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  • 1.
    Adeback, Petra
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Schulman, Abbe
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Doris
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Children exposed to a natural disaster: psychological consequences eight years after 2004 tsunami2018In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 75-81Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a need for studies that follow up children and adolescents for many years post disaster since earlier studies have shown that exposure during natural disasters constitutes a risk factor for poor psychological health.Aims: The main aim was to examine whether there was an association between severity of exposures during a natural disaster experienced in childhood or adolescence and posttraumatic stress symptoms, psychological distress, self-rated health, diagnosis of depression, anxiety or worry, thoughts about or attempted suicide, physical symptoms or daily functioning eight years later in young adulthood. A second aim was to compare psychological distress and self-rated health of exposed young adults with a matched population-based sample.Method: Young adults, who experienced the 2004 tsunami as children between 10 and 15 years of age, responded to a questionnaire eight years post disaster. The results were compared to a matched population sample.Results: The results showed that the likelihood for negative psychological outcomes was higher for those who had been exposed to several types of exposures during this natural disaster.Conclusions: The negative psychological impact on children and adolescents can still be present eight years post-disaster and seems to have association with the type of exposure; loss, physical presence and subjective experience. It is important for clinicians, who meet young adults seeking help, to be conscious about the impact as long as eight years post disaster and to be aware of possible clinical implications associated with severity of exposures.

  • 2.
    Afzelius, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Ostman, Margareta
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Råstam, Maria
    Lund University, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Lund University, Sweden.
    Parents in adult psychiatric care and their children: a call for more interagency collaboration with social services and child and adolescent psychiatry2018In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 31-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A parental mental illness affects all family members and should warrant a need for support.Aim: To investigate the extent to which psychiatric patients with underage children are the recipients of child-focused interventions and involved in interagency collaboration.Methods: Data were retrieved from a psychiatric services medical record database consisting of data regarding 29,972 individuals in southern Sweden and indicating the patients main diagnoses, comorbidity, children below the age of 18, and child-focused interventions.Results: Among the patients surveyed, 12.9% had registered underage children. One-fourth of the patients received child-focused interventions from adult psychiatry, and out of these 30.7% were involved in interagency collaboration as compared to 7.7% without child-focused interventions. Overall, collaboration with child and adolescent psychiatric services was low for all main diagnoses. If a patient received child-focused interventions from psychiatric services, the likelihood of being involved in interagency collaboration was five times greater as compared to patients receiving no child-focused intervention when controlled for gender, main diagnosis, and inpatient care.Conclusions: Psychiatric services play a significant role in identifying the need for and initiating child-focused interventions in families with a parental mental illness, and need to develop and support strategies to enhance interagency collaboration with other welfare services.

  • 3.
    Agnafors, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Västra Götalandsregionen, Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken.
    A Biopsychosocial and Long Term Perspective on Child Behavioral Problems: Impact of Risk and Resilience2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health has become a prominent issue in society. Yet, much remains unknown about the etiology of psychiatric disorders. The aim of the present thesis was to investigate the association between biological, psychological and social factors of risk and resilience and behavioral problems in a birth cohort of Swedish children. 1723 mothers and their children were followed from birth to the age of 12 as part of the South East Sweden Birth Cohort Study (the SESBiC study). Information was gathered through register data, standardized questionnaires and DNA samples.

    In study I, stability of maternal symptoms of depression and the impact on child behavior at age 12 were investigated. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was found to be 12.0 % postpartum. Symptoms of postpartum depression significantly increased the risk for subsequent depressive symptoms 12 years later in women. Children whose mothers reported concurrent symptoms of depression and anxiety had an increased risk for both internalizing and externalizing problems at age 12, but no long term effect on child behavior was seen for postpartum depressive symptoms. The greatest risk was seen for children whose mothers reported symptoms of depression on both occasions. In study II, the impact of gene-environment interaction of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met and experience of life events together with symptoms of maternal depression and anxiety on child behavior at age 12 was studied. A main effect of 5-HTTLPR was noticed, but no geneenvironment effects were shown. Similarly to study I, concurrent symptoms of maternal depression and anxiety were an important predictor of child behavioral problems. A high degree of psychosocial stress around childbirth was found to have long lasting detrimental effects on child behavior, increasing the risk for internalizing problems at age 12. Study III investigated the impact of geneenvironment interactions of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met and life events together with symptoms of maternal depression and birth characteristics on behavioral problems at age 3. Symptoms of postpartum depression were found to predict internalizing as well as externalizing problems in children three years later. Child experience of life events was a stable predictor of behavioral problems across the scales similar to sociodemographic factors such as parental immigration status and unemployment. No gene-environment interaction effects of 5-HTTLPR or BDNF Val66Met were shown. Study IV used the risk factors identified in studies I-III to investigate factors of resilience to behavioral problems at age 12. The l/l genotype of 5-HTTLPR was associated with a lower risk for behavioral problems at age 12, especially for children facing low adversity. Good social functioning was found to be a general resource factor, independent of the level of risk, while an easy temperament was associated with resilience for children with a high degree of adversity. However, effect sizes were small.

    In summary, the results from the present thesis emphasize the importance of maternal mental health and sociodemographic factors for child mental health at ages 3 and 12, which must be taken into account in clinical settings. Moreover, it adds to the null-findings of the gene-environment effect of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met on behavioral problems in children, but indicates a main effect of 5-HTTLPR on internalizing symptoms at age 12.

    List of papers
    1. Symptoms of Depression Postpartum and 12 years Later-Associations to Child Mental Health at 12 years of Age
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptoms of Depression Postpartum and 12 years Later-Associations to Child Mental Health at 12 years of Age
    2013 (English)In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, ISSN 1092-7875, E-ISSN 1573-6628, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 405-414Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Children of depressed mothers have been shown to express behaviour problems to a greater extent than children of non-depressed mothers. The purpose of this study was to examine the persistence of depressive symptoms in mothers and to evaluate the relative importance of symptoms of postpartum depression (PPD) and concurrent maternal symptoms of depression, on child behaviour at age 12. A birth cohort of 1,707 children and their mothers was followed from 3 months after birth to 12 years after birth. Self-reported symptoms of depression in mothers were assessed at baseline and 12-year follow-up where 893 mothers (52.3 %) and their children participated. The mothers reports on the behaviour of their children at age 12 were used. Multivariate analysis was used to assess factors that increased the risk of child behaviour problems. At baseline, 10.4 % scored above the cutoff for symptoms of postpartum depression. At follow up, 18.2 % scored above the cutoff for depressive symptoms. Multivariate analysis showed that ongoing maternal symptoms of depression, as distinct from PPD-symptoms, was the strongest predictor of child behaviour problems at age 12. The gender of the child and socio-demographic factors at baseline were additional factors that affected the risk of behaviour problems in the 12 year old children. Children of mothers who reported symptoms of depression, both postpartum and at follow-up, were at a greater risk of behaviour problems compared to children of women with no depressive symptoms on either occasion. Our findings indicate that recurrent and ongoing maternal depressive symptoms significantly increase the risk of child behaviour problems as reported by mothers, while symptoms of PPD do not seem to result in an increased risk of behaviour problems in 12 year olds. High maternal socio-demographic life stress at childbirth constitutes an important risk factor for later child behaviour problems.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Verlag (Germany), 2013
    Keywords
    CBCL, Children, Mental health, Postpartum depression, SESBiC-study
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-90750 (URN)10.1007/s10995-012-0985-z (DOI)000316021200003 ()
    Available from: 2013-04-05 Created: 2013-04-05 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Effect of gene, environment and maternal depressive symptoms on pre-adolescence behavior problems - a longitudinal study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of gene, environment and maternal depressive symptoms on pre-adolescence behavior problems - a longitudinal study.
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, ISSN 1753-2000, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 10-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a common and disabling condition with a high relapse frequency. Maternal mental health problems and experience of traumatic life events are known to increase the risk of behavior problems in children. Recently, genetic factors, in particular gene-by-environment interaction models, have been implicated to explain depressive etiology. However, results are inconclusive.

    METHODS: Study participants were members of the SESBiC-study. A total of 889 mothers and their children were followed during the child's age of 3 months to 12 years. Information on maternal depressive symptoms was gathered postpartum and at a 12 year follow-up. Mothers reported on child behavior and traumatic life events experienced by the child at age 12. Saliva samples were obtained from children for analysis of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms.

    RESULTS: Multivariate analysis showed a significant association between maternal symptoms of depression and anxiety, and internalizing problems in 12-year-old children (OR 5.72, 95% CI 3.30-9.91). Furthermore, carriers of two short alleles (s/s) of the 5-HTTLPR showed a more than 4-fold increased risk of internalizing problems at age 12 compared to l/l carriers (OR 4.73, 95% CI 2.14-10.48). No gene-by-environment interaction was found and neither depressive symptoms postpartum or traumatic experiences during childhood stayed significant in the final model.

    CONCLUSIONS: Concurrent maternal symptoms of depression and anxiety are significant risk factors for behavior problems in children, which need to be taken into account in clinical practice. Furthermore, we found a main effect of 5-HTTLPR on internalizing symptoms in 12-year-old children, a finding that needs to be confirmed in future studies.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2013
    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104869 (URN)10.1186/1753-2000-7-10 (DOI)23518193 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-02-28 Created: 2014-02-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Early predictors of behavioural problems in pre-schoolers: a longitudinal study of constitutional and environmental main and interaction effects
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early predictors of behavioural problems in pre-schoolers: a longitudinal study of constitutional and environmental main and interaction effects
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The early environment is important for child development and wellbeing. Gene-by-environment studies investigating the impact of the serotonin transporter genelinked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphisms by life events on mental health and behaviour problems have been inconclusive. Methodological differences regarding sample sizes, study population, definitions of adversities and measures of mental health problems obstacle their comparability. Furthermore, very few studies included children. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between a broad range of risk factors covering pregnancy and birth, genetic polymorphism, experience of multiple life events and psychosocial environment, and child behaviour at age three, using a comparably large, representative, population-based sample.

    Methods: A total of 1,106 children, and their mothers, were followed from pregnancy to age three. Information on pregnancy and birth-related factors was retrieved from the Medical Birth Register. Questionnaires on depressive symptoms, child behaviour and child experiences of life events were filled in by the mothers. Child saliva samples were used for genotyping the 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate the association between psychological scales and genetic polymorphisms.

    Results: Symptoms of postpartum depression increased the risk of both internalizing and externalizing problems. Experience of multiple life events was also a predictor of behavioural problems across the scales. No gene-by-environment or gene-bygene-by-environment interactions were found. Children of immigrants had an increased risk of internalizing problems and parental unemployment was significantly associated with both internalizing and externalizing type of problems.

    Conclusion: This study shows the importance of the psychosocial environment for psychosocial health in preschool children, and adds to  the literature of null-findings of gene-by-environment effects of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF in children

    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124207 (URN)10.1186/s12887-016-0614-x (DOI)000377535800002 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies:Funding was obtained from the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (FAS), the Swedish Research Council (VR), the Clas Groschinsky Memorial Foundation, Stockholm, Samariten Foundation, Stockholm, the Hallsten Research Foundation and ALF, County Council of Ostergotland.

    Vid tiden för publicering förelåg publikationen endast som manuskript

    Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-22 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
    4. A biopsychosocial approach to risk and resilience on behavior in children followed from birth to age twelve
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A biopsychosocial approach to risk and resilience on behavior in children followed from birth to age twelve
    Show others...
    2016 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing prevalence of mental health problems calls for more knowledge into factors associated with resilience in the context of child behavior. Biological factors are seldom considered in psychosocial models of resilience. The present study used multiple statistical methodologies to examine a biopsychosocial model of risk and resilience on behavior at preadolescence. Data from 889 children and their mothers were used. A cumulative adversity score was created by combining maternal symptoms of depression, psychosocial risk and children’s experiences of life events. The proposed resilience factors investigated were candidate genetic polymorphisms, child temperament and social functioning, and maternal sense of coherence. Results show that the l/l genotype of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) was associated with lower internalizing scores, especially for children exposed to low adversity. An easy temperament was associated with resilient outcomes for children exposed to high adversity. Child social functioning was found to be more of a general resource variable buffering risk in both high and low adversity groups. The results support a multiple level model of resilience indicating effects, though small, of both biological and psychosocial factors. The present findings call for both preventive actions and further studies on biopsychosocial models in resilience research.

    Keywords
    Child, genotype, longitudinal, mental health, resilience
    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124208 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-22 Last updated: 2016-01-22Bibliographically approved
  • 4.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Comasco, Erika
    Division of Pharmacology, Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Dekeyser, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Oreland, Lars
    Division of Pharmacology, Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effect of gene, environment and maternal depressive symptoms on pre-adolescence behavior problems - a longitudinal study.2013In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, ISSN 1753-2000, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 10-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a common and disabling condition with a high relapse frequency. Maternal mental health problems and experience of traumatic life events are known to increase the risk of behavior problems in children. Recently, genetic factors, in particular gene-by-environment interaction models, have been implicated to explain depressive etiology. However, results are inconclusive.

    METHODS: Study participants were members of the SESBiC-study. A total of 889 mothers and their children were followed during the child's age of 3 months to 12 years. Information on maternal depressive symptoms was gathered postpartum and at a 12 year follow-up. Mothers reported on child behavior and traumatic life events experienced by the child at age 12. Saliva samples were obtained from children for analysis of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms.

    RESULTS: Multivariate analysis showed a significant association between maternal symptoms of depression and anxiety, and internalizing problems in 12-year-old children (OR 5.72, 95% CI 3.30-9.91). Furthermore, carriers of two short alleles (s/s) of the 5-HTTLPR showed a more than 4-fold increased risk of internalizing problems at age 12 compared to l/l carriers (OR 4.73, 95% CI 2.14-10.48). No gene-by-environment interaction was found and neither depressive symptoms postpartum or traumatic experiences during childhood stayed significant in the final model.

    CONCLUSIONS: Concurrent maternal symptoms of depression and anxiety are significant risk factors for behavior problems in children, which need to be taken into account in clinical practice. Furthermore, we found a main effect of 5-HTTLPR on internalizing symptoms in 12-year-old children, a finding that needs to be confirmed in future studies.

  • 5.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Comasco, Erika
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A Biopsychosocial Approach to Risk and Resilience on Behavior in Children Followed from Birth to Age 122017In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 584-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing prevalence of mental health problems calls for more knowledge into factors associated with resilience. The present study used multiple statistical methodologies to examine a biopsychosocial model of risk and resilience on preadolescence behavior. Data from 889 children and mothers from a birth cohort were used. An adversity score was created by combining maternal symptoms of depression, psychosocial risk and childrens experiences of life events. The proposed resilience factors investigated were candidate genetic polymorphisms, child temperament, social functioning, and maternal sense of coherence. The l/ l genotype of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region was associated with lower internalizing scores, but not mainly related to the level of adversity. An easy temperament was associated with resilience for children exposed to high adversity. Social functioning was found to be promotive independent of the risk level. The results support a multiple-level model of resilience indicating effects, though small, of both biological and psychosocial factors.

  • 6.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Oreland, Lars
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Comasco, Erika
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A biopsychosocial approach to risk and resilience on behavior in children followed from birth to age twelve2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing prevalence of mental health problems calls for more knowledge into factors associated with resilience in the context of child behavior. Biological factors are seldom considered in psychosocial models of resilience. The present study used multiple statistical methodologies to examine a biopsychosocial model of risk and resilience on behavior at preadolescence. Data from 889 children and their mothers were used. A cumulative adversity score was created by combining maternal symptoms of depression, psychosocial risk and children’s experiences of life events. The proposed resilience factors investigated were candidate genetic polymorphisms, child temperament and social functioning, and maternal sense of coherence. Results show that the l/l genotype of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) was associated with lower internalizing scores, especially for children exposed to low adversity. An easy temperament was associated with resilient outcomes for children exposed to high adversity. Child social functioning was found to be more of a general resource variable buffering risk in both high and low adversity groups. The results support a multiple level model of resilience indicating effects, though small, of both biological and psychosocial factors. The present findings call for both preventive actions and further studies on biopsychosocial models in resilience research.

  • 7.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Comasco, Erika
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Oreland, Lars
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Early predictors of behavioural problems in pre-schoolers: a longitudinal study of constitutional and environmental main and interaction effects2016In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The early environment is important for child development and wellbeing. Gene-by-environment studies investigating the impact of the serotonin transporter genelinked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphisms by life events on mental health and behaviour problems have been inconclusive. Methodological differences regarding sample sizes, study population, definitions of adversities and measures of mental health problems obstacle their comparability. Furthermore, very few studies included children. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between a broad range of risk factors covering pregnancy and birth, genetic polymorphism, experience of multiple life events and psychosocial environment, and child behaviour at age three, using a comparably large, representative, population-based sample.

    Methods: A total of 1,106 children, and their mothers, were followed from pregnancy to age three. Information on pregnancy and birth-related factors was retrieved from the Medical Birth Register. Questionnaires on depressive symptoms, child behaviour and child experiences of life events were filled in by the mothers. Child saliva samples were used for genotyping the 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate the association between psychological scales and genetic polymorphisms.

    Results: Symptoms of postpartum depression increased the risk of both internalizing and externalizing problems. Experience of multiple life events was also a predictor of behavioural problems across the scales. No gene-by-environment or gene-bygene-by-environment interactions were found. Children of immigrants had an increased risk of internalizing problems and parental unemployment was significantly associated with both internalizing and externalizing type of problems.

    Conclusion: This study shows the importance of the psychosocial environment for psychosocial health in preschool children, and adds to  the literature of null-findings of gene-by-environment effects of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF in children

  • 8.
    Aho, Nikolas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Victimization, Prevalence, Health and Peritraumatic Reactions in Swedish Adolescents2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis was to expand the knowledge of victimization in children and youth in Sweden. Victimization, prevalence, health and peritraumatic reactions were explored in a cross sectional, representative sample of 5,960 second grade high school students in Sweden. A computerized survey was developed and administered in class room setting.

    Lifetime victimization was found in 84.1% of the sample (m=83.0%, f=85.2%), and, in relation to the five domains, 66.4% had experienced conventional crime, 24% child maltreatment, 54.4% peer and sibling victimization, 21.8% sexual victimization, and 54% had experienced witness victimization. Females experienced significantly more child maltreatment, peer and sibling victimization, sexual victimization, and witnessed victimization, males more conventional crime (p<0.001). Using logistic regression risk factors for victimization were confirmed by a significant increase OR regarding gender, environment and lack of both parents.

    Symptoms (TSCC), were clearly associated with both victimizations per se and the number of victimizations. The results indicated a relatively linear increase in symptoms with an increase in number of events experienced. Mental health of the polyvictimized group was significantly worse than that of the non-polyvictimized group, with significantly elevated TSCC scores (t<0.001). Hierarchical regression analysis resulted in beta value reduction when polyvictimization was introduced supporting the independent effect on symptoms. Social anxiety was found in 10.2 % (n = 605) of the total group (n = 5,960). A significant gender difference emerged, with more females than males reporting social anxiety. Elevated PTSS was found in 14.8 % (n=883). Binary logistic regression revealed the highest OR for having had contact with child and adolescent psychiatry was found for the combined group with social anxiety and elevated PTSS (OR = 4.88, 95 % CI = 3.53–6.73, p<001). Significant associations were also found between use of child and adolescent psychiatry and female gender (OR = 2.05, 95 % CI = 1.70–2.45), Swedish birth origin (OR = 1.68, 95 % CI = 1.16–2.42) and living in a small municipality (OR = 1.33, 95 % CI = 1.02–1.73).

    Mediation models used peritraumatic reactions (PT): total, physiological arousal (PA), peritraumatic dissociation (PD), and intervention thoughts (IT) and JVQ and TSCC. Of the n=5,332 cases, a total of n=4,483 (84.1%) reported at least one victimizing event (m = 83.0%, f = 85.2%). Of these, 74.9% (n=3,360) also experienced a PT reaction of some kind. The effect mediated by PT tot was b= 0.479, BCa CI [0.342 – 0.640], representing a relatively small effect of 7.6%, κ2=0.076, 95% BCa CI [0.054- 0.101]. The mediating effect of JVQ on TSCC was mediated by PD more for males (b=0.394 BCa CI [0.170-0.636]) than for females (b=0.247, BCa CI [0.021-0.469]). The indirect effect of the JVQ on the TSCC tot mediated by the different PT reactions was significant for PD (b=0.355, BCa CI [0.199- 0.523]. In males a mediating effect of PD could be seen in the different models, while females had a more mixed result. IT did not show any indirect effect in males, but had a mixed effect for females.

    The empirical findings in this thesis lead to the conclusion that victimization is highly prevalent in children and youth and is related to health issues. The association of victimization on symptoms was mediated by peritraumatic reactions. Using a comprehensive instrument such as the JVQ provides the researcher or clinician the opportunity to acquire more complete measurement and also makes it possible to identify polyvictimization, a high-level category of events with severe impact on health.  

    List of papers
    1. The Prevalence of Potentially Victimizing Events, Poly-Victimization, and Its Association to Sociodemographic Factors: A Swedish Youth Survey
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Prevalence of Potentially Victimizing Events, Poly-Victimization, and Its Association to Sociodemographic Factors: A Swedish Youth Survey
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 620-651Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Studying the extent to which children are exposed to victimizing events is important to fully understand the effect of such exposure in shaping them as adults. The aim of this study was to use self-report by adolescents to measure the prevalence of victimizing events and of poly-victimization. A representative sample of 5,960 students (aged 17) from high schools in Sweden was given the self-administrated version of the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ) along with questions concerning gender, birthplace, parents birthplace and employment, residence, educational program, and municipality size. The results show that 84.1% (83.0% young men and 85.2% young women) of the students had experienced victimization during their lifetime, and 10.3% were categorized as poly-victims (8.1% young men and 12.5% young women; OR = 1.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.35, 1.94]). Adolescents living with both parents were at lower risk of any form of victimization for both genders, while females were at higher risk of maltreatment, peer victimization, and, most significantly, sexual victimization. In conclusion, the vast majority of young people have been victimized during their lifetime. A greater awareness of the impact of these victimizing events on children and adolescents is important as a basis for providing a safer milieu and establishing better interventions, especially for those that have been victimized on multiple occasions. The high-exposure group was determined by using 10 events as a cutoff. Findings on this group corresponded with findings in other international studies regarding distribution, elevated risk for females, and the possibility of limiting the effects of victimization by modifying living conditions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2016
    Keywords
    JVQ; victim; youth; poly-victimization; sociodemographics
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124456 (URN)10.1177/0886260514556105 (DOI)000367838200004 ()25392393 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority in Sweden; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden

    Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2018-02-21
    2. Victimization, polyvictimization , and health in Swedish adolescents
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Victimization, polyvictimization , and health in Swedish adolescents
    2016 (English)In: Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics, ISSN 1179-318X, Vol. 7, p. 89-99Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this article was to study the relationship between the different areas of victimization (eg, sexual victimization) and psychological symptoms, taking into account the full range of victimization domains. The final aim was to contribute further evidence regarding the bias that studies that focus on just one area of victimization may be introduced into our psychological knowledge. The sample included 5,960 second-year high school students in Sweden with a mean age of 17.3 years (range =16–20 years, standard deviation =0.652), of which 49.6% were females and 50.4% males. The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children were used to assess victimization and psychological problems separately. The results show that a majority of adolescents have been victimized, females reported more total events and more sexual victimization and childhood maltreatment, and males were more often victims of conventional crime. The majority of victimization domains as well as the sheer number of events (polyvictimization [PV]) proved to be harmful to adolescent health, affecting females more than males. PV explained part of the health effect and had an impact on its own and in relation to each domain. This suggests the possibility that PV to a large degree explains trauma symptoms. In order to understand the psychological effects of trauma, clinicians and researchers should take into account the whole range of possible types of victimization.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Dovepress, 2016
    Keywords
    victimization, childhood trauma, psychological symptoms, JVQ, TSCC
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychiatry Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132626 (URN)10.2147/AHMT.S109587 (DOI)27616895 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-17 Last updated: 2018-02-21Bibliographically approved
    3. Posttraumatic stress symptoms and mental health services utilization in adolescents with social anxiety disorder and experiences of victimization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Posttraumatic stress symptoms and mental health services utilization in adolescents with social anxiety disorder and experiences of victimization
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 177-184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Recent findings from studies on adults show similarities between social anxiety disorder (SAD) and posttraumatic stress in the form of recurrent memories and intrusive and distressing images of earlier aversive events. Further, treatment models for SAD in adults have been successfully developed by using transdiagnostic knowledge on posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Studies on adolescents are though missing. The present study aimed at exploring the association between PTSS and SAD in Swedish adolescents. A second aim was to study mental health services utilization in relation to these conditions. A total of 5,960 high-school students participated and reported on SAD, life time victimization, PTSS and mental health service utilization. Socially anxious adolescents reported significantly higher levels of PTSS than adolescents not reporting SAD and this difference was seen in victimized as well as non-victimized subjects. Contact with a school counselor was the most common mental health service utilization in subjects with SAD and those with elevated PTSS. In the prediction of contact with a CAP-clinic, significant odds ratios were found for a condition of SAD and elevated PTSS (OR = 4.88, 95 % CI = 3.53–6.73) but not for SAD only. Screening of PTSS in adolescents with SAD is recommended. The service of school counselors is important in detecting and helping young people with SAD and elevated PTSS. Clinical studies on SAD and PTSS in adolescents could aid in modifying treatment models for SAD.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2013
    Keywords
    Social anxiety disorder, victimization, mental health service utilization, adolescents
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89939 (URN)10.1007/s00787-012-0336-z (DOI)000315736200005 ()
    Available from: 2013-03-11 Created: 2013-03-11 Last updated: 2018-02-21
  • 9.
    Aho, Nikolas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Proczkowska Björklund, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Peritraumatic reactions in relation to trauma exposure and symptoms of posttraumatic stress in high school students2017In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 1380998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Exposure to traumatic events is clearly associated with a diversity of subsequent mental health problems, with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as the most prevalent disorder. Epidemiologically, trauma exposure rates are more prevalent than PTSD, indicating that most trauma victims do not develop PTSD. More knowledge is needed to understand the development of the different posttraumatic pathways including the significance of pretraumatic, peritraumatic and posttraumatic risk factors. Objective: To study peritraumatic reactions in relation to trauma exposure and symptoms of posttraumatic stress and to enhance our understanding of peritraumatic reactions as mediators between trauma and later symptomatology. Method: The study was composed of a representative community sample of 5332 second year high school students (mean age 17.3 years) who completed the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (SAQ/JVQ), Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC) and answered questions about peritraumatic reactions. Mediation effects of peritraumatic reactions on the trauma exposure relationship to symptoms was tested using the PROCESS macro for SPSS. Results: Traumatic events are common (84.1%) and are accompanied in three-quarters of the students with at least one form of peritraumatic reaction. Peritraumatic reactions, especially peritraumatic dissociative reactions, mediate the relationship between trauma exposure and symptoms, and gender moderates the effect of peritraumatic dissociation. This moderating effect was found to be larger for boys than for girls, indicating gender differences in response to trauma. Conclusions: The results indicate the need to screen for peritraumatic reactions as early as possible after a traumatic event in order to identify those at risk for PTSD.

  • 10.
    Aho, Nikolas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Proczkowska-Björklund, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Victimization, polyvictimization , and health in Swedish adolescents2016In: Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics, ISSN 1179-318X, Vol. 7, p. 89-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this article was to study the relationship between the different areas of victimization (eg, sexual victimization) and psychological symptoms, taking into account the full range of victimization domains. The final aim was to contribute further evidence regarding the bias that studies that focus on just one area of victimization may be introduced into our psychological knowledge. The sample included 5,960 second-year high school students in Sweden with a mean age of 17.3 years (range =16–20 years, standard deviation =0.652), of which 49.6% were females and 50.4% males. The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children were used to assess victimization and psychological problems separately. The results show that a majority of adolescents have been victimized, females reported more total events and more sexual victimization and childhood maltreatment, and males were more often victims of conventional crime. The majority of victimization domains as well as the sheer number of events (polyvictimization [PV]) proved to be harmful to adolescent health, affecting females more than males. PV explained part of the health effect and had an impact on its own and in relation to each domain. This suggests the possibility that PV to a large degree explains trauma symptoms. In order to understand the psychological effects of trauma, clinicians and researchers should take into account the whole range of possible types of victimization.

  • 11.
    Anders Eriksson, Mats
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Lieden, Agne
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Bremer, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics. Division of Clinical Genetics, University Hospital, Link.
    Wincent, Josephine
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sahlin, Ellika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gillberg, Christopher
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Anderlid, Britt-Marie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rare copy number variants are common in young children with autism spectrum disorder2015In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 6, p. 610-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimSeveral studies have suggested that rare copy number variants (CNVs) are an important genetic contributor to autism spectrum disorders. The aims of the study were to use chromosomal microarray to investigate the presence of rare copy number variants in a population-based cohort of well-characterised young children with autism spectrum disorders and to relate the genetic results to neurodevelopmental profiles and medical conditions. MethodsWe performed chromosomal microarray on samples from 162 children who had been referred to the Stockholm Autism Centre for Young Children in Sweden after being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder between 20 and 54months of age. ResultsPathogenic aberrations were detected in 8.6% of the children and variants of uncertain significance were present in another 8.6%. CNVs were more frequent in children with congenital malformations or dysmorphic features as well as in the subgroup with intellectual disability. ConclusionOur results support the use of chromosomal microarray methods for the first tier genetic analysis of autism spectrum disorder. However, it is likely in the near future that chromosomal microarray methods will probably be replaced by whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing technologies in clinical genetic testing.

  • 12.
    Andersen Helland, Wenche
    et al.
    Universitetet i Bergen, Norge.
    Biringer, Eva
    Helse Fonna HF, Norge.
    Helland, Turid
    Universitetet i Bergen, Norge.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Exploring language profiles for children with AD/HD and children with Asperger syndrome2012In: Journal of Attention Disorders, ISSN 1087-0547, E-ISSN 1557-1246, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 34-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aims of the present study was to investigate communication impairments in a Norwegian sample of children with ADHD and children with Asperger syndrome (AS) and to explore whether children with ADHD can be differentiated from children with AS in terms of their language profiles on the Norwegian adaptation of the Children’s Communication Checklist Second Edition (CCC-2). Method: The CCC-2 was completed by the parents, and altogether, 77 children aged between 6 and 15 years participated in the study. Results: Communication impairments were as common in a group of children with ADHD as in a group of children with AS. Although a similar pattern appeared on most CCC-2 scales, children with ADHD and children with AS could be distinguished from each other in terms of their language profiles on the subscales assessing stereotyped language and nonverbal communication. Conclusion: Language abilities should be taken into account when standard assessments of ADHD and AS are performed and before therapies are initiated

  • 13.
    Andersen Helland, Wenche
    et al.
    Universitetet i Bergen, Norge.
    Helland, Turid
    Universitetet i Bergen, Norge.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Language profiles and mental health problems in children with specific language imapirment and children with AD/HD2014In: Journal of Attention Disorders, ISSN 1087-0547, E-ISSN 1557-1246, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 226-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to explore whether children with specific language impairment (SLI) and children with ADHDcan be differentiated from each other in terms of their language profiles, and also to investigate whether these two clinicalgroups differ regarding mental health problems. Method: A total of 59 children in the age range 6 to 12 years participatedin the study. The parents completed the Children’s Communication Checklist–Second Edition and the Strengths andDifficulties Questionnaire. Results: Communication impairments were as prominent in the ADHD group as in the SLIgroup; however, the groups were separable from each other in terms of their language profiles. Furthermore, the ADHDgroup experienced significantly more mental health problems compared with the SLI group. Conclusion: Language shouldbe assessed in children with ADHD and instruments sensitive to ADHD should be included when assessing children withSLI. Mental health should be an area of concern to be addressed in both groups. (J. of Att. Dis. 2012; XX(X) 1-XX)

  • 14.
    Andersson, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Co-morbidity and health care utilisation five years prior to diagnosis for depression: A register-based study in a Swedish population2011In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, p. 552-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Depressive disorders have been associated with a number of co-morbidities, and we   hypothesized that patients with a depression diagnosis would be heavy users of health   care services, not only when first evaluated for depression, but also for preceding   years. The aim of this study was to investigate whether increased health care utilisation   and co-morbidity could be seen during five years prior to an initial diagnosis of   depression.

    Methods

    We used a longitudinal register-based study design. The setting comprised the general   population in the county of Östergötland, south-east Sweden. All 2470 patients who   were 20 years or older in 2006 and who received a new diagnosis of depression (F32   according to ICD-10) in 2006, were selected and followed back to the year 2001, five   years before their depression diagnosis. A control group was randomly selected among   those who were aged 20 years or over in 2006 and who had received no depression diagnosis   during the period 2001-2006.

    Results

    Predictors of a depression diagnosis were a high number of physician visits, female   gender, age below 60, age above 80 and a low socioeconomic status.

    Patients who received a diagnosis of depression used twice the amount of health care   (e.g. physician visits and hospital days) during the five year period prior to diagnosis   compared to the control group. A particularly strong increase in health care utilisation   was seen the last year before diagnosis. These findings were supported with a high   level of co-morbidity as for example musculoskeletal disorders during the whole five-year   period for patients with a depression diagnosis.

    Conclusions

    Predictors of a depression diagnosis were a high number of physician visits, female   gender, age below 60, age above 80 and a low socioeconomic status. To find early signs   of depression in the clinical setting and to use a preventive strategy to handle these   patients is important.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedman, Erik
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Enander, Jesper
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Radu Djurfeldt, Diana
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ljótsson, Brjánn
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cervenka, Simon
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Isung, Josef
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svanborg, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mataix-Cols, David
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Div Psychiat, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindefors, Nils
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rück, Christian
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    D-Cycloserine vs Placebo as Adjunct to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Interaction With Antidepressants: A Randomized Clinical Trial.2015In: JAMA psychiatry, ISSN 2168-6238, E-ISSN 2168-622X, Vol. 72, no 7, p. 659-667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE: It is unclear whether d-cycloserine (DCS), a partial N-methyl-d-aspartate agonist that enhances fear extinction, can augment the effects of exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

    OBJECTIVES: To examine whether DCS augments the effects of CBT for OCD and to explore (post hoc) whether concomitant antidepressant medication moderates the effects of DCS.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A 12-week, double-blind randomized clinical trial with 3-month follow-up conducted at an academic medical center between September 4, 2012, and September 26, 2013. Participants included 128 adult outpatients with a primary diagnosis of OCD and a Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) score of 16 or higher. Concurrent antidepressant medication was permitted if the dose had been stable for at least 2 months prior to enrollment and remained unchanged during the trial. The main analysis was by intention-to-treat population.

    INTERVENTIONS: All participants received a previously validated Internet-based CBT protocol over 12 weeks and were randomized to receive either 50 mg of DCS or placebo, administered 1 hour before each of 5 exposure and response prevention tasks.

    MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Clinician-administered Y-BOCS score at week 12 and at 3-month follow-up. Remission was defined as a score of 12 or lower on the Y-BOCS.

    RESULTS: In the primary intention-to-treat analyses, DCS did not augment the effects of CBT compared with placebo (mean [SD] clinician-rated Y-BOCS score, DCS: 13.86 [6.50] at week 12 and 12.35 [7.75] at 3-month follow-up; placebo: 11.77 [5.95] at week 12 and 12.37 [6.68] at 3-month follow-up) but showed a significant interaction with antidepressants (clinician-rated Y-BOCS, B = -1.08; Z = -2.79; P = .005). Post hoc analyses revealed that antidepressants significantly impaired treatment response in the DCS group but not the placebo group, at both posttreatment and follow-up (clinician-rated Y-BOCS: t62 = -3.00; P = .004; and t61 = -3.49; P < .001, respectively). In the DCS group, a significantly greater proportion of antidepressant-free patients achieved remission status at follow-up (60% [95% CI, 45%-74%]) than antidepressant-medicated patients (24% [95% CI, 9%-48%]) (P = .008). Antidepressants had no effect in the placebo group (50% [95% CI, 36%-64%] remission rate in both groups).

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: The findings suggest that antidepressants may interact with DCS to block its facilitating effect on fear extinction. Use of DCS may be a promising CBT augmentation strategy but only in antidepressant-free patients with OCD.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01649895.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Psykoterapi och psykologisk behandling2016In: Psykiatri / [ed] Jörgen Herlofson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2016, 2, p. 669-681Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    I den här delen av kapitlet går vi igenom psykoterapi och psykologisk behandling. Avsnittet belyser olika terapiformer och format, och en slutsats är att psykologisk behandling fungerar, samt att kombinerad behandling med samtidig läkemedelsbehandling kan vara mer effektiv än att endast erbjuda läkemedel eller psykologisk behandling. Olika psykoterapier har effekt men det finns än så länge mest stöd för kognitiv beteendeterapi.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Paxling, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Roch-Norlund, Pie
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Östman, Gunnar
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Norgren, Anna
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Almlöv, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Georén, Lisa
    Department of Psychology, Uppsala University.
    Breitholtz, Elisabeth
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Dahlin, Mats
    Psykologpartners, Linköping.
    Cuijpers, Pim
    Vrije University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands .
    Carlbring, Per
    Umeå University.
    Silverberg, Farrell
    Philadelphia School of Psychoanalysis and Private Practice, Philadelphia, USA.
    Internet-Based Psychodynamic versus Cognitive Behavioral Guided Self-Help for Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial2012In: Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, ISSN 0033-3190, E-ISSN 1423-0348, Vol. 81, no 6, p. 344-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Guided Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) has been tested in many trials and found to be effective in the treatment of anxiety and mood disorders. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has also been treated with ICBT, but there are no controlled trials on guided Internet-based psychodynamic treatment (IPDT). Since there is preliminary support for psychodynamic treatment for GAD, we decided to test if a psychodynamically informed self-help treatment could be delivered via the Internet. The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of IPDT for GAD and to compare against ICBT and a waiting list control group. Method: A randomized controlled superiority trial with individuals diagnosed with GAD comparing guided ICBT (n = 27) and IPDT (n = 27) against a no treatment waiting list control group (n = 27). The primary outcome measure was the Penn State Worry Questionnaire. Results: While there were no significant between-group differences immediately after treatment on the main outcome measure, both IPDT and ICBT resulted in improvements with moderate to large within-group effect sizes at 3 and 18 months follow-up on the primary measure in the completer analyses. The differences against the control group, although smaller, were still significant for both PDT and CBT when conforming to the criteria of clinically significant improvement. The active treatments did not differ significantly. There was a significant group by time interaction regarding GAD symptoms, but not immediately after treatment. Conclusions: IPDT and ICBT both led to modest symptom reduction in GAD, and more research is needed.

  • 18.
    Andersson Sundell, K.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Beliefs about medicines are strongly associated with medicine-use patterns among the general population2016In: International journal of clinical practice (Esher), ISSN 1368-5031, E-ISSN 1742-1241, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 277-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsTo investigate self-reported beliefs and perceived sensitivity to medicines and their effects in relation to self-reported use of medicines and herbal remedies. MethodsA survey sent to 13,931 randomly selected Swedish adults included the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-General (BMQ-General) Questionnaire and the Perceived Sensitivity to Medicines Scale (PSM). The survey also asked about individuals use of prescribed and over-the-counter (OTC) medicines and herbal remedies in the past month. We examined all associations between scores on the BMQ-General subscales and PSM in relation to the use of medicines and herbal remedies, using analysis of covariance adjusted for potential confounders. ResultsAmong 7099 respondents, those using herbal remedies exclusively believed strongly that prescription and OTC medicines are harmful and overprescribed. Respondents using prescription and OTC medicines reported more positive beliefs [coefficient 0.67 (95% CI 0.47-0.87) and 0.70 (95% CI 0.51-0.90)] on the benefits of medicines compared with those using herbal remedies [-0.18 (95% CI -0.57-0.20)]. Perceived sensitivity to medicines was higher among those using herbal remedies only [1.25 (95% CI 0.46-2.03)] compared with those using no medicines (reference 0) or prescription [-0.44 (95% CI -0.84 to -0.05)] or OTC [-0.27 (95% CI -0.66-0.12)] medicines alone. ConclusionRespondents using prescription and/or OTC medicines reported stronger positive beliefs about the benefits of medicines in general, supporting the hypothesis that beliefs influence medicine use. Therefore, addressing beliefs and concerns about medicines during patient counselling may influence medicine use, particularly regarding unintentional non-adherence.

  • 19.
    Anderssson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Karlsson, Ellen
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    The Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test - Revised Version á la Andersson & Karlsson2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test is a widely used test for measuring aspects of social cognition. The aim of the present study was to provide results from a group of typically developing Swedish children (age 9-12) and to compare these results with children and adults in other Swedish and English studies, as well as results from a group of children with Asperger syndrome. Method: A Swedish version of the child version of the test was completed by 83 controls and by six children with Asperger syndrome. Results were compared between the two groups and with data from other studies. Results: The children in the current study did not differ on scores compared to children in the same age group in other studies. The children in the current study scored significantly lower than adults in an earlier study. The results from the children with Asperger syndrome did not differ significantly to the results from the controls.

  • 20.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    What about the parents?: Sleep quality, mood, saliva cortisol response and sense of coherence in parents with a child admitted to pediatric care2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents experience many stressful situations when their child is ill and needs medical care, irrespective of the child’s age, diagnosis or the severity of the illness. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents’ ability to sustain attention and focus, to care for their ill child, and to cope with the challenges they face.

    The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate sleep, mood, cortisol response, and sense of coherence (SOC) in parents caring for children in need of medical care, and to identify factors that may influence parents’ sleep.

    This thesis includes four original studies; two of these are quantitative, prospective, descriptive and comparative studies including parents (n=82) accommodated in six pediatric wards with their ill child, using questionnaires and sleep logs to measure sleep, mood and SOC, and saliva cortisol to measure cortisol response. A follow-up was performed four weeks later at home, after hospital discharge. The other two studies are qualitative, inductive and explorative interview studies, including parents (n=12) staying overnight with their preterm and/or ill infant in three neonatal intensive care units, and parents (n=15) with a child receiving hospital-based home care in two pediatric outpatient clinics. The interviews were analyzed with a phenomenographic method.

    Being together with one’s family seems beneficial for sleep and may decrease stress. The ability to stay with the child, in the hospital or at home, was highly appreciated by the parents. When caring for a child with illness, parents’ sleep quality was sufficient in the hospital; however, sleep quality improved further (p<0.05) at home after discharge. The parents reported frequent nocturnal awakenings in the hospital caused by the child, medical treatment and hospital staff. Concern and anxiety about the child’s health, and uncertainty about the future were stressors affecting the parents’ sleep and mood negatively. The parents had lower (p=0.01) morning awakening cortisol levels in the pediatric ward compared to at home, and parents accommodated for more than one night had lower (p<0.05) post-awakening cortisol levels compared to parents staying their first night.

    The findings of this thesis conclude that being together as a family is important for the parents’ sleep. The ability to be accommodated in the hospital and gather the family around the child may have given the parents time for relaxation and recovery, that in turn may lead to a less stressful hospital stay. When it is beneficial for the child, the whole family should be included in the pediatric care. Moreover, pediatric nurses must acknowledge parents’ sleep, in hospital and at home. Medical treatment and care at night should be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents in order to maintain health and well-being in the family.

    List of papers
    1. Hindering and buffering factors for parental sleep in neonatal care. A phenomenographic study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hindering and buffering factors for parental sleep in neonatal care. A phenomenographic study
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 5-6, p. 717-727Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

    To explore and describe how parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care perceive their sleep.

    BACKGROUND:

    Parents experience many stressful situations when their newborn infant is preterm and/or sick. This affects bonding. By developing more family-centred care units with single-family rooms, parents are given the opportunity to stay and care for their newborn infant(s) 24 hours a day. Lack of sleep may affect new parents' ability to cope with the many challenges they face on a daily basis.

    DESIGN:

    A phenomenographic study with an inductive and exploratory design.

    METHODS:

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve parents of infants in neonatal care between January-March 2012. To describe variations in perception of the phenomenon, data were analysed using phenomenography.

    FINDINGS:

    Four descriptive categories were identified within the phenomenon sleep in parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care: impact of stress on sleep; how the environment affects sleep; keeping the family together improves sleep; and, how parents manage and prevent tiredness.

    CONCLUSION:

    Anxiety, uncertainty and powerlessness have a negative influence on sleep. This can be decreased by continuous information, guidance and practical support. Skin-to-skin care was perceived as a stress-reducing factor that improved relaxation and sleep and should be encouraged by the nurse. The parents also mentioned the importance of being together. Having a private place where they could relax and take care of themselves and their newborn infant improved sleep. It was also desirable to involve older siblings in order to decrease feelings of loneliness, sadness and isolation.

    RELEVANCE FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    Improved parental sleep in neonatal care may help the families cope with the situation and facilitate problem-solving, emotional regulation and the transition to parenthood.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2015
    Keywords
    family nursing; family-centred care; kangaroo mother care; neonatal intensive care; nursing; siblings; skin-to-skin care
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115549 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12654 (DOI)000350354700010 ()25041598 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)Östergötland County Council
    Available from: 2015-03-16 Created: 2015-03-16 Last updated: 2017-12-04
    2. Sleep of Parents Living With a Child Receiving Hospital-Based Home Care: A Phenomenographical Study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep of Parents Living With a Child Receiving Hospital-Based Home Care: A Phenomenographical Study.
    2015 (English)In: Nursing Research, ISSN 0029-6562, E-ISSN 1538-9847, Vol. 64, no 5, p. 372-380Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Caring for an ill child at home gives the family the chance to be together in a familiar environment. However, this involves several nocturnal sleep disturbances, such as frequent awakenings and bad sleep quality, which may affect parents' ability to take care of the child and themselves.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe parents' perceptions of circumstances influencing their own sleep when living with a child enrolled in hospital-based home care (HBHC) services.

    Method: This is a phenomenographical study with an inductive, exploratory design. Fifteen parents (11 mothers and 4 fathers) with children enrolled in HBHC services were interviewed. Data were analyzed to discover content-related categories describing differences in ways parents experienced sleep when caring for their children receiving HBHC.

    Results: Four descriptive categories were detected: sleep influences mood and mood influences sleep; support influences safeness and safeness influences sleep; the child's needs influence routines and routines influence sleep; and "me time" influences sleep.

    Discussion: Sleep does not affect only the parents' well-being but also the child's care. Symptoms of stress may limit the parents' capacity to meet the child's needs. Support, me time, and physical activity were perceived as essential sources for recovery and sleep. It is important for nurses to acknowledge parental sleep in the child's nursing care plan and help the parents perform self-care to promote sleep and maintain life, health, and well-being.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott-Ravn Publisher, 2015
    Keywords
    children, chronic illness, home care services, parents, qualitative research, sleep
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121085 (URN)10.1097/NNR.0000000000000108 (DOI)000361361000006 ()26325279 (PubMedID)
    Projects
    Parents’ stress and sleep quality when their children need medical care
    Funder
    Östergötland County CouncilMedical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)
    Available from: 2015-09-07 Created: 2015-09-07 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    3. Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 3-4, p. e544-e550Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To describe sleep quality and mood in parents accommodated with their sick child in a family‐centred paediatric ward. Secondary aims were to compare mothers’ and fathers’ sleep quality and mood in the paediatric ward and to compare the parents’ sleep quality and mood between the paediatric ward and in a daily‐life home setting after discharge.

    Background

    Frequent interruptions, ward noise and anxiety affect parents’ sleep quality and mood negatively when accommodated with their sick child in paediatric wards. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents’ ability to sustain attention and focus, and to care for their sick child.

    Methods

    This was a prospective and descriptive study. Eighty‐two parents (61 mothers and 21 fathers) with children (median age 6.25 years) admitted to six paediatric wards participated in the study. Uppsala Sleep Inventory, a sleep diary and the Mood Adjective Checklist were used to measure sleep quality and mood.

    Results

    The parents had a good sleep quality in the paediatric ward even though they had more nocturnal awakenings compared to home. Moreover, they were less alert, less interested and had reduced concentration, and were more tired, dull and passive in the hospital than at home after discharge. Vital sign checks, noises made by the staff and medical treatment were given reasons influencing sleep. Poor sleep quality correlated with negative mood.

    Conclusion

    Parents’ sleep quality in family‐centred paediatric care is good. However, the habitual sleep efficacy before admittance to the hospital is lower than expected and needs to be further investigated.

    Relevance to Clinical Practice

    The healthcare professionals should acknowledge parents’ sleep and mood when they are accommodated with their sick child. Further should care at night be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents to maintain health and well‐being in the family.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2018
    Keywords
    adolescents, child, child nursing, children’s nurses, family nursing, family-centred care, hospitalised child, paediatrics, parent, sleep
    National Category
    Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143585 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14092 (DOI)000425733600018 ()28960555 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85037348121 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden [FORSS-159681]; Region of Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2018-06-01Bibliographically approved
  • 21.
    Annerbäck, Eva-Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping. Centre for Clinical Research in Sörmland, Sörmland County Council, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Child physical abuse: factors influencing the associations between self-reported exposure and self-reported health problems: a cross-sectional study2018In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, ISSN 1753-2000, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 12, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Child physical abuse (CPA) is an extensive public health problem because of its associations with poor health outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine which of the background factors of CPA committed by a parent or other caregiver relates to self-reported poor health among girls and boys (13; 15 and 17 years old): perpetrator, last year exposure; severity and frequency; socioeconomic load and foreign background.

    Methods

    In a cross-sectional study in a Swedish county (n = 8024) a path analysis was performed to evaluate a model where all background variables were put as predictors of three health-status variables: mental; physical and general health problems. In a second step a log linear analysis was performed to examine how the distribution over the health-status categories was different for different combinations of background factors.

    Results

    Children exposed to CPA reported poor health to a much higher extent than those who were not exposed. In the path analysis it was found that frequency and severity of abuse (boys only) and having experienced CPA during the last year, was significantly associated with poor health as well as socioeconomic load in the families. Foreign background was significantly negatively associated with all three health indicators especially for girls. Neither mother nor father as perpetrator remained significant in the path analysis, while the results from the log linear analyses showed that mother-abuse did in fact relate to poor general health and mental as well as physical health problems among boys and girls. Father-abuse was associated with poor mental health if severe abuse was reported. Poor mental health was also associated with mild father-abuse if exposure during the last year was reported.

    Conclusion

    Despite the limitations that cross-sectional studies imply, this study provides new knowledge about factors associated with poor health among physically abused children. It describes details of CPA that have significant associations to different aspects of poor health and thus what needs to be addressed by professionals within mental health providers and social services. Understanding how different factors may contribute to different health outcomes for exposed children is important in future research and needs further studies.

  • 22. Back, Christina
    et al.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Interpretativ fenomenologisk analys2015In: Handbok i kvalitativ analys / [ed] Andreas Fejes och Robert Thornberg, Stockholm: Liber, 2015, 2, p. 148-161Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Back, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Parental opinions of their child's experience in the legal process: an interpretative analysis2014In: Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, ISSN 1053-8712, E-ISSN 1547-0679, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 290-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate how parents of children who are victims of sexual assault experience the legal process from the children’s and parents’ perspective. Nine parents, identified in the records of three public prosecution offices in three cities in Sweden, were interviewed. The parents described feelings of shame and guilt over what their children had experienced. They felt stigmatized and had difficulty fulfilling their parental role, perceived a lack of information and support from the professionals involved, and experienced a sense of withdrawal from their role as parents, though they felt the professionals who worked with their children were helpful and influential.

  • 24.
    Bejerot, Susanne
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Neuroscience Stockholm, Sweden .
    Landén, Mikael
    Göteborgs universitet, Sahlgrenska akademin, Sweden.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Anckarsäter, Henrik
    Göteborgs universitet, Sahlgrenska akademin, Sweden.
    Waern, Magda
    Göteborgs universitet, Sahlgrenska akademin, Sweden.
    Socialstyrelsens målnivåer signalerar brist på tillit in Lakartidningen, vol 114, issue , pp2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Bergh-Johannesson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala .
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala.
    Nilsson, Doris
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Otto, Ulf
    Centrallasarettet, Kristianstad.
    Psykotraumatologi: bedömning, bemötande och behandling av stresstillstånd2010 (ed. 2:a)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Nya allvarliga händelser drabbar kontinuerligt människor runt om i världen och även i vårt land. Det gör att ämnet psykotraumatologi ständigt är aktuellt och som följd av att kunskapsmängden inom området har ökat under senare år har det blivit nödvändigt att sammanfatta det psykotraumatologiska fältet på nytt.I denna omarbetade och utökade upplaga har författarna behållit utgångspunkten med det psykiska traumat sett ur ett historiskt och socialt sammanhang, grundat på ett holistiskt synsätt. Vi beskriver hur den normala och den traumatiska stressen påverkar människan. Faktorer som kan verka skyddande och sådana som kan bidra till att utveckla psykiska störningar skildras även. Vi beskriver ingående krisstöd i akutfas och riktlinjer för modern traumafokuserad behandling.Syftet med boken är att utgöra en samlad kunskapskälla på svenska språket för den som behöver det i sin utbildning och fortbildning. De som på så sätt kan ha nytta av boken är personal i hälso- och sjukvården, kuratorer, läkare, psykologer, skötare inom vuxen-, barn- och ungdomspsykiatrin, primärvården och företagshälsovården samt även befattningshavare inom kommunernas krisstödsorganisation. Andra som kan ha nytta av boken är alla som i sin profession kommer i kontakt med traumatiserade individer.Boken kan med fördel användas både som lärobok och uppslagsbok.

  • 26.
    Bjälke, Christer
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Norrköping.
    Widén, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Norrköping.
    BOF (Barnorienterad familjeterapi): symtomens arena?1999Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Barnorienterad familjeterapi - BOF, en terapiform där barn och föräldrar leker tillsammans i en sandlåda med ett material av dockor, djur, träd, staket, etc. I studien undersöker vi om man med ledning av det som sker i leken, samhandlingen, kan se och förstå barnets problem, dvs det symtom familjen sökte till BUP för.

    Vi valde att dela in symtomen i tre huvudgrupper; externaliserande, dvs. utagerande symtom, internaliserande symtom, dvs mer inåtvända symtom som oro, ledsenhet samt somatiserande, där symtomen tar sig kroppsliga uttryck.

    Nio familjer som inledde en BOF-terapi vid BUP, Vrinnevisjukhuset under 1997-98 kom att ingå i undersökningen.

    Innan terapin påbörjades fyllde föräldrarna i ett CBCL -formulär om barnets symtom. BOF-terapin utfördes på vanligt sätt med filmning av sessionerna och samtal i familjen om filmerna. Därefter fick vi tillgång till filmerna. Vi fick ej veta något om symtom eller problematik. I ett fall kände vi anmälningsorsaken. Familjesammansättningen var också okänd för oss.

    Vi har studerat den första terapiomgången med barn, föräldrar och terapeut vid sandlådan. Filmen har transkriberats vilket innebär att varje  sammanhållen handling och verbal tur, dvs. yttrande, har dikterats in på band. Ex, Pojke gör: Tar bilen, Mamma säger: "Kom hit" Transkriptionen har skrivits ut och analyserats. Vi har sorterat och räknat antal handlingar och yttranden och för varje aktör. För att få veta intensiteten i leken har vi sedan delat antalet med lekens längd. Vi antog att intensivare lek kan tyda på utagerande problematik.

    Vi har läst materialet och försökt beskriva terapiomgångarna globalt avseende innehåll och teman i leken, gränser och aktivitet i sandlådan samt terapeutens agerande.

    I utskrifterna har vi även försökt finna handlingar och yttranden som visar på gränsergränssättning, aggressivitet, omsorg, oro-ängslan, sjukdom-skada, ledsenhet, att bli sedd etc. Vi har även försökt se till samspelet ur olika aspekter.

    De olika kategorierna har markerats i skriften, förts in i ett protokoll och räknats samman. Vi har jämfört de olika resultaten och ställt en hypotes om barnets symtom.

    Våra antaganden om varje barns symtom har jämförts med resultatet av CBCL-skattningen. Vi fann, att vi vid åtta av nio barn hamnat inom samma huvudgrupp av symtom som CBCL. Pojken som avvek hade, liksom flertalet av barnen, en dubbel problematik med både internaliserande och externaliserande symtom. I gruppen ingick inget barn med starka somatiserande symtom varför vi ej kan uttala oss om giltigheten för den gruppen.

    Vår slutsats är att barnets symtom syns i samleken och att BOF-sandlådan verkligen är symtomets arena.

  • 27.
    Björnsdotter Åberg, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Davidovic, Monika
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karjalainen, Louise
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Starck, Goran
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wentz, Elisabet
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Grey matter correlates of autistic traits in women with anorexia nervosa2018In: Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience, ISSN 1180-4882, E-ISSN 1488-2434, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 79-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with anorexia nervosa exhibit higher levels of behaviours typically associated with autism-spectrum disorder (ASD), but the neural basis is unclear. We sought to determine whether elevated autistic traits in women with anorexia nervosa may be reflected in cortical morphology. Methods: We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to examine regional grey matter volumes in high-resolution MRI structural brain scans in women with anorexia nervosa and matched healthy controls. The Autism-spectrum Quotient (AQ) scale was used to assess autistic traits. Results: Women with anorexia nervosa (n = 25) had higher AQ scores and lower bilateral superior temporal sulcus (STS) grey matter volumes than the control group (n = 25). The AQ scores correlated negatively with average left STS grey matter volume in women with anorexia nervosa. Limitations: We did not control for cognitive ability and examined only women with ongoing anorexia nervosa. Conclusion: Elevated autistic traits in women with anorexia nervosa are associated with morphometric alterations of brain areas linked to social cognition. This finding provides neurobiological support for the behavioural link between anorexia nervosa and ASD and emphasizes the importance of recognizing autistic traits in preventing and treating-anorexia nervosa.

  • 28.
    Björnsdotter Åberg, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wang, Nancy
    Yale School Med, CT USA.
    Pelphrey, Kevin
    George Washington University, DC USA; Childrens National Medical Centre, DC 20010 USA.
    Kaiser, Martha D.
    Yale School Med, CT USA.
    Evaluation of Quantified Social Perception Circuit Activity as a Neurobiological Marker of Autism Spectrum Disorder2016In: JAMA psychiatry, ISSN 2168-6238, E-ISSN 2168-622X, Vol. 73, no 6, p. 614-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is marked by social disability and is associated with dysfunction in brain circuits supporting social cue perception. The degree to which neural functioning reflects individual-level behavioral phenotype is unclear, slowing the search for functional neuroimaging biomarkers of ASD. OBJECTIVE To examine whether quantified neural function in social perception circuits may serve as an individual-level marker of ASD in children and adolescents. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The cohort study was conducted at the Yale Child Study Center and involved children and adolescents diagnosed as having ASD and typically developing participants. Participants included a discovery cohort and a larger replication cohort. Individual-level social perception circuit functioning was assessed as functional magnetic resonance imaging brain responses to point-light displays of coherent vs scrambled human motion. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Outcome measures included performance of quantified brain responses in affected male and female participants in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), sensitivity and specificity, and correlations between brain responses and social behavior. RESULTS Of the 39 participants in the discovery cohort aged 4 to 17 years, 22 had ASD and 30 were boys. Of the 75 participants in the replication cohort aged 7 to 20 years, 37 had ASD and 52 were boys. A relative reduction in social perception circuit responses was identified in discovery cohort boys with ASD at an AUC of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.52-0.89; P = .01); however, typically developing girls and girls with ASD could not be distinguished (P = .54). The results were confirmed in the replication cohort, where brain responses were identified in boys with ASD at an AUC of 0.79 (95% CI, 0.64-0.91; P amp;lt; .001) and failed to distinguish affected and unaffected girls (P = .82). Across both cohorts, boys were identified at an AUC of 0.77 (95% CI, 0.64-0.86) with corresponding sensitivity and specificity of 76% each. Additionally, brain responses were associated with social behavior in boys but not in girls. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Quantified social perception circuit activity is a promising individual-level candidate neural marker of the male ASD behavioral phenotype. Our findings highlight the need to better understand effects of sex on social perception processing in relation to ASD phenotype manifestations.

  • 29.
    Braarud, Hanne
    et al.
    Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Bergen, Norway.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Moe, Vibeke
    National Network for Infant Mental Health, Norway.
    Slinning, Kari
    National Network for Infant Mental Health, Norway.
    Tranaas-Vannebo, Unni
    National Network for Infant Mental Health, Norway.
    Guedeney, Antoine
    Hôpital Bichat-Claude Bernard, AP/HP, Paris, France.
    Smith, Lars
    National Network for Infant Mental Health, Norway.
    Early sustained withdrawal in infants, mothers’ mental health, other early risk factors, and socio- emotional outcome in infants2012In: Infant Mental Health Journal, 33: [Abstract supplement p 64] / [ed] K. Puura, M. Tomkinson, N.W. Boris & M. Sorsa, 2012, p. 64-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The  paper examines the interplay between the biomedical and socioemotional risk factors, i.e. maternal depression and prematurity, as predictors of infant’s sustained withdrawal, and subsequent socioemotional outcomes. The study (n=284) follows the developmental course of infant’s sustained withdrawal during the first year, and illuminates the pathways in which the early adversity possibly compromises the infant’s natural intersubjective skills and motivation.

  • 30.
    Brohede, Sabina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Capturing a prevalent but under-recognized disorder2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are highly distressed due to defects they perceive in their physical appearance that are not noticeable to others. The condition often leads to impaired functioning in relationships, socialization, and intimacy and a decreased ability to function in work, school, or other daily activities. Although BDD seems to be relatively prevalent, it is under-recognized by people in general and by health care professionals. Individuals with BDD are secretive about their symptoms, and they usually do not recognize that they are suffering from a psychiatric disorder. Instead, in an attempt to relieve their symptoms by correcting their perceived defects, they commonly seek dermatological treatment or cosmetic surgery. However, such interventions usually do not result in any decrease in BDD symptom severity, but can rather aggravate the symptoms. Therefore, it is crucial that health care professionals recognize BDD in order to offer adequate care. Prior to the studies conducted for this thesis, there were no known data regarding the prevalence of BDD in Sweden.

    Main aims

    (i) To translate a screening questionnaire for BDD (the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire, BDDQ) into Swedish and validate the questionnaire in a community sample. (ii) To estimate the prevalence of BDD in the general population of Swedish women and in female dermatology patients. (iii) To explore BDD patients’ experiences of living with the disorder, including their experiences of the health care system.

    Methods

    The BDDQ was validated using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) as the gold standard for diagnosing BDD (Study I). The validated BDDQ was used to estimate the prevalence of BDD in a randomly selected population-based sample of Swedish women (n=2 885) (Study II) and in a consecutive sample of female dermatology patients (n=425) (Study III). In Studies II and III, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess symptoms of depression and anxiety. In Study III, quality of life was evaluated by the Dermatology Life Quality Index. BDD patients’ lived experiences were explored using a qualitative research design (Study IV). Fifteen individuals with BDD were interviewed, and the interviews were analysed using Interpretive Description.

    Results

    The Swedish translation of the BDDQ displayed a sensitivity of 94%, a specidicity of 90% and a (positive) likelihood ratio of 9.4. The prevalence of women screening positive for BDD was 2.1% (95% CI 1.7–2.7) in the population-based sample of women and 4.9% (95% CI 3.2–7.4) in the dermatology patients’ sample. The positive predictive value of the BDDQ (71%) gave an estimated BDD prevalence of 1.5% (95% CI 1.1–2.0) in the female Swedish population. Women screening positive for BDD had signidicantly more symptoms of anxiety and depression compared to those screening negative for BDD in both samples. In the dermatology patients, quality of life was severely impaired in patients with positive BDD screening. The overarching concept found in Study IV was that patients with BDD felt imprisoned and were struggling to become free and to no longer feel abnormal. The participants had encountered difdiculties in accessing health care and had disappointing experiences of the health care system.

    Conclusion

    The findings of this thesis indicate that BDD is a relatively common disorder in the Swedish female population, and that it is more prevalent in dermatology patients. BDD patients struggle to be free from a feeling of imprisonment, and in this struggle they encounter difficulties in accessing health care. Therefore, it is important to increase awareness and recognition of BDD among health care professionals to ensure that patients with BDD receive the appropriate care.

    List of papers
    1. Validation of the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire in a community sample of Swedish women
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire in a community sample of Swedish women
    2013 (English)In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 210, no 2, p. 647-652Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is characterized by a distressing and impairing preoccupation with a nonexistent or slight defect in appearance. Patients with the disorder present to both psychiatric and non-psychiatric physicians. A few studies have assessed BDD prevalence in the general population and have shown that the disorder is relatively common. To date, no BDD assessment instruments have been validated in the general population. Our aim was to validate a brief self-screening instrument, the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ), in a female community sample. The BDDQ was translated into Swedish and filled out by 2891 women from a randomly selected community sample. The questionnaire was validated in a subsample of 88 women, using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) together with clinical assessment as the gold standard. In the validation subsample, the BDDQ showed good concurrent validity, with a sensitivity of 94%, a specificity of 90% and a likelihood ratio of 9.4. The questionnaire can therefore be of value when screening for BDD in female populations.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2013
    Keywords
    Self-report instrument; Measurement; Somatoform disorders; Appearance concerns; Body image
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103301 (URN)10.1016/j.psychres.2013.07.019 (DOI)000328518600044 ()
    Available from: 2014-01-17 Created: 2014-01-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder among Swedish women: A population-based study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder among Swedish women: A population-based study
    2015 (English)In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, ISSN 0010-440X, E-ISSN 1532-8384, Vol. 58, p. 108-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by a highly distressing and impairing preoccupation with nonexistent or slight defects in appearance. Patients with BDD present to both psychiatric and non-psychiatric physicians. A few studies have assessed BDD prevalence in representative samples of the general population and have demonstrated that this disorder is relatively common. Our primary objective was to assess the prevalence of BDD in the Swedish population because no data are currently available. Methods: In the current cross-sectional study, 2891 randomly selected Swedish women aged 18-60 years participated. The occurrence of BDD was assessed using the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ), which is a validated self-report measure derived from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV criteria for BDD. In addition, symptoms of depression and anxiety were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Results: The prevalence of BDD among Swedish women was 2.1%. The women with BDD had significantly more symptoms of depression and anxiety than the women without BDD. Depression (HADS depression score greater than= 8) and anxiety (HADS anxiety score greater than= 8) were reported by 42% and 72% of the women with BDD, respectively. Conclusions: The results of the present study indicate that BDD is relatively common among Swedish women (2.1%) and that it is associated with significant morbidity.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WB Saunders, 2015
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117368 (URN)10.1016/j.comppsych.2014.12.014 (DOI)000351807800015 ()25617963 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Linkoping University; Ostergotland County Council

    Available from: 2015-04-24 Created: 2015-04-24 Last updated: 2017-12-04
    3. I will be at deaths door and realize that Ive wasted maybe half of my life on one body part: the experience of living with body dysmorphic disorder
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>I will be at deaths door and realize that Ive wasted maybe half of my life on one body part: the experience of living with body dysmorphic disorder
    2016 (English)In: International journal of psychiatry in clinical practice (Print), ISSN 1365-1501, E-ISSN 1471-1788, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 191-198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of patients living with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), including their experiences with the health care system. Methods: Fifteen individuals with BDD were interviewed, and interpretive description was used to analyse the interviews. Results: The following six themes were identified: being absorbed in time-consuming procedures, facing tension between ones own ideal and the perceived reality, becoming the disorder, being restricted in life, attempting to reduce ones problems and striving to receive care. The overarching concept derived from the themes was feeling imprisoned - struggling to become free and to no longer feel abnormal. Conclusions: Ideas of imprisonment and abnormality compose the entire experience of living with this disorder. Although the participants suffered greatly from their BDD, these patients encountered difficulties in accessing health care and had disappointing experiences during their encounters with the health care system. Therefore, it is important to increase awareness and knowledge of BDD among health care professionals to ensure that patients with BDD receive the appropriate care.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2016
    Keywords
    Body dysmorphic disorder; body image; interview; qualitative research
    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131206 (URN)10.1080/13651501.2016.1197273 (DOI)000380144000013 ()27314665 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-09-16 Created: 2016-09-12 Last updated: 2017-11-21
  • 31.
    Brohede, Sabina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Karin
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    I will be at deaths door and realize that Ive wasted maybe half of my life on one body part: the experience of living with body dysmorphic disorder2016In: International journal of psychiatry in clinical practice (Print), ISSN 1365-1501, E-ISSN 1471-1788, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 191-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of patients living with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), including their experiences with the health care system. Methods: Fifteen individuals with BDD were interviewed, and interpretive description was used to analyse the interviews. Results: The following six themes were identified: being absorbed in time-consuming procedures, facing tension between ones own ideal and the perceived reality, becoming the disorder, being restricted in life, attempting to reduce ones problems and striving to receive care. The overarching concept derived from the themes was feeling imprisoned - struggling to become free and to no longer feel abnormal. Conclusions: Ideas of imprisonment and abnormality compose the entire experience of living with this disorder. Although the participants suffered greatly from their BDD, these patients encountered difficulties in accessing health care and had disappointing experiences during their encounters with the health care system. Therefore, it is important to increase awareness and knowledge of BDD among health care professionals to ensure that patients with BDD receive the appropriate care.

  • 32.
    Brus, O.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Cao, Y.
    Örebro University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, E.
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hulten, M.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Landen, M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Lundberg, J.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Nordanskog, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Nordenskjold, A.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Self-assessed remission rates after electroconvulsive therapy of depressive disorders2017In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 45, p. 154-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) effectively treats severe depression, but not all patients remit. The aim of the study was to identify clinical factors that associate with ECT-induced remission in a community setting. Methods: Depressed patients who underwent ECT in 2011-2014 were identified from the Swedish National Quality Register for ECT. Remission was defined as self-rated Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores of 0-10 after ECT. Other registers provided data on previous antidepressant use, comorbidities, and demographics. Results: Of 1671 patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria, 42.8% achieved remission. Older age, education length over 9 years, psychotic symptoms, shorter duration of preceding antidepressant use, pulse width stimulus amp;gt;= 0.50 ms, absence of substance use disorders, anxiety diagnosis, lamotrigine, and benzodiazepines, were associated with remission. Conclusions: This study shows that psychotic subtype of depression and older age are clinically relevant predictors of a beneficial ECT effect. Additionally, ECT outcomes can be further improved by optimizing the treatment technique and concomitant medication. (C) 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  • 33.
    Brändström, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Personality and its complexity: An investigation of the Swedish version of the Temperament and Character Inventory2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In former days the descriptions of personality were based on typologies, reflecting the view that people do not change over time and so have a stable, life-long personality type. Later on exclusive categories were created, but during recent times the understanding of personality has changed due to more dimensional and dynamic thinking.

    Cloninger’s personality theory integrates concepts and research findings from neuroanatomy, neurophysiology of behavior and learning, and from developmental, social and clinical psychology. It is postulated that the behavioural systems of temperament and character are related to two major neural systems for the adaptation of experiences on various levels. The continuous interaction between temperament and character affects the personality development in both directions; temperament impacts upon character and vice versa during life.

    The development of the TCI was founded on the development of the biosocial theory of personality, which in turn stimulated the further development of the theory. Unfortunately this theory-based approach is not commonly used in the development of personality measurements. The development of a personality questionnaire on the basis of the theory must be viewed as a significant challenge, and this prompted my interest in dealing with and learning more about this personality assessment method.

    The objectives of this thesis were a critical evaluation of Cloninger’s theory; a test of its applicability in psychiatric science; and an attempt to contribute to its development.

    The main findings of our investigations can be described as follows:

    The adaptation of the Swedish version of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) was successful and the seven factor structure of Cloninger’s biopsychological theory of personality theory was mainly confirmed by the Swedish normative data and by cross-cultural comparisons between data from Germany, Sweden and the U.S.A.

    The results concerning internal consistency and factor structure further underline that the adult version of the TCI is unsuitable for use in adolescents before age of 17 years. For the adolescents the junior TCI is recommended.

    Furthermore temperament dimensions seem to be more stable over time compared to the character dimensions. The gender and age differences found suggest that both have to be taken into account in research and clinical application.

    The results from our studies suggested that the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) has to be evaluated as a useful tool within the process of validation of diagnosis of a Personality Disorder (PD), especially in clinical practice where it is often difficult to recognise all a patient’s personality disturbances during a short time. Use of the TCI is likely to improve understanding, classification, and subsequently the interpretations in clinical settings.

     

    List of papers
    1. Swedish normative data on personality using the Temperament and Character Inventory
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish normative data on personality using the Temperament and Character Inventory
    Show others...
    1998 (English)In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, ISSN 0010-440X, E-ISSN 1532-8384, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 122-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) is a self-report personality questionnaire based on Cloninger's psychobiological model of personality, which accounts for both normal and abnormal variation in the two major components of personality, temperament and character. Normative data for the Swedish TCI based on a representative Swedish sample of 1,300 adults are presented, and the psychometric properties of the questionnaire are discussed. The structure of the Swedish version replicates the American version well for the means, distribution of scores, and relationships within the between scales and subscales. Further, the Swedish inventory had a reliable factor structure and test-retest performance. The results of this study confirm the theory of temperament and character as a seven-factor model of personality.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17831 (URN)10.1016/S0010-440X(98)90070-0 (DOI)9606577 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-04-22 Created: 2009-04-22 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. The Swedish Version of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI): A Cross-Validation of Age and Gender Influences
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Swedish Version of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI): A Cross-Validation of Age and Gender Influences
    2008 (English)In: European Journal of Psychological Assessment, ISSN 1015-5759, E-ISSN 2151-2426, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 14-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In order to establish new norms of the Swedish version of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), data from 2,209 Swedish individuals (age between 13 and 80) was analyzed. The second aim was to evaluate the impact of age and gender on the questionnaire scores. The third aim was to investigate whether the TCI can be meaningfully applied to adolescents in personality assessment as a basis for further research and clinical studies. Age and gender showed independent effects on personality dimensions, which implies that age and gender specific norms have to be established for the TCI. Furthermore, the results in terms of inconsistencies in the correlational and factorial structure, as well as low internal consistency scores in the younger age groups, suggest that the adult version of the TCI should not be applied below the age of 17; for these age groups we recommend the use of the junior TCI (JTCI). The inventory is under further development and several items are in need of revision in order to create less complicated formulations, enabling an improvement in the psychometrics.

    Keywords
    Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), age cohort, Swedish normative data, personality, gender
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17832 (URN)10.1027/1015-5759.24.1.14 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-04-22 Created: 2009-04-22 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Assessing personality: The Temperament and Character Inventory in a cross-cultural comparison between Germany, Sweden, and the U.S.A.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing personality: The Temperament and Character Inventory in a cross-cultural comparison between Germany, Sweden, and the U.S.A.
    1999 (English)In: Psychological Reports, ISSN 0033-2941, E-ISSN 1558-691X, Vol. 84, p. 1315-1330Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the American, Swedish, and German versions of the Temperament and Character Inventory were compared based on samples of 330 healthy volunteers each, which had been carefully matched for age and sex. The analyses indicate a high agreement for scores on the temperament and character dimensions and subscales across the samples. Exceptions include minor differences that appear to be due to cultural variations, differences in sampling methods, and of some minor difficulties with two subscales (Exploratory Excitability and Self-acceptance) as well as defining the Persistence factor as an independent dimension of Temperament. The subscales yielded similar internal consistencies, correlational structure, factor structures, and high factor congruence coefficients. The results indicate a cross-cultural transferability of the Temperament and Character dimensions of the inventory. Also, the validity and stability of the seven-factor model of personality, as suggested by Cloninger, is supported.

    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17833 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-04-22 Created: 2009-04-22 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Distributions by age and sex of the dimensions of Temperament and Character Inventory in a cross-cultural perspective among Sweden, Germany, and the USA
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distributions by age and sex of the dimensions of Temperament and Character Inventory in a cross-cultural perspective among Sweden, Germany, and the USA
    2001 (English)In: Psychological Reports, ISSN 0033-2941, E-ISSN 1558-691X, Vol. 89, p. 747-758Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Distribution by age and sex of the dimensions of the Temperament and Character Inventory were assessed cross-culturally for samples in Sweden, German, and USA. The Temperament and Character Inventory is a 240-item (Sweden, 238-item), self-administered, true-false format, paper-and-pencil test developed by Cloninger and his co-workers based on his unified biosocial theory of personality. The inventory measures the Temperament dimensions Novelty Seeking, Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence, and Persistence as well as the Character dimensions, Self-directedness, Cooperativeness, and Self-transcendence. The samples consisted of 300 German subjects, 300 Swedish subjects, and 300 U.S. subjects matched by age cohort and sex. Stability of the personality dimensions was evaluated across samples as were their age and sex distributions. We found significant affects of age, sex, and culture in univariate and multivariate comparisons on the personality dimensions. However, several significant differences in the personality dimensions for both European samples appear to be similar compared with those of the U.S. sample. We have to conclude that sex- and age-specific norms for the dimensions of the Temperament and Character Inventory are necessary given the established significant differences.

    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17834 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-04-22 Created: 2009-04-22 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    5. Further development of the Temperament and Character Inventory
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Further development of the Temperament and Character Inventory
    2001 (English)In: Psychological Reports, ISSN 0033-2941, E-ISSN 1558-691X, Vol. 93, p. 995-1002Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The Temperament and Character Inventory is an internationally used personality questionnaire based on Cloninger’s psychobiological theory of personality. Given some limitations of Version 9 a revised version was developed. The structural equivalence of the two versions was demonstrated from a cross-cultural perspective with 309 and 173 healthy volunteers from Sweden and Germany, respectively, who completed both versions in one session. In testing for the replicability of the factors across both samples as well as across both versions, an orthogonal Procrustes rotation method was used. The reliability coefficients for the revision were higher than the former version for both samples. The factor structures of the inventory remain highly equivalent across cultures and across versions. The results indicate a cross-cultural transferability of the Temperament and Character dimensions of the inventory. The stability and the validity of the 7-factor model of personality, as suggested by Cloninger, are supported. The Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised represents an important and useful method for the assessment of personality.

    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17837 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-04-22 Created: 2009-04-22 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    6. Personality disorder diagnosis by means of the Temperament and Character Inventory
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Personality disorder diagnosis by means of the Temperament and Character Inventory
    2009 (English)In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, ISSN 0010-440X, E-ISSN 1532-8384, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 347-352Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Personality disorders (PDs) criteria are still in development. Cloninger's biosocial theory of personality contributed to this discussion. The aim of the study was to explore the relationships between extreme expressions on temperament and an immature character according to Cloninger's assumptions. Eight hundred healthy volunteers and 200 psychiatric inpatients were consecutively recruited each from Sweden and Germany, and were asked to complete the Temperament and Character Inventory, which measures 4 temperament and 3 character dimensions. Patients differed from controls on temperament and character dimensions. The combination of low and very low character scores with extreme scores in either novelty seeking, harm avoidance, or reward dependence was found more often among patients with PD compared with patients without PD and controls; this is more pronounced with an increasing number of extreme temperament scores. The Temperament and Character Inventory represents a useful tool in the diagnostic process of personality disorders.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Maryland Heights, United States: Saunders Elsevier, 2009
    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17838 (URN)10.1016/j.comppsych.2008.09.002 (DOI)000266820100008 ()
    Available from: 2009-04-22 Created: 2009-04-22 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
  • 34.
    Brändström, Sven
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Richter, Jörg
    Clinical of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Rostock University, Germany.
    Nylander, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion.
    Further development of the Temperament and Character Inventory2001In: Psychological Reports, ISSN 0033-2941, E-ISSN 1558-691X, Vol. 93, p. 995-1002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Temperament and Character Inventory is an internationally used personality questionnaire based on Cloninger’s psychobiological theory of personality. Given some limitations of Version 9 a revised version was developed. The structural equivalence of the two versions was demonstrated from a cross-cultural perspective with 309 and 173 healthy volunteers from Sweden and Germany, respectively, who completed both versions in one session. In testing for the replicability of the factors across both samples as well as across both versions, an orthogonal Procrustes rotation method was used. The reliability coefficients for the revision were higher than the former version for both samples. The factor structures of the inventory remain highly equivalent across cultures and across versions. The results indicate a cross-cultural transferability of the Temperament and Character dimensions of the inventory. The stability and the validity of the 7-factor model of personality, as suggested by Cloninger, are supported. The Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised represents an important and useful method for the assessment of personality.

  • 35.
    Brändström, Sven
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Richter, Jörg
    Department of Psychiatry and Phsycotherapy, Rostock Univeristy, Germany.
    Przybeck, Tom
    Centre for Psychobioloty of Personality, Washington University, St Louis, USA.
    Distributions by age and sex of the dimensions of Temperament and Character Inventory in a cross-cultural perspective among Sweden, Germany, and the USA2001In: Psychological Reports, ISSN 0033-2941, E-ISSN 1558-691X, Vol. 89, p. 747-758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distribution by age and sex of the dimensions of the Temperament and Character Inventory were assessed cross-culturally for samples in Sweden, German, and USA. The Temperament and Character Inventory is a 240-item (Sweden, 238-item), self-administered, true-false format, paper-and-pencil test developed by Cloninger and his co-workers based on his unified biosocial theory of personality. The inventory measures the Temperament dimensions Novelty Seeking, Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence, and Persistence as well as the Character dimensions, Self-directedness, Cooperativeness, and Self-transcendence. The samples consisted of 300 German subjects, 300 Swedish subjects, and 300 U.S. subjects matched by age cohort and sex. Stability of the personality dimensions was evaluated across samples as were their age and sex distributions. We found significant affects of age, sex, and culture in univariate and multivariate comparisons on the personality dimensions. However, several significant differences in the personality dimensions for both European samples appear to be similar compared with those of the U.S. sample. We have to conclude that sex- and age-specific norms for the dimensions of the Temperament and Character Inventory are necessary given the established significant differences.

  • 36.
    Cederlund, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wallin, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    DELORES: Smartphone som stöd vid beteendeaktivering för depression: en studie av prediktorer för utfall2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med föreliggande studie var att undersöka möjliga prediktorer för utfallet i KBT-behandling vid depression, face-to-face samt i kombination med stöd av en smartphoneapplikation. 88 deltagare randomiserades till smartphone- (n = 45) eller face-to-face-betingelsen (n = 43). Utfallsmåttet var förändring i Beck Depression Inventory-II mellan förocheftermätning, främst beräknat med residual gain scores. Samband mellan prediktorer och utfall undersöktes medkorrelationsanalyser. Regressionsanalyser med interaktionen mellan prediktor och behandlingsbetingelse genomfördes för att undersöka skillnader mellan betingelserna. Resultatet visade att högre initial depressionsnivå predicerade större förbättring för alla deltagare sammantaget samt för båda behandlingsbetingelserna. Att ha sysselsättning predicerade mindre förbättring för face-to-face-betingelsen. Vissa frågor gällande smartphoneanvändning visade sig betydelsefulla. Exempelvis var upplevelsen av att ha stor användning av sin smartphone relaterat till större förbättring för smartphonebetingelsen. Gällande allians var högre skattningar på Working Alliance Inventory-Short under behandlingsvecka tre relaterat till större förbättring för alla deltagaresammantaget samt för smartphonebetingelsen. Detta samband gällde även vid kontroll för skattning av förväntad allians. Kön, ålder, civilstånd, utbildningsnivå, stad, initial ångestnivå, samtidig ångestdiagnos, tidigare depressionsdiagnos, förväntad allians samt flera smartphonefrågor predicerade inte utfallet. Att många faktorer inte korrelerade med utfallet skulle kunna tyda på att detta behandlingsformat kan komma att passa en bred patientgrupp, men att det kan vara viktigt att ta hänsyn till betydelsen av allians samt individers smartphonevanor.

  • 37.
    Chau, David T.
    et al.
    Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA.
    Fogelman, Phoebe
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA.
    Nordanskog, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Drevets, Wayne C.
    Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA; Janssen Research and Development, Janssen Pharmaceuticals of Johnson and Johnson, Titusville, New Jersey, USA.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA.
    Distinct Neural-Functional Effects of Treatments With Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Electroconvulsive Therapy, and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Their Relations to Regional Brain Function in Major Depression: A Meta-analysis2017In: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, ISSN 2451-9030, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 318-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functional neuroimaging studies have examined the neural substrates of treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Low sample size and methodological heterogeneity, however, undermine the generalizability of findings from individual studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to identify reliable neural changes resulting from different modes of treatment for MDD and compared them with each other and with reliable neural functional abnormalities observed in depressed versus control samples.

  • 38.
    Checa, Antonio
    et al.
    Division of Physiological Chemistry II, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmqvist, Anna
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Flyckt, Lena
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Schwieler, Lilly
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Skogh, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Cervenka, Simon
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahl, Marja-Liisa
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Erhardt, Sophie
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wheelock, Craig E.
    Division of Physiological Chemistry II, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cerebrospinal fluid levels of sphingolipids associate with disease severity in first episode psychosis patients2018In: Schizophrenia Research, ISSN 0920-9964, E-ISSN 1573-2509, Vol. 199, p. 438-441Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 39.
    Chermá Yeste, Maria Dolores
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahlner, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Finn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Concentration of Antidepressant Drugs in Children and Adolescents: a naturalistic clinical studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aims of this study were to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of antidepressant agents, in terms of steady-state and trough values, in a heterogeneous cohort of patients and to describe the utilisation of antidepressant drugs (ATDs) in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the south- east of Sweden.

    Method: Patients from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry centres in the counties of Östergötland, Jönköping and Kalmar (Sweden) to be prescribed an antidepressant drug, were studied between 2002 and 2004. The blood concentration of ATDs and, in some cases, also CYP2D6 were determined and relevant clinical information provided.

    Results: Two hundred and eleven children: 64 % girls and 36 % boys, between the ages of 8 and 20 were evaluated. The concentrations of drugs in the patient evaluated (PE) population were as expected from the dose administered in 63 % of this population, higher than expected in 26 % and lower than expected in 11 %.

    Dose-concentration relationships for sertraline (rs=0.48, p<0.001) and metabolite desmethylsertraline (rs=0.5, p<0.001) were seen. No relationship was found between dose and ratio desmethylsertraline-to-sertraline. CYP2D6*4 was the most common poor metabolizer (PM) allele. The primary indication for the antidepressant treatment was depression in 69 % of subjects. Suspected adverse drug reactions were spontaneously reported in 31 %. Monotherapy was indicated in 49 % of request forms. The most common drug combinations with the antidepressant drug were oral anticontraceptives and anxiolytics/sedatives/hypnotic drugs.

    Conclusion: the most prescribed antidepressant drug in children and adolescents in the present study was sertraline. The pharmacokinetic outcomes of serum concentration of sertraline, as well as daily doses administered were similar to the referenced data for adults. Antidepressant drug monotherapy was most common. No serious adverse side effects were spontaneously reported. TDM may provide support to the prescribing physicians to individual dose optimising and to assess drug compliance, above all when the antidepressant drugs are not well studied in pediatric patients before approval for general prescription. Further clinical trials, as well as naturalistic studies are necessary to ensure that children are not exposed to unnecessary risk and to determine the most appropriate dose in children of different ages.

  • 40.
    Cocozza, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Parenting of Society: From Report to Support2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Child protection is the process that aims to find, investigate and help maltreated children. In many countries this process is initiated by professionals who compile mandated reports that are then submitted to a designated agency that in many cases is part of a separate child protection system. In Sweden there is no separate child protection system. In Sweden, the child protection process is part of the family-service organization system. The system has two main objectives, one is voluntary (provide family service), the other coercive (provide child protection). This system is administered by the municipal social services agencies (referred to throughout as Social Services).

    Aim: The overall purpose of this study was to gain knowledge of the child protection process in Sweden. The aim was two fold, one to carry out an in-depth study of a population of reports, the other to analyse the results of the findings in relation to the child protection system. The child protection system consists of elements outlined in the macro system: the underlying ideology and the framing of the problem, and the legislation, administration and the demands placed on professionals.

    Method: A total population of reports made to one municipality during 1998 was followed to a final decision. The reports were collected in 2000.´There were 1 570 reports made regarding 1 051 children, which composed 4 % of children age 0-18. This initial study was used in four papers where data were analysed covering four different issues. In 2003 a follow-up study was conducted in order to determine the extent to which the child appeared in the database of Social Services. In the first paper the children’s age, gender and contacts with Social Services were described as were the content of the reports and the outcome of reporting. The objective of the second paper was a description of the reporter, and the measurement of the extent to which the reports indicated child maltreatment. The third paper aimed at analysing how the first decision, the decision not to investigate reports, was made in the child protection process. Then a re-evaluation of these decisions was made to see how well the decision was justified. The contacts taken were described. In the fourth paper the influence of the socio-economic load on the child protection process was measured.

    Findings: Few reports (16 %) led to an intervention being provided, and 41% of the reports were not investigated further. In the follow-up study 61% of all 1 051 children appeared in the files of Social Services. As Sweden lacks a juvenile delinquency system these cases are automatically passed from the police to Social Services and are there registered as mandated reports.

    Hence the police became the largest report group of reporters, followed by professionals. Of the professionals’ reports 22 % were not investigated. In the follow-up study 53 % of these re-occurred at the Social Service and were then investigated. Seventy six percent of the reports not investigated were when re-evaluated found to indicate child maltreatment.

    The social worker used the parents as the main source for information in 74 % of the cases. The social worker did not contact the child at all in 53 % of the cases and only nine of the reporters were contacted. In the follow-up study 45 % of the children investigation re-appeared in the files of Social Services. Children from high socio-economic load districts were more often reported than those from middle or low (4.3%, 3.1% 2.3%). The socio economic load when measured in logistic regression was not found to correlate with the decision to investigate.

    A main finding in this study was that the child protection process was difficult to separate from other systems within the family service. This makes it much more difficult to evaluate the child protection process.

    The reports filed by professionals were not investigated adequately, and the lack of criteria of specifying how reports are to be evaluated creates a risk that maltreated children will not be found. The professional reports were handled in a way that increased the risk that professionals will have negative experiences with Social Services that consequently can lead them to refrain from filing eports.

    Conclusion: These findings suggest the following: Pass new legislation that makes it easier to separate each of the three systems from the other. Create a national database in which data on the handling of child-protection cases is systematically recorded. Develop a national reporting form that is to be used by all who file mandated reports of suspected maltreatment. Create clear criteria that specify how a report is to be handled to ensure that the reporting professionals are met with appropriate respect and that the quality of the decisions is guaranteed all over the country.

    List of papers
    1. Child Protection in a Family Service Organisation in Sweden- What is the outcome for maltreated children?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Child Protection in a Family Service Organisation in Sweden- What is the outcome for maltreated children?
    2010 (English)In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 922-928Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study was conducted to increase the knowledge of what characterises the child-protection process in family-service organisations. A total of 1570 (regarding 1051 children) reports made to Social Services in one municipality during 1 year were followed to a final decision. A five-year follow-up study was conducted. There were 651 (41%) of the reports that were not investigated, 84% of the reports filed were judged not to demonstrate child maltreatment. The most usual cluster consisted of children that had committed a crime/offence when they were between 13 and 18 years old (314/1051–30%). The social worker reported 38% of the reports that regarded sexual or physical abuse to the police. Comparing the filtering pattern with the results from a study conducted in England, the family-service organisation does not seem to lead to the provision of services for a greater percentage of children than does a distinctive child-protection system. In the five-year follow-up period there were 61% of the children that were or had been targeted for an intervention or an investigation. This study raises questions about child protection in Sweden and emphasises the need for the system to be studied further.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12931 (URN)10.1016/j.childyouth.2010.03.003 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-02-13 Created: 2008-02-13 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Who suspects and report child maltreatment to Social Services in Sweden?: Is there a reliable mandatory reporting process?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who suspects and report child maltreatment to Social Services in Sweden?: Is there a reliable mandatory reporting process?
    2007 (English)In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 209-223Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the mandatory report process in Sweden. The components that are analysed are who makes the reports, what is reported and the outcome for the reports. Data were collected in a Swedish county in the year 2000 by means of locating every report made to the Social Services during one year (1998). The net sample consisted of 1,570 reports regarding 1,051 children. A follow-up study was carried out in 2003 of all the children for whom a report in 1998 did not lead to an investigation being initiated. We found in these study indicators that the process might not be secure. The professionals reported 1% of the children in the municipality; 22% of the reports from professionals were not investigated. The five-year follow-up study shows that 53% of the children that these reports concerned had been the subject of an investigation. This could be an indicator that children continue to be maltreated after being reported since the assessments are not accurate. In this study, 67% of 'crime reports' were 'not indicating' child maltreatment. There should be a questioning of 'crime reports' automatically entering the mandated report process as, if registered nationally, this could lead to a deflation of mandatory reports. Administration needs to change introducing a national form for filing reports.

    Keywords
    Mandatory Reporting, Child Protection, Reporter, Child Welfare, Child Neglect, Child Abuse, Social Services, Anmälningsplikt, Anmälare, Barn Som Far Illa, Social Förvaltning, Barnmisshandel
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12932 (URN)10.1080/13691450701317996 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-02-13 Created: 2008-02-13 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    3. Child Protection in Sweden: Are routine assesments reliable?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Child Protection in Sweden: Are routine assesments reliable?
    2006 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 95, no 11, p. 1474-1480Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study the validity of the decision not to investigate mandatory reports of suspected child maltreatment.

    Methods: Written files of 220 reports indicating possible child maltreatment were analysed and re-evaluated. As a measure of the justification for the decisions, a 5-y follow-up study was done.

    Results: We determined that 76% of the reports still indicated child maltreatment after the initial assessment was done. In the follow-up study, 45% of the children had been investigated. The social worker used the family as the only source of information in 74% of the cases, in 6% someone outside the family was contacted, and in 11% no further information in addition to the report was collected. In 9%, data on information sources were missing.

    Conclusion: The findings are rather discouraging, as they challenge the belief that a report is a means of ensuring that maltreatment does not continue. The study shows that, depending upon the way in which the initial assessments are made, maltreated children may run a risk of not being identified, even though the maltreatment has been reported. This suggests that there may be a need for national guidelines concerning the reporting of maltreatment.

    Keywords
    Child abuse, child protection, decision making, mandatory reporting, social service
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12933 (URN)10.1080/08035250600784352 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-02-13 Created: 2008-02-13 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. The Impact of Socio-economic load in Family Service organized child protection
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Impact of Socio-economic load in Family Service organized child protection
    2007 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12934 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-02-13 Created: 2008-02-13
  • 41.
    Cortes, Carlos R.
    et al.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Grodin, Erica N.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Mann, Claire L.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Mathur, Karan
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Kerich, Michael
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Zhu, Xi
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Schwandt, Melanie
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Diazgranados, Nancy
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    George, David T.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Momenan, Reza
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Insula Sensitivity to Unfairness in Alcohol Use Disorder2018In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 201-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Social decision making has recently been evaluated in alcohol use disorder (AUD) using the ultimatum game (UG) task, suggesting a possible deficit in aversive emotion regulation elicited by the unfairness during this task. Despite the relevance to relapse of this possible faulty regulation, the brain correlates of the UG in AUD are unknown. Methods: In total, 23 AUD and 27 healthy controls (HC) played three consecutive fMRI runs of the UG, while behavioral and brain responses were recorded. Results: Overall, acceptance rate of unfair offers did not differ between groups, but there was a difference in the rate of behavioral change across runs. We found significant anterior insula (aINS) activation in both groups for both fair and unfair conditions, but only HC showed a trend towards increased activation during unfair vs. fair offers. There were not overall whole-brain between-group significant differences. We found a trend of signal attenuation, instead of an increase, in the aINS for AUD when compared to HC during the third run, which is consistent with our recent findings of selective insula atrophy in AUD. Conclusion: We found differential group temporal dynamics of behavioral response in the UG. The HC group had a low acceptance rate for unfair offers in the first two runs that increased markedly for the third run; whereas the AUD group was consistent in their rejection of unfair offers across the three runs. We found a strong significant decrease in neural response across runs for both groups. Short summary: This fMRI study of UG in alcohol use disorder found behavioral group differences in acceptance rate across runs, which together with significant BOLD-signal decrease across runs in UG-related regions in both groups, highlights the impairment of strategy in AUD and the effect of repetitive exposure to unfairness in this task.

  • 42.
    Croy, Ilona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Geide, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN).
    Paulus, Martin
    Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK USA.
    Weidner, Kerstin
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Affective touch awareness in mental health and disease relates to autistic traits - An explorative neurophysiological investigation2016In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 245, p. 491-496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Affective touch is important for social interaction within families and groups and there is evidence that unmyelinated C tactile fibers are involved in this process. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders show alterations in the perception and processing of affective touch. sThus, we hypothesized that affective touch awareness based on C tactile fiber activation is impaired in individuals with high levels of autistic trait. The pleasantness perception of optimal and suboptimal C tactile stimuli was tested in an explorative study in 70 patients recruited from an outpatient psychotherapy clinic and 69 healthy comparison subjects. All participants completed questionnaires about autistic traits, depressive symptomatology, childhood maltreatment, and about the daily amount of touch. Relative to comparison subjects, patients reported engaging in touch less frequently in daily life and rated touch less pleasant. Reduced valence ratings of touch were explained by childhood maltreatment but not by any particular disorder or depression severity. Among all tested variables, the affective touch awareness correlated with autistic traits only - in patients as well as in comparison subjects. Taken together, individuals with mental health issues have a lower baseline of expression and reception of affective touch. Autistic traits and childhood maltreatment modulate the experience of affective touch. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 43.
    Cuijpers, Pim
    et al.
    Vrije University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Reynolds, Charles F.
    University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pennsylvania, USA.
    Donker, Tara
    Vrije University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Li, Juan
    Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Beekman, Aartjan
    Vrije University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Personalized treatment of adult depression: medication, psychotherapy, or both? A systematic review2012In: Depression and anxiety (Print), ISSN 1091-4269, E-ISSN 1520-6394, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 855-864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Personalized medicine aims to identify which characteristics of an individual predict the outcome of a specific treatment, in order to get a better match between the individual and the treatment received. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials comparing two treatments directly in a group of patients with a specific characteristic.

    METHODS: We searched relevant studies from bibliographical databases and included trials comparing (1) medication with psychotherapy, (2) medication with combined treatment, and (3) psychotherapy with combined treatment, in specific target groups (a) with a predefined sociodemographic characteristic, (b) a specific type of depression, (c) a comorbid mental or somatic disorder, or (d) from a specific setting (outpatients, primary care).

    RESULTS: We included 52 studies with 4,734 depressed patients. In these studies, 20 characteristics of the target groups were examined. The results showed that medication is probably the best treatment for dysthymia, and combined treatments are more effective in depressed outpatients, as well as in depressed older adults. However, in order to examine the 20 characteristics in the three categories of comparisons, 254 studies would be needed for having sufficient statistical power to show an effect size of g = 0.5. Currently, only 20.1% of these studies have been conducted.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although a considerable number of studies have compared medication, psychotherapy, and combined treatments, and some preliminary results are useful for deciding which treatment is best for which patient, the development of personalized treatment of depression has only just begun.

  • 44.
    Daremo, Åsa
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Occupational performance and affective symptoms for patients withdepression disorder2015In: Advances in Psychiatry, ISSN 2356-685X, E-ISSN 2314-7768, p. 1-6, article id 438149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aimof this study was to describe recovering over time in occupational performance and in affective symptoms for patients with depression disorder by using different assessments and methods for collecting data. A longitudinal design with data collections on repeated occasions was used. The Occupational Circumstances Assessment Interview and Rating Scale and Occupational Self- Assessment were used formeasuring occupational performance, and for affective symptoms, a Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale Self-Assessment was used. Fourteen patients with depression disorder were included in the study. The result indicates that affective symptoms improve earlier than occupational performance. Furthermore, self-assessment seems to reflect more improvement to the patient than interview-based assessment. Different kinds of assessment and different kinds of data collection methods seem to facilitate the understanding of the patients recovering. In addition habituationwas themost important item for the patients to manage.One implication for practice is that patients may need an extended period of treatment supporting occupational performance.

  • 45.
    Djukanovic, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Jorg
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden; Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Is the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) a valid measure in a general population 65-80 years old? A psychometric evaluation study2017In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 15, article id 193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The HADS (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) aims to measure symptoms of anxiety (HADS Anxiety) and depression (HADS Depression). The HADS is widely used but has shown ambiguous results both regarding the factor structure and sex differences in the prevalence of depressive symptoms. There is also a lack of psychometric evaluations of the HADS in non-clinical samples of older people. The aim of the study was to evaluate the factor structure of the HADS in a general population 65-80 years old and to exam possible presence of differential item functioning (DIF) with respect to sex. Methods: This study was based on data from a Swedish sample, randomized from the total population in the age group 65-80 years (n = 6659). Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were performed to examine the factor structure. Ordinal regression analyses were conducted to detect DIF for sex. Reliability was examined by both ordinal as well as traditional Cronbachs alpha. Results: The CFA showed a two-factor model with cross-loadings for two items (7 and 8) had excellent model fit. Internal consistency was good in both subscales, measured with ordinal and traditional alpha. Floor effects were presented for all items. No indication for meaningful DIF regarding sex was found for any of the subscales. Conclusions: HADS Anxiety and HADS Depression are unidimensional measures with acceptable internal consistency and are invariant with regard to sex. Despite pronounced ceiling effects and cross-loadings for item 7 and 8, the hypothesized two-factor model of HADS can be recommended to assess psychological distress among a general population 65-80 years old.

  • 46.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Wiklund, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Siamouli, Melina
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Moutou, Katerina
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Could PANSS be a useful tool in the determining of the stages of schizophrenia? A clinically operational approach2017In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, ISSN 0022-3956, E-ISSN 1879-1379, Vol. 86, p. 66-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Staging in schizophrenia might be an important approach for the better treatment and rehabilitation of patients. The purpose of this study was to empirically devise a staging approach in a sample of stabilized patients with schizophrenia. One hundred and seventy patients aged amp;gt;= 18 years (mean = 40.7, SD = 11.6) diagnosed by DSM-5 criteria were evaluated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Principal components analysis (PCA) with varimax rotation was used. The model was examined in the total sample and separately across a hypothesized stage of illness based on three age groups and between the two sexes. The PCA revealed a six factor structure for the total sample: 1) Negative, 2) Positive, 3) Depression and anxiety, 4) Excitement and Hostility, 5) Neurocognition and 6) Disorganization. The separate PCAs by stage of illness and sex revealed different patterns and quality of symptomatology. The Negative and Positive factors were stable across all examined groups. The models corresponding to different stages differed mainly in terms of neurocognition and disorganization and their interplay. Catatonic features appear more prominent in males while in females neurocognition takes two forms; one with disorganization and one with stereotype thinking with delusions. This study suggests that the three arbitrary defined stages of illness (on the basis of age) seem to reflect a progress from a preserved insight and more coherent mental functioning to disorganization and eventually neurocognitive impairment. Sexes differ in terms of the relationship of psychotic features with neurocognition. These results might have significant research and clinical implications. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 47.
    Ekeblad, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    A Randomized Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder: Predictors of process and outcome2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) are both evidence-based treatments for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Several head-to-head comparisons between these methods have been made, most of them in the US. There is a need for more trials in different treatment settings. This thesis is based on a randomized controlled trial of CBT and IPT for MDD in a community-based psychiatric outpatient clinic. In the trial, treatment outcome and mentalization change was compared between the methods. In addition, the significance of pre-treatment mentalization for subsequent alliance and outcome was analyzed. Ninety-six patients, about half of them with personality disorders, were randomized to 14 sessions of CBT or IPT. The hypothesis was that IPT would not be inferior to CBT which was confirmed. CBT had a significantly higher drop-out rate. Initial capacity for mentalization predicted alliance and outcome in both IPT and CBT. The level of mentalization was changed in IPT but not in CBT

    List of papers
    1. Reflective Functioning as Predictor of Working Alliance and Outcome in the Treatment of Depression
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reflective Functioning as Predictor of Working Alliance and Outcome in the Treatment of Depression
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0022-006X, E-ISSN 1939-2117, Vol. 84, no 1, p. 67-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Although considerable attention has been paid to the concept of mentalization in psychotherapy, there is little research on mentalization as predictor of psychotherapy process and outcome. Using data from a randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy for depression, we studied mentalization in 85 outpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD) according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. It was hypothesized that patients showing lower capacity for mentalization would experience poorer quality of alliance and worse outcome. Method: Depressive symptoms were measured each session using the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Mentalization was measured as reflective functioning (RF) on a slightly shortened version of the Adult Attachment Interview. A measure of depression-specific reflective functioning (DSRF), measuring mentalization about depressive symptoms, was also used. The Working Alliance Inventory-Short Form Revised was completed after each session by both therapist and patient. Longitudinal multilevel modeling was used to analyze data. Results: The patients had on average very low RF (M = 2.62, SD = 1.22). Lower pretreatment RF/DSRF predicted significantly lower therapist-rated working alliance during treatment. RF did not affect patient-rated alliance, but lower DSRF predicted lower patient-rated alliance across treatment. Patients with higher RF/DSRF had better outcomes on self-rated depression. Conclusions: The findings showed lower than normal capacity for mentalization in patients with MDD. Lower RF/DSRF predicted worse treatment outcome. More research is needed to understand how RF affects psychotherapy response and how RF is affected after recovery from depression.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC, 2016
    Keywords
    psychotherapy process; mentalization; reflective functioning; working alliance; major depression
    National Category
    Basic Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124490 (URN)10.1037/ccp0000055 (DOI)000367426900006 ()26594944 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Rehsam Fund [2010/013]; Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare [2013-0203]; L. J. Boethius Research Fund; Emil Andersson Research Fund

    Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2018-01-10
  • 48.
    Ekeblad, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Vasternorrland County Council, Sweden.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Vestberg, Robert
    Vasternorrland County Council, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Randomized Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder in a Community-Based Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic2016In: Depression and anxiety (Print), ISSN 1091-4269, E-ISSN 1520-6394, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 1090-1098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundInterpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are both evidence-based treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Several head-to-head comparisons have been made, mostly in the United States. In this trial, we compared the two treatments in a small-town outpatient psychiatric clinic in Sweden. The patients had failed previous primary care treatment and had extensive Axis-II comorbidity. Outcome measures were reduction of depressive symptoms and attrition rate. MethodsNinety-six psychiatric patients with MDD (DSM-IV) were randomized to 14 sessions of CBT (n = 48) or IPT (n = 48). A noninferiority design was used with the hypothesis that IPT would be noninferior to CBT. A three-point difference on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used as noninferiority margin. ResultsIPT passed the noninferiority test. In the ITT group, 53.5% (23/43) of the IPT patients and 51.0% (24/47) of the CBT patients were reliably improved, and 20.9% (9/43) and 19.1% (9/47), respectively, were recovered (last BDI score amp;lt;10). The dropout rate was significantly higher in CBT (40%; 19/47) compared to IPT (19%; 8/43). Statistically controlling for antidepressant medication use did not change the results. ConclusionsIPT was noninferior to CBT in a sample of depressed psychiatric patients in a community-based outpatient clinic. CBT had significantly more dropouts than IPT, indicating that CBT may be experienced as too demanding. Since about half the patients did not recover, there is a need for further treatment development for these patients. The study should be considered an effectiveness trial, with strong external validity but some limitations in internal validity.

  • 49.
    Emilsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Health Science, Section of Nursing Graduate Level, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Per A
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Öhnström, Gisela
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Beliefs regarding medication and side effects influence treatment adherence in adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder2017In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 559-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adherence to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatment is important because, when untreated, it may have serious consequences with lifelong effects. In the case of adolescents on long-term medicine prescription, more knowledge is needed regarding adherence and factors influencing adherence, which was the purpose of this study. Adolescents (n = 101) on ADHD medication ≥6 months were administrated questionnaires at a monitoring appointment: Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS), beliefs about medicines (BMQ) and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ). Adherence was high, the mean value was 88% of the maximum MARS score, and correlated positively with the “BMQ-necessity-concerns differential” but negatively with “BMQ-concerns” and “BMQ-side effects”. Adolescents with more belief in the necessity of the medication, less concerns and less experience of side effects tended to be more adherent to medication prescription (“intentional non-adherence”), while “unintentional non-adherence” (forgetfulness) was associated with how much they perceived that their ADHD affected their lives. In a multiple regression model, the variance of MARS total (R2 = 0.21) and “intentional non-adherence” (R2 = 0.24) was explained by the “BMQ-necessity–concern differential” and “BMQ-experienced side effects”. The variance of “unintentional non-adherence” (R2 = 0.12) was explained by the “BMQ-necessity–concern differential” and “B-IPQ-consequences of ADHD”. In conclusion, adolescents on long-term medication reported good adherence, mainly influenced by more beliefs in the necessity versus concerns of the medications, less experienced side effects and more perceived consequences of ADHD. BMQ could be useful to identify risks of low adherence, which should be counteracted by partially gender-specific interventions.

  • 50.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ekeblad, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Vasternorrland County Council, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Improvement of the Working Alliance in One Treatment Session Predicts Improvement of Depressive Symptoms by the Next Session2016In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0022-006X, E-ISSN 1939-2117, Vol. 84, no 8, p. 738-751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Developments in working alliance theory posit that the therapists attention to fluctuations in the alliance throughout treatment is crucial. Accordingly, researchers have begun studying the alliance as a time-varying mechanism of change rather than as a static moderator. However, most studies to date suffer from bias owing to the nonindependence of error term and predictors (endogeneity). Method: Patients with major depressive disorder (N = 84) from a randomized trial comparing cognitive-behavioral therapy with interpersonal psychotherapy filled out the Beck Depression Inventory-II before each session. After each session, patients and therapists filled out the Working Alliance Inventory short forms. Data were analyzed using the generalized method of moments for dynamic panel data, a method commonly applied in econometrics to eliminate endogeneity bias. Results: Improvement of the alliance predicted significant reduction of depressive symptoms by the next session (patient rating: b = -4.35, SE = 1.96, p = .026, 95% confidence interval [CI] [-8.19, -0.51]; therapist rating: b = -4.92, SE = 1.84, p = .008, 95% CI [-8.53, -1.31]). In addition, there was a significant delayed effect on the session after the next (patient rating: b = -3.25, SE = 1.20, p = .007, 95% CI [-5.61, -0.89]; therapist rating: b = -5.44, SE = 1.92, p = .005, 95% CI [-9.20, -1.68]). Conclusion: If the quality of patient-therapist alliance is improved in a given treatment session, depressive symptoms will likely decrease by the next session. The most important limitation of this study is its relatively small sample size.

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