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  • 1.
    Abbas, Ashraf H.
    et al.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Moati, Taha Ali
    General Surgery department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Aesthetic Outcome After Reconstruction of Complex SoftTissue Defects with Free Antero-Lateral Thigh Flap UsingSimple Equipment2015In: Journal of surgery, ISSN 2330-0914, Vol. 3, no 2-1, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: We aimed to assess the aesthetic outcome of surgical reconstruction by free ALT flap using binocular single-refraction magnifying glasses and a modified post- operative surveillance protocol. Methods: 16 patients were operated for free antero-lateral thigh flap to reconstruct complex soft tissue defects with a close clinical follow up protocol for post operative care depending on the attending personnel in the Plastic surgery unit, Suez Canal University hospital, Ismailia, Egypt. Aesthetic outcome was assessed using a questionnaire based on Posch et al. 2005, including the following items colour, contour, presence of hair, overall appearance and donor site scar. Results: The patients’ assessed aesthetic outcome was acceptable in majority of the cases; median score was 4 for all assessed items. Complete flap loss occurred in one case, other complications as arterial thrombosis and hematomas and infection were detected and managed accordingly with flap salvage in the 3 complicated cases. Conclusion: The result suggests that the proposed protocol is sufficient as an alternative. The aesthetic outcome assessed by the patient and the failure rate was in line with other studies.

  • 2.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Division of overall duration of stay into operative stay and postoperative stay improves the overall estimate as a measure of quality of outcome in burn care.2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients and Methods: Surgically managed burn patients admitted between 2010-14 were included. Operative stay was defined as the time from admission until the last operation, postoperative stay as the time from the last operation until discharge. The difference in variation was analysed with F-test. A retrospective review of medical records was done to explore reasons for extended postoperative stay. Multivariable regression was used to assess factors associated with operative stay and postoperative stay.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Operative stay/TBSA% showed less variation than total duration/TBSA% (F test = 2.38, pless than0.01). The size of the burn, and the number of operations, were the independent factors that influenced operative stay (R2 0.65). Except for the size of the burn other factors were associated with duration of postoperative stay: wound related, psychological and other medical causes, advanced medical support, and accommodation arrangements before discharge, of which the two last were the most important with an increase of (mean) 12 and 17 days (pless than0.001, R2 0.51).less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Adjusted operative stay showed less variation than total hospital stay and thus can be considered a more accurate outcome measure for surgically managed burns. The size of burn and number of operations are the factors affecting this outcome measure.

  • 3.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Moghazy, Amr
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abbas, Ashraf
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, Osama
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    A prospective randomized cost billing comparison of local fasciocutaneous perforator versus free Gracilis flap reconstruction for lower limb in a developing economy2016In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1532-1959, Vol. 69, no 8, p. 1121-1127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distal half leg complex wounds are usually a formidable problem that necessitates either local or free flap coverage. The aim of this study was to compare cost billing charges in free Gracilis flap (fGF) and local fasciocutaneous perforator flap (lFPF) in reconstructing complex soft tissue leg and foot defects. Patients and methods: Thirty consecutive adult (amp;gt; 15-year-old) patients with soft tissue defects in the leg and/or foot requiring tissue coverage with a flap in the period between 2012 and 2015 were randomly assigned (block randomization) to either an fGF or lFPF procedure. The outcome measures addressed were total billed charges costs, perioperative billed charges cost, partial or complete flap loss, length of hospital stay, inpatient postsurgical care duration, complications, operating time and number of operative scrub staff. Results: One patient suffered from complete flap loss in each group. Reconstruction with lFPF showed total lower billed charges costs by 62% (2509 USD) (p amp;lt; 0.001) and perioperative billed charges cost by 54% (779 USD) (p amp;lt; 0.001), and shorter total hospital stay (36.5 days; p amp;lt; 0.001), inpatient postsurgical care duration (6.4 days; p amp;lt; 0.001), operating time (4.3 h; p amp;lt; 0.001) and fewer scrub staff (2.2 persons; p amp;lt; 0.001). Conclusion: These results suggest that neither flap is totally superior to the other; the choice should instead be based on the outcome sought and logistics. lFPF requires lower billed charges cost and resource use and saves operative time and personnel and reduces length of hospital stay. Our approach changed towards using perforator flaps in medium-sized defects, keeping the free flap option for larger defects. (C) 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Response to comments on: A prospective randomized cost billing comparison of local fasciocutaneous perforator versus free Gracilis flap reconstruction for lower limb in a developing economy2017In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1532-1959, Vol. 70, no 9, p. 1307-1308Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department Suez, Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Evaluation of Glandular Liposculpture as a Single Treatment for Grades I and II Gynaecomastia2018In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Gynaecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast, of which the psychological burden on the patient can be considerable, with the increased risk of disorders such as depression, anxiety, and social phobia. Minimal scarring can be achieved by liposuction alone, though it is known to have a limited effect on the dense glandular and fibroconnective tissues. We know of few studies published on “liposuction alone”, so we designed this study to evaluate the outcome of combining liposuction with glandular liposculpturing through two axillary incisions as a single treatment for the management of grades I and II gynaecomastia.

    Methods

    We made a retrospective analysis of 18 patients with grade I or II gynaecomastia who were operated on by combined liposuction and glandular liposculpturing using a fat disruptor cannula, without glandular excision, during the period 2014–2016. Patient satisfaction was assessed using the Breast Evaluation Questionnaire (BEQ), which is a 5-point Likert scale (1 = very dissatisfied; 2 = dissatisfied; 3 = neither; 4 = satisfied; 5 = very satisfied). The post-operative aesthetic appearance of the chest was evaluated by five independent observers on a scale from 1 to 5 (5 = considerable improvement).

    Results

    The patient mean (SD) overall satisfaction score was 4.7 (0.7), in which 92% of the responders were “satisfied” to “very satisfied”. The mean (SD) BEQ for all questions answered increased from 2.1 (0.2) “dissatisfied” preoperatively to 4.1 (0.2) “satisfied” post-operatively. The observers’ mean (SD) rate for the improvement in the shape of the front chest wall was 4.1 (0.7). No haematomas were recorded, one patient developed a wound infection, and two patients complained of remnants of tissue. The median (IQR) body mass index was 27.4 (26.7–29.4), 11 patients had gynaecomastia grade I, and 7 patients grade II. The median (IQR) volume of aspirated fat was 700 ml (650–800), operating time was 67 (65–75) minutes, 14 patients had general anaesthesia, and hospital charges were US$ 538 (481–594).

    Conclusions

    Combined liposuction and liposculpturing using the fat disruptor cannula resulted in satisfied patients and acceptable outcomes according to the observers’ ratings. It could be a useful alternative with an outcome that corresponds to that of more expensive methods.

  • 6.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Nestorson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Scheer, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Extensive soft tissue lesions in redislocated after simple elbow dislocations2017In: Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery, ISSN 1058-2746, E-ISSN 1532-6500, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 1294-1297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The majority of simple elbow dislocations (no associated fractures) can be treated nonoperatively with a short period of immobilization followed by guided aftercare. This case series describes the soft tissue injuries in a rare subset of patients in whom the elbow redislocated despite adequate immobilization. Methods: During a 6-year period, 8 patients were identified. They were all treated with reduction and casting in 90 degrees of flexion or more. At 1 week of follow-up, redislocation had occurred in all patients and open soft tissue repair was performed. The injuries were documented and the patients were followed up clinically and with radiographs. Results: Extensive soft tissue injuries, including both collateral ligament injuries and muscle origin avulsions from either or both sides, were found in all patients. The functional result at follow-up was satisfactory in all patients. Conclusion: Vast soft tissue injuries including both collateral ligaments and muscle origins should be expected in the event of early severe instability of a dislocated elbow joint. (C) 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Ahlden, M.
    et al.
    Orthocenter IFK-kliniken, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitetGöteborg, Sweden.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, K.
    Ortopedkliniken, Sahlgrenska universitetssjuk huset.
    Eriksson, K.O.
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, Sweden; Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, Sweden.
    Karlsson, J.
    Ortopedkliniken, Institutionen för klinisk forskning och utbildning, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska institutetStockholm, Sweden.
    Individualiserad terapi viktigt vid främre korsbandsskada2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 111, no 36, p. 1440-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a common injury and is often associated with concomitant injuries to the menisci and cartilage and, in the long term, osteoarthritis. Preventive training programs have shown to be highly effective in terms of reducing the risk for ACL injury in sports. ACL reconstruction is indicated when the patient experiences symtoms of instability (»giving way«) despite rehabilitation with a physiotherapist aiming to gain neuromuscular control of the knee. Early ACL reconstruction may be indicated, for example when the patient desires to return to pivoting contact-sports at high level. Modern surgical technique for ACL reconstruction has evolved rapidly and includes »anatomic reconstruction« and individualized treatment, where each patient’s unique anatomy, injury and requests on knee function are taken into consideration. In Sweden, more than 90% of all ACL reconstructions performed are included into the Swedish National ACL Register.

  • 8.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Staging and tumor biological mechanisms of lymph node metastasis in invasive urinary bladder cancer2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study the possibility of detecting lymph node metastasis in locally advanced urinary bladder cancer (UBC) treated with radical cystectomy (RC) by using preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and peroperative sentinel node biopsy (SNB) technique. We also investigate the clinical significance of macrophage traits expression by cancer cells, M2-macrophage infiltration (MI) in tumor stroma and the immunohistochemical expression of biomarkers in cancer cells in relation to clinicopathologic data.

    Patients and Methods: We studied prospectively 122 patients with UBC, pathological stage pT1–pT4 treated with RC and pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) during 2005–2011 at the Department of Urology, Linköping University Hospital. In the first study, we compared the results of preoperative PET/CT and conventional CT with the findings of postoperative histopathological evaluation of lymph nodes (LNs). In the second study we investigated the value of SNB technique for detecting pathological LNs during RC in patients with UBC. W also examined the significance of the primary tumor location in the bladder in predicting the site of LN metastases, and the prognostic significance of lympho-vascular invasion (LVI) and lymph node metastasis density (LNMD) on survival. In the third study, we investigate the clinical significance of macrophage infiltration (MI) in tumor stroma and macrophage-traits expression by tumor cells. In the fourth study, we investigate the cell cycle suppression proteins p53, p21, pRb, p16, p14 ARF as well as tumors proliferative protein Ki67 and DNA repair protein ERCC1 expression in cancer cells. The results were compared with clinical and pathological characteristics and outcome.

    Results: Prior to RC, PET/CT was used to detect LN metastasis in 54 patients. PET/CT had 41% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 58% PPV, and 76% NPV, whereas the corresponding figures for conventional CT were 41%, 89%, 64%, and 77%. SNB was performed during RC in 103 patients. A median number of 29 (range 7–68) nodes per patient were examined. SNs were detected in 83 out of 103 patients (81%). The sensitivity and specificity for detecting metastatic disease by SNB varied among LN stations, with average values of 67% -90%. LNMD or ≥8% and LVI were significantly related to shorter survival. In 103 patients, MI was high in 33% of cases, while moderate and low infiltration occurred in 42% and 25% of tumors respectively. Patients with tumors containing high and moderate compared to low MI had low rate of LN metastases (P=0.06) and improved survival (P=0.06), although not at significant level. The expression of different tumor suppression proteins was altered in 47-91% of the patients. There were no significant association between cancer specific survival (CSS) and any of the studied biomarkers. In case of altered p14ARF, ERCC1 or p21, CSS was low in case of low p53 immunostaining but increased in case of p53 accumulation, although not at a significant level, indicating a possible protective effect of p53 accumulation in these cases.

    Conclusion: PET/ CT provided no improvement over conventional CT in detection and localization of regional LN metastases in bladder cancer. It is possible to detect the SN but the technique is not a reliable for perioperative localization of LN metastases; however, LVI and LNMD at a cut-off level of 8% had significant prognostic values. MI in the tumor microenvironment but not CD163 expression in tumor cells seems to be synergistic with the immune response against urinary bladder cancer. Our results further indicate that altered p53 might have protective effect on survival in case of altered p14ARF, p21, or ERCC1 indicating an interaction between these biomarkers.

    List of papers
    1. PET/CT versus conventional CT for detection of lymph node metastases in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>PET/CT versus conventional CT for detection of lymph node metastases in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer.
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: BMC urology, ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 87-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We studied patients treated with radical cystectomy for locally advanced bladder cancer to compare the results of both preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and conventional CT with the findings of postoperative histopathological evaluation of lymph nodes.

    METHODS: Patients who had bladder cancer and were candidates for cystectomy underwent preoperative PET/CT using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and conventional CT. The results regarding lymph node involvement were independently evaluated by two experienced radiologists and were subsequently compared with histopathology results, the latter of which were reassessed by an experienced uropathologist (HO).

    RESULTS: There were 54 evaluable patients (mean age 68 years, 47 [85 %] males and 7 [15 %] females) with pT and pN status as follows: < pT2-14 (26 %), pT2-10 (18 %), and > pT2-30 (56 %); pN0 37 (69 %) and pN+ 17 (31 %). PET/CT showed positive lymph nodes in 12 patients (22 %), and 7 of those cases were confirmed by histopathology; the corresponding results for conventional CT were 11 (20 %) and 7 patients (13 %), respectively. PET/CT had 41 % sensitivity, 86 % specificity, 58 % PPV, and 76 % NPV, whereas the corresponding figures for conventional CT were 41 %, 89 %, 64 %, and 77 %. Additional analyses of the right and left side of the body or in specified anatomical regions gave similar results.

    CONCLUSIONS: In this study, PET/CT and conventional CT had similar low sensitivity in detecting and localizing regional lymph node metastasis in bladder cancer.

    National Category
    Urology and Nephrology Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120796 (URN)10.1186/s12894-015-0080-z (DOI)000359832000001 ()26294219 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-08-25 Created: 2015-08-25 Last updated: 2017-05-17
    2. Radio-guided sentinel lymph node detection and lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer: a prospective clinical study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radio-guided sentinel lymph node detection and lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer: a prospective clinical study.
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the possibility of detecting sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) in patients with urinary bladder cancer (BCa) intra-operatively and whether the histopathological status of the identified SNs reflected that of the lymphatic field.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 103 patients with BCa pathological stage T1-T4 who were treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node (LN) dissection during 2005-2011 at the Department of Urology, Linköping University Hospital. Radioactive tracer Nanocoll 70 MBq and blue dye were injected into the bladder wall around the primary tumour before surgery. SNs were detected ex vivo during the operation with a handheld Geiger probe (Gamma Detection System; Neoprobe Corp., Dublin, OH, USA). All LNs were formalin-fixed, sectioned three times, mounted on slides and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. An experienced uropathologist evaluated the slides.

    RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 69 years, and 80 (77%) were male. Pathological staging was T1-12 (12%), T2-20 (19%), T3-48 (47%) and T4-23 (22%). A mean (range) number of 31 (7-68) nodes per patient were examined, totalling 3 253 nodes. LN metastases were found in 41 patients (40%). SNs were detected in 83 of the 103 patients (80%). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting metastatic disease by SN biopsy (SNB) varied between LN stations, with average values of 67% and 90%, respectively. LN metastatic density (LNMD) had a significant prognostic impact; a value of ≥8% was significantly related to shorter survival. Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) occurred in 65% of patients (n = 67) and was significantly associated with shorter cancer-specific survival (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that SNB is not a reliable technique for peri-operative localization of LN metastases during cystectomy for BCa; however, LNMD has a significant prognostic value in BCa and may be useful in the clinical context and in BCa oncological and surgical research. LVI was also found to be a prognostic factor.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2017
    Keywords
    #BladderCancer, #blcsm, cystectomy, lymph node metastasis, prognostic factors, sentinel node
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136947 (URN)10.1111/bju.13700 (DOI)000407781500011 ()27797436 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: County Council of Ostergotland, Linkoping, Sweden

    Available from: 2017-05-01 Created: 2017-05-01 Last updated: 2018-05-03
  • 9.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Endocrine and Sarcoma Surgery Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna Stockholm, Sweden .
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Radio-guided sentinel lymph node detection and lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer: a prospective clinical study.2017In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the possibility of detecting sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) in patients with urinary bladder cancer (BCa) intra-operatively and whether the histopathological status of the identified SNs reflected that of the lymphatic field.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 103 patients with BCa pathological stage T1-T4 who were treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node (LN) dissection during 2005-2011 at the Department of Urology, Linköping University Hospital. Radioactive tracer Nanocoll 70 MBq and blue dye were injected into the bladder wall around the primary tumour before surgery. SNs were detected ex vivo during the operation with a handheld Geiger probe (Gamma Detection System; Neoprobe Corp., Dublin, OH, USA). All LNs were formalin-fixed, sectioned three times, mounted on slides and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. An experienced uropathologist evaluated the slides.

    RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 69 years, and 80 (77%) were male. Pathological staging was T1-12 (12%), T2-20 (19%), T3-48 (47%) and T4-23 (22%). A mean (range) number of 31 (7-68) nodes per patient were examined, totalling 3 253 nodes. LN metastases were found in 41 patients (40%). SNs were detected in 83 of the 103 patients (80%). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting metastatic disease by SN biopsy (SNB) varied between LN stations, with average values of 67% and 90%, respectively. LN metastatic density (LNMD) had a significant prognostic impact; a value of ≥8% was significantly related to shorter survival. Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) occurred in 65% of patients (n = 67) and was significantly associated with shorter cancer-specific survival (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that SNB is not a reliable technique for peri-operative localization of LN metastases during cystectomy for BCa; however, LNMD has a significant prognostic value in BCa and may be useful in the clinical context and in BCa oncological and surgical research. LVI was also found to be a prognostic factor.

  • 10.
    Alstad, V.
    et al.
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Surgical removal of keratocystic odontogenic tumours via a Le Fort I osteotomy approach: a retrospective study of the recurrence rate2017In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 6p. 434-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) is one of the most aggressive odontogenic cysts and has a high recurrence rate. The treatment of these tumours is the subject of debate. A KCOT in the posterior maxilla with sinus involvement is rare. Few reports have been published in the literature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the recurrence rate after surgical removal of maxillary KCOTs via a Le Fort I osteotomy. A search was performed to identify patients with a follow-up time of at least 5 years. Nine patients were included in the study. The following clinical variables were analyzed: age at surgery, sex, symptoms, site and size of the tumour, surgical approach, and recurrence rate. The surgical approaches were curettage (n=6) and enucleation (n=3). Recurrence was seen in three patients (33%); all had multilocular tumours. No recurrence was seen in patients with unilocular tumours. The Le Fort I osteotomy approach allows direct visualization and ensures wide excision, minimizing the risk of recurrence. In this series, cases with a multilocular KCOT showed a higher risk of recurrence due to the difficulty of removing the tumour in total. All recurrences took place within 2 years of the intervention; a 5-year follow-up is recommended.

  • 11.
    Altgärde, Noomi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Local release of lithium from sol-gel coated orthopaedic screws: an in vitro and in vivo study2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     

    In orthopaedic practice, fractures are usually stabilised with metal screws or rods. This is done in order to keep the fracture parts in place during the rather slow healing process. The healing time can potentially be reduced by local- or systemic treatment with different bone promoting drugs. In later years, lithium, otherwise used to treat bipolar disease, has shown promise to be such a drug.

     

    The aim of this master thesis was to find a way to coat metal bone screws with lithium and to characterise the coating. The coating was to be designed in such a way that it could release lithium to the surrounding bone tissue.

     

    Lithium chloride was incorporated into a titanate sol-gel and attached to silicon wafers and stainless steel screws by dip coating. Wafers were used for initial in vitro studies of how lithium changed coating characteristics. This was studied using ellipsometry, AFM and SEM. Lithium is most probably physisorbed and not incorporated into the network building up the sol-gel. Coating structure is changed as more lithium is incorporated. For large amounts of lithium, the nanoparticles normally formed when curing the sol-gel are inhibited. One effect of this is reduced bioactivity, seen as a reduced ability for calcium phosphate crystals to nucleate on the coating when immersed in simulated body fluid.

    Lithium release was investigated using AAS. Lithium is released from the coating, showing a burst effect. By changing the number of coating layers used, the release profile can be partly altered. The coating was also applied to screws, showing good attachment, and the lithium release profile was similar to the one seen from wafers.

    Finally, a screw model was used in rats to assess the effect of local lithium treatment from screws and systemic lithium treatment on fracture healing. In the model, a screw was inserted in tibia, mimicking a fracture. When the bone around the screw was healed, a pullout test was performed, giving information about the strength of the bone surrounding the screw. No significant difference could be found for either local- or systemic lithium treatment compared to control. However, when evaluating the strength of intact bone in a similar way, a positive effect of systemic lithium treatment could be seen. Therefore, it is still likely that lithium has a positive effect on bone and further studies are needed to fully evaluate its role in fracture healing.

     

  • 12.
    Andersson, Manne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Structured management of patients with suspected acute appendicitis2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Acute appendicitis (“appendicitis”) is one of the most common abdominal surgical emergencies worldwide. In spite of this, the diagnostic pathways are highly variable across countries, between centres and physicians. This has implications for the use of resources, exposure of patients to ionising radiation and patient outcome. The aim of this thesis is to construct and validate a diagnostic appendicitis score, to evaluate new inflammatory markers for inclusion in the score, and explore the effect of implementing a structured management algorithm for patients with suspected appendicitis. Also, we compare the outcome of management with routine diagnostic imaging versus observation and selective imaging in equivocal cases.

    Methods. In study I, the Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score was constructed from eight variables with independent diagnostic value (right lower quadrant pain, rebound tenderness or muscular defence, WBC count, proportion of polymorphonuclear granulocytes, CRP, body temperature and vomiting). Its diagnostic properties were evaluated and compared with the Alvarado score. In study II, we performed an external validation and evaluation of novel inflammatory markers for inclusion in the score on patients with suspected appendicitis at two Swedish hospitals. In study III we externally validated and evaluated the impact of an AIR-scorebased algorithm assigning patients to a low or high risk of having appendicitis in an interventional multicentre study involving 25 Swedish hospitals and 3791 patients. In study IV, we compared the efficiency of routine diagnostic imaging with repeated clinical assessment followed by selective imaging in a randomised trial of 1028 patients with equivocal signs of appendicitis, as indicated by an intermediate AIR score, from study III.

    Main results. In study I we found that the AIR score could assign 63% of the patients to either a high- or low-risk group of appendicitis with an accuracy of 97%, which compared favourably with the Alvarado score. In study II, the diagnostic properties of the AIR score proved to be  reproducible, but the inclusion of novel inflammatory markers did not improve the diagnostic accuracy. In study III, the AIR-score-based algorithm led to a reduction in negative explorations, operations for nonperforated appendicitis and hospital admissions in the low-risk group and reduced use of imaging in both low- and high-risk groups. In study IV, routine imaging led to more operations for nonperforated appendicitis but had no effect on negative explorations or perforated appendicitis.

    Conclusions. The AIR score was found to have promising diagnostic properties that were not improved further with the inclusion of novel inflammatory variables. Structured management of patients with suspected appendicitis according to an AIR-score-based algorithm may improve outcome while reducing hospital admissions and use of imaging. Patients with equivocal signs of appendicitis do not benefit from routine imaging which may lead to an increased detection of, and treatment for, uncomplicated cases of appendicitis that are otherwise allowed to resolve spontaneously.

    List of papers
    1. The appendicitis inflammatory response score: A tool for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis that outperforms the Alvarado score
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The appendicitis inflammatory response score: A tool for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis that outperforms the Alvarado score
    2008 (English)In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 1843-1849Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The clinical diagnosis of appendicitis is a subjective synthesis of information from variables with ill-defined diagnostic value. This process could be improved by using a scoring system that includes objective variables that reflect the inflammatory response. This study describes the construction and evaluation of a new clinical appendicitis score. Methods: Data were collected prospectively from 545 patients admitted for suspected appendicitis at four hospitals. The score was constructed from eight variables with independent diagnostic value (right-lower-quadrant pain, rebound tenderness, muscular defense, WBC count, proportion neutrophils, CRP, body temperature, and vomiting) in 316 randomly selected patients and evaluated on the remaining 229 patients. Ordered logistic regression was used to obtain a high discriminating power with focus on advanced appendicitis. Diagnostic performance was compared with the Alvarado score. Results: The ROC area of the new score was 0.97 for advanced appendicitis and 0.93 for all appendicitis compared with 0.92 (p = 0.0027) and 0.88 (p = 0.0007), respectively, for the Alvarado score. Sixty-three percent of the patients were classified into the low- or high-probability group with an accuracy of 97.2%, leaving 37% for further investigation. Seventy-three percent of the nonappendicitis patients, 67% of the advanced appendicitis, and 37% of all appendicitis patients were correctly classified into the low- and high-probability zone, respectively. Conclusion: This simple clinical score can correctly classify the majority of patients with suspected appendicitis, leaving the need for diagnostic imaging or diagnostic laparoscopy to the smaller group of patients with an indeterminate scoring result. © 2008 Société Internationale de Chirurgie.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45600 (URN)10.1007/s00268-008-9649-y (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Can New Inflammatory Markers Improve the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can New Inflammatory Markers Improve the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis?
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 38, no 11, p. 2777-2783Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The diagnosis of appendicitis is difficult and resource consuming. New inflammatory markers have been proposed for the diagnosis of appendicitis, but their utility in combination with traditional diagnostic variables has not been tested. Our objective is to explore the potential of new inflammatory markers for improving the diagnosis of appendicitis. The diagnostic properties of the six most promising out of 21 new inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6, chemokine ligand [CXCL]-8, chemokine C-C motif ligand [CCL]-2, serum amyloid A [SAA], matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-9, and myeloperoxidase [MPO]) were compared with traditional diagnostic variables included in the Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score (right iliac fossa pain, vomiting, rebound tenderness, guarding, white blood cell [WBC] count, proportion neutrophils, C-reactive protein and body temperature) in 432 patients with suspected appendicitis by uni- and multivariable regression models. Of the new inflammatory variables, SAA, MPO, and MMP9 were the strongest discriminators for all appendicitis (receiver operating characteristics [ROC] 0.71) and SAA was the strongest discriminator for advanced appendicitis (ROC 0.80) compared with defence or rebound tenderness, which were the strongest traditional discriminators for all appendicitis (ROC 0.84) and the WBC count for advanced appendicitis (ROC 0.89). CCL2 was the strongest independent discriminator beside the AIR score variables in a multivariable model. The AIR score had an ROC area of 0.91 and could correctly classify 58.3 % of the patients, with an accuracy of 92.9 %. This was not improved by inclusion of the new inflammatory markers. The conventional diagnostic variables for appendicitis, as combined in the AIR score, is an efficient screening instrument for classifying patients as low-, indeterminate-, or high-risk for appendicitis. The addition of the new inflammatory variables did not improve diagnostic performance further.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2014
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112174 (URN)10.1007/s00268-014-2708-7 (DOI)000343048900006 ()25099684 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Jonkoping County Research Council; Research Council of South-Eastern Sweden (FORSS); Futurum- Academy of Health Care, Jonkoping County Council, Jonkoping, Sweden

    Available from: 2014-11-18 Created: 2014-11-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Structured Management of Patients with Suspected Acute Appendicitis Using a Clinical Score and Selective Imaging (STRAPPSCORE)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structured Management of Patients with Suspected Acute Appendicitis Using a Clinical Score and Selective Imaging (STRAPPSCORE)
    2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The management of patients with suspected appendicitis is highly variable with implications for the rate of diagnostic errors, unnecessary admissions and resource consumption. We hypothesise that a structured management algorithm based on the Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score can improve diagnostic accuracy, limit the use of diagnostic imaging, and reduce the number of hospital admissions for patients with suspected appendicitis.

    Methods

    Prospective interventional multicentre study. Patients at 25 Swedish hospitals over the age of five, presenting with suspected appendicitis at the emergency department were considered for inclusion. After an initial period of routine management and registration of the AIR score parameters (baseline period), an AIR-score-based management algorithm was implemented (intervention period). The study analyses the discriminating capacity and predictive value of the AIR score and the impact of implementing the AIR-score-based algorithm.

    Results

    In total, 3791 patients were included. Advanced appendicitis is unlikely at an AIR score <5 points (sensitivity 0.96), and appendicitis is likely at an AIR score >8 (specificity 0.98). The implementation of the AIR-score-based algorithm resulted in fewer negative explorations and operations for phlegmonous appendicitis (1.6% vs 3.4%, p=0.019 and 5.5% vs 9.4%, p=0.003, respectively), a reduction in admissions to hospital and use of imaging (29.5% vs 42.8%, p<0.001 and 19.2% vs 34.5%, respectively), and no difference with regard to advanced appendicitis in the low-risk group, and a decrease in the use of diagnostic imaging in the high-risk group (38.5% vs 53.1%, p=0.021).

    Conclusions

    The AIR score has high discriminating capacity. Implementing an AIR-score-based algorithm increased diagnostic accuracy and lowered the use of diagnostic imaging and in-hospital observation.

    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113764 (URN)
    Funder
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, SwedenMedical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)
    Available from: 2015-01-30 Created: 2015-01-30 Last updated: 2015-01-30Bibliographically approved
    4. Routine versus selective diagnostic imaging in patients with intermediate probability of acute appendicitis: A randomised controlled multicentre study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Routine versus selective diagnostic imaging in patients with intermediate probability of acute appendicitis: A randomised controlled multicentre study
    2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Diagnostic imaging is increasingly used in patients with suspected appendicitis, with increased costs and concerns about exposure to ionising radiation. Indications suggest that routine imaging is associated with a higher detection rate and treatment of potentially resolving appendicitis. The efficiency of routine imaging compared with in-hospital observation and selective imaging is not well studied.

    Methods

    The proportions of negative appendectomy and treatments for appendicitis are studied in 1068 patients with intermediate suspicion of appendicitis, indicated by an Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score sum of five to eight points, randomly allocated by opaque sealed envelopes to early routine diagnostic imaging (Imaging group, n=543) or re-assessment after 4–8 hours inhospital observation followed by selective diagnostic imaging (Observation group, n=525). Some 21 hospitals in Sweden participated in this multicentre study.

    Findings

    The Imaging and Observation groups had the same proportion of negative appendectomies (6·5% in both, difference 0·03%, CI –3·0%–3·1%, p=0·98) but routine imaging was associated with an increased proportion of patients treated for appendicitis (53·4% vs 46·3%, difference  7·1%, CI 1·0–13·2%, p=0·020). As secondary outcomes, the Imaging group had shorter time to surgery (median 13·7 hours vs 15·5 hours, p<0·01), but no difference in admissions, number of perforations or length of hospital stay.

    Interpretation

    Patients with suspected appendicitis and equivocal clinical findings do not benefit from early routine diagnostic imaging compared with re-assessment after observation and selective imaging. The latter is associated with fewer operations for non-perforated appendicitis which supports the hypothesis of resolving appendicitis.

    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113765 (URN)
    Funder
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, SwedenMedical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)
    Available from: 2015-01-30 Created: 2015-01-30 Last updated: 2015-01-30Bibliographically approved
  • 13.
    Andersson, Manne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Council Jonkoping, Dept Surg, Ryhov Cty Hosp, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Kolodziej, B.
    County Council Jonköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Council Jonköping, Sweden.
    Randomized clinical trial of Appendicitis Inflammatory Response score-based management of patients with suspected appendicitis2017In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 104, no 11, p. 1451-1461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe role of imaging in the diagnosis of appendicitis is controversial. This prospective interventional study and nested randomized trial analysed the impact of implementing a risk stratification algorithm based on the Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score, and compared routine imaging with selective imaging after clinical reassessment. MethodPatients presenting with suspicion of appendicitis between September 2009 and January 2012 from age 10years were included at 21 emergency surgical centres and from age 5years at three university paediatric centres. Registration of clinical characteristics, treatments and outcomes started during the baseline period. The AIR score-based algorithm was implemented during the intervention period. Intermediate-risk patients were randomized to routine imaging or selective imaging after clinical reassessment. ResultsThe baseline period included 1152 patients, and the intervention period 2639, of whom 1068 intermediate-risk patients were randomized. In low-risk patients, use of the AIR score-based algorithm resulted in less imaging (192 versus 345 per cent; Pamp;lt;0001), fewer admissions (295 versus 428 per cent; Pamp;lt;0001), and fewer negative explorations (16 versus 32 per cent; P=0030) and operations for non-perforated appendicitis (68 versus 97 per cent; P=0034). Intermediate-risk patients randomized to the imaging and observation groups had the same proportion of negative appendicectomies (64 versus 67 per cent respectively; P=0884), number of admissions, number of perforations and length of hospital stay, but routine imaging was associated with an increased proportion of patients treated for appendicitis (534 versus 463 per cent; P=0020). ConclusionAIR score-based risk classification can safely reduce the use of diagnostic imaging and hospital admissions in patients with suspicion of appendicitis. Registration number: NCT00971438 ( ). Reduces imaging and admissions

  • 14.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Muhrbeck, Måns
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Veen, Harald
    Int Comm Red Cross, Switzerland.
    Osman, Zaher
    Int Comm Red Cross, Switzerland.
    von Schreeb, Johan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hospital Workload for Weapon-Wounded Females Treated by the International Committee of the Red Cross: More Work Needed than for Males2018In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 93-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Civilians constitute 33-51% of victims in armed conflicts. Several reports on civilian injuries exist, but few have focused on injuries afflicting females. We analyzed routinely collected data on weapon-related injuries from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) hospital in northwestern Pakistan in order to define injury patterns and types of surgical treatment for females. A total of 3028 patient files (376 females) from consecutively admitted patients to the ICRC-hospital in Peshawar from February 2009 to May 2012 were included. Information regarding injury-mechanism, time since injury, vital parameters at admission, type of injury, treatment and basic outcome was extracted from the files and analyzed. Comparisons between gender and age-groups were done by cross-table analyses or nonparametric tests. Females were younger than males (20 vs. 25 years), arrived sooner after injury (24 vs. 48 h) (p amp;lt; 0.001 for both) and were victims of bombs and missiles more frequently (64.4 vs. 54.6%) (p amp;lt; 0.001). Vital parameters such as systolic blood pressure (110 vs. 113 mmHg) and pulse rate (100 vs. 86) were more affected at admission (p amp;lt; 0.001 for both). Females were subjected to surgery (83.0 vs. 77.4%) (p amp;lt; 0.05) and were given blood transfusions more often (18.8 vs. 13.6%) (p amp;lt; 0.01). No differences in amputations or in-hospital mortality were found. Females treated at the ICRC-hospital in northwestern Pakistan are markedly affected by indiscriminate weapons such as bombs and missiles. Their average consumption of surgery is greater than for males, and this might be relevant in planning for staffing and facility needs in similar contexts.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Continent Ileostomy2008In: Seminars in Colon and Rectal Surgery, ISSN 1043-1489, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 124-131Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Continent ileostomy reservoir is today still an alternative to a standard (conventional) ileostomy in patients where ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is contraindicated or malfunctioning. It eliminates a protruding stoma, obviates the need for a stoma bag, and permits controlled evacuation of bowel contents. A well-functioning continent ileostomy also is entirely continent for gas and feces in the elderly. The reservoir is emptied three to five times a day. Obvious benefits are improved sexual life and facilitated leisure activities. The main drawbacks are frequent complications requiring reoperations in about 50% of the patients. Slippage of the nipple valve occurs in about one-third but in the majority of patients reoperations are successful in the long run. Other complications are pouchitis, enterocutaneous fistula, and stomal stricture. Modifications of the original Kock pouch have been developed as the Barnett pouch and the T-pouch to reduce complications associated with dysfunction of the nipple valve. Cancer of a continent ileostomy reservoir has been reported only in one patient and there seems to be no risk of high-grade dysplasia even after long-term follow-up. At present there are few indications for creating a continent ileostomy reservoir but it is still recommended in very select patients. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjerså, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Falk, Kristin
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olsén, Monika Fagevik
    Department of Surgery and Department of Physical Therapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital; Department of Gastrosurgical Research and Education, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Effects of chewing gum against postoperative ileus after pancreaticoduodenectomy: a randomized controlled trial2015In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, no 37, article id 25886536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative ileus is common after surgery. One non-pharmacological intervention that has shown promising results in reducing the duration of postoperative ileus is chewing gum after surgery. However, this has not been investigated in upper gastrointestinal surgery such as pancreatic surgery. Hence the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chewing gum treatment on patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy ad modum whipple due to pancreatic or periampullary cancer.

    METHODS: This study was conducted as a phase III trial that was terminated early. Patients diagnosed with pancreatic tumours scheduled for pancreaticoduodenectomy ad modum whipple were included. The treatment group received chewing gum postoperatively and standard care. Controls received glucose solution and standard care. Chewing gum and glucose were used four times a day during the whole hospital stay. Time to first flatus and stool was defined as the primary outcome. The secondary outcome was start with clear liquids, start with liquid diet and length of hospital stay.

    RESULTS: No statistically significant differences could be observed between the chewing gum intervention group and the control group. However, a numerical difference in mean time was observed in first flatus, first stool, start of clear fluids, and start of liquid diet and length of hospital stay in favour of the intervention group.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although this study did not find statistically significant differences favouring the use of chewing gum for postoperative ileus, a positive trend was observed of a reduction of the impact of postoperative ileus among patients after pancreatic surgery. It also contributes valuable methodological experience that is important for future studies of chewing gum interventions during recovery after pancreatic surgery.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02319512 , publication date 2014-12-17.

  • 17.
    Axelsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Maternal obesity, obstetric interventions and post-partum anaemia increase the risk of post-partum sepsis: a population-based cohort study based on Swedish medical health registers2017In: Infectious Diseases, ISSN 2374-4235, E-ISSN 2374-4243, Vol. 49, no 10, p. 765-771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The objective was to estimate whether maternal obesity and/or obstetric interventions are associated with diagnosed maternal post-partum sepsis. Methods: A retrospective observational cohort study including all deliveries in Sweden between 1997 and 2012 (N=1,558,752). Cases of sepsis (n=376) were identified by International Classification of Diseases, (ICD-10) codes A40, A41 and O 85 in the Medical Birth Register and the National Patient Register. The reference population was non-infected, and therefore, women with any other infection diagnosis and/or with dispensed antibiotics within eight weeks post-partum were excluded. Information on dispensed drugs was available in the prescribed drug Register. Women with sepsis were compared with non-infected women concerning maternal characteristics and obstetric interventions. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) were determined using the Mantel-Haenszel technique. Adjustments were made for maternal age, parity and smoking. Results: Obese women (body mass index 30) had a doubled risk of sepsis (3.6/10,000) compared with normal weight women (2.0/10,000) (aOR 1.85 (95%CI: 1.37-2.48)). Induction of labour (aOR 1.44 (95%CI: 1.09-1.91)), caesarean section overall (aOR 3.06 (95%CI: 2.49-3.77)) and elective caesarean section (aOR 2.41 (95%CI: 1.68-3.45)) increased the risk of sepsis compared with normal vaginal delivery. Post-partum anaemia due to acute blood loss was associated with maternal sepsis (aOR 3.40 (95%CI: 2.59-4.47)). Conclusions: Maternal obesity, obstetric interventions and post-partum anaemia due to acute blood loss increased the risk of diagnosed post-partum sepsis indicating that interventions in obstetric care should be considered carefully and anaemia should be treated if resources are available.

  • 18.
    Bannister, Patricia
    et al.
    Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Lindberg, Nina
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Jeppesen, Karin
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Elfving-Little, Ulla
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Semmingsen, Ann-Margritt
    Division of Surgery and Clinical Neuroscience, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Paganini, Anna
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Annica
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Slevin, Emma
    Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK.
    Jacobsen, Gry
    Center for Cleft Lip and Palate, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Eyres, Phil
    Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Semb, Gunvor
    Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK;Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University of Hospital Rikshospitalet and Statped, Sørøst, Hospital Oslo, Norway.
    Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate: 3. Descriptive study of postoperative nursing care following first stage cleft closure.2017In: Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 6p. 21-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common congenital anomalies requiring surgical treatment in children, normally commenced in the first year of life. Following the initiation of a group of multicentre surgical trials of primary surgery, variations in postoperative recovery and management became apparent. An agreement was made for a nurse-led survey in eight surgical centres to document postoperative care and recovery. Materials and methods:A postoperative recovery clinical report form was developed to capture relevant data for the children participating in the four arms of the trials. This included the age and weight at admission, the postoperative recovery setting, pain management, postoperative feeding, post-operative complications, and length of hospital stay. Results:Four hundred and three nursing forms from the first surgical procedure were returned for analysis. Differences in important aspects of care such as postoperative analgesia and postoperative feeding were evident. Postoperative care was influenced by local custom and practice, as little firm clinical evidence exists to guide optimal management. Conclusion:Postoperative recovery may play a significant role in the future selection of surgical protocols, and future trials need to consider cross-study site training to familiarise nurses, prior to any changes in surgical methods. Trial registration:ISRCTN29932826. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 19.
    Bergkvist, Max
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Zötterman, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Vascular Occlusion in a Porcine Flap Model: Effects on Blood Cell Concentration and Oxygenation.2017In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery. Global open, ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 5, no 11, article id e1531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Venous congestion in skin flaps is difficult to detect. This study evaluated the ability of tissue viability imaging (TiVi) to measure changes in the concentration of red blood cells (CRBC), oxygenation, and heterogeneity during vascular provocations in a porcine fasciocutaneous flap model.

    Methods: In 5 pigs, cranial gluteal artery perforator flaps were raised (8 flaps in 5 pigs). The arterial and venous blood flow was monitored with ultrasonic flow probes. CRBC, tissue oxygenation, and heterogeneity in the skin were monitored with TiVi during baseline, 50% and 100% venous occlusion, recovery, 100% arterial occlusion and final recovery, thereby simulating venous and arterial occlusion of a free fasciocutaneous flap. A laser Doppler probe was used as a reference for microvascular perfusion in the flap.

    Results: During partial and complete venous occlusion, increases in CRBC were seen in different regions of the flap. They were more pronounced in the distal part. During complete arterial occlusion, CRBC decreased in all but the most distal parts of the flap. There were also increases in tissue oxygenation and heterogeneity during venous occlusion.

    Conclusions: TiVi measures regional changes in CRBC in the skin of the flap during arterial and venous occlusion, as well as an increase in oxygenated hemoglobin during venous occlusion that may be the result of reduced metabolism and impaired delivery of oxygen to the tissue. TiVi may provide a promising method for measuring flap viability because it is hand-held, easy to-use, and provides spatial information on venous congestion.

  • 20.
    Bergmark, K
    et al.
    Gynecological Oncology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Clinical Cancerepidemiology, Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Gynecological Oncology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dickman, P W
    Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Henningsohn, L
    Clinical Cancerepidemiology, Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden . Department of Urology, Huddinge Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Steineck, G
    Clinical Cancerepidemiology, Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Clinical Cancerepidemiology, Stockholm City Council, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Lymphedema and bladder-emptying difficulties after radical hysterectomy for early cervical cancer and among population controls.2006In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, ISSN 1048-891X, E-ISSN 1525-1438, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 1130-1139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to acquire knowledge that can be used to refine radical hysterectomy to improve quality-of-life outcome. Data were collected in 1996-1997 by means of an anonymous postal questionnaire in a follow-up study of two cohorts (patients and population controls). We attempted to enroll all 332 patients with stage IB-IIA cervical cancer registered in 1991-1992 at the seven departments of gynecological oncology in Sweden and 489 population controls. Ninety three (37%) of the 256 women with a history of cervical cancer who answered the questionnaire (77%) were treated with surgery alone. Three-hundred fifty population controls answered the questionnaire (72%). Women treated with radical hysterectomy, as compared with controls, had an 8-fold increase in symptoms indicating lymphedema (25% reported distress due to lymphedema), a nearly 9-fold increase in difficult emptying of the bladder, and a 22-fold increase in the need to strain to initiate bladder evacuation. Ninety percent of the patients were not willing to trade off survival for freedom from symptoms. Avoiding to induce long-term lymphedema or bladder-emptying difficulties would probably improve quality of life after radical hysterectomy (to cure cervical cancer). Few women want to compromise survival to avoid long-term symptoms.

  • 21.
    Bergmark, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Oncology, Gynecological Oncology, Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet PO Box 4402 S-102 68 Stockholm Sweden.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Oncology, Gynecological Oncology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm Sweden.
    Dickman, Paul W
    Department of Oncology, Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henningsohn, Lars
    Department of Oncology, Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Urology, Huddinge Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Department of Oncology, Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Patient-rating of distressful symptoms after treatment for early cervical cancer.2002In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 81, no 5, p. 443-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: More refined information on sources of symptom-induced distress in a patient population can improve the quality of pretreatment information, make follow-up visits more efficient and guide research priorities in the efforts to modify treatments.

    METHODS: In a population-based epidemiological study covering all of Sweden, data were collected 1996-97 by means of an anonymous postal questionnaire. We attempted to enroll all 332 patients with stage IB-IIA cervical cancer registered in 1991-92 at the seven departments of gynecological oncology in Sweden.

    RESULTS: A total of 256 cases (77%) completed the questionnaire. After surgery, alone or in combination with intracavitary radiotherapy, several symptoms related to sexual dysfunction are the primary sources of symptom-induced distress (reduced orgasm frequency: much distress 23% (surgery alone) and 23% (intracavitary radiotherapy and surgery), respectively, overall intercourse dysfunction: much distress 17% and 20%, respectively, followed by lymphedema (much distress 14% and 14%, respectively). Dyspareunia (much distress 24%) and defecation urgency (much distress 22%) are two leading causes of distress after surgery and external radiotherapy. After treatment with radiotherapy alone, loose stool and dyspareunia were the two most distressful symptoms (much distress 19% each). When a symptom occurs, fecal leakage and reduced orgasm frequency are the two most distressful ones (measured as much distress, 38% each).

    CONCLUSIONS: The observed symptoms are distressful and should, if one focuses on patient satisfaction, be given priority.

  • 22.
    Bergthorsdottir, R
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, A G
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gillberg, P
    Shire, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Ekman, Bertil
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wahlberg, Jeanette
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Health-Related Quality of Life In Patients With Adrenal Insufficiency Receiving Plenadren Compared With Immediate-Release Hydrocortisone.2015In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 18, no 7, p. A616-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Previous studies in patients with primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI) on conventional replacement therapy suggest decreased health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and that patients report more frequently fatigue, increased anxiety and inability to work compared to background population.

    Objectives

    To study self-reported health status with EQ-5D in patients with PAI. Patients treated with Plenadren (modified-release hydrocortisone) were compared with patients treated with immediate release hydrocortisone (IRHC) replacement therapy.

    Methods

    This was a cross-sectional, multi-centre, non-interventional survey of patients with PAI receiving Plenadren or immediate release hydrocortisone (IRHC) replacement.

    Subjects

    One hundred thirty-four adult patients with PAI of whom 36 (19 females [53%]) were treated with Plenadren and 98 (77 females [79%]) were treated with IRHC, were included.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

    HRQoL described by the EQ-5D, a generic preference-based measure of health.

    RESULTS

    Patients on Plenadren and on IRHC had a mean ± SD age of 53.1 ± 12.7 years and 48.0 ± 13.1 years, respectively (P=0.043). The majority of the patients were diagnosed more than 5 years ago (69%). The mean ± SD daily Plenadren and IRHC doses were 27.0 ± 6.8 mg and 26.6 ± 10.9 mg, respectively (P=0.807). 47% of the Plenadren patients had been receiving Plenadren and 82% of the IRHC patients had been receiving IRHC for more than 3 years. Patients receiving Plenadren had better HRQoL measured by the EQ-5D questionnaire compared to patients replaced with IRHC (0.76 ± 0.18 vs 0.68 ± 0.18, respectively [P=0.040]).

    CONCLUSIONS

    Replacement therapy with Plenadren in patients with PAI confers measurable benefit on HRQoL relative to IRHC as estimated by the EQ-5D questionnaire, and may therefore be advantageous when compared to IRHC substitution.

  • 23.
    Berrevoet, Frederik
    et al.
    Department of General and Hepatopancreaticobiliary Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Doerhoff, Carl
    General Surgery, Surgicare of Missouri, Jefferson City, MO, USA.
    Muysoms, Filip
    Department of Surgery, AZ Maria Middelares Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Hopson, Steven
    Bon Secours Hernia Center, Mary Immaculate Hospital, Newport News, VA, USA.
    Muzi, Marco Gallinella
    University Hospital Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
    Nienhuijs, Simon
    Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Kullman, Eric
    Medicinskt Centrum Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Tollens, Tim
    Imelda Hospital-General Surgery Imelda Hospital, Bonheiden, Belgium.
    Schwartz, Mark R
    Monmouth Medical Center, Long Branch, NJ.
    LeBlanc, Karl
    Our Lady of Lakes Regional Medical Center, Baton Rouge, LA.
    Velanovich, Vic
    Tampa General Hospital, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA.
    Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad
    Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    A multicenter prospective study of patients undergoing open ventral hernia repair with intraperitoneal positioning using the monofilament polyester composite ventral patch: interim results of the PANACEA study2017In: Medical Devices: Evidence and Research, ISSN 1179-1470, E-ISSN 1179-1470, Vol. 10, p. 81-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assessed the recurrence rate and other safety and efficacy parameters following ventral hernia repair with a polyester composite prosthesis (Parietex™ Composite Ventral Patch [PCO-VP]).

  • 24.
    Billaud Feragen, Kristin
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Statped Sorost, Norway.
    Semb, Gunvor
    University of Manchester, England; National Hospital Norway, Norway.
    Heliovaara, Arja
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Lohmander, Anette
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Johannessen, Emma Christine
    Statped Sorost, Norway.
    Boysen, Betty Marie
    University of Copenhagen Hospital, Denmark.
    Havstam, Christina
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lundeborg, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nyberg, Jill
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Nina-Helen
    Statped Vest, Norway.
    Bogh-Nielsen, Joan
    Cleft Palate Centre, Denmark.
    Eyres, Philip
    University of Manchester, England.
    Bradbury, Eileen
    Private Practice, Manchester, UK.
    Rumsey, Nichola
    University of West England, England.
    Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate: 10. Parental perceptions of appearance and treatment outcomes in their 5-year-old child2017In: Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 81-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim: Few studies have explored childrens emotional and behavioural reactions to cleft surgery and treatment-related stress. The objective was to investigate parents evaluations of appearance and treatment outcomes in their 5-year-old child with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), and their perceptions of how their child was coping with treatment, comparing this information with recorded postsurgical complications.Design: Three parallel group randomised clinical trials were undertaken as an international multicentre study by 10 cleft teams in five countries: Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Norway, and the UK.Methods: Three different surgical procedures for primary palatal repair were tested against a common procedure in the total cohort of 448 children born with a non-syndromic UCLP. A total of 356 parents completed the Scandcleft Parent Questionnaire, and 346 parents completed the Cleft Evaluation Profile.Results: The results indicated that the majority of parents were satisfied with cleft-related features of their childs appearance. Further, most children coped well with treatment according to their parents. Nevertheless, 17.5% of the children showed minor or short-term reactions after treatment experiences, and 2% had major or lasting difficulties. There were no significant relationships between parent perceptions of treatment-related problems and the occurrence of post-surgical medical complications.Conclusions: Most parents reported satisfaction with their childs appearance. However, treatment-related problems were described in some children, urging cleft centres to be aware of potential negative emotional and behavioural reactions to treatment in some young children, with a view to preventing the development of more severe treatment-related anxiety.

  • 25.
    Bjerså, Kristofer
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Anna
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fagevik Olsén, Monika
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska academy, University of Gothenburg; Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Perceptions of complementary therapies among Swedish registered professions in surgical care2011In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, ISSN 1744-3881, E-ISSN 1873-6947, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 44-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is increasing interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among healthcare professions. However, no studies have been conducted in Sweden or in a surgical context. The aim of this study is to describe different perceptions of complementary therapies among registered healthcare professions in Swedish surgical care. Sixteen interviews were conducted with registered physicians, nurses, physiotherapists and clinical dieticians at a Swedish university hospital. Analysis was made with a phenomenographic research approach. The findings showed variations in perceptions of the definition of complementary therapies. A constructive approach toward use was observed, but there was a conflict in matters of indications and contraindications, and also criticism over a lack of knowledge. There was seen to be a need for education to be able to act professionally. Scepticism over high costs of treatment was highlighted. In conclusion, a need for policies on management, education and research in the field of CAM should be addressed.

  • 26.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lundgren, L
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    A Personal Computer Freeware as a Tool for Surgeons to Plan Liver Resections.2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 153-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The increase in liver surgery and the proportion of resections done on the margin to postoperative liver failure make preoperative calculations regarding liver volume important. Earlier studies have shown good correlation between calculations done with ImageJ and specimen weight as well as volume calculations done with more robust systems. The correlation to actual volumes of resected liver tissue has not been investigated, and this was the aim of this study.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 30 patients undergoing well-defined liver resections were included in this study. Volumes calculated with ImageJ were compared to volume measurements done after the retrieval of resected liver tissue.

    RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A strong correlation between calculated and measured liver volume was found with sample concordance correlation coefficient (ρc) = 0.9950. The knowledge on the nature of liver resections sets liver surgeons in a unique position to be able to accurately predict the volumes to be resected and, therefore, also the volume that will remain after surgery. This becomes increasingly important with the evolvement of methods to extend the boundaries of liver surgery. ImageJ is a reliable tool to preoperatively assess liver volume.

  • 27.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sparrelid, E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Isaksson, B.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Associating Liver Partition and Portal Vein Ligation for Primary Hepatobiliary Malignancies and Non-Colorectal Liver Metastases2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 158-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy may increase the possibility of radical resection in the case of liver malignancy. Concerns have been raised about the high morbidity and mortality associated with the procedure, particularly when applied for diagnoses other than colorectal liver metastases. The aim of this study was to analyze the initial experience with associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy in cases of non-colorectal liver metastases and primary hepatobiliary malignancies in Scandinavia. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of all associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy procedures performed at two Swedish university hospitals for non-colorectal liver metastases and primary hepatobiliary malignancies was performed. The primary focus was on the safety of the procedure. Results and Conclusion: Ten patients were included: four had hepatocellular cancer, three had intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, one had a Klatskin tumor, one had ocular melanoma metastasis, and one had a metastasis from a Wilms tumor. All patients completed both operations, and the highest grade of complication (according to the Clavien-Dindo classification) was 3A, which was observed in one patient. No 90-day mortality was observed. Radical resection (R0) was achieved in nine patients, while the resection was R2 in one patient. The low morbidity and mortality observed in this cohort compared with those of earlier reports on associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy for diagnoses other than colorectal liver metastases may be related to the selection of patients with limited comorbidity. In addition, procedures other than associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy had been avoided in most of the patients. In conclusion, associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy can be applied to primary hepatobiliary malignancies and non-colorectal liver metastases with acceptable rates of morbidity and mortality.

  • 28.
    Bondi, J.
    et al.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; Drammen Hospital, Norway.
    Avdagic, J.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; Innlandet Hospital, Norway.
    Karlbom, U.
    Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Kalman, Thordis Disa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Saltyte Benth, J.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Naimy, N.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    Oresland, T.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Randomized clinical trial comparing collagen plug and advancement flap for trans-sphincteric anal fistula2017In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 104, no 9, p. 1160-1166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The role of a collagen plug for treating anal fistula is not well established. A randomized prospective multicentre non-inferiority study of surgical treatment of trans-sphincteric cryptogenic fistulas was undertaken, comparing the anal fistula plug with the mucosal advancement flap with regard to fistula recurrence rate and functional outcome. Methods: Patients with an anal fistula were evaluated for eligibility in three centres, and randomized to either mucosal advancement flap surgery or collagen plug, with clinical follow-up at 3 and 12 months. The primary outcome was the fistula recurrence rate. Anal pain (visual analogue scale), anal incontinence (St Marks score) and quality of life (Short Form 36 questionnaire) were also reported. Results: Ninety-four patients were included; 48 were allocated to the plug procedure and 46 to advancement flap surgery. The median follow-up was 12 (range 9-24) months. The recurrence rate at 12 months was 66 per cent (27 of 41 patients) in the plug group and 38 per cent (15 of 40) in the flap group (P = 0.006). Anal pain was reduced after operation in both groups. Anal incontinence did not change in the follow-up period. Patients reported an increased quality of life after 3 months. There were no differences between the groups with regard to pain, incontinence or quality of life. Conclusion: There was a considerably higher recurrence rate after the anal fistula plug procedure than following advancement flap repair.

  • 29.
    Brink, Rob C.
    et al.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Schlosser, Tom P. C.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Colo, Dino
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Vavruch, Ludek
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    van Stralen, Marijn
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Vincken, Koen L.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Malmqvist, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kruyt, Moyo C.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Spinal Surgery.
    Castelein, Rene M.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Anterior Spinal Overgrowth Is the Result of the Scoliotic Mechanism and Is Located in the Disc2017In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 42, no 11, p. 818-822Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design. Cross-sectional study. Objective. To investigate the presence and magnitude of anterior spinal overgrowth in neuromuscular scoliosis and compare this with the same measurements in idiopathic scoliosis and healthy spines. Summary of Background Data. Anterior spinal overgrowth has been described as a potential driver for the onset and progression of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Whether this anterior overgrowth is specific for AIS or also present in nonidiopathic scoliosis has not been reported. Methods. Supine computed tomography (CT) scans of thirty AIS patients (thoracic Cobb 21-81 degrees), thirty neuromuscular (NM) scoliotic patients (thoracic Cobb 19-101 degrees) and 30 nonscoliotic controls were used. The difference in length in per cents between the anterior and posterior side {[(Delta A-P)/P] * 100%, abbreviated to A-P%} of each vertebral body and intervertebral disc, and between the anterior side of the spine and the spinal canal (A-C%) were determined. Results. The A-P% of the thoracic curves did not differ between the AIS (+1.2 perpendicular to 2.2%) and NM patients (+0.9 +/- 4.1%, P = 0.663), both did differ, however, from the same measurements in controls (-3.0 +/- 1.6%; Pamp;lt; 0.001) and correlated linearly with the Cobb angle (AIS r = 0.678, NM r = 0.687). Additional anterior length was caused by anterior elongation of the discs (AIS: A-P% disc +17.5 +/- 12.7% vs. A-P% body - 2.5 +/- 2.6%; Pamp;lt; 0.001, NM: A-P% disc + 19.1 +/- 18.0% vs. A-P% body -3.5 +/- 5.1%; Pamp;lt; 0.001). The A-C% T1-S1 in AIS and NM patients were similar (+ 7.9 +/- 1.8% and + 8.7 +/- 4.0%, P = 0.273), but differed from the controls (+4.2 +/- 3.3%; Pamp;lt; 0.001). Conclusion. So called anterior overgrowth has been postulated as a possible cause for idiopathic scoliosis, but apparently it occurs in scoliosis with a known origin as well. This suggests that it is part of a more generalized scoliotic mechanism, rather than its cause. The fact that the intervertebral discs contribute more to this increased anterior length than the vertebral bodies suggests an adaptation to altered loading, rather than a primary growth disturbance.

  • 30.
    Britt, Rebecca C
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA.
    Scerbo, Mark W
    Department of Psychology, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA.
    Montano, Michael
    Department of Psychology, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA.
    Kennedy, Rebecca A
    Department of Psychology, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA.
    Prytz, Erik
    the Department of Psychology, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA.
    Stefanidis, Dimitrios
    Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA.
    Intracorporeal suturing: Transfer from Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery to cadavers results in substantial increase in mental workload2015In: Surgery, ISSN 0039-6060, E-ISSN 1532-7361, Vol. 158, no 5, p. 1428-1433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION:

    A spatial secondary task developed by the authors was used to measure the mental workload of the participant when transferring suturing skills from a box simulator to more realistic surgical conditions using a fresh cadaver. We hypothesized that laparoscopic suturing on genuine bowel would be more challenging than on the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS)-simulated bowel as reflected in differences on both suturing and secondary task scores.

    METHODS:

    We trained 14 surgical assistant students to FLS proficiency in intracorporeal suturing. Participants practiced suturing on the FLS box for 30 minutes and then were tested on both the FLS box and the bowel of a fresh cadaver using the spatial, secondary dual-task conditions developed by the authors.

    RESULTS:

    Suturing times increased by >333% when moving from the FLS platform to the cadaver F(1,13) = 44.04, P < .001. The increased completion times were accompanied by a 70% decrease in secondary task scores, F(1,13) = 21.21, P < .001.

    CONCLUSION:

    The mental workload associated with intracorporeal suturing increases dramatically when trainees transfer from the FLS platform to human tissue under more realistic conditions of suturing. The increase in mental workload is indexed by both an increase in suturing times and a decrease in the ability to attend to the secondary task.

  • 31.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Carlsson, Anders K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Olausson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Multivariate proteomic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with peripheral neuropathic pain and healthy controls: a hypothesis-generating pilot study2015In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 8, p. 321-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pain medicine lacks objective biomarkers to guide diagnosis and treatment. Combining two-dimensional gel proteomics with multivariate data analysis by projection, we exploratively analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid of eleven patients with severe peripheral neuropathic pain due to trauma and/or surgery refractory to conventional treatment and eleven healthy controls. Using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, we identified a panel of 36 proteins highly discriminating between the two groups. Due to a possible confounding effect of age, a new model with age as outcome variable was computed for patients (n=11), and four out of 36 protein spots were excluded due to a probable influence of age. Of the 32 remaining proteins, the following seven had the highest discriminatory power between the two groups: an isoform of angiotensinogen (upregulated in patients), two isoforms of alpha-1-antitrypsin (downregulated in patients), three isoforms of haptoglobin (upregulated in patients), and one isoform of pigment epithelium-derived factor (downregulated in patients). It has recently been hypothesized that the renin–angiotensin system may play a role in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, and a clinical trial of an angiotensin II receptor antagonist was recently published. It is noteworthy that when searching for neuropathic pain biomarkers with a purely explorative methodology, it was indeed a renin–angiotensin system protein that had the highest discriminatory power between patients and controls in the present study. The results from this hypothesis-generating pilot study have to be confirmed in larger, hypothesis-driven studies with age-matched controls, but the present study illustrates the fruitfulness of combining proteomics with multivariate data analysis in hypothesis-generating pain biomarker studies in humans.

  • 32.
    Cao, Ziquan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    VEGF-mediated vascular functions in health and disease2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Angiogenesis is essential for physiological processes including embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and reproduction. Under various pathological conditions the same angiogenic process contribute to the onset, development, and progression of many human diseases including cancer, diabetic complications, ocular disease, chronic inflammation and cardiovascular disease. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key angiogenic factor for physiological and pathological angiogenesis. In addition to its strong angiogenic activity, VEGF also potently induces vascular permeability, often causing tissue edema in various pathological tissues. VEGF transduces its vascular signal through two tyrosine kinase receptors-VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, the latter being a functional receptor that mediates both angiogenic and vascular permeability effects. To study physiological and pathological functions of VEGF, we developed novel zebrafish disease models that permit us to study hypoxia-induced retinopathy and cancer metastasis processes. We have also administered anti-VEGF and anti-VEGFR specific antibodies to healthy mice to study the homeostatic role of VEGF in the maintenance of vascular integrity and its functions in various tissues and organs.

    Finally, using a zebrafish model, we evaluated if VEGF expression is regulated by circadian clock genes. In paper I, we developed protocols that create hypoxia-induced retinopathy in adult zebrafish. Adult fli1:EGFP zebrafish were placed in hypoxic water for 3-10 days with retinal neovascularization being analyzed using confocal microscopy. This model provides a unique opportunity to kinetically study the development of retinopathy in adult animals using non-invasive protocols and to assess the therapeutic efficacy of orally administered anti-angiogenic drugs. In paper II, we developed a zebrafish metastasis model to dissect the complex events of hypoxia-induced tumor cell invasion and metastasis in association with angiogenesis at the single-cell level. In this model, fluorescent DiI-labeled human or mouse tumor cells were implanted into the perivitelline cavity of 48-hour-old zebrafish embryos, which were subsequently placed in hypoxic water for 3 days. Tumor cell invasion, metastasis and pathological angiogenesis were analyzed using fluorescent microscopy in the living fish. The average experimental time for this model is 7 days. Our protocol offers an opportunity to study molecular mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer metastasis. In paper III, we show that systemic delivery of an anti-VEGF or an anti-VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2 neutralizing antibody cause global vascular regression in mice. Among all examined tissues, the vasculature in endocrine glands, intestinal villi, and the uterus are most affected in response to VEGF or VEGFR-2 blockades. Pro-longed anti-VEGF treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the circulating levels of the predominant thyroid hormone, free thyroxine, but not the minimal isoform of triiodothyronine, suggesting that chronic anti-VEGF treatment impairs thyroid function. These findings provide structural and functional bases of anti-VEGF-specific druginduced side effects in relation to vascular changes in healthy tissues. In paper IV, we show that disruption of the circadian clock by constant exposure to light coupled with genetic manipulation of key genes in the zebrafish led to impaired developmental angiogenesis. A bmal1-specific morpholino inhibited developmental angiogenesis in zebrafish embryos without causing obvious nonvascular phenotypes. Conversely, a period2 morpholino accelerated angiogenic vessel growth, suggesting that Bmal1 and Period2 display opposing angiogenic effects. These results offer mechanistic insights into the role of the circadian clock in regulation of developmental angiogenesis, and our findings may be reasonably extended to other types of physiological or pathological angiogenesis. Overall, the results in this thesis provide further insight to angiogenic mechanistic properties in tissues and suggest possible novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of various angiogenesis-dependent diseases.

    List of papers
    1. Hypoxia-induced retinopathy model in adult zebrafish
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hypoxia-induced retinopathy model in adult zebrafish
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: Nature Protocols, ISSN 1754-2189, E-ISSN 1750-2799, Vol. 5, no 12, p. 1903-1910Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Hypoxia-induced vascular responses, including angiogenesis, vascular remodeling and vascular leakage, significantly contribute to the onset, development and progression of retinopathy. However, until recently there were no appropriate animal disease models recapitulating adult retinopathy available. In this article, we describe protocols that create hypoxia-induced retinopathy in adult zebrafish. Adult fli1: EGFP zebrafish are placed in hypoxic water for 3-10 d and retinal neovascularization is analyzed using confocal microscopy. It usually takes 11 d to obtain conclusive results using the hypoxia-induced retinopathy model in adult zebrafish. This model provides a unique opportunity to study kinetically the development of retinopathy in adult animals using noninvasive protocols and to assess therapeutic efficacy of orally active antiangiogenic drugs.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Nature Publishing Group, 2010
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-63381 (URN)10.1038/nprot.2010.149 (DOI)000284884100003 ()
    Available from: 2010-12-17 Created: 2010-12-17 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Hypoxia-induced metastasis model in embryonic zebrafish
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hypoxia-induced metastasis model in embryonic zebrafish
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: Nature Protocols, ISSN 1754-2189, E-ISSN 1750-2799, Vol. 5, no 12, p. 1911-1918Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Hypoxia facilitates tumor invasion and metastasis by promoting neovascularization and co-option of tumor cells in the peritumoral vasculature, leading to dissemination of tumor cells into the circulation. However, until recently, animal models and imaging technology did not enable monitoring of the early events of tumor cell invasion and dissemination in living animals. We recently developed a zebrafish metastasis model to dissect the detailed events of hypoxia-induced tumor cell invasion and metastasis in association with angiogenesis at the single-cell level. In this model, fluorescent DiI-labeled human or mouse tumor cells are implanted into the perivitelline cavity of 48-h-old zebrafish embryos, which are subsequently placed in hypoxic water for 3 d. Tumor cell invasion, metastasis and pathological angiogenesis are detected under fluorescent microscopy in the living fish. The average experimental time for this model is 7 d. Our protocol offers a remarkable opportunity to study molecular mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer metastasis.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Nature Publishing Group, 2010
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-63382 (URN)10.1038/nprot.2010.150 (DOI)000284884100004 ()
    Available from: 2010-12-17 Created: 2010-12-17 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    3. Anti-VEGF- and anti-VEGF receptor-induced vascular alteration in mouse healthy tissues
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti-VEGF- and anti-VEGF receptor-induced vascular alteration in mouse healthy tissues
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 110, no 29, p. 12018-12023Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic therapy with anti-VEGF drugs such as bevacizumab is widely used for treatment of human patients with various solid tumors. However, systemic impacts of such drugs in host healthy vasculatures remain poorly understood. Here, we show that, in mice, systemic delivery of an anti-VEGF or an anti-VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2 neutralizing antibody caused global vascular regression. Among all examined tissues, vasculatures in endocrine glands, intestinal villi, and uterus are the most affected in response to VEGF or VEGFR-2 blockades. Thyroid vascular fenestrations were virtually completely blocked by VEGF blockade, leading to marked accumulation of intraendothelial caveolae vesicles. VEGF blockade markedly increased thyroid endothelial cell apoptosis, and withdrawal of anti-VEGF resulted in full recovery of vascular density and architecture after 14 d. Prolonged anti-VEGF treatment resulted in a significant decrease of the circulating level of the predominant thyroid hormone free thyroxine, but not the minimal isoform of triiodothyronine, suggesting that chronic anti-VEGF treatment impairs thyroid functions. Conversely, VEGFR-1-specific blockade produced virtually no obvious phenotypes. These findings provide structural and functional bases of anti-VEGF-specific drug-induced side effects in relation to vascular changes in healthy tissues. Understanding anti-VEGF drug-induced vascular alterations in healthy tissues is crucial to minimize and even to avoid adverse effects produced by currently used anti-VEGF-specific drugs.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    National Academy of Sciences, 2013
    Keywords
    angiogenesis, antiangiogenic therapy, off-tumor targets, vascular homeostasis, vessel regression
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102114 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1301331110 (DOI)000322086100078 ()23818623 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2013-12-01 Created: 2013-12-01 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Opposing Effects of Circadian Clock Genes Bmal1 and Period2 in Regulation of VEGF-Dependent Angiogenesis in Developing Zebrafish
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Opposing Effects of Circadian Clock Genes Bmal1 and Period2 in Regulation of VEGF-Dependent Angiogenesis in Developing Zebrafish
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Cell Reports, ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 231-241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular mechanisms underlying circadian-regulated physiological processes remain largely unknown. Here, we show that disruption of the circadian clock by both constant exposure to light and genetic manipulation of key genes in zebrafish led to impaired developmental angiogenesis. A bmal1-specific morpholino inhibited developmental angiogenesis in zebrafish embryos without causing obvious nonvascular phenotypes. Conversely, a period2 morpholino accelerated angiogenic vessel growth, suggesting that Bmal1 and Period2 display opposing angiogenic effects. Using a promoter-reporter system consisting of various deleted vegf-promoter mutants, we show that Bmal1 directly binds to and activates the vegf promoter via E-boxes. Additionally, we provide evidence that knockdown of Bmal1 leads to impaired Notch-inhibition-induced vascular sprouting. These results shed mechanistic insight on the role of the circadian clock in regulation of developmental angiogenesis, and our findings may be reasonably extended to other types of physiological or pathological angiogenesis.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier (Cell Press), 2012
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-85304 (URN)10.1016/j.celrep.2012.07.005 (DOI)000309715100004 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council||Swedish Cancer Foundation||Karolinska Institute Foundation||Karolinska Institute||Tianjin Natural Science Foundation (CMM-Tianjin)|09ZCZDSF04400|Torsten Soderbergs Foundation||European Union|222741|European Research Council (ERC)|250021|

    Available from: 2012-11-16 Created: 2012-11-15 Last updated: 2017-03-27Bibliographically approved
  • 33.
    Cardemil, Carina
    et al.
    Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, NÄL Medical Centre Hospital, Trollhättan, Sweden; Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ristevski, Zoran
    Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, NÄL Medical Centre Hospital, Trollhättan, Sweden, and Department of Oral; Maxillofacial Surgery, Head & Neck Oncology Center, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Alsén, Bengt
    Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, NÄL Medical Centre Hospital, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Dahlin, Christer
    Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, NÄL Medical Centre Hospital, Trollhättan, Sweden; Department of Biomaterials Science, Institute for Surgical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Influence of different operatory setups on implant survival rate: a retrospective clinical study2009In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 288-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Surgery performed under sterile operating conditions, as well as atraumatic surgery, has been stated to be among the most important requirements for successful osseointegration. However, there are few reports concerning the sterile surgical technique in association with implant placement, and the appropriate level of operatory setup is not fully known.

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to analyze implant survival rate using a simplified surgical operatory setup compared with the use of the original Brånemark System (Nobel Biocare AB, Göteborg, Sweden) protocol.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 1,285 consecutively treated patients were included in the study. Four thousand implants were placed during the period of 1985 to 2003. Group A (using the Brånemark System protocol) comprised of 654 patients and 2,414 implants. Group B (using a simplified operatory setup) comprised of 631 patients and 1,586 implants. Healing was evaluated after 6 months of clinical function. Failure was defined as the removal of implants because of nonosseointegration. Statistic analysis was performed using t-test for paired data. The level of significance was set at 5% for comparison of data.

    RESULTS: No significant difference with regard to complications and implant survival rate was found in the study.

    CONCLUSION: The result from the present study suggests that a simplified operatory setup does not affect the survival rate of oral implant treatment.

  • 34.
    Carlander, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Energy based surgical instruments: With particular focus on collateral thermal injury2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Iatrogenic post-operative nerve dysfunction is a significant problem in many areas of surgery and can be caused by collateral thermal injury from activation of energy based surgical devices (EBD).

    The aims of this thesis were to: create an animal model in order to compare mono- and bipolar electrosurgery (ES) and an ultrasonic dissection (UD) with regard to collateral thermal nerve injury, and with data of a national multicenter register to study the use of EBD and their potential effects on operation time and complication rates in thyroid surgery.urgical devices (EBD).

    Material and Methods: The biceps femoris muscle of 104 anesthetized rats was cut in a standard manner adjacent to the sciatic nerve using clinical relevant settings of mono- and bipolar ES and UD. The sciatic nerve was stimulated supramaximally and the electromyographic (EMG) potential recorded before and after each experiment. Nerve dysfunction was defined as > 10% reduction of the evoked EMG potential. In Paper II and III temperature was measured before, during and after instrument activation. The sciatic nerves were coded and examined blinded with light (LM) and electron microscopy (EM). Advanced temperature measurements were conducted in Paper II and III. In Paper IV, the use of EBD was specifically registered in the Scandinavian Quality Register for Thyroid, Parathyroid and Adrenal Surgery (SQRTPA) during one year and 1297 patients were included. Operation time, recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury, post-operative hypoparathyroidism and the use of topical haemostatic agents were compared between bipolar ES, electric vessel sealing (EVS) and UD. Clamp and Tie technique (C-A-T) being without thermal risk constituted the control group.

    Results: In Paper I the EMG potential was significantly more frequent reduced in the monopolar and bipolar ES group compared to the UD group and LM showed significantly less nerve damage in the UD group. In Paper II exact temperature measurements was possible with thermoelectric micros sensors and the thermal dose was significantly less and with less variation for the UD compared to the bipolar ES. Similar to the Paper I the EMG potential was significantly more frequent reduced in the ES group. Moderate and severe morphological damage was significantly less common in the UD group compared to monopolar ES. We found no statistical correlation between the highest temperatures/doses and the degree of morphological damage or functional loss. In Paper III the temperature increase was significantly less and with shorter duration in the UD group, compared to bipolar ES. LM and EM demonstrated loss of density in the myelin sheet only in a small number of nerves in all groups after instrument activation 1 mm from the nerve.

    In Paper IV, operation time was significantly shorter in the UD group and significantly longer in the EVS and bipolar ES group, compared to C-A-T. Postoperative hypoparathyroidism with need for Calcium treatment at discharge and at 6 weeks was significantly higher with ES instruments compared to UD. The incidence of reported RLN injury was 2.5% at 6 weeks postoperatively without statistical differences between the groups. Topical haemostatic agents were more frequently used in the EBD groups compared to C-A-T.

    Conclusion: The experimental Papers (I-III) demonstrated a lower risk of adverse collateral thermal nerve injury with activation of the mechanical UD technique compared to ES techniques. In the nationwide multicenter register Paper (IV), the use of UD shortened end EVS increased operation time compared to the low cost C-A-T. The UD instruments had a lower risk of hypoparathyroidism than electrosurgery.

    List of papers
    1. Comparison of experimental nerve injury caused by ultrasonically activated scalpel and electrosurgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of experimental nerve injury caused by ultrasonically activated scalpel and electrosurgery
    Show others...
    2005 (English)In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 92, no 6, p. 772-777Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Iatrogenic nerve injury caused by heat from dissection instruments is a significant problem in many areas of surgery. The aim of the present study was to compare the risk of nerve injury for three different dissection instruments: monopolar and bipolar electrosurgery (ES) and an ultrasonically activated (US) instrument. Methods: The biceps femoris muscle was cut in a standard manner just adjacent to the sciatic nerve using monopolar ES, bipolar ES or US shears. A total of 73 functional experiments were conducted in which the nerve was isolated, divided proximally, and stimulated supramaximally in 37 anaesthetized rats. The electromyographic (EMG) potential was recorded distally before and after each experiment. Nerve dysfunction was defined as more than 10 per cent loss of the evoked EMG potential. Fifty-nine nerves were examined histologically after dissection with the different instruments. The extent of heat damage was determined in four nerves that were divided with ES bipolar scissors and five that were divided with US shears. Results: Reduction in the EMG potential was significantly more frequent in the monopolar ES group than in the US group. Morphological examination also showed significantly less nerve damage in the US group. Conclusion: US instruments may be safer than ES for dissection close to nerves. Copyright © 2005 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-30498 (URN)10.1002/bjs.4948 (DOI)16075 (Local ID)16075 (Archive number)16075 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Heat Production, Nerve Function, and Morphology following Nerve Close Dissection with Surgical Instruments
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heat Production, Nerve Function, and Morphology following Nerve Close Dissection with Surgical Instruments
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 1361-1367Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to compare an ultrasonically activated instrument (US), monopolar electrosurgery, and bipolar electrosurgery (ES) with respect to heat production, nerve function, and nerve morphology following in vivo application. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe biceps femoris muscle of anesthetized rats was cut in a standardized manner longitudinally 1 mm adjacent to the sciatic nerve using US shears, a monopolar ES knife, or a bipolar ES scissors. Activation time and temperature were recorded continuously within 1-4 mm of the activation site ipsilateral and contralateral to the nerve with two thermoelectric microsensors. Temperature rise and time delay of reaching the temperature maximum, as an expression of heat spread within tissue, maximum temperature, and thermal dose (equivalent time of exposure at 43A degrees C) were measured and calculated. A total of 49 functional experiments were conducted. The electromyographic (EMG) potential was recorded distally. Nerve dysfunction was defined as more than 10% loss of the evoked EMG amplitude. Forty-eight nerves were coded and submitted to blind histopathological examination, and morphological damage was graded on a 4-grade scale. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe maximum temperature elevation and the thermal dose were significantly higher for the bipolar ES compared with the US instrument ( = 0.024, = 0.049), and with much less variation of results for the US instrument. The monopolar ES maximum temperature and thermal dose were lower, but a very large variation occurred, probably as a result of more random electrical spread to the ground electrode and muscle motion artifacts. Functional loss was least common in the US group-without being significant-compared to bipolar and monopolar ES. Moderate and severe morphological damage was significantly less common in the US group than in the monopolar ES group ( = 0.041). We found no statistically significant correlation between the highest temperatures and the degree of morphological damage or functional loss less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe temperature elevation depends strongly on the distance to the activated instrument. The bipolar ES scissors generates a higher maximum temperature and thermal dose with a greater variation in than the US. Functional loss and severe morphological damage were uncommon in all groups.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Verlag (Germany), 2012
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78261 (URN)10.1007/s00268-012-1471-x (DOI)000304096800022 ()
    Note
    Funding Agencies|FORSS||Available from: 2012-06-08 Created: 2012-06-08 Last updated: 2018-04-25
    3. Risk of nerve injury after use of energy based surgical devices
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk of nerve injury after use of energy based surgical devices
    Show others...
    2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The use of energy based surgical devices (EBD) is well established in surgery. Iatrogenic nerve injury is a common problem in many areas of surgery and may be caused by collateral thermal injury from EBD.

    Methods

    The sciatic nerve of anaesthetized rats was used in an experimental model. A bipolar scissors (ES) was compared to an ultrasonic device (UD) by cutting the femoris muscle longitudinal during 3 seconds at 1 mm from the sciatic nerve. Temperature and electromyography (EMG) were recorded before, during and after activation of the devices. The nerves were examined blinded with light (LM) and electronic microscope (EM).

    Results

    The temperature increase was significantly less and with shorter duration after instrument activationfor the UD compared to bipolar ES. The EMG potential was reduced by 3 % in the UD group and 6% in the ES group respectively (n.s.). LM and EM demonstrated a loss of density in the myelin sheath in a small number of nerves in both groups.

    Conclusion

    This study indicates less thermal spread in tissue following activation of the ultrasonic devices compared to bipolar ES. EMG and morphology assessment with LM and EM indicate a small risk and probably reversible thermal injury after clinical relevant instrument activation at 1 mm from the nerve.

    Keywords
    Energy based devices, nerve injury, electron microscope
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122145 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-10-20 Created: 2015-10-20 Last updated: 2015-10-20Bibliographically approved
    4. Risk of Complications with Energy-Based Surgical Devices in Thyroid Surgery: A National Multicenter Register Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk of Complications with Energy-Based Surgical Devices in Thyroid Surgery: A National Multicenter Register Study
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Energy-based surgical devices (EBD) combining cutting and coagulation are increasingly used in thyroid surgery. However, there is a lack of information about potential benefits and risk of complications outside controlled trials. The aims of this national multicenter register study were to describe the use of EDB, their potential effect on complication rates, and on operation time.

    Materials and methods

    The Scandinavian Quality Register for Thyroid and Parathyroid surgery includes 35 surgical units in Sweden and covered 88 % of the thyroid procedures performed during 2008–2009. The use of the EBD was specifically registered for 12 months, and 1297 patients were included. Surgically related complications and operation time were evaluated. The clamp-and-tie group (C-A-T) constituted the control group for comparison with procedures where EBD was used.

    Results

    The thyroid procedures performed included C-A-T (16.6 %), bipolar electrosurgery (ES: 56.5 %), electronic vessel sealing (EVS: 12.2 %), and ultrasonic dissection (UD: 14.5 %). Mean operative time was longer with EVS (p < 0.001) and shorter with UD (p < 0.05) than in the other groups. The bipolar ES group and the EVS group had higher incidence of calcium treatment at discharge and after 6 weeks than the UD group. No significant difference in nerve injury was found between the groups. There was a significant more frequent use of topical hemostatic agents in the EBD group compared to C-A-T.

    Conclusion

    In this national multicenter study, the use of UD shortened and EVS increased operating time. There was a higher risk of calcium treatment at discharge and after 6 weeks after use of EVS and bipolar ES than after UD use. There was a significant more frequent use of topical hemostatic agents in the EBD groups compared to C-A-T.

    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122146 (URN)10.1007/s00268-015-3270-7 (DOI)000367465500015 ()26470699 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: FORSS (Forskningsradet i Sydostra Sverige)

    Available from: 2015-10-20 Created: 2015-10-20 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
  • 35.
    Carlander, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Surgery and Center for Clinical Research Uppsala University, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Defechereux, T
    Department of Endocrine Surgery, University Hospital CHU Sart-Tilman, Liege, Belgium.
    Koch, C
    Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Cheramy, JP.
    Department of animal laboratory, Liege, Belgium.
    Deprez, M.
    Department of Pathology, Liege University, Belgium.
    Johansson, K
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dept Surgery, Västervik Hospital, Sweden / Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Risk of nerve injury after use of energy based surgical devices2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The use of energy based surgical devices (EBD) is well established in surgery. Iatrogenic nerve injury is a common problem in many areas of surgery and may be caused by collateral thermal injury from EBD.

    Methods

    The sciatic nerve of anaesthetized rats was used in an experimental model. A bipolar scissors (ES) was compared to an ultrasonic device (UD) by cutting the femoris muscle longitudinal during 3 seconds at 1 mm from the sciatic nerve. Temperature and electromyography (EMG) were recorded before, during and after activation of the devices. The nerves were examined blinded with light (LM) and electronic microscope (EM).

    Results

    The temperature increase was significantly less and with shorter duration after instrument activationfor the UD compared to bipolar ES. The EMG potential was reduced by 3 % in the UD group and 6% in the ES group respectively (n.s.). LM and EM demonstrated a loss of density in the myelin sheath in a small number of nerves in both groups.

    Conclusion

    This study indicates less thermal spread in tissue following activation of the ultrasonic devices compared to bipolar ES. EMG and morphology assessment with LM and EM indicate a small risk and probably reversible thermal injury after clinical relevant instrument activation at 1 mm from the nerve.

  • 36.
    Carlander, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery and Center for Clinical Research Uppsala University.
    Wagner, Philippe
    Department of Surgery and Center for Clinical Research Uppsala University, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nordenström, Erik
    Department of Surgery, Lund University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jansson, Svante
    Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Department of Surgery and Center for Clinical Research Uppsala University, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Johansson, Kenth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department Surgery, Västervik Hospital, Västervik,Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Risk of Complications with Energy-Based Surgical Devices in Thyroid Surgery: A National Multicenter Register Study2016In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Energy-based surgical devices (EBD) combining cutting and coagulation are increasingly used in thyroid surgery. However, there is a lack of information about potential benefits and risk of complications outside controlled trials. The aims of this national multicenter register study were to describe the use of EDB, their potential effect on complication rates, and on operation time.

    Materials and methods

    The Scandinavian Quality Register for Thyroid and Parathyroid surgery includes 35 surgical units in Sweden and covered 88 % of the thyroid procedures performed during 2008–2009. The use of the EBD was specifically registered for 12 months, and 1297 patients were included. Surgically related complications and operation time were evaluated. The clamp-and-tie group (C-A-T) constituted the control group for comparison with procedures where EBD was used.

    Results

    The thyroid procedures performed included C-A-T (16.6 %), bipolar electrosurgery (ES: 56.5 %), electronic vessel sealing (EVS: 12.2 %), and ultrasonic dissection (UD: 14.5 %). Mean operative time was longer with EVS (p < 0.001) and shorter with UD (p < 0.05) than in the other groups. The bipolar ES group and the EVS group had higher incidence of calcium treatment at discharge and after 6 weeks than the UD group. No significant difference in nerve injury was found between the groups. There was a significant more frequent use of topical hemostatic agents in the EBD group compared to C-A-T.

    Conclusion

    In this national multicenter study, the use of UD shortened and EVS increased operating time. There was a higher risk of calcium treatment at discharge and after 6 weeks after use of EVS and bipolar ES than after UD use. There was a significant more frequent use of topical hemostatic agents in the EBD groups compared to C-A-T.

  • 37.
    Carlsson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Robotassisterad kirurgi ökar – trots osäker kostnadseffektivitet2016In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 113, no 48, p. 1-5Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Cervin, A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; NU Hospital Org, Sweden.
    Tjarnstrom, J.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; NU Hospital Org, Sweden.
    Ravn, H.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Lillebaelt Hospital, Denmark.
    Acosta, S.
    Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hultgren, R.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Welander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bjorck, M.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Treatment of Popliteal Aneurysm by Open and Endovascular Surgery: A Contemporary Study of 592 Procedures in Sweden2015In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 342-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS Previous comparisons between open and endovascular repair of popliteal aneurysms have focused on asymptomatic patients, and have short follow up. This study is strengthened by the fact that it is contemporary, population based, without any selection bias, reporting on all kinds of presentations, and has approximately 90% 1 year follow up data. It shows that endovascular repair has significantly inferior results compared with open repair, in particular in the group of patients who present with acute ischaemia. We believe these results will make many vascular surgeons think twice before they treat patients endovascularly in the future. Background: Popliteal aneurysm (PA) is traditionally treated by open repair (OR). Endovascular repair (ER) has become more common. The aim was to describe time trends and compare results (OR/ER). Methods: The Swedish vascular registry, Swedvasc, has a specific PA module. Data were collected (2008-2012) and supplemented with a specific protocol (response rate 99.1%). Data were compared with previously published data (1994-2002) from the same database. Results: The number of operations for PA was 15.7/million person-years (8.3 during 1994-2001). Of 592 interventions for PA (499 patients), 174 (29.4%) were treated for acute ischaemia, 13 (2.2%) for rupture, 105 (17.7%) for other symptoms, and 300 (50.7%) were asymptomatic (31.5% were treated for acute ischaemia, 1994-2002, p = .58). There were no differences in background characteristics between OR and ER in the acute ischaennia group. The symptomatic and asymptomatic groups treated with ER were older (p = .006, p less than .001). ER increased 3.6 fold (4.7% 1994-2002, 16.7% 2008-2012, p = .0001). Of those treated for acute ischaemia, a stent graft was used in 27 (16.4%). Secondary patency after ER was 70.4% at 30 days and 47.6% at 1 year, versus 93.1% and 86.8% after OR (p = .001, less than .001). The amputation rate at 30 days was 14.8% after ER, 3.7% after OR (p = .022), and 17.4% and 6.8% at 1 year (p = .098). A stent graft was used in 18.3% for asymptomatic PA. Secondary patency after ER was 94.5% at 30 days and 83.7% at 1 year, compared with 98.8% and 93.5% after OR (p = .043 and 0.026). OR was performed with vein graft in 87.6% (395/451), with better primary and secondary patency at 1 year than prosthetic grafts (p = .002 and less than .001), and with a posterior approach in 20.8% (121/581). Conclusions: The number of operations for PA doubled while the indications remained similar. ER patency was inferior to OR, especially after treatment for acute ischaemia, and the amputation risk tended to be higher, despite similar pre-operative characteristics. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of European Society for Vascular Surgery. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-SA license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/).

  • 39.
    Coster, Maria C.
    et al.
    SUS Malmö, Sweden.
    Nilsdotter, Anna
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Hospital, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Lund University, Sweden; Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Minimally important change, measurement error, and responsiveness for the Self-Reported Foot and Ankle Score2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 3, p. 300-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly used to evaluate results in orthopedic surgery. To enhance good responsiveness with a PROM, the minimally important change (MIC) should be established. MIC reflects the smallest measured change in score that is perceived as being relevant by the patients. We assessed MIC for the Self-reported Foot and Ankle Score (SEFAS) used in Swedish national registries. Patients and methods - Patients with forefoot disorders (n = 83) or hindfoot/ankle disorders (n = 80) completed the SEFAS before surgery and 6 months after surgery. At 6 months also, a patient global assessment (PGA) scaleas external criterionwas completed. Measurement error was expressed as the standard error of a single determination. MIC was calculated by (1) median change scores in improved patients on the PGA scale, and (2) the best cutoff point (BCP) and area under the curve (AUC) using analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs). Results - The change in mean summary score was the same, 9 (SD 9), in patients with forefoot disorders and in patients with hindfoot/ankle disorders. MIC for SEFAS in the total sample was 5 score points (IQR: 2-8) and the measurement error was 2.4. BCP was 5 and AUC was 0.8 (95% CI: 0.7-0.9). Interpretation - As previously shown, SEFAS has good responsiveness. The score change in SEFAS 6 months after surgery should exceed 5 score points in both forefoot patients and hindfoot/ankle patients to be considered as being clinically relevant.

  • 40.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Peterzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Impella Used for Hemostasis by Left Ventricular Unloading, in a Case With Left Ventricular Posterior Wall Rupture2008In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 85, no 4, p. 1445-1447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Left ventricle wall rupture is a feared complication in mitral valve surgery. We report a combined mitral valve anuloplasty and coronary artery bypass grafting procedure with severe, life-threatening bleeding complication due to left ventricular posterior wall rupture. The patient was successfully treated with a temporary left ventricular assist device to decompress the left ventricle in an attempt to minimize the bleeding, as the patient's condition did not allow standard repair of the left ventricle.

  • 41.
    Di Saverio, Salomone
    et al.
    AUSL, Italy.
    Birindelli, Arianna
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Kelly, Micheal D.
    Canberra Hospital, Australia.
    Catena, Fausto
    Maggiore Hospital Parma, Italy.
    Weber, Dieter G.
    Trauma and Gen Surgeon Royal Perth Hospital, Australia; University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Sartelli, Massimo
    Macerata Hospital, Italy.
    Sugrue, Michael
    Letterkenny Hospital, Ireland.
    De Moya, Mark
    Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Augusto Gomes, Carlos
    University of Gen Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Bhangu, Aneel
    University Hospital Birmingham NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Agresta, Ferdinando
    Civil Hospital, Italy.
    Moore, Ernest E.
    Denver Health Medical Centre, CO USA.
    Soreide, Kjetil
    Stavanger University Hospital, Norway.
    Griffiths, Ewen
    University Hospital Birmingham NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    De Castro, Steve
    OLVG, Netherlands.
    Kashuk, Jeffry
    University of Jerusalem, Israel.
    Kluger, Yoram
    Rambam Health Care Campus, Israel.
    Leppaniemi, Ari
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Ansaloni, Luca
    Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Italy.
    Andersson, Manne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Coccolini, Federico
    Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Italy.
    Coimbra, Raul
    UCSD Health Syst, CA USA.
    Gurusamy, Kurinchi S.
    UCL, England.
    Cesare Campanile, Fabio
    San Giovanni Decollato Andosilla Hospital, Italy.
    Biffl, Walter
    University of Hawaii, HI USA.
    Chiara, Osvaldo
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Italy.
    Moore, Fred
    University of Florida, FL USA.
    Peitzman, Andrew B.
    University of Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Fraga, Gustavo P.
    University of Estadual Campinas, Brazil.
    Costa, David
    Alicante, Spain.
    Maier, Ronald V.
    University of Washington, WA USA.
    Rizoli, Sandro
    St Michaels Hospital, Canada.
    Balogh, Zsolt J.
    John Hunter Hospital, Australia.
    Bendinelli, Cino
    John Hunter Hospital, Australia.
    Cirocchi, Roberto
    University of Perugia, Italy.
    Tonini, Valeria
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Piccinini, Alice
    AUSL, Italy.
    Tugnoli, Gregorio
    AUSL, Italy.
    Jovine, Elio
    AUSL, Italy.
    Persiani, Roberto
    Catholic University, Italy.
    Biondi, Antonio
    University of Catania, Italy.
    Scalea, Thomas
    R Adams Cowley Trauma Centre, MD USA.
    Stahel, Philip
    Denver Health Medical Centre, CO USA.
    Ivatury, Rao
    Virginia Commonwealth University, VA USA.
    Velmahos, George
    Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    WSES Jerusalem guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis2016In: World Journal of Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1749-7922, E-ISSN 1749-7922, Vol. 11, no 34Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute appendicitis (AA) is among the most common cause of acute abdominal pain. Diagnosis of AA is challenging; a variable combination of clinical signs and symptoms has been used together with laboratory findings in several scoring systems proposed for suggesting the probability of AA and the possible subsequent management pathway. The role of imaging in the diagnosis of AA is still debated, with variable use of US, CT and MRI in different settings worldwide. Up to date, comprehensive clinical guidelines for diagnosis and management of AA have never been issued. In July 2015, during the 3rd World Congress of the WSES, held in Jerusalem (Israel), a panel of experts including an Organizational Committee and Scientific Committee and Scientific Secretariat, participated to a Consensus Conference where eight panelists presented a number of statements developed for each of the eight main questions about diagnosis and management of AA. The statements were then voted, eventually modified and finally approved by the participants to The Consensus Conference and lately by the board of co-authors. The current paper is reporting the definitive Guidelines Statements on each of the following topics: 1) Diagnostic efficiency of clinical scoring systems, 2) Role of Imaging, 3) Non-operative treatment for uncomplicated appendicitis, 4) Timing of appendectomy and in-hospital delay, 5) Surgical treatment 6) Scoring systems for intra-operative grading of appendicitis and their clinical usefulness 7) Non-surgical treatment for complicated appendicitis: abscess or phlegmon 8) Pre-operative and post-operative antibiotics.

  • 42.
    Dillström, Maria
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjerså, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engström, My
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Patients' experience of acute unplanned surgical reoperation.2017In: Journal of Surgical Research, ISSN 0022-4804, E-ISSN 1095-8673, Vol. 209, p. 199-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Undergoing surgery always involves various risks of complications, often depending on the type of surgery. Because of complications, a second surgical intervention, a reoperation, must occasionally be done, which in turn often causes an extended hospital stay, a longer recovery phase, greater suffering for the patient, and higher health care costs. Even though complications after general surgery are relatively common, little is known regarding patient experience of a reoperation. Knowledge of this could impact on care models in the future. The aim of this study was to describe patients' experience of acute, unplanned reoperation during a planned hospital stay.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A purposive sampling strategy was used, and 16 patients were included, all who had undergone acute unplanned reoperation during a planned hospital stay. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data, and a content analysis with an inductive approach was used for data analysis.

    RESULTS: The analysis resulted in two main themes: (1) health professionals' importance, having its foundation in categories trust and information, and (2) reaction, based on the categories anxiety and sadness.

    CONCLUSIONS: Unplanned reoperation caused psychological, social, and existential reactions. Health care professionals were perceived as important because good communication, accurate information, their presence, and creating feelings of confident and safe care were meaningful factors for the patients as they managed the situation.

  • 43.
    Divanoglou, A
    et al.
    Division of Neuro-rehabilitation, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Seiger, A
    Division of Neuro-rehabilitation, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Levi, Richard
    Division of Neuro-rehabilitation, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Acute management of traumatic spinal cord injury in a Greek and a Swedish region: a prospective, population-based study2010In: Spinal Cord, ISSN 1362-4393, E-ISSN 1476-5624, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 477-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study design: Prospective, population-based study. This paper is part of the Stockholm Thessaloniki Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Study (STATSCIS).andlt;br /andgt;Objectives: To characterize patient populations and to compare acute management after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI).andlt;br /andgt;Settings: The Greater Thessaloniki region in Greece and the Greater Stockholm region in Sweden.andlt;br /andgt;Methods: Inception cohorts with acute TSCI that were hospitalized during the study period, that is September 2006 to October 2007, were identified. Overall, 81 out of 87 cases consented to inclusion in Thessaloniki and 47 out of 49 in Stockholm. Data from Thessaloniki were collected through physical examinations, medical record reviews and communication with TSCI cases and medical teams. Data from Stockholm were retrieved from the Nordic Spinal Cord Injury Registry.andlt;br /andgt;Results: There were no significant differences between study groups with regard to core clinical characteristics. In contrast, there were significant differences in (1) transfer logistics from the scene of trauma to a tertiary-level hospital (number of intermediate admissions, modes of transportation and duration of transfer) and (2) acute key therapeutic interventions, that is, the use of mechanical ventilation (49% in Thessaloniki versus 20% in Stockholm), and performance of tracheostomy (36% in Thessaloniki versus 15% in Stockholm); spinal surgery was performed significantly more often and earlier in Stockholm than in Thessaloniki.andlt;br /andgt;Conclusions: Despite largely similar core clinical characteristics, Stockholm and Thessaloniki cases underwent significantly different acute management, most probably to be attributed to adaptations to the differing regional approaches of care one following a systematic approach of SCI care and the other not. Spinal Cord (2010) 48, 477-482; doi: andlt;highlightandgt;10.1038andlt;/highlightandgt;/andlt;highlightandgt;scandlt;/highlightandgt;.andlt;highlightandgt;2009.160andlt;/highlightandgt;; published online 22 December 2009

  • 44.
    Djerf, K
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Edholm, P
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Hedbrant, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A simplified roentgen stereophotogrammetric method. Analysis of small movements between the prosthetic stem and the femur after total hip replacement.1987In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 603-606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simplified roentgen stereophotogrammetric method is described. It is based on the use of a 50 mm thick reference plate consisting of a carbon-fibre-reinforced polyester box. The patient is placed directly on this box, which makes the methods less cumbersome and more suitable for routine use. The method has been tested in a model experiment designed for detecting small movements between femur and prosthesis at an early stage after total hip replacement. The head and two hemispheres on the prosthesis and three small tantalum balls inserted in the femur serve as reference points. The model experiment now reported shows that the method has acceptable precision.

  • 45.
    Ekholm, Maria
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Bendahl, Par-Ola
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Two Years of Adjuvant Tamoxifen Provides a Survival Benefit Compared With No Systemic Treatment in Premenopausal Patients With Primary Breast Cancer: Long-Term Follow-Up (> 25 years) of the Phase III SBII:2pre Trial2016In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 34, no 19, p. 2232-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effect of 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen compared with no systemic treatment (control) in premenopausal patients with breast cancer over different time periods through long-term (amp;gt; 25 years) follow-up. Patients and Methods Premenopausal patients with primary breast cancer (N = 564) were randomly assigned to 2 years of tamoxifen (n = 276) or no systemic treatment (n = 288). Data regarding date and cause of death were obtained from the Swedish Cause of Death Register. End points were cumulative mortality (CM) and cumulative breast cancer-related mortality (CBCM). The median follow-up for the 250 patients still alive in April 2014 was 26.3 years (range, 22.7 to 29.7 years). Results In patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors (n = 362), tamoxifen was associated with a marginal reduction in CM (hazard ratio [HR], 0.77; 95% CI, 0.58 to 1.03; P = .075) and a significant reduction in CBCM (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.99; P = .046). The effect seemed to vary over time (CM years 0 to 5: HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.73; years amp;gt;5 to 15: HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.91; and after 15 years: HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.42; CBCM years 0 to 5: HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.82; years amp;gt;5 to 15: HR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.86; and after 15 years: HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.36 to 1.44). Conclusion Two years of adjuvant tamoxifen resulted in a long-term survival benefit in premenopausal patients with estrogen receptor-positive primary breast cancer. (C) 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

  • 46.
    Elawa, Sherif
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Intestinal obstruction following harvest of VRAM-flap for reconstruction of a large perineal defect2015In: Case Reports in Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2332-0885, Vol. 2, no 3-4, p. 88-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A patient with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum was operated with abdominoperineal resection and perineal reconstruction with a vertical rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. Six days postoperatively, there was herniation of the small bowel, between the anterior and posterior rectus sheaths, to a subcutaneous location.

  • 47.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abbas, A.H.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, O.A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nagi, M.A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Scald management protocols - outcome differences in two different time periods using different treatment strategies.2016In: Annals of burns and fire disasters, ISSN 1592-9558, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 139-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the years the treatment of scalds in our centre has changed, moving more towards the use of biological dressings (xenografts). Management of scalds with mid dermal or deep dermal injuries differs among centers using different types of dressings, and recently biological membrane dressings were recommended for this type of injury. Here we describe differences in treatment outcome in different periods of time. All patients with scalds who presented to the Linkoping Burn Centre during two periods, early (1997-98) and later (2010-12) were included. Data were collected in the unit database and analyzed retrospectively. A lower proportion of autograft operations was found in the later period, falling from 32% to 19%. Hospital stay was shorter in the later period (3.5 days shorter, p=0.01) and adjusted duration of hospital stay/TBSA% was shorter (1.2 to 0.7, p=0.07). The two study groups were similar in most of the studied variables: we could not report any significant differences regarding outcome except for unadjusted duration of hospital stay. Further studies are required to investigate functional and aesthetic outcome differences between the treatment modalities.

  • 48.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Staged excisions of moderate-sized burns compared with total excision with immediate autograft: an evaluation of two strategies.2017In: International journal of burns and trauma, ISSN 2160-2026, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Different surgical techniques have evolved since excision and autografting became the treatment of choice for deep burns in the 1970s. The treatment plan at the Burn Center, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden, has shifted from single-stage excision and immediate autografting to staged excisions and temporary cover with xenografts before autografting. The aim of this study was to find out if the change in policy resulted in extended duration of hospital stay/total body surface area burned (LOS/TBSA%).

    METHODS: Retrospective clinical cohort including surgically-managed patients with burns of 15%-60% TBSA% within each treatment group. The first had early full excisions of deep dermal and full thickness burns and immediate autografts (1997-98), excision and immediate autograft group) and the second had staged excisions before final autografts using xenografts for temporary cover (2010-11, staged excision group).

    RESULTS: The study included 57 patients with deep dermal and full-thickness burns, 28 of whom had excision and immediate autografting, and 29 of whom had staged excisions with xenografting before final autografting. Adjusted (LOS/TBSA%) was close to 1, and did not differ between groups. Mean operating time for the staged excision group was shorter and the excised area/operation was smaller. The total operating time/TBSA% did not differ between groups.

    CONCLUSION: Staged excisions with temporary cover did not affect adjusted LOS/TBSA% or total operating time. Staged excisions may be thought to be more expensive because of the cost of covering the wound between stages, but this needs to be further investigated as do the factors that predict long term outcome.

  • 49.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abbas, A.H.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, O.A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Temporary coverage of burns with a xenograft and sequential excision, compared with total early excision and autograft2016In: Annals of burns and fire disasters, ISSN 1592-9558, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 196-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 80s and 90s, early and total excision of full thickness burns followed by immediate autograft was the most common treatment, with repeated excision and grafting, mostly for failed grafts. It was hypothesized, therefore, that delayed coverage with an autograft preceded by a temporary xenograft after early and sequential smaller excisions would lead to a better wound bed with fewer failed grafts, a smaller donor site, and possibly also a shorter duration of stay in hospital. We carried out a case control study with retrospective analysis from our National Burn Centre registry for the period 1997-2011. Patients who had been managed with early total excision and autograft were compared with those who had had sequential smaller excisions covered with temporary xenografts until the burn was ready for the final autograft. The sequential excision and xenograft group (n=42) required one-third fewer autografts than patients in the total excision and autograft group (n=45), who needed more than one operation (p<0.001). We could not detect any differences in duration of stay in hospital / total body surface area burned% (duration of stay/TBSA%) (2.0 and 1.8) (p=0.83). The two groups showed no major differences in terms of adjusted duration of stay, but our findings suggest that doing early, smaller, sequential excisions using a xenograft for temporary cover can result in shorter operating times, saving us the trouble of making big excisions. However, costs tended to be higher when the burns were > 25% TBSA.

  • 50.
    Eneling, Johanna
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Karlsson, Per M.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Rossitti, Sandro
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sphenopalatine arteriovenous fistula complicating transsphenoidal pituitary surgery: A rare cause of delayed epistaxis treatable by endovascular embolization.2016In: Surgical Neurology International, ISSN 2152-7806, E-ISSN 2152-7806, Vol. 7, no Suppl 41, p. S1053-S1056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Vascular injuries in transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas are uncommon but can result in serious disability or death.

    CASE DESCRIPTION:

    A 46-year-old man, who underwent resection of a pituitary adenoma with suprasellar extension via a transsphenoidal approach, presented with massive epistaxis five days postoperatively. Angiography revealed an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) between the right sphenopalatine artery and a deep vein draining to the right internal jugular vein, as well as contrast agent extravasation at the fistula point. The AVF was catheterized and successfully occluded with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Transsphenoidal pituitary surgery can be complicated by massive epistaxis from a lesion of a small branch of the external carotid artery. Airway protection through intubation and investigation with conventional digital subtraction angiography is recommended. The treatment of choice is endovascular embolization because it can be done immediately at the angiography suite.

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