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  • 1.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Henefalk, Gustav
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Impact of a zoledronate coating on early post-surgical implant stability and marginal bone resorption in the maxilla-A split-mouth randomized clinical trial.2019In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 49-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this clinical study was to evaluate the effect of a bisphosphonate coating on a titanium implant on the implant stability quotient (ISQ) and the radiographic marginal bone levels at implants during early healing (2-8 weeks).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a randomized double-blind trial with internal controls, 16 patients received a dental implant coated with zoledronate and one uncoated implant as a control. The coated and uncoated implants which were visually indistinguishable were bone level titanium implants with a moderately rough surface and a microthreaded neck. ISQ values were obtained at insertion and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks. Radiographs were obtained at insertion and at 8 weeks. The primary outcome was the difference in ISQ values between the coated implants and the control implants at 4 and 6 weeks, corrected for insertion values. The secondary outcome was loss of marginal bone level from insertion to 8 weeks.

    RESULTS: Implant stability quotient values remained largely constant over the 8 weeks, and there was no significant difference between coated and uncoated implants at any time point. There was 0.12 (SD 0.10) mm marginal bone loss at the control implants and 0.04 (SD 0.08) mm at the coated implants. The difference was 0.17 mm; SD 0.14; p < 0.006). On blind qualitative scoring, 13 of the 15 control implants and two of 15 coated implants showed small marginal bone defects (p = 0.003).

    CONCLUSIONS: There were no statistically significant differences observed in ISQ values between the coated and uncoated implants during the early healing. There was less marginal bone loss at the coated implants.

  • 2.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Bisphosphonate coating might improve fixation of dental implants in the maxilla: A pilot study2010In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 673-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This pilot study evaluates the clinical stability of bisphosphonate-coated dental implants placed using a two-stage surgical procedure in five patients. Each patient received seven regular Branemark implants, one of which was coated with bisphosphonate in a fibrinogen matrix. The coated implant was inserted where the bone was expected to have the least favourable quality. The level of the marginal bone around each implant was measured by intraoral periapical radiographs and implant stability was recorded using resonance frequency measurements. Frequency values (ISQ) were obtained peroperatively before flap closure and after 6 months at abutment connection. At abutment connection the bisphosphonate-coated implants were removed en bloc in two patients for histological examination. An animal experiment had previously confirmed that gamma-sterilization did not reduce bioactivity of the bisphosphonate coating. In each patient, the bisphosphonate-coated implant showed the largest improvement in ISQ level of all implants. Their values at the start tended to be lower, and the absolute value at 6 months did not differ. No complications occurred with the coated implants. Histology showed no abnormalities. Improvement in ISQ values was an expected effect of the bisphosphonate coating, but could be due to the choice of insertion site. This finding warrants a randomized blinded study.

  • 3.
    Agholme, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Macias, Brandon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hamang, Matt
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Lucchesi, Jonathan
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Adrian, Mary D.
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Kuhstoss, Stuart
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Harvey, Anita
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Sato, Masahiko
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Efficacy of a Sclerostin Antibody Compared to a Low Dose of PTH on Metaphyseal Bone Healing2014In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, ISSN 0736-0266, E-ISSN 1554-527X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 471-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compared the effect of a sclerostin antibody to that of a clinically relevant dose of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in a rat model for metaphyseal bone healing. Screws of steel or poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) were inserted bilaterally into the proximal tibia of young male rats. During 4 weeks the animals then received injections of either phosphate buffered saline (control), sclerostin antibody (25mg/kg, twice weekly) or PTH (5 mu g/kg, daily). The healing response around the screws was then assessed by mechanical testing and X-ray microtomography (mu CT). To distinguish between effects on healing and general effects on the skeleton, other untraumatized bone sites and serum biomarkers were also assessed. After 4 weeks of treatment, PTH yielded a 48% increase in screw pull-out force compared to control (p=0.03), while the antibody had no significant effect. In contrast, the antibody increased femoral cortical and vertebral strength where PTH had no significant effect. mu CT showed only slight changes that were statistically significant for the antibody mainly at cortical sites. The results suggest that a relatively low dose of PTH stimulates metaphyseal repair (screw fixation) specifically, whereas the sclerostin antibody has wide-spread effects, mainly on cortical bone, with less influence on metaphyseal healing.

  • 4.
    Alkner, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Orthopaedics, Eksjö, Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Halvardsson, Christina
    Falun Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    Brakenhielm, Gustaf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Orthopaedics, Eksjö, Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Eskilsson, Therese
    Falun Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    Andersson, Erika
    Falun Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    Fritzell, Peter
    Falun and Futurum Acad Hlth and Care, Sweden.
    Effect of postoperative pneumatic compression after volar plate fixation of distal radial fractures: a randomized controlled trial2018In: Journal of Hand Surgery, European Volume, ISSN 1753-1934, E-ISSN 2043-6289, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 825-831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the difference between postoperative rehabilitation with or without adjunctive intermittent pneumatic compression therapy following distal radial fracture treated with volar plating. A total of 115 patients were randomized to a control or to an experimental group. After 4 weeks of immobilization the experimental group received intermittent pneumatic compression therapy in addition to conventional postoperative rehabilitation. Primary outcome up to 1 year postoperatively was assessed using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. No significant differences between groups were found. There were no clinically relevant differences regarding the secondary outcome measures swelling, strength, pain and flexibility. We conclude that postoperative intermittent pneumatic compression treatment had no major benefits. The results of the present study do not support general use of intermittent pneumatic compression initiated 4 weeks following volar plating surgery for distal radial fracture. Level of evidence: I

  • 5.
    Amirhosseini, Mehdi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Göran
    Division of Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mechanical instability and titanium particles induce similar transcriptomic changes in a rat model for periprosthetic osteolysis and aseptic loosening2017In: Bone Reports, ISSN 2352-1872, Vol. 7, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wear debris particles released from prosthetic bearing surfaces and mechanical instability of implants are two main causes of periprosthetic osteolysis. While particle-induced loosening has been studied extensively, mechanisms through which mechanical factors lead to implant loosening have been less investigated. This study compares the transcriptional profiles associated with osteolysis in a rat model for aseptic loosening, induced by either mechanical instability or titanium particles. Rats were exposed to mechanical instability or titanium particles. After 15 min, 3, 48 or 120 h from start of the stimulation, gene expression changes in periprosthetic bone tissue was determined by microarray analysis. Microarray data were analyzed by PANTHER Gene List Analysis tool and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Both types of osteolytic stimulation led to gene regulation in comparison to unstimulated controls after 3, 48 or 120 h. However, when mechanical instability was compared to titanium particles, no gene showed a statistically significant difference (fold change = ± 1.5 and adjusted p-value = 0.05) at any time point. There was a remarkable similarity in numbers and functional classification of regulated genes. Pathway analysis showed several inflammatory pathways activated by both stimuli, including Acute Phase Response signaling, IL-6 signaling and Oncostatin M signaling. Quantitative PCR confirmed the changes in expression of key genes involved in osteolysis observed by global transcriptomics. Inflammatory mediators including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1ß, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)2, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase (Ptgs)2 and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) showed strong upregulation, as assessed by both microarray and qPCR. By investigating genome-wide expression changes we show that, despite the different nature of mechanical implant instability and titanium particles, osteolysis seems to be induced through similar biological and signaling pathways in this rat model for aseptic loosening. Pathways associated to the innate inflammatory response appear to be a major driver for osteolysis. Our findings implicate early restriction of inflammation to be critical to prevent or mitigate osteolysis and aseptic loosening of orthopedic implants.

  • 6.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Österberg, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Ctr Clin Res Sormland, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Webster, Kate E.
    La Trobe University, Australia.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The impact of psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activities after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction2014In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 48, no 22, p. 1613-U50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background This cross-sectional study aimed to examine whether appraisal of knee function, psychological and demographic factors were related to returning to the preinjury sport and recreational activity following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Method 164 participants completed a questionnaire battery at 1-7 years after primary ACL reconstruction. The battery included questionnaires evaluating knee self-efficacy, health locus of control, psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activity, and fear of reinjury; and self-reported knee function in sport-specific tasks, knee-related quality of life and satisfaction with knee function. The primary outcome was returning to the preinjury sport or recreational activity. Results At follow-up, 40% (66/164) had returned to their preinjury activity. Those who returned had more positive psychological responses, reported better knee function in sport and recreational activities, perceived a higher knee-related quality of life and were more satisfied with their current knee function. The main reasons for not returning were not trusting the knee (28%), fear of a new injury (24%) and poor knee function (22%). Psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activity, measured with the ACL-Return to Sport after Injury scale (was most strongly associated with returning to the preinjury activity). Age, sex and preinjury activity level were not related. Conclusions Less than 50% returned to their preinjury sport or recreational activity after ACL reconstruction. Psychological readiness to return to sport and recreation was the factor most strongly associated with returning to the preinjury activity. Including interventions aimed at improving this in postoperative rehabilitation programmes could be warranted to improve the rate of return to sport and recreational activities.

  • 7.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Atypical fractures, a biased perspective2016In: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 47, no 1, p. S28-S30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When stress fractures started to show up in the femurs of elderly ladies, it was soon evident that bisphosphonate use lay behind, and the absolute risk increase due to bisphosphonate use was reasonably well estimated already in 2008. Thereafter followed a period of confusion: the term atypical fracture was introduced, with a definition so vague that the true stress fractures tended to disappear in a cloud of ambiguity. This cast doubt on the association with bisphosphonates. The association was then re-established by large epidemiological studies based on radiographic adjudication. Atypical fractures are largely caused by bisphosphonates. With a correct indication, bisphosphonates prevent many more fractures than they cause, at least during the first years of use. With an incorrect indication they are likely to cause more harm than good. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Beslut att operera kopplat till ortopeders attityder till kirurgi2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114, no 41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 9.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Bone: Silk, metal and bone: why take implants out?2014In: Nature Reviews Rheumatology, ISSN 1759-4790, E-ISSN 1759-4804, Vol. 10, no 7, p. 386-387Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Degradable screws and plates for bone surgery have been produced from silk protein. The idea is to eliminate the need to take the implant out when the bone has healed. Will they provide sufficient strength, and will they degrade without causing inflammation? And why take implants out in the first place?

  • 10.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: Why do we operate proximal humeral fractures?2015In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 279-279Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Mythbusting in Orthopedics challenges our desire for meaning2014In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 85, no 6, p. 547-547Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Malouf, Jorge
    Hospital San Pablo, Spain.
    Tarantino, Umberto
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Garcia-Hernandez, Pedro A.
    University Hospital, Mexico.
    Corradini, Costantino
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Overgaard, Soren
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark; University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Stepan, Jan J.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Borris, Lars
    University Hospital, Denmark.
    Lespessailles, Eric
    CHR Orleans, France; University of Orleans, France.
    Frihagen, Frede
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Papavasiliou, Kyriakos
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Petto, Helmut
    Eli Lilly, Austria.
    Ramon Caeiro, Jose
    University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Marin, Fernando
    Eli Lilly Research Centre, England.
    Effects of Teriparatide Compared with Risedronate on Recovery After Pertrochanteric Hip Fracture Results of a Randomized, Active-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial at 26 Weeks2016In: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American volume, ISSN 0021-9355, E-ISSN 1535-1386, Vol. 98, no 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Osteoporosis drugs might affect fracture-healing. We therefore studied the effects of teriparatide in comparison with risedronate on recovery after pertrochanteric hip fractures. Methods: The study was a randomized, multicenter, active-controlled, 78-week trial comparing teriparatide (20 mg/day) with risedronate (35 mg/week) initiated within 2 weeks after fixation of a low-trauma pertrochanteric hip fracture (AO/OTA 31-A1 or 31-A2). The main inclusion criteria were a bone mineral density T-score of amp;lt;=-22.0 and 25-OH-vitamin D of amp;gt;= 9.2 ng/mL. During the first 26 weeks, patients received study medication with oral or injectable placebo plus calcium and vitamin D in a double-blinded fashion. Secondary (Timed Up-and-Go [TUG] test, hip pain, Short Form [SF]-36 health status, and safety) and exploratory (radiographic outcomes and ability to walk) 26-week end points are reported. Results: Of the 224 patients who were randomized, 171 (86 teriparatide, 85 risedronate) were included in the analysis. The mean age was 77 +/- 8 years, 77% were female, and 26% had a prior history of low-trauma fracture. The teriparatide group completed the TUG test in a shorter time at 6, 12, 18, and 26 weeks (differences of 25.7, -4.4, -3.1, and -3.1 seconds, respectively; p = 0.021 for the overall difference). They also reported less pain on a visual analog scale immediately after the TUG test at 12 and 18 weeks (adjusted absolute differences of 10.6 and 11.9 mm, respectively; p amp;lt; 0.05). There were no significant between-group differences in the SF-36 score, Charnley hip pain score, ability to walk, or use of walking aids during follow-up. Radiographic healing at 6, 12, and 26 weeks, mechanical failure of the implant (teriparatide, 7; risedronate, 8), loss of reduction (teriparatide, 2; risedronate, 4), and nonunion (0 cases) were not significantly different. Mild hypercalcemia and hyperuricemia were more frequent with teriparatide. Conclusions: Teriparatide was associated with less pain and a shorter time to complete the TUG test between 6 and 26 weeks compared with risedronate. Other fracture-recovery outcomes were similar. The results should be interpreted with caution as these were secondary end points.

  • 13.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rydholm, Anders
    Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Olle
    Umeå, Sweden.
    Artrosskolan: evidensen måste stärkas2018In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 115Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schepull, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Substantial creep in healing human Achilles tendons: A pilot study2015In: MLTJ Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal, ISSN 2240-4554, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 151-155Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: healing after rupture of the Achilles tendon can be described in terms of mechanical properties of the new-formed tissue, constituting the tendon callus. In previous human studies, the elastic modulus and the density remained almost constant during 3 months after mobilization started, and then improved up to one year. So far, time-dependent deformation of the healing human tendon has not been reported.

    Methods: in a series of 16 patients, operated with Achilles tendon suture, we implanted tantalum beads into the tendon and measured the distance between them repeatedly during 3 min of constant loading, using an ordinary image intensifier. The patients unloaded their leg for 30 min before the test. To avoid bias, all images were investigated in a randomized and blinded order.

    Results: total strain during 3 min of constant loading at 7 weeks post injury amounted to 5%, and at 19 weeks to 3%. About half of the strain, after the loading was applied, occurred during the second and third min. Considerable strain also occurred just before loading, when the patient was told that a load would be applied, but before this was actually done.

    Conclusion: the measurements were crude, and this study should be seen as a pilot. Still, viscoelastic properties seem to dominate the mechanical behavior the healing Achilles tendon from start of mobilization to 19 weeks, at least when tested after 30 min rest. This deserves further studies with more precise methods.

  • 15.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Atypical femoral fractures, bisphosphonates, and mechanical stress2014In: Current osteoporosis reports, ISSN 1544-1873, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 189-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atypical fractures are stress fractures occurring in the femoral shaft and closely related to bisphosphonate use. We here discuss their radiographic definition and different putative etiologies, apart from mechanical stress. Long time reduction of skeletal remodeling because of bisphosphonate use is thought to allow time for the bone to deteriorate mechanically, resulting in reduced toughness. However, the risk of atypical fracture diminishes rapidly after cessation of treatment, which suggests more acute effects of bisphosphonate use. Microdamage normally accumulates at areas of high stress. Possibly, ongoing bisphosphonate use reduces the ability to resorb and replace areas of microdamage by targeted remodeling. This could lead to crack propagation beyond a point of no return, ending in macroscopic stress fracture.

  • 16.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Stressfrakturer: hjulaxlar och idrottskarriärer brister2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 111, no 36, p. 1436-1439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress fractures are caused by material fatigue. Microcracks appear normally in bone, and are dealt with by remodeling, specifically targeting areas of microdamage. Inhibition of targeted remodeling can allow microcracks to grow and form fractures. Intensive athletic training can lead to an increased microcrack formation rate, which exceeds what can be balanced by remodeling. Stress fractures often heal poorly, possibly because they are so thin: normal deformation of the bone during loading has been shown to lead to strains within thin cracks that are incompatible with cell survival. If the patient can't reduce loading sufficiently to allow healing, surgical stabilization will therefore be required. If the crack is transformed into a larger defect, e.g. by drilling a hole, strains will be reduced and healing facilitated by a simple procedure.

  • 17.
    Balasingam, Sadeshkumar
    et al.
    NU Hosp Grp Trollhattan Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Sernert, Ninni
    NU Hosp Grp Trollhattan Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kartus, Juri
    NU Hosp Grp Trollhattan Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Patients With Concomitant Intra-articular Lesions at Index Surgery Deteriorate in Their Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score in the Long Term More Than Patients With Isolated Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture: A Study From the Swedish National Anterior Cruciate Ligament Register2018In: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopy And Related, ISSN 0749-8063, E-ISSN 1526-3231, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 1520-1529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To analyze and compare clinical outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction 5 and 10 years postsurgery between patients with concomitant intra-articular injuries and those with isolated ACL injury at reconstruction. Methods: Registrations were made using a web-based protocol by physicians for baseline and surgical data. Patients registered their Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) preoperatively and at 5 and 10 years postsurgery. The exclusion criteria for the present study were revisions of previously unregistered ACL surgeries, non-ACL surgeries, patients for whom 10-year follow-up data had not yet been collected, and the proportion of index surgeries that were revision or contralateral interventions. Results: There were 1,295 KOOS scores available for patients 5 years postsurgery, and 1,023 10 years postsurgery from a baseline of 2,751 index reconstructions. A deterioration between the 5-and 10-year scores was observed for patients with concomitant meniscus injury on the KOOS subscales for pain (P = .015), symptoms (P = .005), sport and recreation (P = .011), and knee-related quality of life (QoL) (P = .03) compared with patients with isolated ACL injury. Correspondingly, KOOS subscale score deterioration was seen for combined concomitant cartilage and meniscus injuries for pain (P = .005), symptoms (P = .009), sport and recreation (P = .006), and QoL (P amp;lt; .001). The largest deteriorations were found in sport and recreation (-5.9 points; confidence interval [CI] -10.1, -1.1) and QoL (-6.5 points; CI -10.3, -2.8) subscale scores for patients with concomitant meniscal and cartilage injuries. A similar pattern was not seen between patients with concomitant cartilage injury and isolated ACL injury. Conclusions: The present study reveals that concomitant meniscus injuries at the index operation, either in isolation or in combination with cartilage lesions, render a deterioration of scores on the KOOS outcome subscales for pain, sport and recreation, and quality of life between 5-and 10-year postsurgery follow-up of ACL-reconstructed patients. No such deterioration was seen for patients who had isolated ACL injury.

  • 18.
    Banefelt, J.
    et al.
    Quantify Res, Sweden.
    Akesson, K. E.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Spångeus, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Ljunggren, O.
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Karlsson, L.
    Quantify Res, Sweden.
    Strom, O.
    Quantify Res, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ortsater, G.
    Quantify Res, Sweden.
    Libanati, C.
    UCB Biopharma Sprl, Belgium.
    Toth, E.
    UCB Biopharma Sprl, Belgium.
    Risk of imminent fracture following a previous fracture in a Swedish database study2019In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 601-609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The SummaryThis study examined the imminent risk of a future fracture within 1 and 2years following a first fracture in women aged 50years and older and assessed independent factors associated with risk of subsequent fractures. The study highlights the need to intervene rapidly after a fracture to prevent further fractures.IntroductionThis study aims to determine the imminent risk of subsequent fractures within 1 and 2years following a first fracture and to assess independent factors associated with subsequent fractures.MethodsRetrospective, observational cohort study of women aged 50years with a fragility fracture was identified from Swedish national registers. Clinical/demographic characteristics at the time of index fracture and cumulative fracture incidences up to 12 and 24months following index fracture were calculated. Risk factors for subsequent fracture were identified using multivariate regression analysis.ResultsTwo hundred forty-two thousand one hundred eight women (mean [SD] age 74 [12.5] years) were included. The cumulative subsequent fracture incidence at 12months was 7.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.9-7.2) and at 24months was 12.0% (95% CI, 11.8-12.1). The rate of subsequent fractures was highest in the first month (similar to 15 fractures per 1000 patient-years) and remained steady between 4 and 24months (similar to 5 fractures/1000 patient-years). Higher age was an independent risk factor for imminent subsequent fractures (at 24months, sub-distribution hazard ratio [HR], 3.07; pamp;lt;0.001 for women 80-89years [reference 50-59years]). Index vertebral fracture was a strong independent risk factor for subsequent fracture (sub-distribution HR, 2.72 versus hip fracture; pamp;lt;0.001 over 12months; HR, 2.23; pamp;lt;0.001 over 24months).ConclusionsOur findings highlight the need to intervene rapidly after any fragility fracture in postmenopausal women. The occurrence of a fragility fracture provides healthcare systems with a unique opportunity to intervene to reduce the increased risk of subsequent fractures.

  • 19.
    Bartha, Erzsebet
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Davidson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berg, Hans E.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Kalman, Sigridur
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    A 1-year perspective on goal-directed therapy in elderly with hip fracture: Secondary outcomes2019In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 63, no 5, p. 610-614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background We have previously reported inconclusive results from a randomized controlled trial in elderly with hip-fracture comparing intra-operative goal-directed therapy with routine fluid treatment. Now we aimed to describe and compare secondary outcomes at 4 months and 1 year follow-up and to analyze the cost-effectiveness. Methods Patients with hip fracture (age amp;gt;= 70) were randomized for GDT or routine fluid treatment (RFT). The secondary outcomes were long-term survival, complications, number of hospital readmissions, and quality of life (EQ-5D) changes. Additionally, cost effectiveness was analyzed by an analytic tool which combines the clinical effectiveness, quality of life changes and costs. Results Patient data (GDT n = 74; RFT n = 75) were analyzed on an intention to treat basis. Statistically significant differences (GDT vs RFT) were not found considering survival (RR 0.76, 95%CI 0.45-1.28) and complications (RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.4-1.10) at 12 months. No statistically significant difference was found between hospital readmissions and quality of life changes. Conclusion The statistical uncertainty of risk reduction of negative outcomes and the large variability of the collected data indicate the need of further research in large sample sizes. To enable future health economic evaluation for decision support surrounding implementation of GDT, we suggest adding patient-oriented outcomes in future trials.

  • 20.
    Berglund, Caroline
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Ekströmer, Karin
    Department of Radiology, Mälarsjukhuset Eskilstuna Hospital, Sweden.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Primary Chronic Osteomyelitis of the Jaws in Children: An Update on Pathophysiology, Radiological Findings, Treatment Strategies, and Prospective Analysis of Two Cases2015In: Case Reports in Dentistry, ISSN 2090-6447, E-ISSN 2090-6455, Vol. 2015, no 152717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Primary chronic osteomyelitis (PCO) of the jaws in children is associated with pain, trismus, and swelling. In children, temporomandibular joint involvement is rare and few studies have been published due to the relatively low incidence. This paper presents two cases of mandibular PCO in children with the involvement of the collum mandibulae. In addition, a review of the literature regarding demographic data, histological, radiological, and laboratory findings, and treatment strategies of PCO was also performed. Material and Methods. Prospective analyses of two PCO cases. A PubMed search was used and the articles were sorted according to their corresponding key area of focus. Results. Review of the literature revealed twenty-four cases of PCO with two cases of mandibular condyle involvement. The mean age was 18 years; the male to female ratio was 1 : 3. Most of the patients were treated with anti-inflammatory drugs in combination with decortication. Clinical recurrence was seen in 7 cases. Conclusion. A combination of anti-inflammatory drugs and surgical intervention appears to be the first choice of treatment. However, surgical removal of necrotic tissue adjacent to collum mandibulae has its limitations in children. Further investigations are of utmost importance in order to increase our knowledge and understanding of this disease.

  • 21.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Healing Processes in Cancellous Bone2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of what is known about the biological response during fracture healing comes from numerous animal studies with shaft fractures in the long bone. However, most patients suffer from fractures closer to the ends of the long bones, in the hip, or in the vertebrae. These types of fractures mainly involve cancellous bone, while shaft fractures concern cortical bone. Compared to cortical bone whose structure is dense and compact, cancellous bone is of spongy and porous structure. A growing number of studies point towards that cortical and cancellous bone heal differently. To even this imbalance in knowledge between these two types of bone tissue, further studies in cancellous bone are justified.

    In this thesis we delved into the quiet unknown processes behind cancellous bone healing.

    In the first study we characterized and compared two models for cancellous bone healing in mice and rats: the first model can be used to analyze the morphology and morphometry of the regenerating bone; the second model can measure the mechanical properties of cancellous bone. The two models correspond in their developing patterns during the first week before they diverge. This suggests that these models can be utilized together to evaluate the initial healing in cancellous bone. Furthermore, we saw in the drill hole model that the bone formation is strictly restricted to the traumatized region, with a distinct interface to the adjacent uninjured tissue.

    The second study characterized the cellular response during the initial healing phase in cancellous bone. The focus was to follow the spatial location of inflammatory and osteogenic cells over time in a cancellous bone injury. In contrast to shaft fractures (cortical bone), where healing is described as sequential events where inflammatory cells are the first to arrive to the trauma before osteogenic cells are recruited and initiate healing, we could see how inflammatory and osteogenic cells appeared early, simultaneously after a cancellous bone injury. This study showed that cancellous bone differs from how fracture healing is normally described.

    In the third study we explored the role of a subpopulation of lymphocytes (CD8 positive cells), earlier studied in shaft fractures. We wanted to see how their absence would affect the healing in a cancellous bone injury. Without CD8+ cells, cancellous bone healing was impaired as expressed via poorer mechanical properties of the regenerated bone tissue.

    The fourth and last study issued the influence of uninjured bone marrow on cortical bone healing. We developed a cortical defect model which blocked uninjured marrow from reaching the defect. Without the presence of marrow, the cortical defects ability to regenerate was significantly impaired. This implies that the marrow is important for cortical bone healing.

    In conclusion, cancellous bone healing is different from its cortical counterpart and the general perception of fracture healing. We have briefly discerned healing mechanisms in cancellous bone that might be of clinical importance: the restricted cancellous bone formation is something to take into consideration when performing arthrodeses; and importance of marrow in skeletal defects (e.g. pseudarthroses). With this thesis, we hope to promote that further investigating on cancellous bone healing is necessary.

    List of papers
    1. Experimental models for cancellous bone healing in the rat Comparison of drill holes and implanted screws
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental models for cancellous bone healing in the rat Comparison of drill holes and implanted screws
    2015 (English)In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 86, no 6, p. 745-750Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Cancellous bone appears to heal by mechanisms different from shaft fracture healing. There is a paucity of animal models for fractures in cancellous bone, especially with mechanical evaluation. One proposed model consists of a screw in the proximal tibia of rodents, evaluated by pull-out testing. We evaluated this model in rats by comparing it to the healing of empty drill holes, in order to explain its relevance for fracture healing in cancellous bone. To determine the sensitivity to external influences, we also compared the response to drugs that influence bone healing. Methods - Mechanical fixation of the screws was measured by pull-out test and related to the density of the new bone formed around similar, but radiolucent, PMMA screws. The pull-out force was also related to the bone density in drill holes at various time points, as measured by microCT. Results - The initial bone formation was similar in drill holes and around the screw, and appeared to be reflected by the pull-out force. Both models responded similarly to alendronate or teriparatide (PTH). Later, the models became different as the bone that initially filled the drill hole was resorbed to restore the bone marrow cavity, whereas on the implant surface a thin layer of bone remained, making it change gradually from a trauma-related model to an implant fixation model. Interpretation - The similar initial bone formation in the different models suggests that pull-out testing in the screw model is relevant for assessment of metaphyseal bone healing. The subsequent remodeling would not be of clinical relevance in either model.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2015
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123812 (URN)000365484500019 ()26200395 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2031-47-5]; AFA insurance company; EU [279239]; Linkoping University; Eli Lilly and Company

    DOI does not work: 10.3109/17453674.2015.1075705

    Available from: 2016-01-11 Created: 2016-01-11 Last updated: 2018-10-29
    2. Osteoblast precursors and inflammatory cells arrive simultaneously to sites of a trabecular-bone injury
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Osteoblast precursors and inflammatory cells arrive simultaneously to sites of a trabecular-bone injury
    2018 (English)In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 4, p. 457-461Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Fracture healing in the shaft is usually described as a sequence of events, starting with inflammation, which triggers mesenchymal tissue formation in successive steps. Most clinical fractures engage cancellous bone. We here describe fracture healing in cancellous bone, focusing on the timing of inflammatory and mesenchymal cell type appearance at the site of injury. Material and methods - Rats received a proximal tibial drill hole, A subgroup received clodronate-containing liposomes before or after surgery. The tibiae were analyzed with micro-CT and immunohistochemistry 1 to 7 days after injury. Results - Granulocytes (myeloperoxidase) appeared in moderate numbers within the hole at day 1 and then gradually disappeared. Macrophage expression (CD68) was seen on day 1, increased until day 3, and then decreased. Mesenchymal cells (vimentin) had already accumulated in the periphery of the hole on day 1. Mesenchymal cells dominated in the entire lesion on day 3, now producing extracellular matrix. A modest number of preosteoblasts (RUNX2) were seen on day 1 and peaked on day 4. Osteoid was seen on day 4 in the traumatized region, with a distinct border to the uninjured surrounding marrow. Clodronate liposomes given before the injury reduced the volume of bone formation at day 7, but no reduction in macrophage numbers could be detected. Interpretation - The typical sequence of events in shaft fractures was not seen. Mesenchymal cells appeared simultaneously with granulocyte and macrophage arrival. Clodronate liposomes, known to reduce macrophage numbers, seemed to be associated with the delineation of the volume of tissue to be replaced by bone.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2018
    National Category
    Orthopaedics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150316 (URN)10.1080/17453674.2018.1481682 (DOI)000439704100018 ()29865916 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2019-05-02
    3. Marrow compartment contribution to cortical defect healing
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Marrow compartment contribution to cortical defect healing
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 119-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Healing of shaft fractures is commonly described as regards external callus. We wanted to clarify the role of the bone marrow compartment in the healing of stable shaft fractures. Patients and methods - A longitudinal furrow was milled along the longitudinal axis of the femoral shaft in mice. The exposed bone marrow under the furrow was scooped out. The mice were then randomized to no further treatment, or to receiving 2 silicone plugs in the medullary canal distal and proximal to the defect. The plugs isolated the remaining marrow from contact with the defect. Results were studied with histology and flow cytometry. Results - Without silicone plugs, the marrow defect was filled with new bone marrow-like tissue by day 5, and new bone was seen already on day 10. The new bone was seen only at the level of the cortical injury, where it seemed to form simultaneously in the entire region of the removed cortex. The new bone seemed not to invade the marrow compartment, and there was a sharp edge between new bone and marrow. The regenerated marrow was similar to uninjured marrow, but contained considerably more cells. In the specimens with plugs, the marrow compartment was either filled with loose scar tissue, or empty, and there was only minimal bone formation, mainly located around the edges of the cortical injury. Interpretation - Marrow regeneration in the defect seemed to be a prerequisite for normal cortical healing. Shaft fracture treatment should perhaps pay more attention to the local bone marrow.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2018
    National Category
    Orthopaedics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145120 (URN)10.1080/17453674.2017.1382280 (DOI)000423474000020 ()28946782 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2018-02-19 Created: 2018-02-19 Last updated: 2019-05-27
  • 22.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Abaloparatide versus teriparatide: a head to head comparison of effects on fracture healing in mouse models2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 6, p. 674-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Teriparatide accelerates fracture healing in animals and probably in man. Abaloparatide is a new drug with similar although not identical effects on the teriparatide receptor. Given at 4 times the teriparatide dose in a human osteoporosis trial, abaloparatide increased bone density more than teriparatide, and both reduced fracture risk. We investigated in mice whether abaloparatide stimulates fracture healing, and if it does so with the suggested dose effect relation (4:1). Patients and methods - In a validated mouse model for metaphyseal healing (burr hole with screw pull-out), 96 mice were randomly allocated to 11 groups: control (saline), teriparatide or abaloparatide, where teriparatide and abaloparatide were given at 5 different doses each. In a femoral shaft osteotomy model, 24 mice were randomly allocated to 3 groups: control (saline), teriparatide (15 mu g/kg) or abaloparatide (60 mu g/kg). Each treatment was given daily via subcutaneous injections. Results were evaluated by mechanical testing and microCT. Results - In the metaphyseal model, a dose-dependent increase in screw pull-out force could be seen. In a linear regression analysis (r = 0.78) each increase in ln(dose) by 1 (regardless of drug type) was associated with an increase in pull-out force by 1.50 N (SE 0.18) (p amp;lt; 0.001). Changing drug from teriparatide to abaloparatide increased the force by 1.41 N (SE 0.60; p = 0.02). In the diaphyseal model, the callus density was 23% (SD 10), 38% (SD 10), and 47% (SD 2) for control, for teriparatide and abaloparatide respectively. Both drugs were significantly different from controls (p = 0.001 and p = 0.008), but not from each other. Interpretation - Both drugs improve fracture healing, but in these mouse models, the potency per mu g of abaloparatide seems only 2.5 times that of teriparatide, rather than the 4:1 relation chosen in the clinical abaloparatide-teriparatide comparison trial.

  • 23.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Osteoblast precursors and inflammatory cells arrive simultaneously to sites of a trabecular-bone injury2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 4, p. 457-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Fracture healing in the shaft is usually described as a sequence of events, starting with inflammation, which triggers mesenchymal tissue formation in successive steps. Most clinical fractures engage cancellous bone. We here describe fracture healing in cancellous bone, focusing on the timing of inflammatory and mesenchymal cell type appearance at the site of injury. Material and methods - Rats received a proximal tibial drill hole, A subgroup received clodronate-containing liposomes before or after surgery. The tibiae were analyzed with micro-CT and immunohistochemistry 1 to 7 days after injury. Results - Granulocytes (myeloperoxidase) appeared in moderate numbers within the hole at day 1 and then gradually disappeared. Macrophage expression (CD68) was seen on day 1, increased until day 3, and then decreased. Mesenchymal cells (vimentin) had already accumulated in the periphery of the hole on day 1. Mesenchymal cells dominated in the entire lesion on day 3, now producing extracellular matrix. A modest number of preosteoblasts (RUNX2) were seen on day 1 and peaked on day 4. Osteoid was seen on day 4 in the traumatized region, with a distinct border to the uninjured surrounding marrow. Clodronate liposomes given before the injury reduced the volume of bone formation at day 7, but no reduction in macrophage numbers could be detected. Interpretation - The typical sequence of events in shaft fractures was not seen. Mesenchymal cells appeared simultaneously with granulocyte and macrophage arrival. Clodronate liposomes, known to reduce macrophage numbers, seemed to be associated with the delineation of the volume of tissue to be replaced by bone.

  • 24.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dietrich, Franciele
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tätting, Love
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Eliasson, Pernilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Depletion of cytotoxic (CD8+) T cells impairs implant fixation in rat cancellous bone2019In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, ISSN 0736-0266, E-ISSN 1554-527X, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 805-811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As cytotoxic (CD8(+)) T cells seem to impair shaft fracture healing, we hypothesized that depletion of CD8(+) cells would instead improve healing of cancellous bone. Additionally, we also tested if CD8-depletion would influence the healing of ruptured Achilles tendons. Rats received a single injection of either anti-CD8 antibodies or saline and put through surgery 24 h later. Three different surgical interventions were performed as follows: (1) a drill hole in the proximal tibia with microCT (BV/TV) to assess bone formation; (2) a screw in the proximal tibia with mechanical evaluation (pull-out force) to assess fracture healing; (3) Achilles tendon transection with mechanical evaluation (force-at-failure) to assess tendon healing. Furthermore, CD8-depletion was confirmed with flow cytometry on peripheral blood. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed depletion of CD8(+) cells (p amp;lt; 0.001). Contrary to our hypothesis, depletion of CD8(+) cells reduced the implant pull-out force by 19% (p amp;lt; 0.05) and stiffness by 34% (p amp;lt; 0.01), although the bone formation in the drill holes was the same as in the controls. Tendon healing was unaffected by CD8-depletion. Our results suggest that CD8(+) cells have an important part in cancellous bone healing.

  • 25.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Ressner, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Koziorowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Malmqvist, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Shining dead bone-cause for cautious interpretation of [F-18]NaF PET scans2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 124-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose — [18F]Fluoride ([18F]NaF) PET scan is frequently used for estimation of bone healing rate and extent in cases of bone allografting and fracture healing. Some authors claim that [18F]NaF uptake is a measure of osteoblastic activity, calcium metabolism, or bone turnover. Based on the known affinity of fluoride to hydroxyapatite, we challenged this view.

    Methods — 10 male rats received crushed, frozen allogeneic cortical bone fragments in a pouch in the abdominal wall on the right side, and hydroxyapatite granules on left side. [18F]NaF was injected intravenously after 7 days. 60 minutes later, the rats were killed and [18F]NaF uptake was visualized in a PET/CT scanner. Specimens were retrieved for micro CT and histology.

    Results — MicroCT and histology showed no signs of new bone at the implant sites. Still, the implants showed a very high [18F]NaF uptake, on a par with the most actively growing and remodeling sites around the knee joint.

    Interpretation — [18F]NaF binds with high affinity to dead bone and calcium phosphate materials. Hence, an [18F]NaF PET/CT scan does not allow for sound conclusions about new bone ingrowth into bone allograft, healing activity in long bone shaft fractures with necrotic fragments, or remodeling around calcium phosphate coated prostheses

  • 26.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tätting, Love
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Marrow compartment contribution to cortical defect healing2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 119-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Healing of shaft fractures is commonly described as regards external callus. We wanted to clarify the role of the bone marrow compartment in the healing of stable shaft fractures. Patients and methods - A longitudinal furrow was milled along the longitudinal axis of the femoral shaft in mice. The exposed bone marrow under the furrow was scooped out. The mice were then randomized to no further treatment, or to receiving 2 silicone plugs in the medullary canal distal and proximal to the defect. The plugs isolated the remaining marrow from contact with the defect. Results were studied with histology and flow cytometry. Results - Without silicone plugs, the marrow defect was filled with new bone marrow-like tissue by day 5, and new bone was seen already on day 10. The new bone was seen only at the level of the cortical injury, where it seemed to form simultaneously in the entire region of the removed cortex. The new bone seemed not to invade the marrow compartment, and there was a sharp edge between new bone and marrow. The regenerated marrow was similar to uninjured marrow, but contained considerably more cells. In the specimens with plugs, the marrow compartment was either filled with loose scar tissue, or empty, and there was only minimal bone formation, mainly located around the edges of the cortical injury. Interpretation - Marrow regeneration in the defect seemed to be a prerequisite for normal cortical healing. Shaft fracture treatment should perhaps pay more attention to the local bone marrow.

  • 27.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eliasson, Pernilla T
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Elevated plasma levels of TIMP-1 in patients with rotator cuff tear2012In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 83, no 5, p. 523-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose:Extracellular matrix remodelling is altered in rotator cuff tears,16partly due to altered expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors. It is unclear if this altered expression can be traced as changes in plasma protein levels.

    The purposes were to measure the plasma level of MMPs and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) inpatients with rotator cuff tears and to relate changes in the pattern of MMP and TIMP levels with the extent of the rotator cuff tear.

    Methods: Blood samples were collected from 17 patients, median 61 (range 39-77) years, with sonographically verified rotator cuff tears (partial- or full-thickness). These were compared with 16 gender and age matched control persons with sonographically intact rotator cuffs. Plasma levels of MMPs and TIMPs were measured simultaneously using Luminex technology and ELISA.

    Results: The plasma level of TIMP-1 was elevated in patients with rotator cuff tears, especially in those with full-thickness tears. The levels of TIMP-1, TIMP-3 and MMP-9 were higher in patients with full-thickness tears compared to those with partial-thickness tears, but only TIMP-1 was different from controls.

    Interpretation: The observed elevation of TIMP-1 in plasma might reflect local pathological processes in or around the rotator cuff, or a genetic predisposition in these patients. That levels of TIMP-1 and certain MMP´s was found to differ between partial and full thickness tears may reflect the extent of the lesion or different aetiology and pathomechanisms.

  • 28.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmgren, Theresa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    A specific exercise strategy for patients with subacromial pain significantly reduced the need for surgery: one-year results of a randomised controlled studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A specific exercise strategy focusing on eccentric exercises, for treating sbacromial pain has in a previous study been found effective at three-month followup.

    The aim of the present study was to investigate if the positive short-term results were maintained after one year. A further aim was to examine if baseline clinical score, rotator cuff status and radiological findings influenced the choice of surgery.

    Methods: 97 patients on the waiting-list for arthroscopic subacromial decompression were in the first study randomized to a three-month specific exercise strategy or unspecific exercises (controls). Patients were examined with radiology, ultrasound and assessed with clinical scores: primary Constant-Murley score. After three months of exercises the patients were asked if they still wanted surgery and this option was available until the one-year follow-up. All patients were re-assessed with clinical scores one year after inclusion or one year after surgical intervention and the number of patients that had chosen surgery in each group was compared. The baseline Constant-Murley score and the status of subacromial structures were analyzed in relation to patient's choice of surgery.

    Results: The positive short-term effect (improved shoulder function and pain) of the specific exercises was maintained after one-year. Compared to the three-month followup all patients had improved significantly (p < 0.0001) in Constant-Murley score. The number of patients that had chosen surgery in the control exercise group (63%) was significantly larger (p < 0.0001) than in the specific exercise group (24%). Patients that had chosen surgery had a significantly lower baseline Constant-Murley score and significantly more often a full-thickness tear. Patients with partial-thickness tears did not differ from those with intact cuff tendons.

    Conclusions: The positive short-term outcomes after specific exercises were maintained after one year and reduced the need of surgery significantly more than the unspecific control exercises. Patients with low baseline clinical score and/or a full-thickness tear significantly more often chose surgery.

    Level of evidence: I, Randomized controlled trail according to Consort statement.

  • 29.
    Bogl, H. P.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schilcher, J.
    Gavle Central Hospital, Sweden.
    Undisturbed local bone formation capacity in patients with atypical femoral fractures: a case series2017In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 2439-2444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We excised the fracture site in 8 patients with incomplete atypical femoral fractures by drilling an 11-mmdiameter hole. New bone formation could be seen in the hole within a normal time frame. Delayed healing of these fractures might be unrelated to an impaired capacity to form bone. Introduction Incomplete atypical femoral fractures (undisplaced cracks) heal slowly or not at all, and often progress to a complete fracture with minimal trauma. The impaired healing has been attributed to an impaired biologic healing capacity related to bisphosphonate use, or, alternatively, to the mechanical environment within the fracture crack. This study aimed to investigate the capacity for bone formation after resection of the fracture site. Methods Between 2008 and 2014, we recruited eight patients with incomplete atypical femoral fractures. All used oral bisphosphonates before the fracture for on average 8 years (range 4 to 15) and complained of thigh pain. The fractures were stabilized with reamed cephalomedullary nails. During surgery, the fracture site in the lateral cortex was resected with a cylindrical drill (diameter 11.5 mm). The cylindrical cortical defect allowed radiographic evaluation of new bone formation, and the patients were followed clinically and radiologically for 24 months (range 15 to 92). Results After 3 months, newly formed bone could be seen in the cortical defects in all patients. After 13-26 months, the previous defects showed continuous cortical bone. At final follow-up, all patients reported full recovery of pre-surgical complaints. No complications occurred and no reoperations were performed. Conclusions New bone formation occurred within a time frame that appears normal for healing of cortical bone defects. This suggests that the capacity to form new bone is intact.

  • 30.
    Borg, Sabina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Leosdottir, Margret
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lindolm, Daniel
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bäck, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Factors associated with non-attendance at exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation2019In: BMC SPORTS SCIENCE MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION, ISSN 2052-1847, Vol. 11, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundDespite its well-established positive effects, exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (exCR) is underused in patients following an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of the study was to identify factors associated with non-attendance at exCR in patients post-AMI in a large Swedish cohort.MethodsA total of 31,297 patients who have suffered an AMI, mean age 62.44years, were included from the SWEDEHEART registry during the years 2010-2016. Comparisons between attenders and non-attenders at exCR were done at baseline for the following variables: age, sex, body mass index, occupational status, smoking, previous diseases, type of index cardiac event and intervention, and left ventricular function. Distance of residence from the hospital and type of hospital were added as structural variables in logistic regression analyses, with non-attendance at exCR at one-year follow-up as dependent, and with individual and structural variables as independent variables.ResultsIn total, 16,214 (52%) of the patients did not attend exCR. The strongest predictor for non-attendance was distance to the exCR centre (OR 1.75 [95% CI: 1.64-1.86]). Other predictors for non-attendance included smoking, history of stroke, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), AMI or diabetes, male sex, being retired vs. being employed, and being followed-up at a county hospital. Patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and those intervened with PCI or CABG were more likely to attend exCR.Conclusions A distance greater than 16km was associated with increased probability of non-attendance at exCR, as were smoking, a higher burden of comorbidities, and male sex. A better understanding of individual and structural factors can support the development of future rehabilitation services.

  • 31.
    Brink, Rob C.
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, G05.228, University Medical Center Utrecht, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands..
    Vavruch, Ludvig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Schlösser, Tom P. C.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, G05.228, University Medical Center Utrecht, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands..
    Abul-Kasim, Kasim
    Division of Neuroradiology, Diagnostic Centre for Imaging and Functional Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden..
    Ohlin, Acke
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden..
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Castelein, René M.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, G05.228, University Medical Center Utrecht, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands. r.m.castelein@umcutrecht.nl..
    Vrtovec, Tomaž
    Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia..
    Three-dimensional pelvic incidence is much higher in (thoraco)lumbar scoliosis than in controls2019In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 544-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The pelvic incidence (PI) is used to describe the sagittal spino-pelvic alignment. In previous studies, radiographs were used, leading to less accuracy in establishing the three-dimensional (3D) spino-pelvic parameters. The purpose of this study is to analyze the differences in the 3D sagittal spino-pelvic alignment in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) subjects and non-scoliotic controls.

    Methods

    Thirty-seven female AIS patients that underwent preoperative supine low-dose computed tomography imaging of the spine, hips and pelvis as part of their general workup were included and compared to 44 non-scoliotic age-matched female controls. A previously validated computerized method was used to measure the PI in 3D, as the angle between the line orthogonal to the inclination of the sacral endplate and the line connecting the center of the sacral endplate with the hip axis.

    Results

    The PI was on average 46.8° ± 12.4° in AIS patients and 41.3° ± 11.4° in controls (p = 0.025), with a higher PI in Lenke type 5 curves (50.6° ± 16.2°) as compared to controls (p = 0.042), whereas the Lenke type 1 curves (45.9° ± 12.2°) did not differ from controls (p = 0.141).

    Conclusion

    Lenke type 5 curves show a significantly higher PI than controls, whereas the Lenke type 1 curves did not differ from controls. This suggests a role of pelvic morphology and spino-pelvic alignment in the pathogenesis of idiopathic scoliosis. Further longitudinal studies should explore the exact role of the PI in the initiation and progression of different AIS types.

  • 32.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Långvarig smärta efter kirurgi, neuropatisk smärta, CRPS2017In: Information från Läkemedelsverket, ISSN 1101-7104, Vol. 3, p. 34-38Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Neuropatisk smärta orsakas definitionsmässigt av en skada eller sjukdom i det somatosensoriska nervsystemet. Långvarig postoperativ smärta (LPOS) är tämligen vanligt, framför allt efter ingrepp som exempelvis amputation, torakotomi, eller mastektomi. I många fall anses LPOS vara av neuropatisk karaktär, och den farmakologiska behandlingen utgår då i stor utsträckning från rekommendationerna för behandling av neuropatisk smärta, med fokus på vissa antidepressiva läkemedel (amitriptylin, duloxetin) och gabapentinoider (gabapentin, pregabalin). Topikal behandling med till exempel lidokainplåster kan vara av stort värde när smärtan utlöses av lätt beröring av huden (allodyni). Överlag bör stor försiktighet råda angående långtidsanvändning av opioider. Vid LPOS efter bukkirurgi bör man speciellt beakta opioidernas negativa effekter på tarmfunktionen, eftersom en ”ond cirkel” kan uppkomma mellan ökade doser opioider och ökad smärta. Komplext regionalt smärtsyndrom (CRPS) kan uppkomma i en extremitet efter trauma av lindrig karaktär och/eller immobilisering (till exempel gipsning). Även om CRPS typ 1 definitionsmässigt inte är ett neuropatiskt smärttillstånd, är de farmakologiska behandlingsprinciperna ändå i stor utsträckning desamma som för neuropatisk smärta. Mer forskning behövs för att på sikt kunna få fram bättre, mer mekanism-baserade behandlingsmetoder.

  • 33.
    Charlesworth, Jonathon
    et al.
    Australasian Coll Sport and Exercise Phys, Australia.
    Fitzpatrick, Jane
    Australasian Coll Sport and Exercise Phys, Australia; Univ Melbourne, Australia; Univ Melbourne, Australia.
    Perera, Nirmala
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Australasian Coll Sport and Exercise Phys, Australia.
    Orchard, John
    Australasian Coll Sport and Exercise Phys, Australia; Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Osteoarthritis- a systematic review of long-term safety implications for osteoarthritis of the knee2019In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 20, article id 151Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is no cure for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) and typically patients live approximately 30-years with the disease. Most common medical treatments result in short-term palliation of symptoms with little consideration of long-term risk. This systematic review aims to appraise the current evidence for the long-term (amp;gt;= 12 months) safety of common treatments for knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Methods: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Medline and PubMed were systematically searched from 1990 to July 2017, inclusive. Inclusion criteria were 1) peer-reviewed publications investigating treatments for KOA referred to in the Australian Clinical Care Standard and/or Therapeutic Guidelines: Rheumatology 2) specifically addressing safety of the treatments 3) with amp;gt;= 12 months of follow-up and 4) Downs and Black quality score amp;gt;= 13. Results: Thirty-four studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Lifestyle modifications (moderate exercise and weight loss), paracetamol, glucosamine, Intraarticular Hyaluronic Acid (IAHA) and platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) injections have a low risk of harm and beneficial amp;gt;= 12 month outcomes. Although Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) provide pain relief, they are associated with increased risk of medical complications. Cortisone injections are associated with radiological cartilage degeneration at amp;gt; 12 months. Arthroscopy for degenerative meniscal tears in KOA leads to a 3-fold increase in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). TKA improves primary outcomes of KOA but has a low rate of significant medical complications. Conclusions: Given the safety and effectiveness of lifestyle interventions such as weight loss and exercise, these should be advocated in all patients due to the low risk of harm. The use of NSAIDs should be minimized to avoid gastrointestinal complications. Treatment with opioids has a lack of evidence for use and a high risk of long-term harm. The use of IAHA and PRP may provide additional symptomatic benefit without the risk of harm. TKA is associated with significant medical complications but is justified by the efficacy of joint replacement in late-stage disease.

  • 34.
    De Kleuver, Marinus
    et al.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Faraj, Sayf S. A.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Holewijn, Roderick M.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Germscheid, Niccole M.
    AOSpine Int, Switzerland.
    Adobor, Raphael D.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Andersen, Mikkel
    Middelfart Hospital, Denmark.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Spinal Surgery.
    Dahl, Benny
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Texas Childrens Hospital, TX 77030 USA; Baylor Coll Med, TX 77030 USA.
    Keskinen, Heli
    University of Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Olai, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Spinal Surgery.
    Polly, David W.
    University of Minnesota, MN 55455 USA.
    Van Hooff, Miranda L.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; Sint Maartensklin, Netherlands.
    Haanstra, Tsjitske M.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Defining a core outcome set for adolescent and young adult patients with a spinal deformity A collaborative effort for the Nordic Spine Surgery Registries2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 6, p. 612-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Routine outcome measurement has been shown to improve performance in several fields of healthcare. National spine surgery registries have been initiated in 5 Nordic countries. However, there is no agreement on which outcomes are essential to measure for adolescent and young adult patients with a spinal deformity. The aim of this study was to develop a core outcome set (COS) that will facilitate benchmarking within and between the 5 countries of the Nordic Spinal Deformity Society (NSDS) and other registries worldwide. Material and methods - From August 2015 to September 2016, 7 representatives (panelists) of the national spinal surgery registries from each of the NSDS countries participated in a modified Delphi study. With a systematic literature review as a basis and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework as guidance, 4 consensus rounds were held. Consensus was defined as agreement between at least 5 of the 7 representatives. Data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Results - Consensus was reached on the inclusion of 13 core outcome domains: "satisfaction with overall outcome of surgery", "satisfaction with cosmetic result of surgery", "pain interference", physical functioning", "health-related quality of life", "recreation and leisure", "pulmonary fatigue", "change in deformity", "selfimage", "pain intensity", "physical function", "complications", and "re-operation". Panelists agreed that the SRS-22r, EQ-5D, and a pulmonary fatigue questionnaire (yet to be developed) are the most appropriate set of patient-reported measurement instruments that cover these outcome domains. Interpretation - We have identified a COS for a large subgroup of spinal deformity patients for implementation and validation in the NSDS countries. This is the first study to further develop a COS in a global perspective.

  • 35.
    Devitt, Brian M
    et al.
    OrthoSport Victoria, Epworth Healthcare, Melbourne, Australia; School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Bell, Stuart W.
    OrthoSport Victoria, Epworth Healthcare, Melbourne, Australia.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hartwig, Taylor
    OrthoSport Victoria, Epworth Healthcare, Melbourne, Australia.
    Porter, Tabitha J
    OrthoSport Victoria, Epworth Healthcare, Melbourne, Australia.
    Feller, Julian A
    OrthoSport Victoria, Epworth Healthcare, Melbourne, Australia.
    Webster, Kate E
    School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    The Role of Lateral Extra-articular Tenodesis in Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review With Meta-analysis and Best-Evidence Synthesis2017In: The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 2325-9671, Vol. 5, no 10, article id 2325967117731767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of lateral extra-articular tenodesis (LEAT) to augment primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) remains controversial.

  • 36.
    Diarbakerli, Elias
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Orthopaedics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grauers, Anna
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Orthopaedics, Sundsvall and Härnösand County Hospital, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Aina
    Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Abbott, Allan
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gerdhem, Paul
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Orthopaedics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quality of life in males and females with idiopathic scoliosis2018In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design. Cross-sectional.

    Objective. To describe quality of life in males and females with idiopathic scoliosis.

    Summary of Background Data. Idiopathic scoliosis is a three-dimensional deformity affecting the growing spine. The prevalence of larger curves, requiring treatment, is higher in females.

    Methods. This cross-sectional study comprised 1519 individuals with idiopathic scoliosis (211 males) with a mean (SD) age of 35.3 (14.9) years. They all answered the Scoliosis Research Society 22 revised (SRS-22r) questionnaire and EuroQol 5-dimension-index (EQ-5D). Five hundred twenty eight were surgically treated (78 males), 535 were brace treated (50 males), and 456 were untreated (83 males). The SRS-22r subscore (excluding the satisfaction domain), the SRS-22r domains and the EQ-5D index score were calculated. Subgroup analyses based on treatment and age were performed. Statistical comparisons were performed using analysis of covariance with adjustments for age and treatment. A P-value less than 0.05 was considered as statistical significant.

    Results. The mean (SD) SRS-22r subscore was 4.19 (0.61) in males and 4.05 (0.61) in females (P = 0.010). The males had higher scores on the SRS-22r domains function (4.56 vs. 4.42), pain (4.20 vs. 4.00), and mental health (4.14 vs. 3.92) (all P < 0.05). The mean (SD) EQ-5D index score was 0.85 (0.22) for males and 0.81 (0.21) for females (P = 0.10). There were minor differences when comparing males and females in treatment and age groups, but both treated and untreated groups had reduced quality of life compared with the national norms.

    Conclusion. When compared with females, males with idiopathic scoliosis tend to have slightly higher scores in the scoliosis specific SRS-22r but not in the generic quality of life measurement EQ-5D. Quality of life is overall similar between males and females in treatment and age groups, but reduced in comparison with the general population.

    Level of Evidence: 3

  • 37.
    Divanoglou, A
    et al.
    Division of Neuro-rehabilitation, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Levi, Richard
    Division of Neuro-rehabilitation, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Incidence of traumatic spinal cord injury in Thessaloniki, Greece and Stockholm, Sweden: a prospective population-based study2009In: Spinal Cord, ISSN 1362-4393, E-ISSN 1476-5624, Vol. 47, no 11, p. 796-801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study design: Prospective population-based open-ended study. This paper is part of the Stockholm Thessaloniki Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Study.andlt;br /andgt;Objectives: To calculate incidence and evaluate the epidemiological profile of the incident population with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). Settings: The greater Thessaloniki region in Greece and the greater Stockholm region in Sweden.andlt;br /andgt;Methods: TSCI individuals, older than 15 years of age, who had survived the first 7 days post-trauma, were identified through an active surveillance system. The forms of the Nordic Spinal Cord Injury Registry were used.andlt;br /andgt;Results: 87 individuals were injured in the greater Thessaloniki and 49 in the greater Stockholm region. Annual crude incidence was 33.6 per million for Thessaloniki and 19.5 per million for the Stockholm region. The leading causes of injury for the Thessaloniki region were transportation accidents (51%) and falls (37%), and those for the Stockholm region were falls (47%) and transportation accidents (23%). A significantly larger number of individuals of the Thessaloniki group were injured in transportation accidents. There was no significant difference between regions with regard to the type of resulting impairment.andlt;br /andgt;Conclusions: Incidence of TSCI was considerably higher in the Thessaloniki region as compared with that in the Stockholm region, probably chiefly reflecting differences in preventative measures with regard to driving. Spinal Cord (2009) 47, 796-801; doi:andlt;highlightandgt;10.1038andlt;/highlightandgt;/andlt;highlightandgt;scandlt;/highlightandgt;.andlt;highlightandgt;2009.28andlt;/highlightandgt;; published online 7 April 2009

  • 38.
    Djerf, K
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Edholm, P
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Hedbrant, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A simplified roentgen stereophotogrammetric method. Analysis of small movements between the prosthetic stem and the femur after total hip replacement.1987In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 603-606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simplified roentgen stereophotogrammetric method is described. It is based on the use of a 50 mm thick reference plate consisting of a carbon-fibre-reinforced polyester box. The patient is placed directly on this box, which makes the methods less cumbersome and more suitable for routine use. The method has been tested in a model experiment designed for detecting small movements between femur and prosthesis at an early stage after total hip replacement. The head and two hemispheres on the prosthesis and three small tantalum balls inserted in the femur serve as reference points. The model experiment now reported shows that the method has acceptable precision.

  • 39.
    Ekas, Guri Ranum
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. La Trobe Univ, Australia.
    Grindem, Hege
    Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Norway.
    Engebretsen, Lars
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    New meniscal tears after ACL injury: what is the risk? A systematic review protocol2018In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 52, no 6, article id 386Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Secondary meniscal tears after ACL injuries increase the risk of knee osteoarthritis. The current literature on secondary meniscal injuries after ACL injury is not consistent and may have methodological shortcomings. This protocol describes the methods of a systematic review investigating the rate of secondary meniscal injuries in children and adults after treatment (operative or non-operative) for ACL injury. Methods We will search electronic databases (Embase, Ovid Medline, Cochrane, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), SPORTDiscus, PEDro and Google Scholar) from database inception. Extracted data will include demographic data, methodology, intervention details and patient outcomes. Risk of bias will be assessed using the Newcastle Ottawa checklist for cohort studies. Article screening, eligibility assessment, risk of bias assessment and data extraction will be performed in duplicate by independent reviewers. A proportion meta-analysis will be performed if studies are homogeneous (I-2 amp;lt; 75%). If meta-analysis is precluded, data will be synthesised descriptively using best-evidence synthesis. The strength of recommendations and quality of evidence will be assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation working group methodology. Ethics and dissemination This protocol is written according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses, and was registered in the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews on 22 March 2016.

  • 40.
    Forsberg, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Claes
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vavruch, Ludvig
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fully automatic measurements of axial vertebral rotation for assessment of spinal deformity in idiopathic scoliosis2013In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 58, no 6, p. 1775-1787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reliable measurements of spinal deformities in idiopathic scoliosis are vital, since they are used for assessing the degree of scoliosis, deciding upon treatment and monitoring the progression of the disease. However, commonly used two dimensional methods (e.g. the Cobb angle) do not fully capture the three dimensional deformity at hand in scoliosis, of which axial vertebral rotation (AVR) is considered to be of great importance. There are manual methods for measuring the AVR, but they are often time-consuming and related with a high intra- and inter-observer variability. In this paper, we present a fully automatic method for estimating the AVR in images from computed tomography. The proposed method is evaluated on four scoliotic patients with 17 vertebrae each and compared with manual measurements performed by three observers using the standard method by Aaro-Dahlborn. The comparison shows that the difference in measured AVR between automatic and manual measurements are on the same level as the inter-observer difference. This is further supported by a high intraclass correlation coefficient (0.971-0.979), obtained when comparing the automatic measurements with the manual measurements of each observer. Hence, the provided results and the computational performance, only requiring approximately 10 to 15 s for processing an entire volume, demonstrate the potential clinical value of the proposed method.

  • 41.
    Frueh, Florian S.
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Switzerland.
    Megerle, Kai
    Tech Univ Munich, Germany.
    Luria, Shai
    Hadassah Hebrew Univ Med Ctr, Israel.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Research activity among European hand surgery residents2019In: Journal of Hand Surgery, European Volume, ISSN 1753-1934, E-ISSN 2043-6289, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 764-765Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 42.
    Fältström, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Jönköping County, Rehabilitation Centre, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    One ACL injury is enough! Focus on female football players: PhD Academy Award2017In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 51, no 16, p. 1235-1236Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Fältström, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    One Anterior Cruciate Ligament injury is enough!: Focus on female football players2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a severe and common injury, and females have 2-4 times higher injury risk compared to men. Return to sport (RTS) is a common goal after an ACL reconstruction (ACLR), but only about two thirds of patients RTS. Young patients who RTS may have a 30-40 times increased risk of sustaining an additional ACL injury to the ipsi- or contralateral knee compared with an uninjured person.

    Aims: The overall aim of this thesis was to increase the knowledge about female football players with ACLR, and patients with bilateral ACL injuries, and to identify predictors for additional ipsi- and/or contralateral ACLR.

    Methods: This thesis comprises four studies. Study I and II were cross-sectional, including females who sustained a primary ACL rupture while playing football and underwent ACLR 6–36 months prior to study inclusion. In study I, 182 females were included at a median of 18 months (IQR 13) after ACLR. All players completed a battery of questionnaires. Ninety-four players (52%) returned to football and were playing at the time of completing the questionnaires, and 88 (48%) had not returned. In study II, 77 of the 94 active female football players (from study I) with an ACLR and 77 kneehealthy female football players were included. A battery of tests was used to assess postural control (the Star excursion balance test) and hop performance (the one-leg hop for distance, the five jump test and the side hop). Movement asymmetries in the lower limbs and trunk were assessed with the drop vertical jump and the tuck jump using two-dimensional analyses. Study III, was a cohort study including all patients with a primary ACLR (n=22,429) registered in the Swedish national ACL register between January 2005 and February 2013. Data extracted from the register to identify predictors for additional ACLR were: patient age at primary ACLR, sex, activity performed at the time of ACL injury, primary injury to the right- or left knee, time between injury and primary ACLR, presence of any concomitant injuries, graft type, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score and Euroqol Index Five Dimensions measured pre-operatively. Study IV was cross-sectional. In this study, patient-reported knee function, quality of life and activity level in 66 patients with bilateral ACL injuries was investigated and outcomes were compared with 182 patients with unilateral ACLR.

    Results: Factors associated with returning to football in females were; short time between injury and ACLR (0–3 months, OR 5.6; 3–12 months OR 4.7 vs. reference group >12 months) and high motivation (study I). In all functional tests, the reconstructed and uninvolved limbs did not differ, and players with ACLR and controls differed only minimally. Nine to 49% of the players with ACLR and controls had side-to-side differences and movement asymmetries and only one fifth had results that met the recommended guidelines for successful outcome on all the different tests (study II). Main predictors for revision and contralateral ACLR were younger age (fourfold increased rate for <16 vs. >35-year-old patients), having ACLR early after the primary injury (two to threefold increased rate for ACLR within 3 months vs. >12 months), and incurring the primary injury while playing football (study III). Patients with bilateral ACL injuries reported poorer knee function and quality of life compared to those who had undergone unilateral ACLR. They had a high activity level before their first and second ACL injuries but an impaired activity level at follow-up after their second injury (study IV).

    Conclusions: Female football players who returned to football after an ACLR had high motivation and had undergone ACLR within one year after injury. Players with ACLR had similar functional performance to healthy controls. Movement asymmetries, which in previous studies have been associated with increased risk for primary and secondary ACL injury, occurred to a high degree in both groups. The rate of additional ACLR seemed to be increased in a selected group of young patients who desire to return to strenuous sports like football quickly after primary ACLR. Sustaining a contralateral ACL injury led to impaired knee function and activity level.

    List of papers
    1. Factors associated with playing football after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in female football players.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors associated with playing football after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in female football players.
    2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 11, p. 1343-1352Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated whether player-related factors (demographic, personality, or psychological factors) or the characteristics of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury were associated with the return to playing football in females after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). We also compared current knee function, knee related quality of life and readiness to return to sport between females who returned to football and those who had not returned. Females who sustained a primary ACL rupture while playing football and underwent ACLR 6-36 months ago were eligible. Of the 460 contacted, 274 (60%) completed a battery of questionnaires, and 182 were included a median of 18 months (IQR 13) after ACLR. Of these, 94 (52%) returned to football and were currently playing, and 88 (48%) had not returned. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified two factors associated with returning to football: short time between injury and ACLR (0-3 months, OR 5.6; 3-12 months OR 4.7 vs reference group > 12 months) and high motivation. Current players showed higher ratings for current knee function, knee-related quality of life, and psychological readiness to return to sport (P < 0.001). Undergoing ACLR sooner after injury and high motivation to return to sports may impact a player's return to football after ACLR.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
    Keywords
    ACL; knee; return to sport; soccer
    National Category
    Physiotherapy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123889 (URN)10.1111/sms.12588 (DOI)000386938300009 ()26589671 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies:The authors acknowledge statistician Henrik Magnusson. The study was supported financially by Futurum-The Academy for Healthcare, Jonkoping County Council, the Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden, the Faculty of Health Sciences at Linkoping University, and the Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports (CIF).

    Available from: 2016-01-13 Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
    2. Functional Performance Among Active Female Soccer Players After Unilateral Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Compared With Knee-Healthy Controls
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functional Performance Among Active Female Soccer Players After Unilateral Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Compared With Knee-Healthy Controls
    2017 (English)In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0363-5465, E-ISSN 1552-3365, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 377-385Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Good functional performance with limb symmetry is believed to be important to minimize the risk of injury after a return to pivoting and contact sports after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR).

    Purpose: This study aimed to investigate any side-to-side limb differences in functional performance and movement asymmetries in female soccer players with a primary unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)–reconstructed knee and to compare these players with knee-healthy controls from the same soccer teams.

    Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.

    Methods: This study included 77 active female soccer players at a median of 18 months after ACLR (interquartile range [IQR], 14.5 months; range, 7-39 months) and 77 knee-healthy female soccer players. The mean age was 20.1 ± 2.3 years for players with an ACL-reconstructed knee and 19.5 ± 2.2 years for controls. We used a battery of tests to assess postural control (Star Excursion Balance Test) and hop performance (1-legged hop for distance, 5-jump test, and side hop). Movement asymmetries in the lower limbs and trunk were assessed with the drop vertical jump and the tuck jump using 2-dimensional analyses.

    Results: The reconstructed and uninvolved limbs did not differ in any of the tests. In the 5-jump test, players with an ACL-reconstructed knee performed worse than controls (mean 8.75 ± 1.05 m vs 9.09 ± 0.89 m; P = .034). On the drop vertical jump test, the ACL-reconstructed limb had significantly less knee valgus motion in the frontal plane (median 0.028 m [IQR, 0.049 m] vs 0.045 m [IQR, 0.043 m]; P = .004) and a lower probability of a high knee abduction moment (pKAM) (median 69.2% [IQR, 44.4%] vs 79.8% [IQR, 44.8%]; P = .043) compared with the control players’ matched limb (for leg dominance). Results showed that 9% to 49% of players in both groups performed outside recommended guidelines on the different tests. Only 14 players with an ACL-reconstructed knee (18%) and 15 controls (19%) had results that met the recommended guidelines for all 5 tests (P = .837).

    Conclusion: The reconstructed and uninvolved limbs did not differ, and players with an ACL-reconstructed knee and controls differed only minimally on the functional performance tests, indicating similar function. It is worth noting that many players with an ACL-reconstructed knee and controls had movement asymmetries and a high pKAM pattern, which have previously been associated with an increased risk for both primary and secondary ACL injury in female athletes.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 2017
    Keywords
    soccer, anterior cruciate ligament, proprioception, physical therapy, return to sports, test battery
    National Category
    Physiotherapy Sport and Fitness Sciences Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified Otorhinolaryngology Orthopaedics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131850 (URN)10.1177/0363546516667266 (DOI)000394776900015 ()28146394 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85011605308 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Futurum the Academy for Healthcare; Region Jonkoping County; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Faculty of Health Sciences at Linkoping University; Swedish Research Council for Sport Science; Swedish Football Association

    Available from: 2016-10-11 Created: 2016-10-11 Last updated: 2018-01-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Predictors for additional anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: data from the Swedish national ACL register.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors for additional anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: data from the Swedish national ACL register.
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 885-894Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To identify predictors for additional anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction.

    METHODS: Patients from the Swedish national ACL register who underwent ACL reconstruction between January 2005 and February 2013 (follow-up duration 6-104 months) were included. Cox regression analyses included the following independent variables regarding primary injury: age, sex, time between injury and primary ACL reconstruction, activity at primary injury, concomitant injuries, injury side, graft type, and pre-surgery KOOS and EQ-5D scores.

    RESULTS: Among ACL reconstruction procedures, 93 % involved hamstring tendon (HT) autografts. Graft type did not predict additional ACL reconstruction. Final regression models only included patients with HT autograft (n = 20,824). Of these, 702 had revision and 591 contralateral ACL reconstructions. The 5-year post-operative rates of revision and contralateral ACL reconstruction were 4.3 and 3.8 %, respectively. Significant predictors for additional ACL reconstruction were age (fourfold increased rate for <16-year-old patients vs. >35-year-old patients), time between injury and primary surgery (two to threefold increased rate for ACL reconstruction within 0-90 days vs. >365 days), and playing football at primary injury.

    CONCLUSION: This study identified younger age, having ACL reconstruction early after the primary injury, and incurring the primary injury while playing football as the main predictors for revision and contralateral ACL reconstruction. This suggests that the rate of additional ACL reconstruction is increased in a selected group of young patients aiming to return to strenuous sports after primary surgery and should be taken into consideration when discussing primary ACL reconstruction, return to sports, and during post-surgery rehabilitation. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II.

    National Category
    Physiotherapy Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115943 (URN)10.1007/s00167-014-3406-6 (DOI)000371300400036 ()25366191 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies:The study was financially supported by Futurum-the academy for healthcare, County Council, Jonkoping, the Faculty of Health Sciences at Linkoping University, and the Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports (CIF).

    Available from: 2015-03-24 Created: 2015-03-24 Last updated: 2018-10-29Bibliographically approved
    4. Patient-Reported Knee Function, Quality of Life, and Activity Level After Bilateral Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient-Reported Knee Function, Quality of Life, and Activity Level After Bilateral Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries
    2013 (English)In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0363-5465, E-ISSN 1552-3365, Vol. 41, no 12, p. 2805-2813Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: About 12% of patients who have undergone primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction sustain a contralateral ACL injury within 5 years. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPurpose: To investigate patient-reported knee function, quality of life, and activity level in patients with bilateral ACL injuries. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: A search of hospital records identified 147 patients, aged 18 to 45 years, with bilateral ACL injuries. Of these, 83 met the inclusion criteria, having had their first ACL injury up to 12 years ago with no other major injuries to the knee joint. Sixty-six of these patients (80% of total; 47% female; mean age, 29.1 7.2 years) answered a questionnaire packet. Patients who had undergone unilateral ACL reconstruction (n = 182) were used for comparison. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Patients with bilateral ACL injuries had a median Lysholm knee score of 82 (range, 34-100). The mean EuroQol index (EQ-5D) score of the overall health status was 0.77 +/- 0.22, and the mean EQ-5D visual analog scale score was 75.5 +/- 17.6. The median Tegner activity level was 9 (range, 1-9) before any injuries, 7 (range, 1-9) before the second ACL injury, and 4 (range, 1-9) at the time of follow-up. The activity level before the second injury was higher compared with the follow-up for patients who had undergone unilateral ACL reconstruction. At follow-up, 23% of the patients with bilateral ACL injuries returned to their previous activity, and 12% of patients returned to the same level as before their injuries compared with 43% (P = .004) and 28% (P = .01) in patients who had undergone unilateral ACL reconstruction, respectively. Patients with bilateral ACL injuries had significantly lower values in the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales for pain, function in sports and recreation, and knee-related quality of life as well as the ACL Deficiency Quality of Life (ACL-QOL) score compared with patients who had undergone unilateral ACL reconstruction. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Patients with bilateral ACL injuries reported poorer knee function and quality of life compared with those who had undergone unilateral ACL reconstruction. Their activities had changed, and they were dissatisfied with their current activity level. They had a high activity level before their first and second ACL injuries but an impaired activity level after their contralateral injury at follow-up.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SAGE Publications (UK and US): No SAGE Choice, 2013
    Keywords
    knee, ligaments, ACL, contralateral, return to sport, subsequent injury, Tegner activity scale
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102774 (URN)10.1177/0363546513502309 (DOI)000327473300013 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Futurum-The Academy for Healthcare, Jonkoping County Council||Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden||Faculty of Health Sciences at Linkoping University||Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports||

    Available from: 2014-01-07 Created: 2013-12-26 Last updated: 2017-12-06
  • 44.
    Fältström, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Jönköping County, Rehabilitation Centre, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Functional Performance Among Active Female Soccer Players After Unilateral Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Compared With Knee-Healthy Controls2017In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0363-5465, E-ISSN 1552-3365, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 377-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Good functional performance with limb symmetry is believed to be important to minimize the risk of injury after a return to pivoting and contact sports after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR).

    Purpose: This study aimed to investigate any side-to-side limb differences in functional performance and movement asymmetries in female soccer players with a primary unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)–reconstructed knee and to compare these players with knee-healthy controls from the same soccer teams.

    Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.

    Methods: This study included 77 active female soccer players at a median of 18 months after ACLR (interquartile range [IQR], 14.5 months; range, 7-39 months) and 77 knee-healthy female soccer players. The mean age was 20.1 ± 2.3 years for players with an ACL-reconstructed knee and 19.5 ± 2.2 years for controls. We used a battery of tests to assess postural control (Star Excursion Balance Test) and hop performance (1-legged hop for distance, 5-jump test, and side hop). Movement asymmetries in the lower limbs and trunk were assessed with the drop vertical jump and the tuck jump using 2-dimensional analyses.

    Results: The reconstructed and uninvolved limbs did not differ in any of the tests. In the 5-jump test, players with an ACL-reconstructed knee performed worse than controls (mean 8.75 ± 1.05 m vs 9.09 ± 0.89 m; P = .034). On the drop vertical jump test, the ACL-reconstructed limb had significantly less knee valgus motion in the frontal plane (median 0.028 m [IQR, 0.049 m] vs 0.045 m [IQR, 0.043 m]; P = .004) and a lower probability of a high knee abduction moment (pKAM) (median 69.2% [IQR, 44.4%] vs 79.8% [IQR, 44.8%]; P = .043) compared with the control players’ matched limb (for leg dominance). Results showed that 9% to 49% of players in both groups performed outside recommended guidelines on the different tests. Only 14 players with an ACL-reconstructed knee (18%) and 15 controls (19%) had results that met the recommended guidelines for all 5 tests (P = .837).

    Conclusion: The reconstructed and uninvolved limbs did not differ, and players with an ACL-reconstructed knee and controls differed only minimally on the functional performance tests, indicating similar function. It is worth noting that many players with an ACL-reconstructed knee and controls had movement asymmetries and a high pKAM pattern, which have previously been associated with an increased risk for both primary and secondary ACL injury in female athletes.

  • 45.
    Fältström, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Football Research Group, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Female Soccer Players With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Have a Higher Risk of New Knee Injuries and Quit Soccer to a Higher Degree Than Knee-Healthy Controls2019In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0363-5465, E-ISSN 1552-3365, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 31-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Many patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction who return to sport suffer new ACL injuries or quit sports soon after returning.

    Purpose:

    To prospectively follow a cohort of female soccer players with primary unilateral ACL reconstruction and matched knee-healthy controls from the same soccer teams to compare (1) the rate of new traumatic and nontraumatic knee injuries and other injuries, (2) the proportion of players who quit soccer, and (3) player-reported activity level and satisfaction with activity level and knee function.

    Study Design:

    Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2.

    Methods:

    A total of 117 active female soccer players (mean ± SD age, 19.9 ± 2.5 years) 18.9 ± 8.7 months after ACL reconstruction and 119 knee-healthy female soccer players (19.5 ± 2.5 years) matched from the same teams were prospectively followed for 2 years for new knee injuries, other injuries, soccer playing level, activity level according to the Tegner Activity Scale, and satisfaction with activity level and knee function.

    Results:

    Players with ACL reconstruction had a higher rate of new ACL injuries (n = 29 vs 8; 19 vs 4 per 100 player years; rate ratio [RR], 4.82; 95% CI, 2.20-10.54; P < .001), other traumatic knee injuries (29 vs 16 per 100 player years; RR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.16-2.93; P < .01), and nontraumatic knee injuries (33 vs 9 per 100 player years; RR, 3.62; 95% CI, 2.11-6.21; P < .001) as compared with controls. There was no difference in the rate of other (not knee) injuries (43 vs 48 per 100 player years; RR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.65-1.23; P = .494). During the 2-year follow-up, 72 (62%) players with ACL reconstruction quit soccer, as opposed to 43 (36%) controls (P = .001). The median Tegner Activity Scale score decreased in both groups (P < .001) but more for the ACL-reconstructed group (P < .015).

    Conclusion:

    Female soccer players with ACL reconstruction had nearly a 5-fold-higher rate of new ACL injuries and a 2- to 4-fold-higher rate of other new knee injuries, quit soccer to a higher degree, and reduced their activity level to a greater extent as compared with knee-healthy controls.

  • 46.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Meunier, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Knee Arthroscopic Surgery in Middle-Aged Patients With Meniscal Symptoms A 3-Year Follow-up of a Prospective, Randomized Study2017In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0363-5465, E-ISSN 1552-3365, Vol. 45, no 9, p. 2077-2084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The optimal treatment for middle-aged patients with knee pain and meniscal lesions has been extensively debated. Most previous studies have revealed only short-term beneficial results of knee arthroscopic surgery. The authors have previously shown a positive benefit of knee arthroscopic surgery and an exercise program after 1 year when compared with an exercise program alone. Purpose: To evaluate if knee arthroscopic surgery combined with an exercise program provided an additional long-term benefit after 3 years compared with an exercise program alone in middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Methods: Of 179 eligible patients, aged 45 to 64 years, 150 were randomized to (1) a 3-month exercise program (nonsurgery group) or (2) the same as group 1 plus knee arthroscopic surgery within 4 weeks (surgery group). The primary outcome was the change in the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscore of pain between baseline and the 3-year follow-up. Results from the 1-year follow-up have been published previously. Results: Both treatment groups improved significantly in the KOOS pain subscore at 3 years follow-up in the intention-to-treat and as-treated analyses (P amp;lt; .001). The between-group difference for the change in the KOOS pain subscore between baseline and the 3-year follow-up was no longer statistically significant, neither in the intention-to-treat analysis (7.6 points; 95% CI, -0.6 to 15.9; P = .068) nor in the as-treated analysis (5.3 points; 95% CI, -3.1 to 13.8; P = .216). The factorial analysis of the effect of the intervention and age, onset of pain, and mechanical symptoms indicated that older patients improved more, regardless of treatment, and surgery may be more beneficial for patients without mechanical symptoms (as-treated analysis). The effect of the predictive factors on the KOOS pain subscore was uncertain because of the small sample size in the subgroup analyses. Conclusion: The benefit of knee arthroscopic surgery, seen at 1 year in middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms, was diminished at 3 years and was no longer statistically significant.

  • 47.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Meunier, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Knee arthroscopic surgery is beneficial to middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms: a prospective, randomised, single-blinded study2014In: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, ISSN 1063-4584, E-ISSN 1522-9653, Vol. 22, no 11, p. 1808-1816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: There is no evidence that a knee arthroscopy is more beneficial to middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms compared to other treatments. This randomised controlled trial aimed to determine whether an arthroscopic intervention combined with a structured exercise programme would provide more benefit than a structured exercise programme alone for middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms that have undergone physiotherapy. Method: 150 out of 179 eligible patients, aged 45 to 64 (mean: 54 +/- 5), symptom duration more than 3 months and standing X-ray with Ahlback grade 0, were randomised to: (1) a physiotherapy appointment within 2 weeks of inclusion that included instructions for a 3-month exercise programme (non-surgery group); or (2) the same as (1) plus, within 4 weeks of inclusion, knee arthroscopy for resection of any significant meniscal injuries (surgery group). The primary outcome was change in pain at 12 months, assessed with the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOSPAIN). Results: In the Intention-To-Treat analysis, pain at 12 months was significantly lower in the surgery than in the non-surgery group. The change in KOOSPAIN was significantly larger in the surgery than in the non-surgery group (between-group difference was 10.6 points of change; 95% CI: 3.4 to 17.7, P = 0.004). The As-Treated analysis results were consistent with the Intention-To-Treat analysis results. Conclusion: Middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms may benefit from arthroscopic surgery in addition to a structured exercise programme. Patients age or symptom history (i.e., mechanical symptoms or acute onset of symptoms) didnt affect the outcome.

  • 48.
    Gustafsson, Anna
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Grassi, Lorenzo
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Isaksson, Hanna
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Strains caused by daily loading might be responsible for delayed healing of an incomplete atypical femoral fracture2016In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 88, p. 125-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atypical femoral fractures are insufficiency fractures in the lateral femoral diaphysis or subtrochanteric region that mainly affect older patients on bisphosphonate therapy. Delayed healing is often seen in patients with incomplete fractures (cracks), and histology of bone biopsies shows mainly necrotic material inside the crack. We hypothesized that the magnitude of the strains produced in the soft tissue inside the crack during normal walk exceeds the limit for new bone formation, and thereby inhibit healink. A patient specific finite element model was developed, based on clinical CT images and high resolution CT images of a biopsy from the crack site. Strain distributions in the femur and inside the crack were calculated for load cases representing normal walk. The models predicted large strains inside the crack, with strain levels above 10% in more than three quarters of the crack volume. According to two different tissue differentiation theories, bone would only form in less than 1-5% cif the crack volume. This can explain the impaired healing generally seen in incomplete atypical fractures. Furthermore, the microgeometry of the crack highly influenced the strain distributions. Hence, a realistic microgeometry needs to be considered when modeling the crack. Histology of the biopsy showed signs of remodeling in the bone tissue adjacent to the fracture line, while the crack itself contained mainly necrotic material and signs of healing only in portions that seemed to have been widened by resorption. In conclusion, the poor healing capacity of incomplete atypical femoral fractures can be explained by biomechanical factors, and daily low impact activities are enough to cause strain magnitudes that prohibit bone formation. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 49.
    Hedbrant, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bjorne, Assar
    Specialisttandvården, Lasarettet Ystad.
    Ny mätmetod för käkmuskulaturen kan finna orsaken till tinnitus: Slutrapport Nutek 92-119041997Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Tinnitus är en åkomma som i lindrigare eller allvarligare former drabbar 17% av västvärldens befolkning. Ca 85 000 svenskar har tinnitus på invalidiserande nivå. Förutom mänskligt lidande orsakar tinnitus samhällskostnader på ca 1.5 miljard kr årligen. Orsaken är till största delen okänd.

    Vissa tecken tyder på ett samband mellan tinnitus och funktionsstörning i en käkmuskel. Några olika icke–invasiva metoder för mätning av muskelstörning i M Pterygoideus Lateralis har utvärderas. Två av dessa är intressanta för fortsatta studier.

    Termografi användes för att diagnosticera muskelstörningar på ytligt liggande muskler. Vi såg åtskilliga varma områden på ytliga käk– och nackmuskler på de patienter som hade käkledsstörningar, samt möjligen tecken på onormal värme från M Pterygoideus Lateralis. Mätförhållandena var dock ej ideala.

    En metod att mäta EMG med adaptiv noise cancelling provades. EMG från en ryggmuskel, stört av en “EKG–signal” från hjärtat användes. Metoden fungerade bra. Fortsatt metodutveckling på t.ex. ryggmuskler borde göras.

  • 50.
    Heilig, Markus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Tagil, Magnus
    Department of Orthopedics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Editorial Material: Do we have an opioid crisis in Scandinavia? Time to act? in ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA, vol 89, issue 4, pp 368-3682018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 4, p. 368-368Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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