suPAR). Ln sclerostin correlated positively to Ln hsTNF-alpha, Ln HGF and Ln suPAR. Ln hsTNF-alpha correlated positively to Ln sclerostin, Ln hsCRP, Ln IL-6, Ln FGF-23, Ln suPAR and Ln IL-18. Ln IL-18 correlated positively to Ln suPAR and Ln TNF-alpha. Ln Klotho correlated negatively to Ln hsCRP but did not correlate to Ln FGF-23. The markers studied here may be involved in the calcification of vessels seen in HD patients due to a combination of inflammation and bone disease. The mechanisms are still not fully known but may be of importance for future therapeutic possibilities in this group of patients.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Bengt-Åke
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Kirurgi, Ortopedi och Onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Sayardoust, Shariel
    Inst Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden.
    Lofgren, Sture
    Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Rutqvist, Lars Erik
    Swedish Match AB, Sweden.
    Lewin, Nongnit
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Kirurgi, Ortopedi och Onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Cigarette smoking affects microRNAs and inflammatory biomarkers in healthy individuals and an association to single nucleotide polymorphisms is indicated2019Ingår i: Biomarkers, ISSN 1354-750X, E-ISSN 1366-5804, Vol. 24, nr 2, s. 180-185Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cigarette smoke induces inflammation and remodels immune response. Genetic and epigenetic alterations might be involved in the pathogenesis of smoking related diseases. In this study, we investigated the effect of smoking on systemic inflammation biomarkers and epigenetic changes at microRNA (miRNA) expression level. We also examined if the levels of inflammatory biomarkers were associated with selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Method: From 39 smokers and 101 non-smokers, levels of total white blood cells (WBCs) and its subpopulations, plasma cytokines/chemokines/proteins and miRNAs were analysed. For three biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP), MCP-1 and IFN-gamma that were affected by smoking, the influence of SNPs was analyzed. Result: Elevated levels of total WBCs, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, CRP, MCP-1, IFN-gamma and lower levels of miR-21 were detected in smokers. The elevated levels of IFN-gamma in smokers was only statistically significantly associated with rs2069705 AG/GG SNP-genotype. Conclusions: A lower level of oncomir miRNA-21 and a higher level of immune modelling cytokine IFN-gamma detected in smokers could be a protective immune response to cigarette smoke. The higher level of IFN-gamma in smokers with a specific SNP genotype also suggests that a genetic interaction with smoking might predict the pathobiology of smoking related disease.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Siv Folkhammar
    et al.
    Unit of Rehabilitation, Kalmar County Council, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Primary Health Care Unit, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Henriksson Welin, Elisabet
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för omvårdnad. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Divison of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society,Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; School of Business, Engineering and Science, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Arthritis management in primary care: A study of physiotherapists current practice, educational needs and adherence to national guidelines2017Ingår i: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 15, nr 4, s. 333-340Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    With an increasing number of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in primary care, our aim was to investigate arthritis‐related practice in physiotherapy and to study adherence to evidence‐based care.

    Methods

    Seventy physiotherapists (PTs) working in primary care were emailed a questionnaire to investigate current practice and the number of roles assumed by PTs, the degree of confidence, educational needs and adherence to national guidelines in managing patients with OA or RA. Interventions supported by national guidelines were compared with reports of treatment modalities in the questionnaire.

    Results

    Sixty‐four (91%) PTs responded, and they reported a higher degree of confidence in assessment, treatment and education of patients with OA than for those with RA (p < 0.001). The total number of roles assumed by the PTs was higher in the management of OA than for RA (p < 0.001). PTs who assumed a greater number of roles also reported a stronger degree of confidence in assessing OA (p = 0.036). Those who assumed fewer roles also reported less confidence in RA treatment (p = 0.045). Recommendations in the guidelines were followed by the majority of PTs for eight of 11 treatment modalities in OA and for six of six in RA.

    Conclusions

    PTs reported a lower degree of confidence and the assumption of fewer roles in managing patients with RA compared with OA. There was good adherence to the national guidelines for almost all the treatment modalities listed. Even so, the results indicate a need for education, especially in chronic inflammatory arthritis care.

  • 5.
    Appelgren, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för läkemedelsforskning. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Knopf, Jasmin
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Germany.
    Bilyy, Rostyslav
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Germany; Danylo Halytsky Lviv Natl Med Univ, Ukraine.
    Vovk, Volodymyr
    Danylo Halytsky Lviv Natl Med Univ, Ukraine.
    Sundgren, Pia C.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Anders A.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Munoz, Luis E.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Germany.
    Herrmann, Martin
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Germany.
    Höög, Anders
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelning för neurobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk patologi. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Active NET formation in Libman-Sacks endocarditis without antiphospholipid antibodies: A dramatic onset of systemic lupus erythematosus2018Ingår i: Autoimmunity, ISSN 0891-6934, E-ISSN 1607-842X, Vol. 51, nr 6, s. 310-318Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Although neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been highlighted in several systemic inflammatory diseases, their clinical correlates and potential pathological role remain obscure. Herein, we describe a dramatic onset of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with clear-cut pathogenic implications for neutrophils and NET formation in a young woman with cardiac (Libman-Sacks endocarditis) and central nervous system (psychosis and seizures) involvement. Despite extensive search, circulating antiphospholipid autoantibodies, a hallmark of Libman-Sacks endocarditis, could not be detected. Instead, we observed active NET formation in the tissue of the mitral valve, as well as in the circulation. Levels of NET remnants were significantly higher in serially obtained sera from the patient compared with sex-matched blood donors (p=.0011), and showed a non-significant but substantial correlation with blood neutrophil counts (r=0.65, p=.16). The specific neutrophil elastase activity measured in serum seemed to be modulated by the provided immunosuppressive treatment. In addition, we found anti-Ro60/SSA antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid of the patient but not NET remnants or increased elastase activity. This case illustrates that different disease mechanisms mediated via autoantibodies can occur simultaneously in SLE. NET formation with release of cytotoxic NET remnants is a candidate player in the pathogenesis of this non-canonical form of Libman-Sacks endocarditis occurring in the absence of traditional antiphospholipid autoantibodies. The case description includes longitudinal results with clinical follow-up data and a discussion of the potential roles of NETs in SLE.

  • 6.
    Arkema, Elizabeth V
    et al.
    1Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Jönsen, Andreas
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Department of Medical Sciences, Science for Life Laboratories, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Simard, Julia F
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Case definitions in Swedish register data to identify systemic lupus erythematosus2016Ingår i: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, nr 1Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To develop and investigate the utility of several different case definitions for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) using national register data in Sweden.

    METHODS: The reference standard consisted of clinically confirmed SLE cases pooled from four major clinical centres in Sweden (n=929), and a sample of non-SLE comparators randomly selected from the National Population Register (n=24 267). Demographics, comorbidities, prescriptions and autoimmune disease family history were obtained from multiple registers and linked to the reference standard. We first used previously published SLE definitions to create algorithms for SLE. We also used modern data mining techniques (penalised least absolute shrinkage and selection operator logistic regression, elastic net regression and classification trees) to objectively create data-driven case definitions. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for the case definitions identified.

    RESULTS: Defining SLE by using only hospitalisation data resulted in the lowest sensitivity (0.79). When SLE codes from the outpatient register were included, sensitivity and PPV increased (PPV between 0.97 and 0.98, sensitivity between 0.97 and 0.99). Addition of medication information did not greatly improve the algorithm's performance. The application of data mining methods did not yield different case definitions.

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of SLE International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes in outpatient clinics increased the accuracy for identifying individuals with SLE using Swedish registry data. This study implies that it is possible to use ICD codes from national registers to create a cohort of individuals with SLE.

  • 7.
    Arkema, Elizabeth V
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Palmsten, Kristin
    University of California, San Diego, USA.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salmon, Jane E
    Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York.
    Simard, Julia F
    Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA ;Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    What to Expect When Expecting With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Population-Based Study of Maternal and Fetal Outcomes in SLE and Pre-SLE.2016Ingår i: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 68, nr 7Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess maternal and fetal outcomes associated with subclinical (pre-systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE] and SLE presenting up to 5 years postpartum) and prevalent maternal SLE during pregnancy compared with the general population.

    METHODS: This prospective cohort study used population-based Swedish registers to identify 13,598 women with first singleton pregnancies registered in the Medical Birth Register (551 prevalent SLE, 65 pre-SLE within 0-2 years, 133 pre-SLE within 2-5 years, and 12,847 general population). SLE was defined as ≥2 SLE-coded discharge diagnoses in the patient register with ≥1 diagnosis from a specialist. Unadjusted risks of adverse pregnancy or birth outcomes were calculated by SLE status, and Cochran-Armitage tests evaluated trend across exposure groups.

    RESULTS: Maternal outcomes such as preeclampsia, hypothyroidism, stroke, and infection were more common among women with SLE. Sixteen percent of prevalent-SLE pregnancies were diagnosed with preeclampsia compared with 5% of those from the general population. Among the pre-SLE women, preeclampsia was found in 26% of those with SLE within 2 years postpartum and 13% in those with SLE within 2-5 years postpartum. Similarly, infant outcomes, such as preterm birth, infection, and mortality, were worse among those born to mothers with prevalent SLE and pre-SLE during pregnancy. The test for trend was significant for most outcomes.

    CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that adverse maternal and fetal outcomes are more common in SLE pregnancies. Furthermore, these unfavorable outcomes are observed in pregnancies occurring prior to the diagnosis of SLE. Thus, the underlying immunologic profile of SLE and alterations preceding clinical SLE may contribute to these pregnancy complications.

  • 8.
    Arkema, Elizabeth V
    et al.
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Rossides, Marios
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Von Euler, Mia
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Rheumatology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Simard, Julia F
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.
    Response to 'Increased stroke incidence in systemic lupus erythematosus patients"2018Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, nr 10, artikel-id UNSP e72Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 9.
    Arkema, Elizabeth V.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Von Euler, Mia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Simard, Julia F.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stanford School Med, CA USA; Stanford School Med, CA USA.
    Stroke in systemic lupus erythematosus: a Swedish population-based cohort study2017Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 76, nr 9, s. 1544-1549Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To study the occurrence of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared with the general population by age, sex and time since SLE diagnosis Methods Adults with incident SLE were identified from the Swedish National Patient Register (NPR, n=3390) and general population comparators from the Total Population Register were matched on age, sex and county (n=16730). Individuals were followed prospectively until first of death, December 2013, emigration or incident stroke (identified from the NPR, Cause of Death Register and the Stroke Register). Incidence rates, rate differences and HR were estimated comparing SLE with non-SLE. Estimates were stratified by sex, age and time since diagnosis. Results We observed 126 strokes in SLE and 304 in the general population. Individuals with SLE had a twofold increased rate of ischaemic stroke compared with the general population (HR 2.2; 95% CI 1.7 to 2.8). The HR for intracerebral haemorrhage was 1.4 (95% CI 0.7 to 2.8). There was effect modification by sex and age, with the highest HRs for females and individuals amp;lt;50 years old. The HR for ischaemic stroke was highest in the first year of follow-up (3.7; 95% CI 2.1 to 6.5). Conclusions The relative risk of ischaemic stroke in SLE was more than doubled compared with the general population, and importantly, the highest relative risks were observed within the first year after SLE diagnosis. Thus, the first encounter with patients presents an opportunity for rheumatologists to screen for risk factors and intervene.

  • 10.
    Askling, J
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Baecklund, E
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Granath, F
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Geborek, P
    Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Fored, M
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Backlin, C
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bertilsson, L
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cöster, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Reumatologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Medicincentrum, Länskliniken för Reumatologi i Östergötland.
    Jacobsson, L T
    Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindblad, S
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lysholm, J
    Falu County Hospital, Falun, Sweden.
    Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, S
    Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Saxne, T
    University of Lund Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    van Vollenhoven, R
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klareskog, L
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Feltelius, N
    Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy in rheumatoid arthritis and risk of malignant lymphomas: relative risks and time trends in the Swedish Biologics Register2009Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 68, nr 5, s. 648-653Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists have proved effective as treatment against rheumatoid arthritis ( RA), but the unresolved issue of whether the use of anti-TNF therapy increases the already elevated risk of lymphoma in RA remains a concern.

    Methods: Using the Swedish Biologics Register (ARTIS), the Swedish Cancer Register, pre-existing RA cohorts and cross-linkage with other national health and census registers, a national RA cohort (n = 67 743) was assembled and patients who started anti-TNF therapy between 1998 and July 2006 ( n = 6604) were identified. A general population comparator ( n = 471 024) was also assembled and the incidence of lymphomas from 1999 to 31 December 2006 was assessed and compared in these individuals.

    Results: Among the 6604 anti-TNF-treated RA patients, 26 malignant lymphomas were observed during 26 981 person-years of follow-up, which corresponded to a relative risk (RR) of 1.35 (95% CI 0.82 to 2.11) versus anti-TNF-naive RA patients ( 336 lymphomas during 365 026 person-years) and 2.72 ( 95% CI 1.82 to 4.08) versus the general population comparator ( 1568 lymphomas during 3 355 849 person-years). RA patients starting anti-TNF therapy in 1998-2001 accounted for the entire increase in lymphoma risk versus the two comparators. By contrast, RR did not vary significantly by time since start of first treatment or with the accumulated duration of treatment, nor with the type of anti-TNF agent.

    Conclusion: Overall and as used in routine care against RA, TNF antagonists are not associated with any major further increase in the already elevated lymphoma occurrence in RA. Changes in the selection of patients for treatment may influence the observed risk.

  • 11.
    Bentow, C.
    et al.
    Inova Diagnost, CA USA.
    Lakos, G.
    Inova Diagnost, CA USA.
    Martis, P.
    Inova Diagnost, CA USA.
    Wahl, E.
    Inova Diagnost, CA USA.
    Garcia, M.
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Vinas, O.
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Espinosa, G.
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Cervera, R.
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Carmona-Fernandes, D.
    University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Santos, M. J.
    University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Hanly, J. G.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Mahler, M.
    Inova Diagnost, CA USA.
    International multi-center evaluation of a novel chemiluminescence assay for the detection of anti-dsDNA antibodies2016Ingår i: Lupus, ISSN 0961-2033, E-ISSN 1477-0962, Vol. 25, nr 8, s. 864-872Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Anti-double stranded desoxyribonucleic acid (anti-dsDNA) antibodies are considered fairly specific for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and their quantification is useful for the clinical management of SLE patients. We assessed the diagnostic performance of the QUANTA Flash dsDNA chemiluminescent immunoassay (CIA) in comparison to an ELISA, using patients from five participating countries. The main focus was to evaluate the correlation between anti-dsDNA antibody results from the CIA and global SLE disease activity, as measured by the SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K). Patients and methods: A total of 1431 samples (SLE, n=843; disease controls, n=588) from five countries (Canada, USA, Portugal, Sweden and Spain) were tested with QUANTA Flash dsDNA (Inova Diagnostics, San Diego, CA, USA). Data obtained with the QUANTA Lite dsDNA SC ELISA (Inova Diagnostics) were available for samples from three sites (Canada, USA and Sweden, n=566). The SLEDAI-2K scores were available for 805 SLE patients and a cut-off ofamp;gt;4 was used to define active disease. Results: QUANTA Flash dsDNA had a sensitivity of 54.3% for the diagnosis of SLE, combined with 89.8% specificity. Anti-dsDNA antibody levels were significantly higher (pamp;lt;0.0001) in active SLE (SLEDAI-2Kamp;gt;4; n=232; median value 83.0IU/mL) versus the inactive patients (n=573; median value 22.3IU/mL), and the SLEDAI-2K scoring correlated with their dsDNA antibody levels (Spearmans rho=0.44, pamp;lt;0.0001). Similar but less pronounced findings were also found for the ELISA, in relation to disease activity. Conclusions: The QUANTA Flash dsDNA assay showed good clinical performance in a large international multi-center study. Additionally, the strong correlation between anti-dsDNA antibody results and SLEDAI-2K scores supported the potential utility of QUANTA Flash dsDNA for monitoring disease activity.

  • 12.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Rehabiliteringsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Aspects of Disability in Rheumatoid Arthritis: a five-year follow-up in the Swedish TIRA project2008Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a progressive disease, often leading to disability. Because the disease course develops rapidly during the first years after diagnosis, more knowledge is needed about the early disease course to minimize later disability. This thesis describes the course of disability in early RA such as hand function, pain intensity, activity limitation and sick leave. In addition, this thesis compares disability between women and men and compares disability between RA patients and referents.

    This thesis is primarily based on data from the 320 patients that were included in the multi-centre project in Sweden called ‘Early interventions in rheumatoid arthritis’ (TIRA). A wide range of outcome variables was registered between 1996 and 2006 during regular follow-ups from time for diagnosis through the eight-year follow-up. Outcome regarding disease activity and disability of RA patients still remaining in TIRA at the three and five year follow-up respectively are used in this thesis. Data concerning sick leave were obtained for the patients during six years (1993-2001) – three years before and three years after diagnosis. Referents were included in two of the studies. Data regarding disability in referents were obtained according to hand function and activity limitation using the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ). Data for sick leave were obtained for six years in referents, for the same period as the RA patients.

    For most variables, disability in RA was most pronounced at time of diagnosis but before intervention started. Disability was then reduced already at the 3-month follow-up and thereafter affected but stable during the following five years. The exception was participation, reflected by sick leave, a variable that was stable from inclusion to three years from diagnosis. Activity limitation, pain intensity and sick leave in RA that represents different aspects of disability were explained by other aspects of disability and contextual factors rather than by disease activity. RA affects women and men differently in some aspects. Women had more severe course of activity limitations than men according to HAQ. Men were more affected than women in range of motion, although the differences were small in a clinical perspective. However, pain intensity and frequency of sick leave did not differ between women and men. Patients with RA have pronounced disability in relation to referents although several variables improve soon after diagnosis. This discrepancy refers to hand function as well as activity limitations and sick leave. The frequency of sick leave increased during the year before diagnosis in relation to referents and was thereafter high compared to sick leave in referents.

    Delarbeten
    1. Hand function in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis: A prospective study over three years (the Swedish TIRA project)
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Hand function in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis: A prospective study over three years (the Swedish TIRA project)
    2006 (Engelska)Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 35, nr 1, s. 15-19Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe the course of hand function in women and men during the first 3 years after diagnosis of recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA), to investigate sex differences in hand function, and to study correlations between and within hand function assessments.

    Methods: A total of 276 patients (69% women) with RA of a maximal duration of 12 months were recruited to the study. Hand function was assessed by the Grip Ability Test (GAT) and Signals of Functional Impairment (SOFI). Peak and average grip force over 10 s in the right and left hand was measured by an electronic device.

    Results: Hand function was affected at diagnosis, but had improved significantly at the 3-months' follow-up and then remained stable (but still affected) in both women and men. As assessed by SOFI, hand function was worse in men than in women, whereas women had significantly lower grip force. GAT, grip force, and SOFI correlated weakly. The average and peak values of grip force correlated strongly, as did the grip force in the right and the left hand.

    Conclusion: Hand function was profoundly affected at diagnosis of RA, but improved significantly within 3 months and remained stable (but still affected) over 3 years. As expected, women on average had significantly lower grip force than men.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Informa Healthcare, 2006
    Nyckelord
    Hand function, course, sex differences, rheumatoid arthritis, impairment, assessment
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13327 (URN)10.1080/03009740510026562 (DOI)000235183300003 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2008-06-02 Skapad: 2008-06-02 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-13Bibliografiskt granskad
    2. Hand Function and Activity Limitation According to Health Assessment Questionnaire in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Healthy Referents: 5-Year Followup of Predictors of Activity Limitation (The Swedish TIRA Project)
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Hand Function and Activity Limitation According to Health Assessment Questionnaire in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Healthy Referents: 5-Year Followup of Predictors of Activity Limitation (The Swedish TIRA Project)
    2007 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 34, nr 2, s. 296-302Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study identifies baseline predictors of future activity limitation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To reinforce the utility of instruments assessing functional ability/activity limitation, we used reference data from healthy referents.

    Methods: This study includes 189 patients (69% women) with recent-onset RA (onset of joint swelling not more than 12 months at diagnosis) in a prospective cohort ("the Swedish TIRA project") during 27 months from 1996 through 1998. Regular followups were done for a period of 5 years, and 123 healthy persons (50% women) were recruited as referents. Hand function was assessed by the "grip ability test (GAT)" and "signals of functional impairment" (SOFI). Grip force was measured with the electronic device GrippitTM. Activity limitation was assessed with the Swedish version of the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ).

    Results: Throughout the study and for both sexes, GAT, grip force, SOFI-hand, and HAQ were significantly different for the patients compared to healthy referents. In the healthy referents, HAQ was mainly related to age and GAT, whereas in RA HAQ was most obviously linked to grip force. Five years after diagnosis only 8% of HAQ outcome was explained by the baseline measures: HAQ, grip force, SOFI-lower limb, sex, walking speed, and GAT.

    Conclusion: Our study provides valuable reference data for several functional ability and activity limitation measures. The HAQ score was explained by different variables in healthy referents compared to patients with RA. Five years after diagnosis only 8% of HAQ outcome was explained by the variables assessed at inclusion.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Journal of Rheumatology Publishing Co. Ltd., 2007
    Nyckelord
    Rheumatoid Arthritis, Disabilty, Longitudinal studies, Sex differences, Reference values
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13328 (URN)000244112900012 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2008-06-02 Skapad: 2008-06-02 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-13Bibliografiskt granskad
    3. Multivariate relationships between pain intensity and other aspects of health in rheumatoid arthritis: cross sectional and five year longitudinal analyses (the Swedish TIRA project)
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Multivariate relationships between pain intensity and other aspects of health in rheumatoid arthritis: cross sectional and five year longitudinal analyses (the Swedish TIRA project)
    2008 (Engelska)Ingår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, Vol. 30, nr 19, s. 1429-1438Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study analyses the relationships between pain intensity and other aspects of health commonly used to assess disease activity and disability in early rheumatoid arthritis and examines whether such relationships were different between women and men.

    Subjects and methods: This study included the 189 patients (69% women) with early RA (symptoms <12 months at diagnosis) still remaining in the Swedish TIRA cohort 5 years after inclusion. Disease activity and disability was assessed 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months (M0-M60) after inclusion by erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), number of swollen and tender joints, physicians global assessment of disease activity (PGA), grip force average over 10 seconds (Grippit), Grip Ability Test (GAT), Signals of Functional Impairment (SOFI) in hand, lower limb and upper limb, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and pain intensity measured with a visual analogue scale (VAS). The variables were divided into meaningful blocks according to the correlation structure in a principal component analysis (PCA) at M60. Using hierarchical partial least squares (PLS) analyses, this study investigated the blocks cross-sectionally to test for correlations with pain intensity at M0 and M60. The blocks at M0 were also used as predictors of pain intensity at M60 in a hierarchical PLS.

    Results: The strongest relationship was found between pain intensity and the second block, consisting of HAQ and SOFI-lower limb at the cross-sectional analyses in both women and men. The block representing disease activity (i.e., ESR, CRP, PGA, and swollen and tender joints) had the weakest relation to pain intensity. According to the longitudinal analyses, the disease activity variables (block 1) at M0 had the strongest relationship to pain intensity at M60 in men. In contrast, HAQ and SOFI-lower limb (block 2) at M0 had a strong relation to pain intensity in women.

    Nyckelord
    pain intensity, predictions, principal component analysis, prospective study, Rheumatoid arthritis, sex differences, pain, research, longitudinal method
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13329 (URN)10.1080/09638280701623356 (DOI)
    Tillgänglig från: 2008-06-02 Skapad: 2008-06-02 Senast uppdaterad: 2013-09-13
    4. Sick leave before and after diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis in relation to referens: A report from the Swedish TIRA project
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Sick leave before and after diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis in relation to referens: A report from the Swedish TIRA project
    Visa övriga...
    2009 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 36, nr 6, s. 1170-1179Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Our study describes sick leave during 3 years before and 3 years after diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in relation to referents and identifies predictors for sick leave during the third year after diagnosis of RA.

    Methods. One hundred twenty patients (76% women) from the Swedish early RA study TIRA were included. Disease activity and disability were registered regularly during 3 years in TIRA. Referents were matched for sex, age, and home town. Sick leave data were obtained for patients 3 years before and 3 years after diagnosis and for the referents for the corresponding 6 years.

    Results. No differences were seen between patients and referents regarding sick leave during the first 2 years, whereas sick leave increased in patients 6 months before diagnosis, from 30% to 53%. During the 3 years after diagnosis, sick leave among patients was rather stable, varying between 50% and 60%, even though disability pension increased and sickness benefit decreased. Sick leave before diagnosis, disability 1 year after diagnosis, and type of work were identified as predictors for sick leave during the third year after diagnosis.

    Conclusion. Not surprisingly, sick leave in patients increased the year before diagnosis. Although disease activity and disability diminished after diagnosis, the patients’ sick leave remained essentially unchanged. Sick leave 3 years after diagnosis was foremost predicted by earlier sick leave, disability, and type of work.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Journal of Rheumatology Publishing Co. Ltd., 2009
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13330 (URN)10.3899/jrheum.080523 (DOI)000266891500016 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2008-06-02 Skapad: 2008-06-02 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-13Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 13.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Avdelningen för arbetsterapi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Rörelse och Hälsa.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    School of Health Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Stenström, Birgitta
    Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Rörelse och Hälsa.
    Foot barriers in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: an interview study among Swedish women and men2018Ingår i: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 70, nr 9, s. 1348-1354Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Foot impairments are related to reduced mobility and participation restrictions in daily activities in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The new biological medications are effective and reduce disease activity, but not disability to the same extent. Foot impairments are assumed to be related to participation restrictions also in patients with early RA, diagnosed after the introduction of biological medications. The knowledge of foot impairments needs to be more explored after the introduction of biological disease-modifying drugs (bDMARDs). The aim of this study was to explore the patients' perspective of foot impairments related to early RA.

    METHODS: The sample included 59 patients (20-63 years) who were interviewed about participation dilemmas in daily life using the Critical Incident Technique. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data related to foot impairments were extracted and analyzed thematically. A research partner validated the analysis. The study was approved by the Regional Ethics Committee.

    RESULTS: Patients with early RA described a variety of participation restrictions related to foot impairments: 1) foot hindrances in domestic life, 2) foot impairments influencing work, 3) leisure activities restricted by one's feet 4) struggling to be mobile 5) foot impairments as an early sign of rheumatic disease.

    CONCLUSION: There is a need to focus on foot impairments related to early RA, and for health care professionals to understand these signs. A suggestion for future research is to conduct a longitudinal follow-up of foot impairment related to medication, disease activity and disability in patients diagnosed after the introduction of bDMARDs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 14.
    Björk Wilhelms, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Mirrasekhian, Elahe
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Engblom, David
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Cyclooxygenase isoform exchange blocks inflammatory symptoms2014Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclooxygenase‐2 (COX‐2) is the main source of inducible prostaglandin E2 production and mediates inflammatory symptoms including fever, loss of appetite and hyperalgesia. In contrast, COX‐1 is dispensable for most inflammatory symptoms. Global deletion of COX‐2 leads to a blockade of inflammation‐induced fever and appetite loss but also to high rates of fetal mortality. The latter is unfortunate since mice without COX‐2 are powerful tools in the study of inflammation and cardiovascular medicine. The differential functionality of the COX isoforms could be due to differences in regulatory regions of the genes, leading to different expression patterns, or to differences in the coding sequence, leading to distinct functional properties of the proteins. To study this in the context of inflammatory symptoms, we used mice in which the coding sequence of COX‐2 was replaced by the corresponding sequence of COX‐1. In these mice, COX‐1 mRNA was induced by inflammation but COX‐1 protein expression did not fully mimic inflammation‐induced COX‐2 expression. Just like mice globally lacking COX‐2, these mice showed a complete lack of fever and inflammation‐induced anorexia. However, as previously reported, they displayed close to normal survival rates. This shows that the COX activity generated from the hybrid gene was strong enough to allow survival but not strong enough to mediate inflammatory symptoms, making the line an interesting alternative to COX‐2 knockouts for the study of inflammation. Our results also show that the functional differences between COX‐1 and COX‐2 in the context of inflammatory symptoms is not only dependent on the features of the promoter regions. Instead they indicate that there are fundamental differences between the isoforms at translational or posttranslational levels, which make hybrid genes less functional.

  • 15.
    Bybrant, Mara Cerqueiro
    et al.
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grahnquist, Lena
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Hepatology and Nutrition, Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ortqvist, Eva
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Pediatric Diabetes Clinic, Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Cecilia
    Department of clinical sciences, Lund University, Skåne University hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Forsander, Gun
    The Queen Silvia Children’s hospital, Sahlgrenska University hospital and The Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Elding Larsson, Helena
    Department of clinical sciences, Lund University, Skåne University hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lernmark, Ake
    Department of clinical sciences, Lund University, Skåne University hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för barns och kvinnors hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Marcus, Claude
    Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Department of Pediatrics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Sten A.
    Department of clinical sciences, Lund University, Skåne University hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies in children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes are related to human leukocyte antigen but not to islet autoantibodies: A Swedish nationwide prospective population-based cohort study2018Ingår i: Autoimmunity, ISSN 0891-6934, E-ISSN 1607-842X, Vol. 51, nr 5, s. 221-227Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study explored the association between tissue transglutaminase autoantibody (tTGA), high-risk human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes and islet autoantibodies in children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes (T1D).

    Patients and methods: Dried blood spots and serum samples were taken at diagnosis from children <18 years of age participating in Better Diabetes Diagnosis (BDD), a Swedish nationwide prospective cohort study of children newly diagnosed with T1D. We analyzed tTGA, high-risk HLA DQ2 and DQ8 (DQX is neither DQ2 nor DQ8) and islet auto-antibodies (GADA, IA-2A, IAA, and three variants of Zinc transporter; ZnT8W, ZnT8R, and ZnT8QA).

    Results: Out of 2705 children diagnosed with T1D, 85 (3.1%) had positive tTGA and 63 (2.3%) had borderline values. The prevalence of tTGA was higher in children with the HLA genotypes DQ2/2, DQ2/X or DQ2/8 compared to those with DQ8/8 or DQ8/X (p = .00001) and those with DQX/X (p ≤ .00001). No significant differences were found in relation to islet autoantibodies or age at diagnosis, but the presence of tTGA was more common in girls than in boys (p = .018).

    Conclusion: tTGA at T1D diagnosis (both positive and borderline values 5.4%) was higher in girls and in children homozygous for DQ2/2, followed by children heterozygous for DQ2. Only children with DQ2 and/or DQ8 had tTGA. HLA typing at the diagnosis of T1D can help to identify those without risk for CD.

  • 16.
    Chalise, Jaya Prakash
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Immune tolerance by interferon-alpha in experimental arthritis2015Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Type I Interferons (mainly IFN-α & IFN-β) belong to a family of cytokines that possess strong antiviral and immunomodulatory properties. Pro- and/or anti-inflammatory effects of type I IFN have been observed in infectious diseases and several autoimmune diseases including SLE, MS, RA and experimental models thereof, but what defines either outcome is largely obscure. The main aim of this thesis is to understand how IFN-α may act anti-inflammatory in a model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). In this model, mice are sensitised with methylated-BSA (mBSA) emulsified in Freund’s adjuvant at day 1 and 7 followed by intra-articular injection of mBSA in the knee joint at day 21, which induces arthritis within 1 week.

    Administration of IFN-α at the time of mBSA sensitisations (day 1 and day 7) but not at induction of arthritis (day 21) clearly protected against arthritis in a type I IFN receptor dependent manner. Humoral immunity might not be involved in this protection as the levels of antigen-specific IgG (total, IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b), IgA, IgE in serum were not altered in IFN-α treated mice. However, IFN-α-protection was accompanied by delayed and decreased antigen-specific proliferative responses in spleen and lymph node cells ex vivo, including impaired proliferative recall responses after intra-articular antigenic challenge.

    In the course of AIA, IFN-α inhibited the increase of circulatory IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF in the sensitisation phase (day 0-21) and also the re-call response of IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12, TNF, IFN-γ, and IL-17 induced by intra-articular mBSA challenge in arthritis phase (day 21-28). This IFN-α-inhibition of cytokines was also apparent in mBSA-re-stimulated spleen and lymph node cell cultures ex vivo, including inhibited cytokine production in CD4+ T helper cells and macrophages. In contrast to the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the levels of immunomodulatory TGF-β was clearly enhanced in IFN-α-treated mice, both in serum and in re-stimulated leucocytes cultures including both macrophages, especially in the sensitisation phase, and in CD4+ T cells in the arthritis phase. By  inhibiting TGF-β signalling in vivo, the protective effect of IFN-α was  shown to be dependent on TGF-β signalling in the sensitisation phase.

    The cytokine TGF-β is an activator of the indoleamine 2,3 dioxygnese (IDO1), a potent immuneregulatory component that acts via enzymatic production of kynurenine (Kyn) and signalling activity. The IFN-α-protective effect in AIA was associated with both increased expression and enzymatic activity of IDO1 and the IFN-α-protection was totally ablated in mice lacking IDO1 expression (IDO1 KO mice) and in mice treated with the inhibitor of the enzymatic activity of IDO1 (1-Methyl Tryptophan; 1-MT). Interestingly, administration of the IDO-metabolite Kyn protected mice from AIA in an IFNARindependent manner. These observations show that the IDO1 enzymatic activity is important for the protective effect of IFN-α. Using 1-MT, it was further shown that the enzymatic activity of IDO1 was, like TGF-β, crucial only at the sensitisation but not in the arthritis phase of AIA for IFN-α to protect against arthritis. Instead, IDO1’s non-enzymatic signalling activity, characterized by sustained expression of IDO1 and non-canonical NF-κB activation in pDCs, was observed in the arthritis phase in spleen cells from mice treated with IFN-α.

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) were also found to be important for IFN-α-protection in AIA. Transient depletion of Treg cells by diphtheria toxin in DEREG mice in the arthritis phase, but not during the sensitisation phase abolished IFN-α-protection. Treatment with IFN-α enhanced the numbers of Treg cells in the course of AIA and their function; compared to untreated mice, Treg cells isolated at day 10 and 20 of AIA from IFN-α- treated mice exhibited higher suppressive activity against mBSA-stimulated proliferation of responder T cells. The enhancing effect of IFN-α on Treg cell numbers was observed in blood, spleen, LNs and also in ex-vivo cultures of leucocytes re-stimulated with mBSA and IFN-α. Although IFN-α clearly increased the suppressive activity of Treg cells, adoptive transfer of Treg cells from mBSA immunized mice, regardless of IFN-α treatment, prevented the development of arthritis.

    Conclusion

    In the presence of IFN-α during antigen sensitisation, a state of tolerance is established, which is able to prevent joint inflammation induced by antigenic re-challenge. This immunological tolerance is created in the sensitisation phase of AIA and is characterized by inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines, increased TGF-β production and activity of the IDO1 enzyme, the latter two being indispensable for IFN-α-induced protection. Administration of Kyn, the metabolite of the enzymatic activity of IDO1, in the sensitisation phase also protected against AIA downstream of type I IFN signalling. In the arthritis phase regulatory T cells, whose numbers and suppressive capacity was clearly enhanced by IFN-α, mediate the actual prevention of arthritis development in IFN-α-treated animals. We have thus identified molecular and cellular components of the anti-inflammatory program elicited by IFN-α including Kyn that may not have the pro-inflammatory effects associated with IFN.

    Delarbeten
    1. Type I IFN protects against antigen-induced arthritis
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Type I IFN protects against antigen-induced arthritis
    2011 (Engelska)Ingår i: European Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0014-2980, E-ISSN 1521-4141, Vol. 41, nr 6, s. 1687-1695Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA) involve immune reactions against specific antigens. The type I IFN system is suspected to promote autoimmunity in systemic lupus erythematosus, but may also dampen immune reactions in e. g. inflammatory bowel disease. This prompted us to investigate the role of type I IFN in antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). The importance of type I IFN in methylated (m) BSA-induced arthritis was studied by using mice deficient for the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR) and by administration of the IFN-alpha activator viral double-stranded (ds) RNA or recombinant IFN-alpha at antigen sensitization. In IFNAR knock-out mice, arthritis severity was significantly higher than in WT mice. Administration of dsRNA at antigen sensitization protected WT but not IFNAR KO mice from arthritis. Also, addition of recombinant IFN-alpha during the immunization, but not the induction phase of arthritis, almost abolished arthritis. Protection mediated by IFN-alpha was accompanied by delayed and decreased antigen-specific proliferative responses, including impaired lymph node recall responses after intra-articular antigenic challenge. In conclusion, we demonstrate that type I IFN can prevent joint inflammation by downregulating antigen-specific cellular immunity.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    John Wiley and Sons, Ltd, 2011
    Nyckelord
    Arthritis; Tolerance; Type I IFN
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-69898 (URN)10.1002/eji.201040956 (DOI)000291559700019 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2011-08-09 Skapad: 2011-08-08 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-08
    2. Interferon alpha inhibits antigen-specific production of proinflammatory cytokines and enhances antigen-specific transforming growth factor beta production in antigen-induced arthritis
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Interferon alpha inhibits antigen-specific production of proinflammatory cytokines and enhances antigen-specific transforming growth factor beta production in antigen-induced arthritis
    2013 (Engelska)Ingår i: Arthritis Research and Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, Vol. 15, nr 5, s. R143-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Interferon alpha (IFN-α) has a complex role in autoimmunity, in that it may both enhance and prevent inflammation. We have previously shown that the presence of IFN-α at sensitization protects against subsequent antigen-triggered arthritis. To understand this tolerogenic mechanism, we performed a descriptive, hypothesis-generating study of cellular and humoral responses associated with IFN-α-mediated protection against arthritis.Methods: Arthritis was evaluated at day 28 in mice given a subcutaneous injection of methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA), together with Freund adjuvant and 0 to 5,000 U IFN-α at days 1 and 7, followed by intraarticular injection of mBSA alone at day 21. The effect of IFN-α on mBSA-specific IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, IgA, and IgE was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cytokines in circulation and in ex vivo cultures on mBSA restimulation was evaluated with ELISA and Luminex, and the identity of cytokine-producing cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis.Results: Administration of IFN-α protected mice from arthritis in a dose-dependent manner but had no effect on antigen-specific antibody levels. However, IFN-α did inhibit the initial increase of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF, and the recall response induced by intraarticular mBSA challenge of IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12, TNF, IFN-γ, and IL-17 in serum. IFN-α decreased both macrophage and CD4+ T cell-derived IFN-γ production, whereas IL-17 was decreased only in CD4+ T cells. Ex vivo, in mBSA-restimulated spleen and lymph node cell cultures, the inhibitory effect of in vivo administration of IFN-α on proinflammatory cytokine production was clearly apparent, but had a time limit. An earlier macrophage-derived, and stronger activation of the antiinflammatory cytokine transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) was observed in IFN-α-treated animals, combined with an increase in CD4+ T cells producing TGF-β when arthritis was triggered by mBSA (day 21). Presence of IFN-α at immunizations also prevented the reduction in TGF-β production, which was induced by the intraarticular mBSA injection triggering arthritis in control animals.Conclusions: Administration of IFN-α has a profound effect on the cellular response to mBSA plus adjuvant, but does not affect antigen-specific Ig production. By including IFN-α at immunizations, spleen and lymph node cells inhibit their repertoire of antigen-induced proinflammatory cytokines while enhancing antiinflammatory TGF-β production, first in macrophages, and later also in CD4+ T cells. On intraarticular antigen challenge, this antiinflammatory state is reenforced, manifested as inhibition of proinflammatory recall responses and preservation of TGF-β levels. This may explain why IFN-α protects against antigen-induced arthritis. © 2013 Chalise et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    London, UK: BioMed Central, 2013
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102367 (URN)10.1186/ar4326 (DOI)000329737400043 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2013-12-09 Skapad: 2013-12-09 Senast uppdaterad: 2015-11-03Bibliografiskt granskad
    3. IDO1 and TGF- 1 β mediate protective effects of IFN-α in antigen-induced arthritis
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>IDO1 and TGF- 1 β mediate protective effects of IFN-α in antigen-induced arthritis
    Visa övriga...
    (Engelska)Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Interferon-α (IFN-α) prevents antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in mice by an unknown mechanism. Indoleamine 2, 3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is an immunoregulator via enzymatic as well as signalling activity, which can be activated by TGF-β and further mediated via non canonical NF-κB signalling. We here investigated whether IDO1 and TGF-β are involved in IFN-α protective effects in AIA. Arthritis was induced in wt, Ido1-/- or Ifnar-/- mice, treated or not with IFN-α or kynurenine, the main IDO1 product, and antibodies neutralizing TGF-β or 1-methyltryptophan (1-MT), an inhibitor of IDO1 catalytic activity. IDO1 expression and enzymatic activity were determined by RT-PCR and HPLC, respectively. Proliferation was measured by 3H-Thymidine incorporation. Non-canonical NF-κB signalling was evaluated by ELISA and Western blot in plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) from treated mice. Protective effects of IFN-α in AIA were associated with increased IDO1 expression and kynurenine production in spleen cells, particularly at the time of mBSA sensitization. Lack of IDO1 ablated IFN-α protection and kynurenine prevented AIA in an IFNAR-independent manner. The IDO1 catalytic activity was crucial for IFN-α effects at the sensitization but not effector phase of AIA. The disease effector phase in mice treated with IFN-α was instead characterized by sustained IDO1 and TGF-β expression and activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway in pDCs. IFN-α protective effects in AIA involves IDO1 enzymatic and signalling activity in the disease sensitization and effector phase, respectively. Kynurenine, the main IDO1 metabolite, can be used as an alternative treatment to IFN-α in protecting mice from AIA.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Farmakologi och toxikologi Reumatologi och inflammation Klinisk medicin
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122461 (URN)
    Forskningsfinansiär
    VetenskapsrådetReumatikerförbundetLinköpings universitet
    Tillgänglig från: 2015-11-03 Skapad: 2015-11-03 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-10Bibliografiskt granskad
    4. Regulatory T cells manifest IFN-α mediated protection during antigen induced arthritis
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Regulatory T cells manifest IFN-α mediated protection during antigen induced arthritis
    Visa övriga...
    (Engelska)Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Type I interferon induces tolerance against arthritogenic antigen and protects against antigen induced arthritis (AIA). Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) resolve aberrant immune reaction, maintain self-tolerance and prevent the development of autoimmune diseases. We here investigated the impact of Interferon alpha (IFN-α) on Treg cells development and function during antigen induced arthritis.

    Methods

    For AIA, mice were immunized with methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) at day 1 and 7 in presence or absence of IFN-α. At day 21, arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of mBSA and arthritis was evaluated at day 28. At various days of AIA, CD4, CD25, Foxp3 and CTLA-4 expression was quantified by FACS in blood cells, splenocytes, lymph nodes cells and in ex vivo re-stimulated leucocytes (pooled splenocytes and lymph nodes cells) isolated at same days. To investigate the importance of Treg cells in IFN-α protection in AIA, Foxp3DTReGFP+mice were used, where Treg cells can be depleted transiently by administration of diptherin toxin. CFSE based suppression assay was used to assess the suppression by Treg cells isolated day 4, 10, 20 of AIA against proliferation of mBSA or anti-CD3 stimulated responder T cells (Tresp cells) isolated at same days. For adoptive transfer experiments, 250,000 Treg cells from IFN-α treated or untreated mice day 20 of AIA were intravenously injected to recipient pre-immunized mice without IFN-α treatment during the induction of arthritis. The importance of IFN-α signalling on T cells for the IFN-α protection was evaluated by using CD4-Cre+/- IFNAR flox/flox mice.

    Results

    Protective effects of IFN-α in AIA were associated with significant TGF-β dependent increase in Foxp3+ T cells in blood at day 4 and minor increase of Foxp3+T cells in spleen and lymph node cells. However IFN-α signalling in T cells is not required for IFN-α-protection. Upon ex vivo re-stimulation in presence of IFN-α with mBSA but not anti-CD3, the Treg cells numbers were increased in leucocytes isolated from day 4 and day 10 of AIA. Transient depletion of Treg cells during induction of arthritis (day 21) abolished IFN-α-protection however the protection was not affected when Treg cells are depleted during immunization phase (day 1 and day 7). Against mBSA-stimulated proliferation of Tresp cells, suppression by Treg cells isolated from day 10 and day 20 from IFN-α treated mice are significantly higher than Treg cells from untreated mice. Treg cells isolated from IFN-α or untreated mice at day 20 of AIA when transferred to pre-immunized untreated mice prevent the development of arthritis.

    Conclusion

    Treg cells are critically associated with IFN-α protective effects in AIA. IFN-α enhances TGF-β dependent early development of Treg cells and later IFN-α enhances their suppressive capacity against T cells proliferation in antigen specific manner during AIA.

    Nyckelord
    Interferon alpha, regulatory T cells, antigen induced arthritis, TGF-beta
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Farmakologi och toxikologi Reumatologi och inflammation Klinisk medicin
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122462 (URN)
    Forskningsfinansiär
    VetenskapsrådetReumatikerförbundetLinköpings universitet
    Tillgänglig från: 2015-11-03 Skapad: 2015-11-03 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-10Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 17.
    Chalise, Jaya Prakash
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Chenna Narendra, Sudeep
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Biggs, Sophie
    Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Kalinke, Ulrich
    Twincore, Germany.
    Iacono, Alberta
    Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Boon, Louis
    EPIRUS Biopharmaceuticals, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Regulatory T cells manifest IFN-α mediated protection during antigen induced arthritisManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Type I interferon induces tolerance against arthritogenic antigen and protects against antigen induced arthritis (AIA). Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) resolve aberrant immune reaction, maintain self-tolerance and prevent the development of autoimmune diseases. We here investigated the impact of Interferon alpha (IFN-α) on Treg cells development and function during antigen induced arthritis.

    Methods

    For AIA, mice were immunized with methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) at day 1 and 7 in presence or absence of IFN-α. At day 21, arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of mBSA and arthritis was evaluated at day 28. At various days of AIA, CD4, CD25, Foxp3 and CTLA-4 expression was quantified by FACS in blood cells, splenocytes, lymph nodes cells and in ex vivo re-stimulated leucocytes (pooled splenocytes and lymph nodes cells) isolated at same days. To investigate the importance of Treg cells in IFN-α protection in AIA, Foxp3DTReGFP+mice were used, where Treg cells can be depleted transiently by administration of diptherin toxin. CFSE based suppression assay was used to assess the suppression by Treg cells isolated day 4, 10, 20 of AIA against proliferation of mBSA or anti-CD3 stimulated responder T cells (Tresp cells) isolated at same days. For adoptive transfer experiments, 250,000 Treg cells from IFN-α treated or untreated mice day 20 of AIA were intravenously injected to recipient pre-immunized mice without IFN-α treatment during the induction of arthritis. The importance of IFN-α signalling on T cells for the IFN-α protection was evaluated by using CD4-Cre+/- IFNAR flox/flox mice.

    Results

    Protective effects of IFN-α in AIA were associated with significant TGF-β dependent increase in Foxp3+ T cells in blood at day 4 and minor increase of Foxp3+T cells in spleen and lymph node cells. However IFN-α signalling in T cells is not required for IFN-α-protection. Upon ex vivo re-stimulation in presence of IFN-α with mBSA but not anti-CD3, the Treg cells numbers were increased in leucocytes isolated from day 4 and day 10 of AIA. Transient depletion of Treg cells during induction of arthritis (day 21) abolished IFN-α-protection however the protection was not affected when Treg cells are depleted during immunization phase (day 1 and day 7). Against mBSA-stimulated proliferation of Tresp cells, suppression by Treg cells isolated from day 10 and day 20 from IFN-α treated mice are significantly higher than Treg cells from untreated mice. Treg cells isolated from IFN-α or untreated mice at day 20 of AIA when transferred to pre-immunized untreated mice prevent the development of arthritis.

    Conclusion

    Treg cells are critically associated with IFN-α protective effects in AIA. IFN-α enhances TGF-β dependent early development of Treg cells and later IFN-α enhances their suppressive capacity against T cells proliferation in antigen specific manner during AIA.

  • 18.
    Chalise, Jaya Prakash
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Pallotta, Maria Teresa
    Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Chenna Narendra, Sudeep
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för läkemedelsforskning. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk farmakologi.
    Iacono, Alberta
    Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Boon, Louis
    EPIRUS Biopharmaceuticals, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Grohmann, Ursula
    Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    IDO1 and TGF- 1 β mediate protective effects of IFN-α in antigen-induced arthritisManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Interferon-α (IFN-α) prevents antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in mice by an unknown mechanism. Indoleamine 2, 3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is an immunoregulator via enzymatic as well as signalling activity, which can be activated by TGF-β and further mediated via non canonical NF-κB signalling. We here investigated whether IDO1 and TGF-β are involved in IFN-α protective effects in AIA. Arthritis was induced in wt, Ido1-/- or Ifnar-/- mice, treated or not with IFN-α or kynurenine, the main IDO1 product, and antibodies neutralizing TGF-β or 1-methyltryptophan (1-MT), an inhibitor of IDO1 catalytic activity. IDO1 expression and enzymatic activity were determined by RT-PCR and HPLC, respectively. Proliferation was measured by 3H-Thymidine incorporation. Non-canonical NF-κB signalling was evaluated by ELISA and Western blot in plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) from treated mice. Protective effects of IFN-α in AIA were associated with increased IDO1 expression and kynurenine production in spleen cells, particularly at the time of mBSA sensitization. Lack of IDO1 ablated IFN-α protection and kynurenine prevented AIA in an IFNAR-independent manner. The IDO1 catalytic activity was crucial for IFN-α effects at the sensitization but not effector phase of AIA. The disease effector phase in mice treated with IFN-α was instead characterized by sustained IDO1 and TGF-β expression and activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway in pDCs. IFN-α protective effects in AIA involves IDO1 enzymatic and signalling activity in the disease sensitization and effector phase, respectively. Kynurenine, the main IDO1 metabolite, can be used as an alternative treatment to IFN-α in protecting mice from AIA.

  • 19.
    Chenna Narendra, Sudeep
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Systemic and local regulation of experimental arthritis by IFN-α, dendritic cells and uridine2017Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, we have studied the immunological processes of joint inflammation that may be targets for future treatment of patients with arthritis. We focus on the immune-modulating properties of interferon-α (IFN-α) and uridine in experimental arthritis. The nucleoside uridine, which is regarded a safe treatment has anti-inflammatory properties notably by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release. Because the inflamed synovium in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by pathogenic TNF-production, uridine could potentially be away to ameliorate arthritis. Systemic administration of uridine had no effect on antigeninduced arthritis (AIA), which is a T-cell dependent model where animals are immunized twice (sensitization) with bovine serum albumin (mBSA), before local triggering of arthritis by intra-articular antigen (mBSA) re-challenge. In contrast, intra-articular administration of uridine clearly down modulated development of AIA in a dose dependent manner and inhibited the expression of synovial adhesion molecules, influx of inflammatory leukocytes and synovial expression of TNF and interleukin 6, but did not affect systemic levels of proinflammatory cytokines or antigen-specific T-cell responses. Local administration of uridine may thus be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of arthritis in the future.

    Viral double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (dsRNA), a common nucleic acid found in most viruses, can be found in the joints of RA patients and local deposition of such viral dsRNA induces arthritis by activating IFN-α. Here we show that arthritis induced by dsRNA can be mediated by IFN-producing dendritic cells in the joint and this may thus explain why viral infections are sometimes associated with arthritis.

    Earlier, to study the effect of dsRNA and IFN-α in an arthritis model, that like RA, is dependent on adaptive immunity, dsRNA and IFN-α were administered individually during the development of AIA. Both molecules clearly protected against AIA in a type I IFN receptor-dependent manner but were only effective if administered in the sensitization phase of AIA. Here we show that the anti-inflammatory effect of IFN-α is critically dependent on signalling via transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the enzymatic activity of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO). The IDO enzyme is produced by plasmacytoid DC and this cell type was critically required both during antigen sensitization and in the arthritis phase of AIA for the protective effect of IFN-α against AIA. In contrast, TGF-β and the enzymatic activity of IDO were only required during sensitization, which indicate that they are involved in initial steps of tolerogenic antigen sensitization. In this scenario, IFN- α first activates the enzymatic activity of IDO in pDC, which converts Tryptophan to Kynurenine, which thereafter activates TGF-β. Common for IDO-expressing pDC, Kyn and TGF-β is their ability to induce development of regulatory T cells (Tregs). We found that Tregs were crucial for IFN-α-mediated protection against AIA, but only in the arthritis phase. In line with this, adoptive transfer of Tregs isolated from IFN-α treated mice to recipient animals in the arthritis phase clearly protected against AIA. The numbers of Tregs were not significantly altered by IFN-α but IFN-α increased the suppressive capacity of Tregs against antigen-induced proliferation. This enhanced suppressive activity of Tregs in the arthritis phase was dependent on the earlier activated enzyme IDO1 during the sensitization phase of AIA. Thus, presence of IFN-α at the time of antigen sensitization activates the enzymatic activity of IDO, which generates Tregs with enhanced suppressive capacity that upon antigen re-challenge prevents inflammation. We have thus identified one example of how immune tolerance can be developed, that may be a future way to combat autoimmunity.

    Delarbeten
    1. Local but Not Systemic Administration of Uridine Prevents Development of Antigen-Induced Arthritis
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Local but Not Systemic Administration of Uridine Prevents Development of Antigen-Induced Arthritis
    2015 (Engelska)Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, nr 10, s. e0141863-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Uridine has earlier been show to down modulate inflammation in models of lung inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of uridine in arthritis. Methods Arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of mBSA in the knee of NMRI mice preimmunized with mBSA. Uridine was either administered locally by direct injection into the knee joint or systemically. Systemic treatment included repeated injections or implantation of a pellet continuously releasing uridine during the entire experimental procedure. Anti-mBSA specific immune responses were determined by ELISA and cell proliferation and serum cytokine levels were determined by Luminex. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify cells, study expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules in the joint. Results Local administration of 25-100 mg/kg uridine at the time of arthritis onset clearly prevented development of joint inflammation. In contrast, systemic administration of uridine (max 1.5 mg uridine per day) did not prevent development of arthritis. Protection against arthritis by local administration of uridine did not affect the anti-mBSA specific immune response and did not prevent the rise in serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with the triggering of arthritis. In contrast, local uridine treatment efficiently inhibited synovial expression of ICAM-1 and CD18, local cytokine production and recruitment of leukocytes to the synovium. Conclusion Local, but not systemic administration of uridine efficiently prevented development of antigen- induced arthritis. The protective effect did not involve alteration of systemic immunity to mBSA but clearly involved inhibition of synovial expression of adhesion molecules, decreased TNF and IL-6 production and prevention of leukocyte extravasation. Further, uridine is a small, inexpensive molecule and may thus be a new therapeutic option to treat joint inflammation in RA.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2015
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Klinisk medicin
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123070 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0141863 (DOI)000363920300089 ()26512984 (PubMedID)
    Anmärkning

    Funding Agencies|Vetenskapsradet-Grant [521-2011-3095]; Reumatikerforbundet Grant [155261]; County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden; Linkoping University

    Tillgänglig från: 2015-12-04 Skapad: 2015-12-03 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-01
    2. IDO1 and TGF-beta Mediate Protective Effects of IFN-alpha in Antigen-Induced Arthritis
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>IDO1 and TGF-beta Mediate Protective Effects of IFN-alpha in Antigen-Induced Arthritis
    Visa övriga...
    2016 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 197, nr 8, s. 3142-3151Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    IFN-alpha prevents Ag-induced arthritis (AIA), and in this study we investigated the role of IDO1 and TGF-beta signaling for this anti-inflammatory property of IFN-alpha. Arthritis was induced by methylated BSA (mBSA) in mBSA-sensitized wild-type (WT), Ido1(-/-), or Ifnar(-/-) mice, treated or not with IFN-alpha or the IDO1 product kynurenine (Kyn). Enzymatic IDO1 activity, TGF-beta, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) were neutralized by 1-methyltryptophan and Abs against TGF-beta and pDC, respectively. IDO1 expression was determined by RT-PCR, Western blot, and FACS, and enzymatic activity by HPLC. Proliferation was measured by H-3-thymidine incorporation and TGF-beta by RT-PCR and ELISA. WT but not Ido1(-/-) mice were protected from AIA by IFN-alpha, and Kyn, the main IDO1 product, also prevented AIA, both in WTand Ifnar(-/-) mice. Protective treatment with IFN-alpha increased the expression of IDO1 in pDC during AIA, and Ab-mediated depletion of pDC, either during mBSA sensitization or after triggering of arthritis, completely abrogated the protective effect of IFN-alpha. IFN-alpha treatment also increased the enzymatic IDO1 activity (Kyn/tryptophan ratio), which in turn activated production of TGF-beta. Neutralization of enzymatic IDO1 activity or TGF-beta signaling blocked the protective effect of IFN-alpha against AIA, but only during sensitization and not after triggering of arthritis. Likewise, inhibition of the IDO1 enzymatic activity in the sensitization phase, but not after triggering of arthritis, subdued the IFN-alpha-induced inhibition of mBSA-induced proliferation. In conclusion, presence of IFN-alpha at Ag sensitization activates an IDO1/TGF-beta-dependent anti-inflammatory program that upon antigenic rechallenge prevents inflammation via pDC.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    AMER ASSOC IMMUNOLOGISTS, 2016
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Immunologi inom det medicinska området
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-133121 (URN)10.4049/jimmunol.1502125 (DOI)000387965100018 ()27647832 (PubMedID)
    Tillgänglig från: 2016-12-12 Skapad: 2016-12-09 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-02-11
    3. Dendritic cells activated by double-stranded RNA induce arthritis via autocrine type I IFN signaling.
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Dendritic cells activated by double-stranded RNA induce arthritis via autocrine type I IFN signaling.
    2014 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Leukocyte Biology, ISSN 0741-5400, E-ISSN 1938-3673, Vol. 95, nr 4, s. 661-666Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Viral dsRNA can be found at the site of inflammation in RA patients, and intra-articular injection of dsRNA induces arthritis by activating type I IFN signaling in mice. Further, DCs, a major source of IFN-α, can be found in the synovium of RA patients. We therefore determined the occurrence of DCs in dsRNA-induced arthritis and their ability to induce arthritis. Here, we show, by immunohistochemistry, that cells expressing the pan-DC marker CD11c and the pDC marker 120G8 are present in the inflamed synovium in dsRNA-induced arthritis. Flt3L-generated and splenic DCs preactivated with dsRNA before intra-articular injection, but not mock-stimulated cells, clearly induced arthritis. Induction of arthritis was dependent on type I IFN signaling in the donor DCs, whereas IFNAR expression in the recipient was not required. Sorting of the Flt3L-DC population into cDCs (CD11c(+), PDCA-1(-)) and pDCs (CD11c(+), PDCA-1(+)) revealed that both subtypes were arthritogenic and produced type I IFN if treated with dsRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that viral nucleic acids can elicit arthritis by activating type I IFN signaling in DCs. Once triggered, autocrine type I IFN signaling in dsRNA-activated DCs is sufficient to propagate arthritis.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Society for Leukocyte Biology, 2014
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102370 (URN)10.1189/jlb.0613320 (DOI)000335346300011 ()24304616 (PubMedID)
    Tillgänglig från: 2013-12-09 Skapad: 2013-12-09 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-06
  • 20.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    The diagnostic accuracies of the 2012 SLICC criteria and the proposed EULAR/ACR criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus classification are comparable2019Ingår i: Lupus, ISSN 0961-2033, E-ISSN 1477-0962, Vol. 28, nr 6, s. 778-782Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In a joint effort, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) recently proposed new criteria for the classification of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with the overarching goal to identify potential participants for clinical studies. Herein, we present the first independent evaluation of these criteria in comparison with older classification grounds using an adult Scandinavian study population of confirmed SLE cases and individuals with SLE-mimicking conditions. We included 56 confirmed SLE cases meeting the 1982 ACR criteria (ACR-82) and/or the Fries diagnostic principle (antinuclear antibodies on at least one occasion plus involvement of at least two defined organ systems) and 55 controls with possible systemic autoimmune disease, including the presence of any SLE-related autoantibody. The proposed EULAR/ACR criteria showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 93% (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.83-0.98) compared with 83% (95% CI, 0.72-0.91) for the updated ACR criteria from 1997. The diagnostic accuracy of all tested classification grounds was fairly similar, achieving approximately 85%. However, the disease specificity of the EULAR/ACR criteria reached only 73% (95% CI, 0.59-0.83), which was comparable with the 2012 Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria, 75% (95% CI, 0.61-0.85), but clearly lower than for ACR-82, 94% (95% CI, 0.83-0.99). In this first independent evaluation of a limited number of cases, we found comparable results with respect to diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and accuracy regarding the SLICC-12 and the proposed EULAR/ACR classification criteria. However, their specificity for SLE appeared to be lower compared with ACR-82.

  • 21.
    Danielsson, Olof
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    The Clinical and Pathological Spectrum of Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies: Implications for pathogenesis, classification and diagnosis2016Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases with severe consequences for the life of affected patients. Dermatomyositis, polymyositis and inclusion body myositis (IBM) are the classical representatives of this group. The treatments given today often have limited effects, and are taken at the cost of side effects. Major obstacles in the search for more effective treatments are; (1) an incomplete understanding of the disease mechanisms, (2) difficulties to delineate homogeneous disease groups for clinical studies and (3) the sometimes challenging task to diagnose these diseases.

    Aims: We addressed a number of “loose ends” in the areas of pathogenesis, classification and diagnosis; mechanisms of muscle fiber degeneration in IIM, with a focus of programmed cell death (apoptosis) and invasion of muscle  fibers by inflammatory cells (partial invasion); protecting and mediating factors present in muscle; the association of other diseases with IIM, in particular celiac disease ; the evaluation of two classification systems and laboratory methods for increased diagnostic performance.

    The studies: We included 106 patients, diagnosed at the Neuromuscular unit in Linköping, Sweden, with pathological muscle findings consistent with IIM. The incidence in the county of Östergötland (during 5 years) was 7.3 per million/year (3 patients each year). Of 88 patients with confirmed IIM 4 (4.5 %) had celiac disease, 33 (38%) had an associated systemic inflammatory disease and 5 (5.7 %) had a malignancy. Ninety-nine patients were included for a comparison of two classification systems using criteria of the European Neuromuscle Centre (Amato/ENMC), and the widely used Bohan and Peter classification, both with the addition of IBM according to Griggs et al. Using the Amato/ENMC criteria the most prevalent diagnostic group after IBM (30%) was nonspecific myositis (23%), followed by polymyositis (20%) and dermatomyositis 17%). A substantial number of patients meeting Bohan and Peter (or Griggs) criteria were excluded by Amato/ENMC criteria, most (21/23) due to lack of detectable muscle weakness. Extended muscle sectioning increased the sensitivity of a muscle biopsy by 15 % and the specificity by 22%, and showed an overlap between disease groups. Muscle biopsies from patients with IIM and controls were used to investigate pathological findings considered specific for disease groups, and for the presence of programmed cell death (apoptosis) and disease protecting and mediating factors in muscle. The presence of apoptotic muscle fiber nuclei was detected in muscle with partial invasion (however not in the invaded fibers) in the presence of granzyme B and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. The major apoptosis inhibiting protein Bcl-2 was shown to be constitutionally expressed in healthy muscle but weakened in IIM.

    Conclusion: We present apoptosis as a possible disease mechanism in parallel with partial invasion of fibers. Furthermore, partial invasion may not be a suitable distinguishing feature in the pathogenesis, or for classification and diagnosis of IIM. We also introduce the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 as a possible relevant muscle fiber protecting factor. A more extensive pathological work-up improves classification and diagnosis of IIM. The proposed Amato/ENMC creates a substantial portion of patients with non-specific or unclassified myositis. Associated diseases are common in IIM, and also include celiac disease.

    Delarbeten
    1. Classification and Diagnostic Investigation in Inflammatory Myopathies: A Study of 99 Patients
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Classification and Diagnostic Investigation in Inflammatory Myopathies: A Study of 99 Patients
    2013 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 40, nr 7, s. 1173-1182Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Insights into the pathogenesis of inflammatory myopathies have led to new diagnostic methods. The aims of our study were (1) to evaluate the consequences of using the classification of Amato/European Neuromuscular Centre Workshop (ENMC), compared to that of Bohan and Peter; and (2) to evaluate any diagnostic benefit in using an extended pathological investigation. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. From a consecutive retrospective database, we evaluated 99 patients for classification. Patients with inclusion body myositis (IBM) were classified according to Griggs, et al. In addition to routine stainings and immunohistochemistry, a multilevel serial sectioning procedure was performed on paraffin-embedded material, to identify scarce pathological findings. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. Classification according to Bohan and Peter could be performed for 83 of the 99 patients, whereas only 60 patients met the Amato/ENMC criteria, the latter resulting in the following diagnostic groups: IBM (n = 18), nonspecific myositis (n = 14), polymyositis (n = 12), dermatomyositis (n = 10), dermatomyositis sine dermatitis (n = 5), and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (n = 1). Most of the Amato/ENMC diagnostic groups harbored patients from several of the Bohan and Peter groups, which included a substantial group lacking proximal muscle weakness. The serial sectioning procedure was essential for classification of 9 patients (15%), and led to a more specific diagnosis for 13 patients (22%) according to Amato/ENMC. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion. The classification of Amato/ENMC was more restrictive, forming groups based on clinical criteria and specified myopathological findings, which clearly differed from the groups of the Bohan and Peter classification. An extended pathological investigation increased the diagnostic yield of a muscle biopsy and highlights the quantity and specificity of certain pathological findings.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Journal of Rheumatology, 2013
    Nyckelord
    INFLAMMATORY MYOPATHIES, IDIOPATHIC INFLAMMATORY MYOPATHIES, POLYMYOSITIS, DERMATOMYOSITIS, INCLUSION BODY MYOSITIS
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96992 (URN)10.3899/jrheum.120804 (DOI)000321993800023 ()
    Anmärkning

    Funding Agencies|University Hospital Linkoping||County Council of Ostergotland||

    Tillgänglig från: 2013-09-02 Skapad: 2013-09-02 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-06
    2. Expression of apoptosis related proteins in normal and diseased muscle: A possible role for Bcl-2 in protection of striated muscle
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Expression of apoptosis related proteins in normal and diseased muscle: A possible role for Bcl-2 in protection of striated muscle
    2009 (Engelska)Ingår i: NEUROMUSCULAR DISORDERS, ISSN 0960-8966, Vol. 19, nr 6, s. 412-417Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The unique absence of major histocompatibility complex class I antigen (MHC-I) expression in normal muscle is one possible mechanism protecting striated muscle. In order to define their possible involvement in protection of normal muscle. we investigated the expression of molecules involved in muscle fibre death and survival mechanisms (Bcl-2, Fas, Fas-ligand and TRAIL), focusing on disorders with possible involvement of cytotoxic T cells. We studied muscle biopsies from 20 healthy volunteers, from 10 patients affected by polymyositis and 10 by Duchenne muscular dystrophy. By using immunohistochemistry, Western blot and real-time PCR we detected a constitutional expression of Bcl-2 in healthy muscle, whereas the expression was weaker in disease processes. Fas-L and TRAIL were not detected in muscle fibres, and Fas only in muscle affected by disease. Our findings indicate that the major apoptotic protein Bcl-2 might have a hitherto unrecognized role in the protection of normal muscle.

    Nyckelord
    Inflammatory myopathy, Apoptosis, Bcl-2, TRAIL, Fas and Fas-L
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-19795 (URN)10.1016/j.nmd.2009.03.008 (DOI)
    Tillgänglig från: 2009-08-10 Skapad: 2009-08-10 Senast uppdaterad: 2016-11-23
  • 22.
    Dieker, Jurgen
    et al.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Berden, Jo H.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Bakker, Marinka
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Briand, Jean-Paul
    CNRS, France.
    Muller, Sylviane
    CNRS, France.
    Voll, Reinhard
    University of Medical Centre Freiburg, Germany; University of Medical Centre Freiburg, Germany.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Herrmann, Martin
    Friedrich Alexander University of Erlangen Nuremberg, Germany.
    Hilbrands, Luuk B.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    van der Vlag, Johan
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Autoantibodies against Modified Histone Peptides in SLE Patients Are Associated with Disease Activity and Lupus Nephritis2016Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, nr 10, artikel-id e0165373Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Persistent exposure of the immune system to death cell debris leads to autoantibodies against chromatin in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Deposition of antichromatin/ chromatin complexes can instigate inflammation in multiple organs including the kidney. Previously we identified specific cell death-associated histone modifications as targets of autoantibodies in SLE. In this study we addressed, in a large cohort of SLE patients and controls, the question whether plasma reactivities with specific histone peptides associated with serology and clinical features. Plasma from SLE patients with and without lupus nephritis, disease controls, and healthy controls, were tested in ELISA with histone H4 peptide acetylated at lysines 8, 12 and 16 (H4p(ac)), H2B peptide acetylated at lysine 12 (H2Bp(ac)), H3 peptide trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3p(me)), and their unmodified equivalents. SLE patients displayed a higher reactivity with the modified equivalent of each peptide. Reactivity with H4p(ac) showed both a high sensitivity (89%) and specificity (91%) for SLE, while H2Bp(ac) exhibited a high specificity (96%) but lower sensitivity (69%). Reactivity with H3p(me) appeared not specific for SLE. Anti-H4p(ac) and anti-H2Bp(ac) reactivity demonstrated a high correlation with disease activity. Moreover, patients reacting with multiple modified histone peptides exhibited higher SLEDAI and lower C3 levels. SLE patients with renal involvement showed higher reactivity with H2B/H2Bp(ac) and a more pronounced reactivity with the modified equivalent of H3p(me) and H2Bp(ac). In conclusion, reactivity with H4p(ac) and H2Bp(ac) is specific for SLE patients and correlates with disease activity, whereas reactivity with H2Bp(ac) is in particular associated with lupus nephritis.

  • 23.
    Englund, Martin
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Boston University, MA 02215 USA.
    Merkel, Peter A.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Tomasson, Gunnar
    University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för läkemedelsforskning. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Njurmedicinska kliniken US.
    Mohammad, Aladdin J.
    Lund University, Sweden; Addenbrookes Hospital, England.
    Comorbidities in Patients with Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Vasculitis versus the General Population2016Ingår i: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 43, nr 8, s. 1553-1558Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate the consultation rates of selected comorbidities in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV) compared with the general population in southern Sweden. Methods. We used data from a population-based cohort of patients with AAV diagnosed between 1998 and 2010 in Southern Sweden (701,000 inhabitants). For each patient we identified 4 reference subjects randomly sampled from the general population and matched for year of birth, sex, area of residence, and index year. Using the population-based Skane Healthcare Register, we identified relevant diagnostic codes, registered between 1998 and 2011, for selected comorbidities assigned after the date of diagnosis of AAV or the index date for the reference subjects. We calculated rate ratios for comorbidities (AAV: reference subjects). Results. There were 186 patients with AAV (95 women, mean age 64.5 yrs) and 744 reference persons included in the analysis. The highest rate ratios (AAV: reference) were obtained for osteoporosis (4.6, 95% CI 3.0-7.0), followed by venous thromboembolism (4.0, 95% CI 1.9-8.3), thyroid diseases (2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.3), and diabetes mellitus (2.0, 95% CI 1.3-2.9). For ischemic heart disease, the rate ratio of 1.5 (95% CI 1.0-2.3) did not reach statistical significance. No statistically significant differences were found for cerebrovascular accidents. Conclusion. AAV is associated with increased consultation rates of several comorbidities including osteoporosis and thromboembolic and endocrine disorders. Comorbid conditions should be taken into consideration when planning and providing care for patients with AAV.

  • 24.
    Enocsson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Sjöwall, Christoffer
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor: A valuable biomarker in systemic lupus erythematosus?2015Ingår i: Clinica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0009-8981, E-ISSN 1873-3492, Vol. 444, s. 234-241Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a potentially severe autoimmune condition with an unpredictable disease course, often with fluctuations in disease activity over time. Long term inflammation and drug-related side-effects may subsequently lead to permanent organ damage, a consequence which is intimately connected to decreased quality of life and mortality. New lupus biomarkers that convey information regarding inflammation and/or organ damage are thus warranted. Today, there is no clinical biomarker that indicates the risk of damage accrual. Herein we highlight the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and especially its soluble form (suPAR) that besides having biological functions in e.g. proteolysis, cell migration and tissue homeostasis, recently has emerged as a promising biomarker of inflammation and prognosis of several disorders. A strong association between suPAR and organ damage in SLE was recently demonstrated, and preliminary data (presented in this review) suggests the possibility of a predictive value of suPAR blood levels. The involvement of suPAR in the pathogenesis of SLE remains obscure, but its effects in leukocyte recruitment, phagocytic uptake of dying cells (efferocytosis) and complement regulation suggests that the central parts of the SLE pathogenesis could be regulated by suPAR, and vice versa.

  • 25.
    Eriksson, D.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Metab and Diabet Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bianchi, M.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Landegren, N.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nordin, J.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Dalin, F.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Mathioudaki, A.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, G. N.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hultin-Rosenberg, L.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist, J.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Zetterqvist, H.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, A.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hallgren, A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Farias, F. H. G.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Muren, E.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ahlgren, K. M.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lobell, A.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Andersson, G.
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Tandre, K.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist, S. R.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk patologi och klinisk genetik.
    Rönnblom, L.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hulting, A. -L.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wahlberg Topp, Jeanette
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för kardiovaskulär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Endokrinmedicinska kliniken.
    Ekwall, O.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist, P.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Meadows, J. R. S.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bensing, S.
    Metab and Diabet Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lindblad-Toh, K.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Broad Institute MIT and Harvard, MA USA.
    Kampe, O.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Metab and Diabet Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Pielberg, G. R.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Extended exome sequencing identifies BACH2 as a novel major risk locus for Addisons disease2016Ingår i: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 286, nr 6, s. 595-608Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundAutoimmune disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In Addisons disease, the adrenal glands are targeted by destructive autoimmunity. Despite being the most common cause of primary adrenal failure, little is known about its aetiology. MethodsTo understand the genetic background of Addisons disease, we utilized the extensively characterized patients of the Swedish Addison Registry. We developed an extended exome capture array comprising a selected set of 1853 genes and their potential regulatory elements, for the purpose of sequencing 479 patients with Addisons disease and 1394 controls. ResultsWe identified BACH2 (rs62408233-A, OR = 2.01 (1.71-2.37), P = 1.66 x 10(-15), MAF 0.46/0.29 in cases/controls) as a novel gene associated with Addisons disease development. We also confirmed the previously known associations with the HLA complex. ConclusionWhilst BACH2 has been previously reported to associate with organ-specific autoimmune diseases co-inherited with Addisons disease, we have identified BACH2 as a major risk locus in Addisons disease, independent of concomitant autoimmune diseases. Our results may enable future research towards preventive disease treatment.

  • 26.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för läkemedelsforskning. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Njurmedicinska kliniken US.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Kirurgi, Ortopedi och Onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Kirurgiska kliniken US.
    Frequency, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcome of Gastrointestinal Disease in Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis and Microscopic Polyangiitis2018Ingår i: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 45, nr 4, s. 529-537Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Involvement of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a rare complication of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). The aim was to describe frequency, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of GI disease in a large series of patients in a single center. Methods. A database that includes all patients with GPA and MPA diagnosed since 1997 in a defined area of southeastern Sweden as well as prevalent older cases and tertiary referral patients was screened for patients with GI disease. Data were retrieved from the patients medical records, and GI manifestations of vasculitis were defined as proposed by Pagnoux, et al in 2005. Results. Fourteen (6.5%) of 216 consecutive patients with GPA/MPA had GI manifestations. Abdominal pain and GI bleeding were the most common symptoms. Radiology was important for detection of GI disease, while endoscopy failed to support the diagnosis in many patients. Because of perforation, 5 patients underwent hemicolectomy or small intestine resection. Primary anastomosis was created in 2/5 and enterostomy in 3/5 patients. One patient had a hemicolectomy because of lower GI bleeding. One sigmoid abscess was treated with drainage, and 1 intraabdominal bleeding condition with arterial coiling. Two patients died from GI disease. GPA and MPA patients with and without GI disease exhibited a similar overall survival. Conclusion. GI disease was found in 6.5% among 216 patients with GPA or MPA. Surgery was judged necessary only in cases with GI perforation or severe bleeding. Multidisciplinary engagement is strongly recommended.

  • 27.
    Ernberg, M.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Christidis, N.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, I.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Lofgren, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Bjersing, J.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Palstam, A.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, A.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, K.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Kosek, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Spine Ctr, Sweden.
    Plasma Cytokine Levels in Fibromyalgia and Their Response to 15 Weeks of Progressive Resistance Exercise or Relaxation Therapy2018Ingår i: Mediators of Inflammation, ISSN 0962-9351, E-ISSN 1466-1861, artikel-id 3985154Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to compare circulating cytokines between FM and healthy controls and to investigate the effect on cytokine levels by 15 weeks of progressive resistance exercise or relaxation therapy in FM. Baseline plasma cytokine levels and clinical data were analyzed in 125 women with FM and 130 age-matched healthy women. The FM women were then randomized to progressive resistance exercise (n = 49) or relaxation (n = 43). Baseline IL-2, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IP-10, and eotaxin were higher in FM than in healthy controls (P amp;lt; 0.041), whereas IL-beta was lower (P amp;lt; 0.001). There were weak correlations between cytokine levels and clinical variables. After both interventions, IL-1ra had increased (P=0.004), while IL-1 beta had increased in the relaxation group (P = 0.002). Changes of IFN-gamma, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-17A were weakly correlated with changes of PPT, but there were no significant correlations between changes of cytokine and changes in other clinical variables. The elevated plasma levels of several cytokines supports the hypothesis that chronic systemic inflammation may underlie the pathophysiology of FM even if the relation to clinical variables was weak. However, 15 weeks of resistance exercise, as performed in this study, did not show any anti-inflammatory effect on neither FM symptoms nor clinical and functional variables.

  • 28.
    Ernberg, Malin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Christidis, Nikolaos
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Monika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Palstam, Annie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjersing, Jan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kosek, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm Spine Centre, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Effects of 15 weeks of resistance exercise on pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in the vastus lateralis muscle of patients with fibromyalgia2016Ingår i: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 18, nr 137Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study aimed at investigating the effect of a resistance exercise intervention on the interstitial muscle levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in fibromyalgia (FMS) and healthy controls (CON). Methods: Twenty-four female patients with FMS (54 +/- 8 years) and 27 female CON (54 +/- 9 years) were subjected to intramuscular microdialysis of the most painful vastus lateralis muscle before and after 15 weeks of progressive resistance exercise twice per week. Baseline dialysates were sampled in the resting muscle 140 min after insertion of the microdialysis catheter. The participants then performed repetitive dynamic contractions (knee extension) for 20 min, followed by 60 min rest. Pain intensity was assessed with a 0-100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS), and fatigue was assessed with Borgs RPE throughout microdialysis. Dialysates were sampled every 20 min and analyzed with Luminex for interleukin (IL)-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, IL-6, and IL-8. Results: At both sessions and for both groups the dynamic contractions increased pain (P amp;lt; 0.012) and fatigue (P amp;lt; 0.001). The levels of TNF were lower in the FMS group than the CON group at both sessions (P amp;lt; 0.05), but none of the other cytokines differed between the groups. IL-6 and IL-8 increased after the dynamic contractions in both groups (P amp;lt; 0.010), while TNF increased only in CON (P amp;lt; 0.05) and IL-1 beta did not change. Overall pain intensity was reduced after the 15 weeks of resistance exercise in FMS (P amp;lt; 0.05), but there was no changes in fatigue or cytokine levels. Conclusion: Progressive resistance exercise for 15 weeks did not affect the interstitial levels of IL-1 beta, TNF, IL-6, and IL-8 in the vastus lateralis muscle of FMS patients or CON.

  • 29.
    Ertzgaard, Per
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Rehabiliteringsmedicinska kliniken.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Sorbo, Ann
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Sodra Alvsborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Rehabiliteringsmedicinska kliniken.
    Sandsjo, Leif
    Univ Boras, Sweden.
    Evaluation of a self-administered transcutaneous electrical stimulation concept for the treatment of spasticity: a randomized placebo-controlled trial2018Ingår i: European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1973-9087, E-ISSN 1973-9095, Vol. 54, nr 4, s. 507-517Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Spasticity is a common consequence of injury to the central nervous system negatively affecting patients everyday activities. Treatment mainly consists of training and different drugs, often with side effects. There is a need for treatment options that can be performed by the patient in their home environment. AIM: The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of an assistive technology (AT), Mono, a garment with integrated electrodes for multifocal transcutaneous electrical stimulation intended for self-treatment of spasticity, in study participants with spasticity due to stroke or CP. DESIGN: The study was a randomized, controlled, double-blind study with a cross-over design. SETTING: Participants were recruited from two rehabilitation clinics. Treatments were performed in participants homes and all follow-ups were performed in the two rehabilitation clinics. POPULATION: Thirty-one participants were included in the study and 27 completed the study. Four participants discontinued the study. Two declined participation before baseline and two withdrew due to problems handling the garment. METHODS: Participants used the AT with and without electrical stimulation (active/non-active period) for six weeks each. followed by six weeks without treatment. Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS), change in mobility, arm-hand ability, spasticity and pain were measured at baseline and after 6, 12 and 18 weeks. RESULTS: Fifteen of the 27 participants fulfilled the treatment protocol in terms of recommended use. Deviations were frequent. No statistically significant differences in outcome were found between the active and the non-active treatment periods. During the active period, an improvement was seen in the 10-meter comfortable gait test, time and steps. An improvement was seen in both the active and non-active periods for the GAS. CONCLUSIONS: Compliance was low, partly due to deviations related to the garment, complicating the interpretation of the results. Further research should focus on identifying the target population and concomitant rehabilitation strategies. CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: The evaluated concept of multifocal transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) represents an interesting addition to the existing repertoire of treatments to alleviate muscle spasticity. The evaluated concept allows TES to be self-administered by the patient in the home environment. A more elaborate design of training activities directly related to patients own rehabilitation goals is recommended and may increase the value of the evaluated concept.

  • 30.
    Feldhusen, Caroline
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Avd. för rehabilitering, HHJ, Hälsohögskolan, Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Forsblad d'Elia, Helena
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    I am so tired of being tired: – a focus group study of fatigue in RA2011Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    BakgrundFatigue is a prominent symptom in persons with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)and has great impact of daily life. The knowledge about how persons with RA in working age are affected by fatigue is limited. The aim of this study was to describe how persons with RA in working age experience and handle their fatigue in everyday life.MetodSix focus group discussions were conducted in 25 persons with RA (19 women/ 6 men) age 20-60 years. The discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed according to qualitative content analysis which resulted in four categories: The nature of fatigue in RA, limitations due to the fatigue, communicating the fatigue and strategies to handle the fatigue.ResultatThe participants experienced their fatigue as a major symptom. Because of its persistence and unpredictable nature it caused feelings of frustration, helplessness and anger. The increased need for rest and sleep caused an imbalance in daily life when valued life activities were forced to be omitted in favor of work. They were feeling limited in everyday life when the fatigue made it impossible to fulfill their roles as expected by themselves and by others. The participants expressed difficulties in communicating about the fatigue and to gain acceptance from the social environment including family, friends and health professionals. They adjusted to whom they were talking to about their fatigue to avoid being seen as lazy, boring or whining. To handle the fatigue in everyday life, planning and prioritizing to find balance was essential. The respondents also used mental strategies to handle the fatigue such as accepting the fatigue and focusing on the possibilities.SammanfattningFatigue causes considerable consequences in persons with RA in working age, living an active life and rating a low general disability. The responsibility for managing fatigue and the struggle of finding balance between important parts in life was taken by the participants themselves because fatigue was not perceived to be a factor given much consideration during medical consultation. This draws attention to the importance for health professionals to address the fatigue and its complexity and unpredictability, even in working persons with low disability.

  • 31.
    Feldthusen, Caroline
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Avd. för rehabilitering, HHJ, Hälsohögskolan, Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    I am so tired of being tired: – a focus group study of fatigue in RA2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fatigue is a prominent symptom in RA and most negative impact from fatigue seems to be experienced by younger persons. Even in individuals with RA who are able to successfully participate in a wide spectrum of demanding daily activities, fatigue has been shown to be significant. The knowledge about how younger persons with RA experience and handle their fatigue is limited.Objectives: The aims were to explore, by means of qualitative interviews, how fatigue is experienced by persons with RA in working age and to identify when fatigue is experienced as a limitation and how it is handled in everyday life.Methods: Six focus group interviews were conducted with 25 (19 women, 6 men) persons. Inclusion criteria: >30 mm fatigue on a 100 mm visual analogue scale, age between 20-60 years and fulfill classification criteria of rheumatoid arthritis. The persons were asked to discuss their fatigue related to RA as well as how fatigue affected everyday life and how fatigue was handled. Transcripts were systematically analyzed by content analysis identifying units, codes, sub categories, categories and a theme (1). The categories and theme were validated by an expert in the field and by a research partner with RA.Results: Fatigue was experienced by the respondents as a significant symptom. Because of its persistence and unpredictable nature it caused feelings of frustration, helplessness and anger. The respondents expressed difficulties in communicating about the fatigue and to get understanding from the social environment including family, friends and healthcare. They were feeling limited in everyday life when the fatigue made it impossible to fulfill the roles as expected by themselves and by others. Feelings of shame, being lazy and boring were common. Finding balance between important parts of life such as work, family, leisure time, social activities and rest was mentioned as difficult. To handle the fatigue in everyday life planning and prioritizing among activities was essential. The respondents also used mental strategies to handle the fatigue including trying to accept the fatigue and focus on the possibilities.Conclusions: The result showed that fatigue in persons with RA in working age was a symptom of great importance that needs to be more highlighted in the clinical care. Even if the patients did not report extremely high levels of fatigue the consequences were extensive. An understanding of the complexity of fatigue in RA could help the persons to find a better balance between important parts in life.

  • 32.
    Feldthusen, Caroline
    et al.
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation research, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Björk, Mathilda
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation research, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation research, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation research, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Perception, consequences, communication, and strategies for handling fatigue in persons with rheumatoid arthritis of working age-a focus group study2013Ingår i: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 32, nr 5, s. 557-566Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe how persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of working age experience and handle their fatigue in everyday life. Six focus group discussions were conducted focusing on experiences of fatigue in 25 persons with RA (19 women, 6 men), aged 20–60 years. The discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed according to qualitative content analysis. The analyses resulted in four categories. (1) Perception of fatigue: Fatigue was experienced different from normal tiredness, unpredictable, and overwhelming. It was associated with negative emotions, changed self-image, and fears. Feelings of frustration and shame were central when the persons were forced to omit valued life activities. (2) Consequences due to fatigue: The fatigue caused changes in cognitive ability, ability to act, and overall activity pattern where the increased need for rest and sleep caused an imbalance in daily life. The participants struggled not to let the fatigue interfere with work. The fatigue also brought negative consequences for their significant others. (3) Communicating fatigue: Fatigue was difficult to gain understanding for, and the participants adjusted their communication accordingly; it was important to keep up appearances. During medical consultation, fatigue was perceived as a factor not given much consideration, and the participants expressed taking responsibility for managing their fatigue symptoms themselves. (4) Strategies to handle fatigue: Strategies comprised conscious self-care, mental strategies, planning, and prioritizing. Fatigue caused considerable health problems for persons with RA of working age: negative emotions, imbalance in daily life due to increased need for rest, and difficulties gaining understanding. This draws attention to the importance of developing new modes of care to address fatigue in RA. Person-centered care to improve balance in life may be one approach needing further investigations.

  • 33.
    Fredlund, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Barnafrid. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Pribe, Gisela
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Barnafrid. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Jonsson, Linda
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Barnafrid. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken.
    Wadsby, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken.
    Self-reported frequency of sex as self-injury (SASI) in a national study of Swedish adolescents and association to sociodemographic factors, sexual behaviors, abuse and mental health2017Ingår i: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, ISSN 1753-2000, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 11, nr 1Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sex as self-injury has become a concept in Swedish society; however it is a largely unexplored area of research, not yet conceptualized and far from accepted in the research field. The use of sex as a way of affect regulation is known in the literature and has, in interviews with young women who sell sex, been compared to direct self-injury, such as cutting or burning the skin. The aim of this study was to investigate the self-reported frequency of sex as self-injury and the association to sociodemographic factors, sexual orientation, voluntary sexual experiences, sexual risk-taking behaviors, sexual, physical and mental abuse, trauma symptoms, healthcare for psychiatric disorders and non-suicidal self-injury.

  • 34.
    Frodlund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Reumatologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Kastbom, Alf
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Reumatologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Reumatologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Reumatologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Associations between antinuclear antibody staining patterns and clinical features of systemic lupus erythematosus: analysis of a regional Swedish register2013Ingår i: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, s. 1-8Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Antinuclear antibody (ANA) analysis by immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy remains a diagnostic hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The clinical relevance of ANA fine-specificities in SLE has been addressed repeatedly, whereas studies on IF-ANA staining patterns in relation to disease manifestations are very scarce. This study was performed to elucidate whether different staining patterns associate with distinct SLE phenotypes.

    Design Observational cohort study.

    Setting One university hospital rheumatology unit in Sweden.

    Participants The study population consisted of 222 cases (89% women; 93% Caucasians), where of 178 met ≥4/11 of the 1982 American College of Rheumatology (ACR-82) criteria. The remaining 20% had an SLE diagnosis based on positive IF-ANA (HEp-2 cells) and ≥2 typical organ manifestations at the time of diagnosis (Fries’ criteria).

    Outcome measures The IF-ANA staining patterns homogenous (H-ANA), speckled (S-ANA), combined homogenous and speckled (HS-ANA), centromeric (C-ANA), nucleolar (N-ANA)±other patterns and other nuclear patterns (oANA) were related to disease manifestations and laboratory measures. Antigen-specificities were also considered regarding double-stranded DNA (Crithidia luciliae) and the following extractable nuclear antigens: Ro/SSA, La/SSB, Smith antigen (Sm), small nuclear RNP (snRNP), Scl-70 and Jo-1 (immunodiffusion and/or line-blot technique).

    Results 54% of the patients with SLE displayed H-ANA, 22% S-ANA, 11% HS-ANA, 9% N-ANA, 1% C-ANA, 2% oANA and 1% were never IF-ANA positive. Staining patterns among patients meeting Fries’ criteria alone did not differ from those fulfilling ACR-82. H-ANA was significantly associated with the 10th criterion according to ACR-82 (‘immunological disorder’). S-ANA was inversely associated with arthritis, ‘immunological disorder’ and signs of organ damage.

    Conclusions H-ANA is the dominant IF-ANA pattern among Swedish patients with SLE, and was found to associate with ‘immunological disorder’ according to ACR-82. The second most common pattern, S-ANA, associated negatively with arthritis and organ damage.

  • 35.
    Frodlund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Reid, S.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Leonard, D.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    The majority of Swedish systemic lupus erythematosus patients are still affected by irreversible organ impairment: factors related to damage accrual in two regional cohorts2019Ingår i: Lupus, ISSN 0961-2033, E-ISSN 1477-0962, artikel-id UNSP 0961203319860198Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Although the survival of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has improved, irreversible organ damage remains a critical concern. We aimed to characterize damage accrual and its clinical associations and causes of death in Swedish patients. Methods Accumulation of damage was evaluated in 543 consecutively recruited and well-characterized cases during 1998-2017. The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC)/American College of Rheumatology damage index (SDI) was used to estimate damage. Results Organ damage (SDI amp;gt;= 1) was observed in 59%, and extensive damage (SDI amp;gt;= 3) in 25% of cases. SDI amp;gt;= 1 was significantly associated with higher age at onset, SLE duration, the number of fulfilled SLICC criteria, neurologic disorder, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS), hypertension, hyperlipidemia, depression and secondary Sjogrens syndrome (SS). In addition, SDI amp;gt;= 3 was associated with serositis, renal and haematological disorders and interstitial lung disease. A multiple regression model identified not only well-known risk factors like APS, antihypertensives and corticosteroids, but pericarditis, haemolytic anaemia, lymphopenia and myositis as being linked to SDI. Malignancy, infection and cardiovascular disease were the leading causes of death. Conclusions After a mean SLE duration of 17 years, the majority of todays Swedish SLE patients have accrued damage. We confirm previous observations and report some novel findings regarding disease phenotypes and damage accrual.

  • 36.
    Ge, Changrong
    et al.
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tong, Dongmei
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China..
    Liang, Bibo
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm,Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.
    Lönnblom, Erik
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Schneider, Nadine
    University Hospital Frankfurt Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Hagert, Cecilia
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Viljanen, Johan
    Biomedicinskt centrum, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stawikowska, Roma
    Florida Atlantic University, Jupiter, Florida, USA.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fields, Gregg B
    Florida Atlantic University, Jupiter, Florida, USA.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Kastbom, Alf
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Kihlberg, Jan
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Burkhardt, Harald
    University Hospital Frankfurt Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Dobritzsch, Doreen
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holmdahl, Rikard
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; University of Turku, Turku, Finland, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.
    Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies cause arthritis by cross-reactivity to joint cartilage2017Ingår i: JCI insight, ISSN 2379-3708, Vol. 2, nr 13, artikel-id 93688Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, it is known that autoimmune diseases start a long time before clinical symptoms appear. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) appear many years before the clinical onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it is still unclear if and how ACPAs are arthritogenic. To better understand the molecular basis of pathogenicity of ACPAs, we investigated autoantibodies reactive against the C1 epitope of collagen type II (CII) and its citrullinated variants. We found that these antibodies are commonly occurring in RA. A mAb (ACC1) against citrullinated C1 was found to cross-react with several noncitrullinated epitopes on native CII, causing proteoglycan depletion of cartilage and severe arthritis in mice. Structural studies by X-ray crystallography showed that such recognition is governed by a shared structural motif "RG-TG" within all the epitopes, including electrostatic potential-controlled citrulline specificity. Overall, we have demonstrated a molecular mechanism that explains how ACPAs trigger arthritis.

  • 37.
    Ge, Changrong
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Xu, Bingze
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Liang, Bibo
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Southern Med Univ, Peoples R China.
    Lonnblom, Erik
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lundstrom, Susanna L.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Zubarev, Roman A.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Kastbom, Alf
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Malmstrom, Vivianne
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Klareskog, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Toes, Rene E. M.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Rispens, Theo
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Dobritzsch, Doreen
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Holmdahl, Rikard
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Southern Med Univ, Peoples R China.
    Structural Basis of Cross-Reactivity of Anti-Citrullinated Protein Antibodies2019Ingår i: Arthritis & Rheumatology, ISSN 2326-5191, E-ISSN 2326-5205, Vol. 71, nr 2, s. 210-221Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) develop many years before the clinical onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was undertaken to address the molecular basis of the specificity and cross-reactivity of ACPAs from patients with RA. Methods Antibodies isolated from RA patients were expressed as monoclonal chimeric antibodies with mouse Fc. These antibodies were characterized for glycosylation using mass spectrometry, and their cross-reactivity was assessed using Biacore and Luminex immunoassays. The crystal structures of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of the monoclonal ACPA E4 in complex with 3 different citrullinated peptides were determined using x-ray crystallography. The prevalence of autoantibodies reactive against 3 of the citrullinated peptides that also interacted with E4 was investigated by Luminex immunoassay in 2 Swedish cohorts of RA patients. Results Analysis of the crystal structures of a monoclonal ACPA from human RA serum in complex with citrullinated peptides revealed key residues of several complementarity-determining regions that recognized the citrulline as well as the neighboring peptide backbone, but with limited contact with the side chains of the peptides. The same citrullinated peptides were recognized by high titers of serum autoantibodies in 2 large cohorts of RA patients. Conclusion These data show, for the first time, how ACPAs derived from human RA serum recognize citrulline. The specific citrulline recognition and backbone-mediated interactions provide a structural explanation for the promiscuous recognition of citrullinated peptides by RA-specific ACPAs.

  • 38.
    Granqvist, Mathias
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Burman, Joachim
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Martin
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Lycke, Jan
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Petra
    University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sundstrom, Peter
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Svenningsson, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Neurologiska kliniken.
    Frisell, Thomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Comparative effectiveness of dimethyl fumarate as the initial and secondary treatment for MS2019Ingår i: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, artikel-id UNSP 1352458519866600Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Population-based real-world evidence studies of the effectiveness and tolerability of dimethyl fumarate in relation to common treatment alternatives are still limited. Objective: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and tolerability of dimethyl fumarate (DMF) as the initial and secondary treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients compared with common treatment alternatives in Sweden. Methods: We conducted a nationwide retrospective observational cohort study of all RRMS patients identified through the Swedish MS registry initiating DMF (n = 641) or interferons/glatiramer acetate (IFN/GA; n = 555) as the initial therapy, or DMF (n = 703) or fingolimod (FGL; n = 194) after switch from IFN/GA between 1 January 2014 and 31 December 2016. Results: The discontinuation rate was lower with DMF as the initial treatment than IFN/GA (adjusted hazard rate (HR): 0.46, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.37-0.58, p amp;lt; 0.001), but higher than FGL as the secondary treatment (HR: 1.51, CI: 1.08-2.09, p amp;lt; 0.05). Annualized relapse rate (ARR) was lower with DMF compared to IFN/GA (0.04, CI: 0.03-0.06 vs 0.10, CI: 0.07-0.13; p amp;lt; 0.05), but not FGL (0.03, CI: 0.02-0.05 vs 0.02, CI: 0.01-0.04; p = 0.41). Finally, time to first relapse (TTFR) was longer with DMF as the initial, but not secondary, therapy (p amp;lt; 0.05 and p = 0.20, respectively). Conclusion: Our findings indicate that DMF performs better than IFN/GA as the initial treatment for RRMS. Compared to FGL, DMF displayed a lower tolerability, but largely similar effectiveness outcomes.

  • 39.
    Gron, Kathrine Lederballe
    et al.
    Rigshosp, Denmark; Rigshosp, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Arkema, Elizabeth V.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Glintborg, Bente
    Rigshosp, Denmark; Rigshosp, Denmark; Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Mehnert, Frank
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Ostergaard, Mikkel
    Rigshosp, Denmark; Rigshosp, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Dreyer, Lene
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Norgaard, Mette
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Krogh, Niels Steen
    ZiteLab ApS, Denmark.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hetland, Merete Lund
    Rigshosp, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Klareskog, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Feltelius, Nils
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Baecklund, Eva
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Forsblad-dElia, Helena
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Lennart
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden.
    Turesson, Carl
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Elisabet
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nisell, Ralph
    Swedish Rheumatol Qual Register, Sweden.
    Risk of serious infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in routine care with abatacept, rituximab and tocilizumab in Denmark and Sweden2019Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, nr 3, s. 320-327Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To estimate (1) crude and age-and gender-adjusted incidence rates (IRs) of serious infections (SI) and (2) relative risks (RR) of SI in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) initiating treatment with abatacept, rituximab or tocilizumab in routine care. Methods This is an observational cohort study conducted in parallel in Denmark and Sweden including patients with RA in Denmark (DANBIO) and Sweden (Anti-Rheumatic Treatment in Sweden Register/Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register) who started abatacept/rituximab/tocilizumab in 2010-2015. Patients could contribute to more than one treatment course. Incident SI (hospitalisations listing infection) and potential confounders were identified through linkage to national registries. Age-and gender-adjusted IRs of SI per 100 person years and additionally adjusted RRs of SI during 0-12 and 0-24 months since start of treatment were assessed (Poisson regression). Country-specific RRs were pooled using inverse variance weighting. Results We identified 8987 treatment courses (abatacept: 2725; rituximab: 3363; tocilizumab: 2899). At treatment start, rituximab-treated patients were older, had longer disease duration and more previous malignancies; tocilizumab-treated patients had higher C reactive protein. During 0-12 and 0-24 months of follow-up, 456 and 639 SI events were identified, respectively. The following were the age-and gender-adjusted 12-month IRs for abatacept/rituximab/tocilizumab: 7.1/8.1/6.1 for Denmark and 6.0/6.4/4.7 for Sweden. The 24-month IRs were 6.1/7.5/5.2 for Denmark and 5.6/5.8/4.3 for Sweden. Adjusted 12-month RRs for tocilizumab versus rituximab were 0.82 (0.50 to 1.36) for Denmark and 0.76 (0.57 to 1.02) for Sweden, pooled 0.78 (0.61 to 1.01); for abatacept versus rituximab 0.94 (0.55 to 1.60) for Denmark and 0.86 (0.66 to 1.13) for Sweden, pooled 0.88 (0.69 to 1.12); and for abatacept versus tocilizumab 1.15 (0.69 to 1.90) for Denmark and 1.14 (0.83 to 1.55) for Sweden, pooled 1.13 (0.91 to 1.42). The adjusted RRs for 0-24 months were similar. Conclusion For patients starting abatacept, rituximab or tocilizumab, differences in baseline characteristics were seen. Numerical differences in IR of SI between drugs were observed. RRs seemed to vary with drug (tocilizumab amp;lt; abatacept amp;lt; rituximab) but should be interpreted with caution due to few events and risk of residual confounding.

  • 40.
    Hadimeri, Henrik
    et al.
    Department of Nephrology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hadimeri, Ursula
    Department of Radiology, Höglandssjukhuset, Eksjö, Sweden.
    Attman, Per-Ola
    Department of Nephrology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Gudrun
    Transplant Unit, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Dimensions of Arteriovenous Fistulas in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease2000Ingår i: Nephron. Clinical practice, ISSN 1660-8151, E-ISSN 2235-3186, Vol. 85, nr 1, s. 50-53Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aim: Aneurysms are known manifestations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We investigated whether the dimensions of arteriovenous fistulas created for performance of haemodialysis were affected by the original disease.

    Methods: The lumen diameter of the fistula was studied by ultrasound in 19 patients with ADPKD and in 19 control patients. The patients’ sex, age, the duration of their fistulas, haemoglobin values and blood pressure levels were similar in both groups. The monitoring was performed along the forearm part of the vein, and the maximal diameter was measured. The diameters at the two needle insertion sites were also measured.

    Results: The ADPKD patients had a significantly higher fistula diameter than the control patients: 12 (range 8–19) mm versus 8 (range 6–24) mm at the widest level (p = 0.003). There were no significant differences in the diameters at the needle insertion sites.

    Conclusion: The receiving veins of arteriovenous fistulas in patients with ADPKD have an abnormality that causes a greater than normal dilatation in response to the arterialization. We postulate that this phenomenon is linked with the increased prevalence of aneurysms in ADPKD.

  • 41.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för kardiovaskulär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Magtarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för kardiovaskulär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Magtarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Hammar, Ulf
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för kardiovaskulär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Magtarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Cardiovascular risk factors in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2019Ingår i: Liver international (Print), ISSN 1478-3223, E-ISSN 1478-3231, Vol. 39, nr 1, s. 197-204Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background amp; Aims Patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is unclear whether histological variables may help predict CVD risk. We evaluated histology and traditional CV risk factors as predictors of CVD outcomes in a large NAFLD cohort. Methods We included 603 biopsy-proven NAFLD patients free of baseline CVD and matched these (1:10, by age, sex and municipality) to 6269 population controls. All individuals were cross-linked to national registries to ascertain incident CVD events, defined as acute ischaemic heart disease or stroke. The presence of CV risk factors and liver histology were available in NAFLD patients only. Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) for incident CVD. Results During a mean follow-up of 18.6 years, 168 (28%) of NAFLD patients and 1325 (21%) of controls experienced a CVD event (HR 1.54, 95%CI 1.30-1.83). Within the NAFLD cohort, age, male sex, type 2 diabetes, smoking and triglycerides were associated with risk of CVD. Taking these CV risk factors into account, no histological parameter, including presence of NASH and fibrosis stage, were associated with incident CVD. Conclusions Patients with NAFLD are at an increased risk for CVD compared to matched controls, but histological parameters do not seem to independently predict this risk.

  • 42.
    Hallert, Eva
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Reumatologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Disease activity, function and costs in early rheumatoid arthritis2006Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a major cause of progressive joint damage and disability, and is associated with decline in quality of life, reduced ability to work and increased health care utilisation. The economic consequences of the disease are substantial for the individuals and their families and for the society as a whole. This thesis describes a 5-year follow up of 320 patients with early RA, enrolled between January 1996 and April 1998 in the Swedish multi-centre inception cohort TIRA (early interventions in rheumatoid arthritis). Health status, function and costs were investigated. Predictors of high costs were calculated, and an algorithm was constructed to predict future need for TNFinhibitor treatment in patients not responding to traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Clinical and laboratory data, measures of functional capacity and self-reported assessments were collected regularly. In addition, patients completed biannual/annual questionnaires concerning all health care utilisation and days lost from work due to the disease. Within 3 months, improvements were seen regarding all variables assessing disease activity and functional ability, but 15% of the patients had sustained high or moderate disease activity throughout the study period. The scores of ‘health assessment questionnaire’ (HAQ) were similar for men and women at baseline, but had a less favourable course in women, who also had DMARDs more frequently prescribed.

    Ambulatory care accounted for 76% of the direct costs during the first year. Women had more ambulatory care visits and higher usage of complementary medicine compared to men. Men ≥65 years had low costs compared to younger men and compared to women of all ages. In multiple logistic regression tests, HAQ, high levels of IgM-class rheumatoid factor (RF), and poor hand function increased the odds of incurring high direct costs. Poor hand function and pain increased the odds of incurring high indirect costs.

    Indirect costs exceeded direct costs all three years. The average direct costs were €3,704 (US$ 3,297) year 1 and €2,652 (US$ 2,360) year 3. All costs decreased over the years, except those for medication and surgery. The indirect costs were €8,871 (US$ 7,895) year 1 and remained essentially unchanged, similarly for both sexes. More than 50% were on sick leave or early retirement at inclusion. Sick leave decreased but was offset by increase in early retirement. 14 patients (5%) were prescribed TNF-inhibitors at the 3- year follow up, thus increasing drug costs substantially. However, they incurred higher costs even before prescription of anti-TNF therapy.

    At the 5-year follow-up (2001-2003), 31 patients (12%) were prescribed TNFinhibitors. Baseline values of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, anti-CCP antibodies and morning stiffness were significantly higher in this group. These patients were also to a larger extent RF-positive and carriers of the ‘shared epitope’ (SE). Anti-TNF treated patients were significantly younger and more often women. For men, a predictive model was constructed using baseline data including SE+ and IgA-RF >100 U/L and anti-CCP >240 U/L yielding a specificity of 98% and a sensitivity of 71%. For women, disease activity score (DAS28) at the 3-month follow-up proved to be a better predictor, and the final model comprised SE+ and 3-month DAS28>5.2, giving a specificity of 95% and a sensitivity of 59%.

    Delarbeten
    1. Comparison between women and men with recent onset rheumatoid arthritis of disease activity and functional ability over two years (the TIRA project)
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Comparison between women and men with recent onset rheumatoid arthritis of disease activity and functional ability over two years (the TIRA project)
    Visa övriga...
    2003 (Engelska)Ingår i: Annals of the rheumatic diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, Vol. 62, s. 667-670Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe the course of recent onset rheumatoidarthritis (RA) and to compare consequences of the disease inmen and women.

    Methods: 284 patients with recent onset RA were followed upprospectively for two years from the time of diagnosis. Measuresof disease activity (for example, 28 joint disease activityscore (DAS28), C reactive protein, morning stiffness, physician’sglobal assessment) and function outcome (for example, rangeof movement, hand function, walking time) were determined. Thepatients’ self reported assessment of functional capacity(Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ)) and grading of wellbeingand pain (visual analogue scale) were registered. Changes overtime and differences between men and women were evaluated.

    Results: Improvements were seen for all variables within thefirst three months. Disease activity then remained unchanged.Function variables followed the same pattern during the firstyear, but then tended to worsen. HAQ scores were similar atbaseline, but significantly worse in women than in men at theone and two year follow ups.

    Conclusions: Disease activity was well managed and had improvedsubstantially after two years, whereas function seemed slowlyto deteriorate. Although disease variables were similar formen and women, functional ability (HAQ) had a less favourablecourse in women.

    Nyckelord
    early rheumatoid arthritis, outcome, disability, sex
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14282 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2007-02-01 Skapad: 2007-02-01 Senast uppdaterad: 2015-08-31
    2. Rheumatoid arthritis is already expensive during the first year of the disease (the Swedish TIRA Project)
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Rheumatoid arthritis is already expensive during the first year of the disease (the Swedish TIRA Project)
    2004 (Engelska)Ingår i: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, Vol. 43, nr 11, s. 1374-1382Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To calculate direct and indirect costs in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to characterize patients generating high and low costs respectively.

    Methods. Two hundred and ninety-seven patients with recent-onset (≤12 months) RA were recruited. Clinical/laboratory data and 'health assessment questionnaire' (HAQ) were registered at inclusion and after 3, 6 and 12 months. After 6 and 12 months, the patients completed a questionnaire concerning health-care utilization and days lost from work. A cut-off point for direct costs was set at 34 000 Swedish kronor (3675) defining one-third of the patients as a high-cost group and two-thirds as low-cost group. Indirect costs were calculated for patients aged <65 yr.

    Results. Two hundred and eleven patients completed the HAQ on both occasions. Indirect costs exceeded direct costs by a factor of 2.3. Sixty three per cent experienced work disability during the first year and were identified as the 'high-indirect-cost group'. Indirect costs accounted for >70% of total costs. Direct costs included ambulatory health care (76%), hospitalization (12%) and medication (9%). Men aged ≥65 yr had low costs compared with younger men and women of all ages. In multiple logistic regression tests, HAQ, high levels of IgM rheumatoid factor (IgM RF) and poor hand function increased the odds of entering the high-direct-cost group, and poor hand function and pain increased the odds of entering the high-indirect-cost group.

    Conclusions. Substantial costs were incurred during the first year after diagnosis of early RA, mainly due to work disability. Indirect costs were two to three times higher than direct costs. High levels of IgM RF, high HAQ score, poor hand function and pain increased the odds of entering high-cost groups.

    Nyckelord
    Early rheumatoid arthritis, Outcome, Indirect costs, Direct costs, Cost of illness
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14283 (URN)10.1093/rheumatology/keh324 (DOI)
    Tillgänglig från: 2007-02-01 Skapad: 2007-02-01 Senast uppdaterad: 2015-08-31
    3. Costs and course of disease and function in early rheumatoid arthritis: a 3-year follow-up (the Swedish TIRA project)
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Costs and course of disease and function in early rheumatoid arthritis: a 3-year follow-up (the Swedish TIRA project)
    2006 (Engelska)Ingår i: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, Vol. 45, nr 3, s. 325-331Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To calculate direct and indirect costs and to studydisease activity and functional ability over 3 yr in early rheumatoidarthritis (RA).

    Methods. Three hundred and three patients with early (≤1 yr)RA were recruited during a period of 27 months (1996–1998).Data were recorded during 3 yr to assess disease activity, functionalability, medication, health-care utilization and days lost fromwork.

    Results. Within 3 months, improvements were seen regarding allrecorded variables assessing disease activity and functionalability, but 15% had sustained high or moderate disease activitythroughout the study period. Indirect costs exceeded directcosts in all 3 yr. The average direct costs were € 3704 (US$3297) in year 1 and € 2652 (US$ 2360) in year 3. All costs decreased,except those for medication and surgery. Compared with men,women had more ambulatory care visits and used more complementarymedicine. The indirect costs were € 8871 (US$ 7895) in year 1and remained essentially unchanged; this was similar for bothsexes. Almost 50% were on sick leave or early retirement atinclusion. Sick leave decreased but was offset by an increasein early retirement. The 14 patients who eventually receivedTNF inhibitors incurred higher costs even before prescriptionof anti-TNF therapy.

    Conclusion. Disease activity and functional ability improvedwithin 3 months after diagnosis of early RA. Direct costs decreased,except for medication and surgery. Indirect costs remained unchanged.Fifteen per cent of the patients had high or moderate diseaseactivity in all 3 yr, indicating a need for more aggressiveearly anti-rheumatic therapy.

    Nyckelord
    Rheumatoid arthritis, Costs, Disease course
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14284 (URN)10.1093/rheumatology/kei157 (DOI)
    Tillgänglig från: 2007-02-01 Skapad: 2007-02-01 Senast uppdaterad: 2015-08-31
    4. Early predictors of TNFtargeted therapy in women and men with recent onset rheumatoid arthritis (the Swedish TIRA Project)
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Early predictors of TNFtargeted therapy in women and men with recent onset rheumatoid arthritis (the Swedish TIRA Project)
    2010 (Engelska)Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Submitted
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14285 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2007-02-01 Skapad: 2007-02-01 Senast uppdaterad: 2015-08-31
  • 43.
    Hallert, Eva
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Avd. för rehabilitering, HHJ, Hälsohögskolan, Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Rehabiliteringsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Development of disease activity and disability in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis: 8 years of follow-up from the Swedish TIRA-project2010Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies have reported that disability is strongly associated with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and disability at time of diagnosis has also proved to be a consistent predictor of disability over time.Objectives: To investigate the course of disease activity and disability over 8 years in early RA and to analyse differences between women and men.Methods: 149 patients with disease duration <1 year were included in the Swedish early RA-cohort "TIRA". Patients were followed prospectively for 8 years from the time of diagnosis. Disease activity was assessed by DAS28. Disability was measured by pain (VAS), grip force (Grippit), 'grip ability test' (GAT), range of motion in hand, upper and lower extremity (SOFI), walking speed and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ). Changes over time and differences between women and men were evaluated.Results: Disease activity decreased over time from inclusion to the 8-year follow-up for both women and men. Disability as measured by SOFI (hand, upper and lower extremity) and walking time was improved during the first year after diagnosis but at the 7 and 8 year follow-up, the level of disability was comparable to the level at inclusion. Pain, grip force and GAT were also improved during the first years but thereafter remained stable. HAQ scores were similar in men and women at inclusion. After initial improvement, HAQ remained at a stable level in men, while scores for women deteriorated from year 2 onwards and had reached back to baseline levels at 8 year follow-up. More disability in women than men was also seen in grip force whereas men had more disability than women in SOFI upper extremity. There were no significant differences between women and men in disease activity or disability as measured by VAS pain, GAT, SOFI hand or SOFI lower extremity during the 8-year follow-up.Conclusion: Although disease activity was well managed, disability deteriorated over 8 years with a less favourable course in women than men. Besides controlling disease activity, there is accordingly a need for regular assessments to detect and prevent progressing disability in RA-patients, not only in the early phase of disease, but also over the following years

  • 44.
    Hallert, Eva
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Kalkan, Almina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Reumatoid artrit är fortfarande en kostsam sjukdom – jämförelse mellan två kohorter2016Ingår i: BestPractice Reumatologi, ISSN 1903-6590, nr 27, s. 14-17Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sjukdomsaktivitet, funktionsförmåga samt direkta och indirekta kostnader har analyserats i två kohorter av patienter med nydebuterad (≤ 1 år) reumatoid artrit (RA).

    Den första kohorten med 320 patienter (T1) rekryterades 1996–1998 och den andra med 463 patienter (T2) rekryterades 2006–2009. Patienterna har följts regelbundet avseende kliniska och laboratoriemedicinska variabler och har fortlöpande i hälsoekonomienkäter registrerat all sjukvårdskonsumtion och antal dagar med sjukskrivning/sjukersättning samt rapporterat livskvalitet med EQ-5D och EQ-VAS.

  • 45.
    Hallert, Eva
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Kalkan, Almina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Allergicentrum US.
    Rheumatoid arthritis is still expensive in the new decade: a comparison between two early RA cohorts, diagnosed 1996-98 and 2006-092016Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 45, nr 5, s. 371-378Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    To calculate total costs during the first year after diagnosis in 463 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) included during 2006-09 (T2) and compare the results with a similar cohort included in 1996-98 (T1).

    METHOD:

    Clinical and laboratory data were collected regularly in both cohorts, and patients completed biannual questionnaires reporting health care utilization and number of days lost from work.

    RESULTS:

    Disease activity was similar in both cohorts T1 and T2 at inclusion. Significant improvements were seen during the first year in both cohorts but were more pronounced in T2. Outpatient care increased and hospitalization decreased in T2 compared with T1. Almost 3% of patients had surgery in both cohorts, but in T2, only women had surgery. Drug costs were higher in T2 than in T1 (EUR 689 vs. EUR 435). In T2, 12% of drug costs were direct costs and 4% were total costs. The corresponding values for T1 were 9% and 3%. In T1, 50% were prescribed disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) at inclusion, compared to T2, where prescription was > 90%. Direct costs were EUR 5716 in T2 and EUR 4674 in T1. Costs for sick leave were lower in T2 than in T1 (EUR 5490 vs. EUR 9055) but disability pensions were higher (EUR 4152 vs. EUR 2139), resulting in unchanged total costs. In T1, direct costs comprised 29% and indirect costs 71% of the total costs. The corresponding values for T2 were 37% and 63%.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The earlier and more aggressive treatment of RA with traditional DMARDs in T2 resulted in better outcomes compared to T1. Direct costs were higher in T2, partly offset by decreased sick leave, but total costs remained unchanged.

  • 46.
    Harris, Valerie M.
    et al.
    Oklahoma Medical Research Fdn, USA; University of Oklahoma, USA.
    Sharma, Rohan
    University of Oklahoma,USA; Department Vet Affairs Medical Centre, OK USA.
    Cavett, Joshua
    Oklahoma Medical Research Fdn, USA; University of Oklahoma, USA.
    Kurien, Biji T.
    Oklahoma Medical Research Fdn, USA; University of Oklahoma, USA; Department Vet Affairs Medical Centre, OK USA.
    Liu, Ke
    Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Centre, USA; University of Cincinnati, USA.
    Koelsch, Kristi A.
    Oklahoma Medical Research Fdn, USA; University of Oklahoma, USA; Department Vet Affairs Medical Centre, USA.
    Rasmussen, Astrid
    Oklahoma Medical Research Fdn, USA.
    Radfar, Lida
    University of Oklahoma, USA.
    Lewis, David
    University of Oklahoma, USA.
    Stone, Donald U.
    University of Oklahoma, USA; University of Oklahoma, USA.
    Erick Kaufman, C.
    University of Oklahoma, USA.
    Li, Shibo
    University of Oklahoma, USA.
    Segal, Barbara
    University of Minnesota, USA.
    Wallace, Daniel J.
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, USA.
    Weisman, Michael H.
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, USA.
    Venuturupalli, Swamy
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, USA.
    Kelly, Jennifer A.
    Oklahoma Medical Research Fdn, USA.
    Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.
    Oklahoma Medical Research Fdn, USA; University of Granada, Spain.
    Pons-Estel, Bernardo
    Sanat Parque, Argentina.
    Jonsson, Roland
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Lu, Xianglan
    University of Oklahoma, USA.
    Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric
    Strasbourg University, France.
    Anaya, Juan-Manuel
    University of Rosario, Colombia.
    Cunninghame-Graham, Deborah S.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Huang, Andrew J. W.
    University of Minnesota, USA.
    Brennan, Michael T.
    Carolinas Medical Centre, USA.
    Hughes, Pamela
    University of Minnesota, MN USA.
    Alevizos, Ilias
    National Institute Dent and Craniofacial Research, MD USA.
    Miceli-Richard, Corinne
    University of Paris 11, France.
    Keystone, Edward C.
    Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Bykerk, Vivian P.
    Hospital Special Surg, NY USA.
    Hirschfield, Gideon
    University of Birmingham, England.
    Xie, Gang
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Ng, Wan-Fai
    Newcastle University, England.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Magnusson Bucher, Sara
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Omdal, Roald
    Stavanger University Hospital, Norway.
    Rhodus, Nelson L.
    University of Minnesota, USA.
    Rischmueller, Maureen
    Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Australia; University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Rohrer, Michael
    University of Minnesota, USA.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Witte, Torsten
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Mariette, Xavier
    University of Paris 11, France.
    Lessard, Christopher J.
    Oklahoma Medical Research Fdn, USA.
    Harley, John B.
    Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Centre, USA; University of Cincinnati, OH USA; Department Vet Affairs Medical Centre, OH USA.
    Sivils, Kathy L.
    Oklahoma Medical Research Fdn, USA; University of Oklahoma, OK 73190 USA.
    Scofield, R. Hal
    Oklahoma Medical Research Fdn, USA; University of Oklahoma, OK 73190 USA; University of Oklahoma, OK 73190 USA; Department Vet Affairs Medical Centre, OK USA.
    Klinefelters syndrome (47,XXY) is in excess among men with Sjogrens syndrome2016Ingår i: Clinical Immunology, ISSN 1521-6616, E-ISSN 1521-7035, Vol. 168, s. 25-29Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary Sjogrens syndrome (pSS) has a strong female bias. We evaluated an X chromosome dose effect by analyzing 47,XXY (Klinefelters syndrome, 1 in 500 live male births) among subjects with pSS. 47,XXY was determined by examination of fluorescence intensity of single nucleotide polymorphisms from the X and Y chromosomes. Among 136 pSS men there were 4 with 47,XXY. This was significantly different from healthy controls (1 of 1254 had 47)0(Y, p = 0.0012 by Fishers exact test) as well men with rheumatoid arthritis (0 of 363 with 47,XXY), but not different compared to men with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (4 of 136 versus 8 of 306, Fishers exact test p = NS). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the number of X chromosomes is critical for the female bias of pSS, a property that may be shared with SLE but not RA. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 47.
    Hellström Ängerud, Karin
    et al.
    Institutionen för omvårdnad, Umeå Universitet.
    Ericsson, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för omvårdnad. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Isaksson, R-M
    Norrbotten County Council, Department of Research, Luleå.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för kardiovaskulär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för omvårdnad. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för kardiovaskulär medicin. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Differences in symptoms in relation to myocardial infarction.2016Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In myocardial infarction (MI) rapid diagnosis and treatment is crucial for the prognosis. Previous research has found that symptom presentation influence pre hospital delay times but studies about differences in MI symptoms between patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) are sparse and inconclusive. To enhance the understanding of symptom presentation in regard to MI type, we aimed to describe symptoms in relation to MI type and to find predictors of STEMI versus NSTEMI in patients with MI.

    Methods: Patients with MI (n=694) from the SymTime study were included. SymTime was a multicentre cross-sectional study of symptoms and actions in the prehospital phase of MI and data were collected using a previously validated questionnaire administered to MI patients within 24 h of admission to hospital.

    Results: Patients with STEMI were younger, more often men and smokers. Patients with NSTEMI were more likely to have a history of hypertension, MI and stroke. Chest pain was the most common symptom in both groups. Pain, discomfort, or pressure located in the jaw or teeth, vertigo/pre-syncope, cold sweat and nausea/vomiting were significantly more frequent in patients with STEMI (Table 1). In a multivariate logistic regression model patients with STEMI were more likely to present with cold sweat (OR 4.13, 95% CI 2.71–6.29) jaw pain (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.02–4.50), and nausea (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.20–3.33), and less likely to have a history of stroke (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.15–0.84), fluctuating symptoms (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.36–0.83) and anxiety (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.32–0.92) compared to patients with NSTEMI.

    Conclusion: Patients with STEMI differed significantly from those with NSTEMI regarding symptom presentation. This knowledge is important for health care personnel to recognize symptoms alarming for STEMI when evaluating patients with MI symptoms.

  • 48.
    Husberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Davidson, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Hallert, Eva
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Non-medical costs during the first year after diagnosis in two cohorts of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis, enrolled 10 years apart2017Ingår i: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 36, nr 3, s. 499-506Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to calculate non-medical costs during year 1 after diagnosis in two cohorts of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis enrolled 1996–1998 and 2006–2009. Clinical data were collected regularly in both cohorts. Besides information about healthcare utilization and days lost from work, patients reported non-medical costs for aids/devices, transportation, formal and informal care. Formal care was valued as full labour cost for official home help (€42.80/h) and informal care from relatives and friends as opportunity cost of leisure time, corresponding to 35% of labour cost (€15/h). In both cohorts, only 2% used formal care, while more than 50% used informal care. Prescription of aids/devices was more frequent in cohort 2 and more women than men needed aids/devices. Help with transportation was also more common in cohort 2. Women in both cohorts needed more informal care than men, especially with personal care and household issues. Adjusting for covariates in regression models, female sex remained associated with higher costs in both cohorts. Non-medical costs in cohort 2 were €1892, €1575 constituting informal care, corresponding to 83% of non-medical costs. Total non-medical costs constituted 25% of total direct costs and 11% of total direct and indirect costs. Informal care accounted for the largest part of non-medical costs and women had higher costs than men. Despite established social welfare system, it is obvious that family and friends, to a large extent, are involved in informal care of patients with early RA, and this may underestimate the total burden of the disease.

  • 49.
    Husberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Hallert, Eva
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Costs and disease activity in early rheumatoid arthritis in 1996-2000 and 2006-2011, improved outcome and shift in distribution of costs: a two-year follow-up2018Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, nr 5, s. 378-383Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate changes in healthcare utilization, costs, and disease activity from 1996 to 2011 for patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).Method: Two cohorts of patients with early RA, included in 1996-1998 (T1) and 2006-2009 (T2), were followed regularly. Healthcare utilization, costs, and disease activity were compared between cohorts during 2years after diagnosis.Results: Disease activity was significantly improved in T2 vs T1. Drug costs increased in T2 vs T1 (EUR 911 vs EUR 535, respectively; p=0.017), and costs for RA-related hospitalization decreased. More than 90% in T2 were prescribed disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) at inclusion compared to 50% in T1. At 2year follow-up, levels were still amp;gt;90% in T2, while corresponding values in T1 were just above 70%. Comparing T2 to T1, total direct costs were slightly higher in T2 (EUR 3941 vs EUR 3364, respectively; ns), sick leave decreased (EUR 3511 vs EUR 5672; p=0.025), while disability pension increased slightly (EUR 4889 vs EUR 4244; ns), but total indirect costs remained unchanged (EUR 8400 vs EUR 9916; ns). Total direct and indirect costs did not differ between the cohorts (EUR 12342 in T2 vs EUR 13280 in T1; ns), and loss of productivity still represented the largest component of total costs.Conclusion: T2 patients were prescribed DMARDs earlier and more aggressively than T1 patients. Stable and better improvements in disease activity, function, and quality of life were achieved in T2 compared to T1. There was a shift within the components in direct costs and indirect costs, but total costs remained essentially unchanged.

  • 50.
    Ighe, Anna
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Application of the 2012 systemic lupus international collaborating clinics classification criteria to patients on a Regional Swedish systemic lupus erythematosus register2015Ingår i: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 17, artikel-id 3Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    In 2012, the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) network presented a new set of criteria (SLICC-12) to classify systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The present study is the first to evaluate the performance of SLICC-12 in an adult European study population. Thus, SLICC-12 criteria were applied to confirmed SLE cases in our regional SLE register as well as to individuals with a fair suspicion of systemic autoimmune disease who were referred to rheumatology specialists at our unit.     

    Methods

    We included 243 confirmed SLE patients who met the 1982 American College of Rheumatology (ACR-82) classification criteria and/or the Fries ‘diagnostic principle’ (presence  of antinuclear antibodies on at least one occasion plus involvement of at least two defined organ systems) and 55 controls with possible systemic autoimmune disease, including the presence of any SLE-related autoantibody.     

    Results

    SLICC-12 showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 94% (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.90 to 0.96) compared with 90% (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.93) for the updated set of ACR criteria from 1997 (ACR-97), whereas ACR-82 failed to identify every fifth true SLE case. However, the disease specificity of SLICC-12 reached only 74% (95% CI, 0.60 to 0.84) and did not change much when involvement of at least two different organs was required as an indicator of systemic disease. In addition, SLICC-12 misclassified more of the controls compared to ACR-82, ACR-97 and Fries.     

    Conclusions

    Establishing a standard definition of SLE continues to challenge lupus researchers and clinicians. We confirm that SLICC-12 has advantages with regard to diagnostic sensitivity, whereas we found the diagnostic specificity to be surprisingly low. To accomplish increased sensitivity and specificity figures, a combination of criteria sets for clinical SLE studies should be considered.

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