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  • 1.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Zhou, Caddie
    Ctr Registries Vastra Gotaland, Sweden.
    Rolfson, Ola
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Gunilla Limbäck
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Ctr Registries, Sweden.
    Analgesic prescriptions received by patients before commencing the BOA model of care for osteoarthritis: a Swedish national registry study with matched reference and clinical guideline benchmarking2022In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 93, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Swedish clinical guidelines for osteoarthritis (OA) prioritize patient education, exercise, and-if necessary-weight reduction before considering adjunct pharmacological intervention. Contrariwise, we investigated the proportion and type of dispensed analgesic prescriptions in Sweden received by patients during 3 years before commencing non-pharmacological primary care interventions for OA (2008-2016) compared with the general population. Furthermore, we analyzed the proportion of analgesic prescriptions dispensed before (2008-2012) compared with after (2012-2016) guideline publication in terms of concordance with clinical guideline recommendations. Patients and methods - Patients with hip or knee OA (n = 72,069) from the Better Management of OA national quality register receiving non-pharmacological interventions in primary care between 2008 and 2016 were included (OA cohort). An age, sex, and residence matched reference cohort (n = 216,207) was formed from the Swedish Total Population Register. Based on a period 3 years prior to inclusion in the OA cohort, Swedish Prescribed Drug Register data was linked to both the OA and reference cohorts. Results - Compared with the reference cohort, a distinctly larger proportion of the OA cohort had dispensed prescriptions for most types of analgesics, increasing exponentially each year prior to commencing non-pharmacological intervention. Since guideline publication, the proportion of the OA cohort having no dispensed prescription analgesics prior to non-pharmacological primary care intervention concordantly increased by 5.0% (95% CI 4.2-5.9). Furthermore, dispensed prescriptions concordantly decreased for non-selective NSAIDs -8.6% (CI -9.6 to -7.6), weak opioids -6.8% (CI -7.7 to -5.9), glucosamine -9.5% (CI -9.8 to -8.8). and hyaluronic acid -1.6% (CI -1.8 to -1.5) but discordantly increased for strong opioids 2.8% (CI 2.1-3.4) and glucocorticoid intra-articular injection for hip OA 2.1% (CI 1.0-3.1). Interpretation - In Sweden, dispensed prescription of analgesics commonly occurred before initiating non-pharmacological primary care interventions for OA but reduced modestly after guideline publication, which prioritizes non-pharmacological before pharmacological interventions. Additional modest improvements occurred in the stepped-care prioritization of analgesic prescription types. However, future strategies are required to curb an increase of strong opioids prescription for OA and glucocorticoid intra-articular injection for hip OA.

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  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Karin
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Marie Cederschiold Univ Coll, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bratthall, Charlotte
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Western Sweden Healthcare Reg, Sweden.
    Bjork-Eriksson, Thomas
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Western Sweden Healthcare Reg, Sweden.
    Stenmarker, Margaretha
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Futurum Acad Hlth & Care, Sweden.
    Referral of patients with cancer to palliative care: Attitudes, practices and work-related experiences among Swedish physicians2022In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 31, no 6, article id e13680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective This study aimed to explore the attitudes, practices and work-related experiences among Swedish physicians regarding the referral process, integration and transition between oncology care and palliative care (PC). Methods A cross-sectional online survey was performed with a study-specific questionnaire in 2016-2017 in south-eastern Sweden. Physicians working with cancer patients within surgical specialties, medical specialties and paediatric oncology participated. Results The vast majority of the 130 participating physicians (99.2%) stated that PC was beneficial for the patient and were positive about early integration of PC (65.5%). Still, only 27.6% of the participants introduced PC at an early stage of non-curable disease. However, paediatric oncologists had a very early introduction of PC in comparison with medical specialties (p = 0.004). Almost 90% of the study population said they wanted to know that the patient had been taken care of by another care facility. Conclusions Despite the physicians positive attitude towards early integration and referral to PC, they often acted late in the disease trajectory. This late approach can reduce the patients opportunity of improving quality of life during severe circumstances. There is a need for in-depth knowledge of the physicians challenges in order to bridge the gap between intentions and actions.

  • 3.
    af Geijerstam, Peder
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Cityhälsan Centrum.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ekholmen.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Cityhälsan Centrum.
    Rådholm, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Kärna. The George Institute for Global Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
    Home Blood Pressure Compared With Office Blood Pressure in Relation to Dysglycemia2022In: American Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0895-7061, E-ISSN 1941-7225, Vol. 35, no 9, p. 810-819Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Masked hypertension is more common in individuals with type 2 diabetes than in individuals with normoglycemia. We aimed to explore if there is a discrepancy between office blood pressure (office BP) and home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) in relation to HbA1c as well as glycemic status in 5,029 middle-aged individuals.

    Methods: HBPM was measured in a subsample of 5,029 participants in The Swedish CardioPulmonary BioImage Study (SCAPIS), a population-based cohort of 50–64 years old participants. Both office BP and HBPM were obtained after 5 minutes’ rest using the semiautomatic Omron M10-IT oscillometric device. White coat effect was calculated by subtracting systolic HBPM from systolic office BP. Participants were classified according to glycemic status: Normoglycemia, prediabetes, or diabetes based on fasting glucose, HbA1c value, and self-reported diabetes diagnosis.

    Results: Of the included 5,025 participants, 947 (18.8%) had sustained hypertension, 907 (18.0%) reported taking antihypertensive treatment, and 370 (7.4%) had diabetes mellitus. Both systolic office BP and HBPM increased according to worsened glycemic status (P for trend 0.002 and 0.002, respectively). Masked hypertension was more prevalent in participants with dysglycemia compared with normoglycemia (P = 0.036). The systolic white coat effect was reversely associated with HbA1c (P = 0.012).

    Conclusions: The systolic white coat effect was reversely associated with HbA1c, and the prevalence of masked hypertension increased with dysglycemia.

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  • 4. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Heart: Image quality, measurement accuracy and patient experience2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Non-invasive diagnostic imaging of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) is frequently carried out with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) or myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (MPS). CMR is the gold standard for the evaluation of scar after myocardial infarction and MPS the clinical gold standard for ischemia. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is at times difficult for patients and may induce anxiety while patient experience of MPS is largely unknown.

    Aims: To evaluate image quality in CMR with respect to the sequences employed, the influence of atrial fibrillation, myocardial perfusion and the impact of patient information. Further, to study patient experience in relation to MRI with the goal of improving the care of these patients.

    Method: Four study designs have been used. In paper I, experimental cross-over, paper (II) experimental controlled clinical trial, paper (III) psychometric crosssectional study and paper (IV) prospective intervention study. A total of 475 patients ≥ 18 years with primarily cardiac problems (I-IV) except for those referred for MRI of the spine (III) were included in the four studies.

    Result: In patients (n=20) with atrial fibrillation, a single shot steady state free precession (SS-SSFP) sequence showed significantly better image quality than the standard segmented inversion recovery fast gradient echo (IR-FGRE) sequence (I). In first-pass perfusion imaging the gradient echo-echo planar imaging sequence (GREEPI) (n=30) had lower signal-to-noise and contrast–to-noise ratios than the steady state free precession sequence (SSFP) (n=30) but displayed a higher correlation with the MPS results, evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively (II). The MRIAnxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ) was validated on patients, referred for MRI of either the spine (n=193) or the heart (n=54). The final instrument had 15 items divided in two factors regarding Anxiety and Relaxation. The instrument was found to have satisfactory psychometric properties (III). Patients who prior CMR viewed an information video scored significantly (lower) better in the factor Relaxation, than those who received standard information. Patients who underwent MPS scored lower on both factors, Anxiety and Relaxation. The extra video information had no effect on CMR image quality (IV).

    Conclusion: Single shot imaging in atrial fibrillation produced images with less artefact than a segmented sequence. In first-pass perfusion imaging, the sequence GRE-EPI was superior to SSFP. A questionnaire depicting anxiety during MRI showed that video information prior to imaging helped patients relax but did not result in an improvement in image quality.

    List of papers
    1. Image quality and myocardial scar size determined with magnetic resonance imaging in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation: a comparison of two imaging protocols
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Image quality and myocardial scar size determined with magnetic resonance imaging in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation: a comparison of two imaging protocols
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    2010 (English)In: CLINICAL PHYSIOLOGY AND FUNCTIONAL IMAGING, ISSN 1475-0961, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 122-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Pandgt;Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the heart generally requires breath holding and a regular rhythm. Single shot 2D steady-state free precession (SS_SSFP) is a fast sequence insensitive to arrhythmia as well as breath holding. Our purpose was to determine image quality, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios and infarct size with a fast single shot and a standard segmented MRI sequence in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation and chronic myocardial infarction. Methods: Twenty patients with chronic myocardial infarction and ongoing atrial fibrillation were examined with inversion recovery SS_SSFP and segmented inversion recovery 2D fast gradient echo (IR_FGRE). Image quality was assessed in four categories: delineation of infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium, occurrence of artefacts and overall image quality. SNR and CNR were calculated. Myocardial volume (ml) and infarct size, expressed as volume (ml) and extent (%), were calculated, and the methodological error was assessed. Results: SS_SSFP had significantly better quality scores in all categories (P = 0 center dot 037, P = 0 center dot 014, P = 0 center dot 021, P = 0 center dot 03). SNRinfarct and SNRblood were significantly better for IR_FGRE than for SS_SSFP (P = 0 center dot 048, P = 0 center dot 018). No significant difference was found in SNRmyocardium and CNR. The myocardial volume was significantly larger with SS_SSFP (170 center dot 7 versus 159 center dot 2 ml, P andlt; 0 center dot 001), but no significant difference was found in infarct volume and infarct extent. Conclusion: SS_SSFP displayed significantly better image quality than IR_FGRE. The infarct size and the error in its determination were equal for both sequences, and the examination time was shorter with SS_SSFP.

    Keywords
    atrial fibrillation, magnetic resonance imaging, myocardial infarction, segmented inversion recovery 2D fast gradient echo, single shot inversion recovery 2D steady-state free precession
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54159 (URN)10.1111/j.1475-097X.2009.00914.x (DOI)000274438800006 ()
    Available from: 2010-02-26 Created: 2010-02-26 Last updated: 2021-12-28
    2. An echo-planar imaging sequence is superior to a steady-state free precession sequence for visual as well as quantitative assessment of cardiac magnetic resonance stress perfusion
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>An echo-planar imaging sequence is superior to a steady-state free precession sequence for visual as well as quantitative assessment of cardiac magnetic resonance stress perfusion
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    2017 (English)In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 52-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background To assess myocardial perfusion, steady-state free precession cardiac magnetic resonance (SSFP, CMR) was compared with gradient-echo–echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI) using myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) as reference. Methods Cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion was recorded in 30 patients with SSFP and in another 30 patients with GRE-EPI. Timing and extent of inflow delay to the myocardium was visually assessed. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated. Myocardial scar was visualized with a phase-sensitive inversion recovery sequence (PSIR). All scar positive segments were considered pathologic. In MPS, stress and rest images were used as in clinical reporting. The CMR contrast wash-in slope was calculated and compared with the stress score from the MPS examination. CMR scar, CMR perfusion and MPS were assessed separately by one expert for each method who was blinded to other aspects of the study. Results Visual assessment of CMR had a sensitivity for the detection of an abnormal MPS at 78% (SSFP) versus 91% (GRE-EPI) and a specificity of 58% (SSFP) versus 84% (GRE-EPI). Kappa statistics for SSFP and MPS was 0·29, for GRE-EPI and MPS 0·72. The ANOVA of CMR perfusion slopes for all segments versus MPS score (four levels based on MPS) had correlation r = 0·64 (SSFP) and r = 0·96 (GRE-EPI). SNR was for normal segments 35·63 ± 11·80 (SSFP) and 17·98 ± 8·31 (GRE-EPI), while CNR was 28·79 ± 10·43 (SSFP) and 13·06 ± 7·61 (GRE-EPI). Conclusion GRE-EPI displayed higher agreement with the MPS results than SSFP despite significantly lower signal intensity, SNR and CNR.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2017
    Keywords
    cardiac imaging techniques, coronary heart disease, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, nuclear medicine, perfusion
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies Medical Image Processing Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130795 (URN)10.1111/cpf.12267 (DOI)000390688200008 ()26147785 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden [12437]; Futurum, the County council of Jonkoping [12440, 81851, 217261]; Linkoping University; County Council of Ostergotland [281281]; Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation [20120449]

    Available from: 2016-08-24 Created: 2016-08-24 Last updated: 2021-12-28Bibliographically approved
    3. Development and validation of a questionnaire evaluating patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging: the Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and validation of a questionnaire evaluating patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging: the Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ)
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    2016 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 6, p. 1368-1380Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To develop and validate a new instrument measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations, Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire. Background. Questionnaires measuring patients anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations have been the same as used in a wide range of conditions. To learn about patients experience during examination and to evaluate interventions, a specific questionnaire measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging is needed. Design. Psychometric cross-sectional study with test-retest design. Methods. A new questionnaire, Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire, was designed from patient expressions of anxiety in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-scanners. The sample was recruited between October 2012-October 2014. Factor structure was evaluated with exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency with Cronbachs alpha. Criterion-related validity, known-group validity and test-retest was calculated. Results. Patients referred for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of either the spine or the heart, were invited to participate. The development and validation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire resulted in 15 items consisting of two factors. Cronbachs alpha was found to be high. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire correlated higher with instruments measuring anxiety than with depression scales. Known-group validity demonstrated a higher level of anxiety for patients undergoing Magnetic Resonance Imaging scan of the heart than for those examining the spine. Test-retest reliability demonstrated acceptable level for the scale. Conclusion. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire bridges a gap among existing questionnaires, making it a simple and useful tool for measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016
    Keywords
    anxiety; instrument development; magnetic resonance imaging; nurse; nursing; reliability; validity
    National Category
    Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129145 (URN)10.1111/jan.12917 (DOI)000376007400014 ()26893007 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation; Futurum County Council of Jonkoping

    Available from: 2016-06-13 Created: 2016-06-13 Last updated: 2021-12-28
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    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Heart: Image quality, measurement accuracy and patient experience
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  • 5.
    Ahlbeck, Lars
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Differences in patient perception of appropriate level of care1996In: European Journal of General Practice, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 109-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The principle of achieving the most cost-effective level of care in relation to needs is an essential aim for all health care systems. However, it is not certain that the corresponding knowledge and attitudes with respect to the appropriate level of care for different symptoms can be found in the general population. There may be age-related differences in illness behaviour that manifest in ‘overutilisation’ of the system. We studied illness behaviour with regard to attitudes and inclination to seek care for different symptoms at various levels in the health care system.Methods: The study group consisted of a random selection of 296 persons, born in the 1940s, ′50s and ′60s, and living in a defined region in Sweden. In a questionnaire they had to choose between different levels of care for twelve symptom descriptions with varying degrees of severity. The answers were scored according to the level of care, adequacy and overutilisation.Results: The vast majority of participants chose an adequate level of care. However, overutilisation was found, particularly among women born in the 1960s and to some extent among men born in the 1940s. These two groups together constituted about 70% of all the individuals who tended to overutilise the health care in their expressed preferences.Conclusions: These individuals do not receive cost-effective care, or the most adequate care with regard to their needs. The results indicate, however, that the problem was more a question of attitude rather than a lack of knowledge and information.

  • 6.
    Ahlstrand, I
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Falkmer, T
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Björk, M
    OP0209-HPR Less Pain and Activity Limitations in Today's Early RA Patients Compared with Patients Diagnosed 10 Years Earlier (The Swedish Tira-Project)2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Over the last decades the RA-treatment strategies have changed considerably. Routines for early RA diagnosis and instituted disease modifying anti rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) have been established. In the early 2000s biologic agents also became available for treatment purposes. Despite these altered and improved strategies RA patients continue to report pain and activity limitations; women more so than men.Objectives: To study differences regarding pain and activity limitations during the first three years after diagnosis of RA in today's patients compared with patients diagnosed 10 years earlier from a gender perspective.Methods: This study was based on patients recruited to the project “early interventions in RA” (TIRA). In the first cohort (TIRA-1) 320 patients were included during 1996-1998. In the second cohort (TIRA-2) 463 patients were included during 2006-2008. Disease activity score 28 joint count (DAS-28) and medication were registered. Pain intensity (VAS), bodily pain (BP) in Short Form36 (SF-36) and activity limitation (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ) were reported at inclusion and at follow-ups after one, two and three years.Results: Disease activity did not differ between cohorts at inclusion, but was significant lower at the follow ups in the TIRA-2 cohort compared with the TIRA-1 cohort. Patients in TIRA2 were prescribed traditional DMARD:s and biologic agents more frequent than in TIRA-1. The TIRA-2 patients reported significantly higher pain intensity and activity limitations at inclusion but lower pain intensity and activity limitations at all follow-ups than TIRA-1 patients. There were no significant differences between cohorts regarding bodily pain at inclusion, but thereafter the TIRA-2 patients showed significant lower bodily pain than the TIRA-1 patients. Men reported lower activity limitation than women in TIRA-1; otherwise there were no gender differences in TIRA-1. In TIRA-2, there were no significant gender differences regarding pain at inclusion. However, men reported lower pain than women at all follow-ups. Women, in turn, reported significantly higher activity limitations at all time points in TIRA-2. Pain and activity limitations were significantly reduced from inclusion to the one year follow-up but remained stable thereafter.Conclusions: Both women and men in today's early RA patient cohort report lower pain and less activity limitations at the follow ups after diagnosis of RA compared to 10 years earlier. However, both activity limitations and bodily pain are still pronounced.Disclosure of Interest: None declared

  • 7.
    Ahmadpour, Doryaneh
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala. Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Kristoffersson, Anna
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Forum Östergötland.
    Link, Yumin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Neurologiska kliniken i Linköping.
    Eriksson, Anne
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Iacobaeus, Ellen
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Neurologiska kliniken i Linköping. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Haghighi, Sara
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Neurologiska kliniken i Linköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Inventory study of an early pandemic COVID-19 cohort in South-Eastern Sweden, focusing on neurological manifestations2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 1, article id e0280376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundNeurological manifestations in patients with COVID-19 have been reported previously as outcomes of the infection.The purpose of current study was to investigate the occurrence of neurological signs and symptoms in COVID-19 patients, in the county of ostergotland in southeastern Sweden. MethodsThis is a retrospective, observational cohort study. Data were collected between March 2020 and June 2020. Information was extracted from medical records by a trained research assistant and physician and all data were validated by a senior neurologist. ResultsSeventy-four percent of patients developed at least one neurological symptom during the acute phase of the infection. Headache (43%) was the most common neurological symptom, followed by anosmia and/or ageusia (33%), confusion (28%), hallucinations (17%), dizziness (16%), sleep disorders in terms of insomnia and OSAS (Obstructive Sleep Apnea) (9%), myopathy and neuropathy (8%) and numbness and tingling (5%). Patients treated in the ICU had a higher male presentation (73%). Several risk factors in terms of co-morbidities, were identified. Hypertension (54.5%), depression and anxiety (51%), sleep disorders in terms of insomnia and OSAS (30%), cardiovascular morbidity (28%), autoimmune diseases (25%), chronic lung diseases (24%) and diabetes mellitus type 2 (23%) founded as possible risk factors. ConclusionNeurological symptoms were found in the vast majority (74%) of the patients. Accordingly, attention to neurological, mental and sleep disturbances is warranted with involvement of neurological expertise, in order to avoid further complications and long-term neurological effect of COVID-19. Furthermore, risk factors for more severe COVID-19, in terms of possible co-morbidities that identified in this study should get appropriate attention to optimizing treatment strategies in COVID-19 patients.

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  • 8.
    Akerblom, Sophia
    et al.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Cervin, Matti
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Perrin, Sean
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Fischer, Marcelo Rivano
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    McCracken, Lance M.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    A Network Analysis of Clinical Variables in Chronic Pain: A Study from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP)2021In: Pain medicine, ISSN 1526-2375, E-ISSN 1526-4637, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 1591-1602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Efforts to identify specific variables that impact most on outcomes from interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation are challenged by the complexity of chronic pain. Methods to manage this complexity are needed. The purpose of the study was to determine the network structure entailed in a set of self-reported variables, examine change, and look at potential predictors of outcome, from a network perspective. Methods. In this study we apply network analysis to a large sample of people seeking interdisciplinary pain treatment (N = 2,241). Variables analyzed include pain intensity, pain interference, extent of pain, depression, anxiety, insomnia, and psychological variables from cognitive behavioral models of chronic pain. Results. We found that Acceptance, Pain Interference, and Depression were key, "central," variables in the pretreatment network. Interestingly, there were few changes in the overall network configuration following treatment, specifically with respect to which variables appear most central relative to each other. On the other hand, Catastrophizing, Depression, Anxiety, and Pain Interference each became less central over time. Changes in Life Control, Acceptance, and Anxiety were most strongly related to changes in the remainder of the network as a whole. Finally, no network differences were found between treatment responders and non-responders. Conclusions. This study highlights potential future targets for pain treatment. Further application of a network approach to interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation data is recommended. Going forward, it may be better to next do this in a more comprehensive theoretically guided fashion, and ideographically, to detect unique individual differences in potential treatment processes.

  • 9.
    Alexander, Lind
    et al.
    Lund Univ CRC, Sweden.
    Yang, Cao
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Maria, Hardstedt
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Vansbro Primary Hlth Care Ctr, Sweden.
    Stefan, Jansson
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ake, Lernmark
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Martin, Sundqvist
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Staffan, Tevell
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Karlstad Hosp, Sweden; Reg Varmland, Sweden.
    Cheng-ting, Tsai
    Enable Biosci Inc, CA USA.
    Jeanette, Wahlberg
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Johan, Jendle
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Anxiety, depression and quality of life in relation to SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in individuals living with diabetes during the second wave of COVID-192024In: DIABETES EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT, ISSN 2666-9706, Vol. 13, article id 100194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The objective was to compare anxiety, depression, and quality of life (QoL) in individuals living with type 1 (T1D) and type 2 (T2D) diabetes with matched controls during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Via randomization, individuals living with diabetes T1D (n = 203) and T2D (n = 413), were identified during February-July 2021 through health-care registers. Population controls (n = 282) were matched for age, gender, and residential area. Questionnaires included self-assessment of anxiety, depression, QoL, and demographics in relation to SARS-CoV-2 exposure. Blood was collected through home-capillary sampling, and SARS-CoV-2 Nucleocapsid (NCP) and Spike antibodies (SC2_S1) were determined by multiplex Antibody Detection by Agglutination-PCR (ADAP) assays. Results: Younger age and health issues were related to anxiety, depression, and QoL, with no differences between the study groups. Female gender was associated with anxiety, while obesity was associated with lower QoL. The SARS-CoV-2 NCP seroprevalence was higher in T1D (8.9 %) compared to T2D (3.9 %) and controls (4.0 %), while the SARS-CoV-2 SC2_S1 seroprevalence was higher for controls (25.5 %) compared to T1D (16.8 %) and T2D (14.0 %). Conclusions: A higher SARS-CoV-2 infection rate in T1D may be explained by younger age and higher employment rate, and the associated increased risk for viral exposure. (c) 2023 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC

  • 10.
    Altena, Renske
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hübbert, Laila
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Norrköping.
    Kiani, Narsis A.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wengstrom, Yvonne
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bergh, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedayati, Elham
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp Stockholm, Sweden.
    Evidence-based prediction and prevention of cardiovascular morbidity in adults treated for cancer2021In: Cardio-Oncology, ISSN 2057-3804, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 20Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Cancer treatment-related morbidity relevantly compromises health status in cancer survivors, and efforts to optimise health-related outcomes in this population are vital to maximising healthy survivorship. A pre-treatment assessment - and possibly preventive management strategies - of cancer patients at increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) seems a rational approach in this regard. Definitive evidence for such strategies is largely lacking, thereby impeding the formulation of firm recommendations. Results The current scoping review aims to summarise and grade the evidence regarding strategies for prediction and prevention of CVD in adults in relation to oncological treatments. We conducted a scoping literature search for different strategies for primary prevention, such as medical and lifestyle interventions, as well as the use of predictive risk scores. We identified studies with moderate to good strength and up to now limited evidence to recommend primary preventive strategies in unselected patients treated with potentially cardiotoxic oncologic therapies. Conclusion Efforts to minimize the CVD burden in cancer survivors are needed to accomplish healthy survivorship. This can be done by means of robust models predictive for CVD events or application of interventions during or after oncological treatments. Up to now there is insufficient evidence to implement preventive strategies in an unselected group of patients treated with potential cardiotoxic oncological treatments. We conclude that randomised controlled trials are needed that evaluate medical and lifestyle interventions in groups at increased risk for complications, in order to be able to influence chronic illness risks, such as cardiovascular complications, for cancer survivors.

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  • 11.
    Andersson, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Co-morbidity and health care utilisation five years prior to diagnosis for depression: A register-based study in a Swedish population2011In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, p. 552-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Depressive disorders have been associated with a number of co-morbidities, and we   hypothesized that patients with a depression diagnosis would be heavy users of health   care services, not only when first evaluated for depression, but also for preceding   years. The aim of this study was to investigate whether increased health care utilisation   and co-morbidity could be seen during five years prior to an initial diagnosis of   depression.

    Methods

    We used a longitudinal register-based study design. The setting comprised the general   population in the county of Östergötland, south-east Sweden. All 2470 patients who   were 20 years or older in 2006 and who received a new diagnosis of depression (F32   according to ICD-10) in 2006, were selected and followed back to the year 2001, five   years before their depression diagnosis. A control group was randomly selected among   those who were aged 20 years or over in 2006 and who had received no depression diagnosis   during the period 2001-2006.

    Results

    Predictors of a depression diagnosis were a high number of physician visits, female   gender, age below 60, age above 80 and a low socioeconomic status.

    Patients who received a diagnosis of depression used twice the amount of health care   (e.g. physician visits and hospital days) during the five year period prior to diagnosis   compared to the control group. A particularly strong increase in health care utilisation   was seen the last year before diagnosis. These findings were supported with a high   level of co-morbidity as for example musculoskeletal disorders during the whole five-year   period for patients with a depression diagnosis.

    Conclusions

    Predictors of a depression diagnosis were a high number of physician visits, female   gender, age below 60, age above 80 and a low socioeconomic status. To find early signs   of depression in the clinical setting and to use a preventive strategy to handle these   patients is important.

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  • 12.
    Andersson, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Implementing healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care: a quasi-experimental cross-sectional study evaluating a team initiative2015In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 15, no 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Non-communicable diseases are a leading cause of death and can largely be prevented by healthy lifestyles. Health care organizations are encouraged to integrate healthy lifestyle promotion in routine care. This study evaluates the impact of a team initiative on healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care.

    Methods: A quasi-experimental, cross-sectional design compared three intervention centres that had implemented lifestyle teams with three control centres that used a traditional model of care. Outcomes were defined using the RE-AIM framework: reach, the proportion of patients receiving lifestyle promotion; effectiveness, self-reported attitudes and competency among staff; adoption, proportion of staff reporting regular practice of lifestyle promotion; implementation, fidelity to the original lifestyle team protocol. Data collection methods included a patient questionnaire (n = 888), a staff questionnaire (n = 120) and structured interviews with all practice managers and, where applicable, team managers (n = 8). The chi square test and problem-driven content analysis was used to analyse the questionnaire and interview data, respectively.

    Results:Reach: patients at control centres (48%, n = 211) received lifestyle promotion significantly more often compared with patients at intervention centres (41%, n = 169). Effectiveness: intervention staff was significantly more positive towards the effectiveness of lifestyle promotion, shared competency and how lifestyle promotion was prioritized at their centre. Adoption: 47% of staff at intervention centres and 58% at control centres reported that they asked patients about their lifestyle on a daily basis. Implementation: all intervention centres had implemented multi-professional teams and team managers and held regular meetings but struggled to implement in-house referral structures for lifestyle promotion, which was used consistently among staff.

    Conclusions:Intervention centres did not show higher rates than control centres on reach of patients or adoption among staff at this stage. All intervention centres struggled to implement working referral structures for lifestyle promotion. Intervention centres were more positive on effectiveness outcomes, attitudes and competency among staff, however. Thus, lifestyle teams may facilitate lifestyle promotion practice in terms of increased responsiveness among staff, illustrated by positive attitudes and perceptions of shared competency. More research is needed on lifestyle promotion referral structures in primary care regarding their configuration and implementation.

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  • 13.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ljungsbro.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dept Internal Med, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Vikbolandet.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Characteristics of patients with acute myocardial infarction contacting primary healthcare before hospitalisation: a cross-sectional study2018In: BMC Family Practice, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 19, article id 167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The characteristics of patients with on-going myocardial infarction (MI) contacting the primary healthcare (PHC) centre before hospitalisation are not well known. Prompt diagnosis is crucial in patients with MI, but many patients delay seeking medical care. The aims of this study was to 1) describe background characteristics, symptoms, actions and delay times in patients contacting the PHC before hospitalisation when falling ill with an acute MI, 2) compare those patients with acute MI patients not contacting the PHC, and 3) explore factors associated with a PHC contact in acute MI patients. Methods: This was a cross-sectional multicentre study, enrolling consecutive patients with MI within 24 hours of admission to hospital from Nov 2012 until Feb 2014. Results: A total of 688 patients with MI, 519 men and 169 women, were included; the mean age was 66 +/- 11 years. One in five people contacted PHC instead of the recommended emergency medical services (EMS), and 94% of these patients experienced cardinal symptoms of an acute MI; i.e., chest pain, and/or radiating pain in the arms, and/or cold sweat. Median delay time from symptom-onset-to-decision-to-seek-care was 2:15 hours in PHC patients and 0:40 hours in non-PHC patients (pamp;lt;0.01). The probability of utilising the PHC before hospitalisation was associated with fluctuating symptoms (OR 1.74), pain intensity (OR 0.90) symptoms during off-hours (OR 0.42), study hospital (OR 3.49 and 2.52, respectively, for two of the county hospitals) and a final STEMI diagnosis (OR 0.58). Conclusions: Ambulance services are still underutilized in acute MI patients. A substantial part of the patients contacts their primary healthcare centre before they are diagnosed with MI, although experiencing cardinal symptoms such as chest pain. There is need for better knowledge in the population about symptoms of MI and adequate pathways to qualified care. Knowledge and awareness amongst primary healthcare professionals on the occurrence of MI patients is imperative.

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  • 14.
    Andersson Sundell, K.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Beliefs about medicines are strongly associated with medicine-use patterns among the general population2016In: International journal of clinical practice (Esher), ISSN 1368-5031, E-ISSN 1742-1241, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 277-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsTo investigate self-reported beliefs and perceived sensitivity to medicines and their effects in relation to self-reported use of medicines and herbal remedies. MethodsA survey sent to 13,931 randomly selected Swedish adults included the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-General (BMQ-General) Questionnaire and the Perceived Sensitivity to Medicines Scale (PSM). The survey also asked about individuals use of prescribed and over-the-counter (OTC) medicines and herbal remedies in the past month. We examined all associations between scores on the BMQ-General subscales and PSM in relation to the use of medicines and herbal remedies, using analysis of covariance adjusted for potential confounders. ResultsAmong 7099 respondents, those using herbal remedies exclusively believed strongly that prescription and OTC medicines are harmful and overprescribed. Respondents using prescription and OTC medicines reported more positive beliefs [coefficient 0.67 (95% CI 0.47-0.87) and 0.70 (95% CI 0.51-0.90)] on the benefits of medicines compared with those using herbal remedies [-0.18 (95% CI -0.57-0.20)]. Perceived sensitivity to medicines was higher among those using herbal remedies only [1.25 (95% CI 0.46-2.03)] compared with those using no medicines (reference 0) or prescription [-0.44 (95% CI -0.84 to -0.05)] or OTC [-0.27 (95% CI -0.66-0.12)] medicines alone. ConclusionRespondents using prescription and/or OTC medicines reported stronger positive beliefs about the benefits of medicines in general, supporting the hypothesis that beliefs influence medicine use. Therefore, addressing beliefs and concerns about medicines during patient counselling may influence medicine use, particularly regarding unintentional non-adherence.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hoffmann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wennersten, Andre
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Healthcare, Sweden.
    Midloev, Patrik
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    PERson-centredness in Hypertension management using Information Technology: a randomized controlled trial in primary care2023In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 246-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives:To increase the proportion of individuals with hypertension obtaining a blood pressure (BP) of less than 140/90 mmHg by improving the management of hypertension in daily life from a person-centred perspective.Methods:In this unblinded randomized controlled trial, we tested an interactive web-based self-management system for hypertension. A total of 949 patients with hypertension from 31 primary healthcare centres (PHCCs) in Sweden were randomized 1 : 1 to either the intervention or usual care group. The intervention included daily measurement - via the participants mobile phone - of BP and pulse and reports of well being, symptoms, lifestyle, medication intake and side effects for eight consecutive weeks. It also included reminders and optional motivational messages. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants obtaining BP of less than 140/90 mmHg at 8 weeks and 12 months. Significance was tested by Pearsons chi(2)-test.Results:A total of 862 patients completed the trial, 442 in the intervention group and 420 in the control group. The primary outcome (BP <140/90 mmHg) at 8 weeks was achieved by 48.8% in the intervention group and 39.9% in the control group (P = 0.006). At 12 months, 47.1% (intervention) and 41.0% (control group) had a BP less than 140/90 mmHg (P = 0.071).Conclusion:The proportion of participants with a controlled BP of less than 140/90 mmHg increased after using the interactive system for self-management of hypertension for 8 weeks compared with usual care. Although the trend continued, there was no significant difference after 12 months. The results indicate that the effect of the intervention is significant, but the long-term effect is uncertain.

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  • 16.
    Andersson White, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jones, Michael P.
    Macquarie Univ, Australia.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Low maternal education increases the risk of Type 1 Diabetes, but not other autoimmune diseases: a mediating role of childhood BMI and exposure to serious life events2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper was to investigate if socioeconomic status (SES), measured by maternal education and household income, influenced the risk of developing autoimmune disease (Type 1 Diabetes, Celiac disease, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Crohns disease, Ulcerative colitis, and autoimmune thyroid disease), or age at diagnosis, and to analyse pathways between SES and autoimmune disease. We used data from the All Babies in Southeast Sweden (ABIS) study, a population-based prospective birth cohort, which included children born 1997-1999. Diagnoses of autoimmune disease was collected from the Swedish National Patient Register Dec 2020. In 16,365 individuals, low maternal education, but not household income, was associated with increased risk of Type 1 Diabetes; middle education RR 1.54, 95% CI 1.06, 2.23; P 0.02, low education RR 1.81, 95% CI 1.04, 3.18; P 0.04. Maternal education and household income was not associated with any other autoimmune disease and did not influence the age at diagnosis. Part of the increased risk of Type 1 Diabetes by lower maternal education was mediated by the indirect pathway of higher BMI and higher risk of Serious Life Events (SLE) at 5 years of age. The risk of developing Type 1 Diabetes associated to low maternal education might be reduced by decreasing BMI and SLE during childhood.

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  • 17.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Operations management PVC.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kärner Köhler, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Does problem-based learning improve patient empowerment and cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease in a Swedish primary care setting? A long-term prospective, randomised, parallel single randomised trial (COR-PRIM)2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e065230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To investigate long-term effects of a 1-year problem-based learning (PBL) on self-management and cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD).Design A prospective, randomised, parallel single centre trial.Settings Primary care settings in Sweden.Participants 157 patients with stable CHD completed the study. Subjects with reading and writing impairments, mental illness or expected survival less than 1 year were excluded.Intervention Participants were randomised and assigned to receive either PBL (intervention) or home-sent patient information (control group). In this study, participants were followed up at baseline, 1, 3 and 5 years.Primary and secondary outcomes Primary outcome was patient empowerment (Swedish Coronary Empowerment Scale, SWE-CES) and secondary outcomes General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), self-rated health status (EQ-VAS), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), body mass index (BMI), weight and smoking. Outcomes were adjusted for sociodemographic factors.Results The PBL intervention group resulted in a significant improved change in SWE-CES over the 5-year period (mean (M), 39.39; 95% CI 37.88 to 40.89) compared with the baseline (M 36.54; 95% CI 35.40 to 37.66). PBL intervention group increased HDL-C level (M 1.39; 95% CI 1.28 to 1.50) compared with baseline (M 1.24; 95% CI 1.15 to 1.33) and for EQ-VAS (M 77.33; 95% CI 73.21 to 81.45) compared with baseline (M 68.13; 95% CI 63.66 to 72.59) while these outcomes remained unchanged in the control group. There were no significant differences in BMI, weight or scores on GSES, neither between nor within groups over time. The overall proportion of smokers was significantly higher in the control group than in the experimental group.Conclusion One-year PBL intervention had positive effect on patient empowerment, health status and HDL-C at a 5-year follow-up compared with the control group. PBL education aiming to improve patient empowerment in cardiac rehabilitation should account for sociodemographic factors.

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  • 18.
    Antovic, A.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bruchfeld, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ekland, J.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lövström, B.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hugelius, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Börjesson, O.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Knight, A.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, I
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Risks and treatment related aspects of COVID-19 infection in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 418-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) require immunosuppressive therapy for disease control and relapse prevention and may be at risk for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The study objective was to analyse risk factors and outcomes of COVID-19 in well-characterized AAV patients. Method Data were retrieved from March 2020 to May 2021 from medical records of AAV cohorts in Stockholm and Uppsala, Sweden. COVID-19 was confirmed by positive PCR test or by ELISA. Severe COVID-19 was defined as need for non-invasive ventilation, intensive care unit care, and/or death. Age, gender, ANCA antibody type, ongoing immunosuppressive medication, and estimated glomerular filtration rate were recorded. Results The cohort comprised 310 AAV patients, of whom 29 (9%) were diagnosed with COVID-19. Four deaths were attributed to COVID-19. Fifteen patients (52%) were on prednisolone in the COVID-19 group and 130 (46%) in the non-COVID group, with significantly higher doses in COVID-19 patients (p < 0.01). Ongoing induction therapy was more prevalent in the COVID-19 group (p < 0.01). Severe COVID-19 was diagnosed in 9/29 (31%). Significant risk factors for severe COVID-19 were impaired kidney function (p = 0.01) and more intense immunosuppressive therapy (p = 0.02), with a trend for age (p = 0.07). Maintenance therapy with rituximab was not associated with severe COVID-19. Conclusions Our findings highlight risks and suggest that more attention should be given to optimal AAV treatment in a pandemic situation. They also emphasize the need for continued shielding, mitigation strategies, and effective vaccination of AAV patients.

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  • 19.
    Badian, Reza A.
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Andreasson, Mattias
    Acad Specialist Ctr, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Svenningsson, Per
    Acad Specialist Ctr, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Utheim, Tor Paaske
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Sorlandet Hosp Arendal, Norway.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping. Sorlandet Hosp Arendal, Norway.
    The pattern of the inferocentral whorl region of the corneal subbasal nerve plexus is altered with age2021In: The Ocular Surface, ISSN 1542-0124, Vol. 22, p. 204-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe the pattern of the nerves in the inferocentral whorl region of the human corneal subbasal nerve plexus (SBNP) in health and diseases known to affect the subbasal nerves. Methods: Laser-scanning in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) was used to image the SBNP bilaterally in 91 healthy subjects, 39 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and 43 subjects with Parkinsons disease (PD). Whorl regions were classified according to nerve orientation relative to age and health/disease status. Results: Of 346 examined eyes, 300 (86.7%) had an identifiable whorl pattern. In healthy subjects, a clockwise nerve orientation of the whorl was most common (67.9%), followed by non-rotatory or seam morphology (21.4%), and counterclockwise (10.7%). The clockwise orientation was more prevalent in healthy subjects than in T2DM or PD (P < 0.001). Healthy individuals below 50 years of age had a predominantly clockwise orientation (93.8%) which was reduced to 51.9% in those over 50 years (P < 0.001). Age but not disease status explained whorl orientation in T2DM and PD groups. Moreover, whorl orientation is bilaterally clockwise in the young, but adopts other orientations and becomes asymmetric across eyes with age. Finally, we report reflective dot-like features confined to the whorl region of the subbasal plexus, sometimes appearing in close association with subbasal nerves and present in 84-93% of examined eyes regardless of disease status, eye or sex. Conclusion: Subbasal nerves in the inferocentral whorl region are predominantly clockwise in young, healthy corneas. With aging and conditions of T2DM and PD, counterclockwise and non-rotatory configurations increase in prevalence, and bilateral symmetry is lost. Mechanisms regulating these changes warrant further investigation.

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  • 20.
    Baldvinsdottir, Bryndis
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Klurfan, Paula
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eneling, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ronne-Engstrom, Elisabeth
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindvall, Peter
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Aineskog, Helena
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Frioriksson, Steen
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Alpkvist, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hillman, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Kronvall, Erik
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ola G.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Adverse events during endovascular treatment of ruptured aneurysms: A prospective nationwide study on subarachnoid hemorrhage in Sweden2023In: BRAIN AND SPINE, ISSN 2772-5294, Vol. 3, article id 102708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: A range of adverse events (AEs) may occur in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Endovascular treatment is commonly used to prevent aneurysm re-rupture.Research question: The aim of this study was to identify AEs related to endovascular treatment, analyze risk factors for AEs and how AEs affect patient outcome.Material and methods: Patients with aneurysmal SAH admitted to all neurosurgical centers in Sweden during a 3.5-year period (2014-2018) were prospectively registered. AEs related to endovascular aneurysm treatment were thromboembolic events, aneurysm re-rupture, vessel dissection and puncture site hematoma. Potential risk factors for the AEs were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. Functional outcome was assessed at one year using the extended Glasgow outcome scale.Results: In total, 1037 patients were treated for ruptured aneurysms. Of which, 715 patients were treated with endovascular occlusion. There were 115 AEs reported in 113 patients (16%). Thromboembolic events were noted in 78 patients (11%). Aneurysm re-rupture occurred in 28 (4%), vessel dissection in 4 (0.6%) and puncture site hematoma in 5 (0.7%). Blister type aneurysm, aneurysm smaller than 5 mm and endovascular techniques other than coiling were risk factors for treatment-related AEs. At follow-up, 230 (32%) of the patients had unfavorable outcome. Patients suffering intraprocedural aneurysm re-rupture were more likely to have unfavorable outcome (OR 6.9, 95% CI 2.3-20.9).Discussion and conclusion: Adverse events related to endovascular occlusion of a ruptured aneurysm were seen in 16% of patients. Aneurysm re-rupture during endovascular treatment was associated with increased risk of unfavorable functional outcome.

  • 21.
    Bengtsson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet; Centrum för personcentrerad vård (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet; Centrum för personcentrerad vård (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Hallberg, Inger
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet; Centrum för personcentrerad vård (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Centrum för personcentrerad vård (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet; Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap, Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Taft, Charles
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet; Centrum för personcentrerad vård (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Improved blood pressure control using an interactive mobile phone support system2016In: The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, ISSN 1524-6175, E-ISSN 1751-7176, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 101-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This explorative, longitudinal study evaluated the effect of the daily use of a mobile phone-based self-management support system for hypertension in reducing blood pressure (BP) among 50 primary care patients with hypertension over 8 weeks. The self-management system comprises modules for (1) self-reports of BP, pulse, lifestyle, symptoms, and well-being; (2) delivery of reminders and encouragements; and (3) graphical feedback of self-reports. Daily use of the support system significantly reduced BP (systolic BP -7 mm Hg, diastolic BP -4.9 mm Hg) between baseline and week 8, with daily improvements leveling off as the study progressed. Three homogenous subsets of patients were identified who, despite different initial BP levels, showed similar decreases in BP during the study, indicating that patients benefited irrespective of baseline BP. In showing significant reductions in BP, our results suggest that the self-management support system may be a useful tool in clinical practice to help patients self-manage their hypertension.

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  • 22.
    Bergfors, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Lundmark, Katarzyna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nyström Kronander, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Allergy Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    A child with a long-standing, intensely itching subcutaneous nodule on a thigh: an uncommon (?) reaction to commonly used vaccines2013In: BMJ Case Reports, E-ISSN 1757-790XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 2-year-old girl presented with an intensely itching subcutaneous nodule on the front of a thigh. The nodule persisted for 10 months until it was excised. Subsequent investigation for malignancy and systemic disease showed no pathological findings. The diagnosis, persistent itching vaccination granuloma, was revealed by hazard almost 2 years after the onset of symptoms. Persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site for aluminium containing vaccines (mostly diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis combination vaccines for primary immunisation of infants) may appear with a long delay after the vaccination (months), cause prolonged itching (years) and are often associated with contact allergy to aluminium. The condition is poorly recognised in Health Care which may lead to prolonged symptoms and unnecessary investigations.

  • 23.
    Bernhardsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Närhälsan Rehabilitation, Region Västra Götaland, Hönö, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Maria E. H.
    Närhälsan Research and Development Primary Health Care, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden; The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Clinical practice in line with evidence?: A survey among primary care physiotherapists in western Sweden2015In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1169-1177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale, aims and objectives

    Evidence-based practice is becoming increasingly important in primary care physiotherapy. Clinical practice needs to reflect current best evidence and be concordant with evidence-based clinical guidelines. There is limited knowledge about therapeutic interventions used in primary care physiotherapy in Sweden. The objectives were to examine preferred treatment interventions reported by publicly employed physiotherapists in primary care for three common musculoskeletal disorders (low back pain, neck pain and subacromial pain), the extent to which these interventions were supported by evidence, and associations with demographic variables.

    Methods

    419 physiotherapists in primary care in western Sweden were surveyed using a validated web-based questionnaire.

    Results

    The survey was completed by 271 respondents (65%). Median number of interventions reported was 7 (range 1–16). The most common treatment interventions across the three conditions were advice on posture (reported by 82–94%), advice to stay active (86–92%), and different types of exercise (65–92%). Most of these interventions were supported by evidence. However, interventions with insufficient evidence, such as advice on posture, TENS and aquatic exercise, were also used by 29–96%. Modalities such as laser therapy and ultrasound were sparingly used (<5%), which is in line with evidence. For neck pain, use of evidence-based interventions was associated with gender and for subacromial pain, with work experience.

    Conclusions

    Advice and exercise therapy were the interventions most frequently reported across the three diagnoses, illustrating an active treatment strategy. While most reported interventions are supported by evidence, interventions with unclear or no evidence of effect were also used to a high extent.

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  • 24.
    Besser, Rachel E. J.
    et al.
    UCL, England; Oxford Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England; Churchill Hosp, England.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Hindmarsh, Peter C.
    UCL, England.
    Cole, Tim J.
    UCL, England.
    Exploring C-peptide loss in type 1 diabetes using growth curve analysis2018In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0199635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives C-peptide (CP) loss in type 1 diabetes (T1D) is highly variable, and factors influencing it are poorly understood. We modelled CP values in T1D patients from diagnosis for up to 6 years, treating the serial data as growth curves plotted against time since diagnosis. The aims were to summarise the pattern of CP loss (i.e. growth curve shape) in individual patients in simple terms, and to identify baseline characteristics that predict this pattern in individuals. Materials and methods Between 1976 and 2011, 442 T1D patients initially aged amp;lt; 18y underwent 120-minute mixed meal tolerance tests (MMTT) to calculate area under the curve (AUC) CP, at 3, 9,18, 30, 48 and 72 months after diagnosis (n = 1537). The data were analysed using the novel SITAR mixed effects growth curve model (Superlmposition by Translation And Rotation). It fits a mean AUC growth curve, but also allows the curves mean level and rate of fall to vary between individuals so as to best fit the individual patient curves. These curve adjustments define individual curve shape. Results The square root (root) AUC scale provided the best fit. The mean levels and rates of fall for individuals were normally distributed and uncorrelated with each other. Age at diagnosis and root AUC at 3 months strongly predicted the patient-specific mean levels, while younger age at diagnosis (p amp;lt; 0.0001) and the 120-minute CP value of the 3-month MMTT (p = 0.002) predicted the patient-specific rates of fall. Conclusions SITAR growth curve analysis is a useful tool to assess CP loss in type 1 diabetes, explaining patient differences in terms of their mean level and rate of fall. A definition of rapid CP loss could be based on a quantile of the rate of fall distribution, allowing better understanding of factors determining CP loss and stratification of patients into targeted therapies.

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  • 25.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Liedberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Svanholm, Frida
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Solmi, Marco
    Univ Padua, Italy.
    Thompson, Trevor
    Univ Greenwich, England.
    Chaimani, Anna
    Univ Paris, France.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Interventions to facilitate return to work in adults with chronic non-malignant pain: a protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis2020In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, no 11, article id e040962Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Work absenteeism due to chronic non-malignant pain (CNMP) is a major societal and individual cause of concern that requires effective treatments. Objective We present a protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis (NMA) aiming to compare available interventions for return to work (RTW) in adults with CNMP. Methods and analysis PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Knowledge and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases will be searched till 31 August 2020 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) examining interventions for RTW outcomes among patients with CNMP. Two independent investigators will search the databases, perform data extraction and assess the methodological quality of the selected RCTs. The primary outcome will be RTW, if possible, full-time or part-time after work absence due to chronic pain from baseline to the last available follow-up. Secondary outcomes will include self-reported workability or work capacity, or self-reported physical functioning and quality of life as measured by any validated scale. Pairwise meta-analysis and NMA will be conducted for each outcome using a random-effects model. For the primary outcomes, we will also obtain the ranking of all competing interventions within each NMA using surface under the cumulative ranking curve. The assumption of coherence (ie, that direct and indirect evidence are in statistical agreement) will be examined using both a local and a global approach. We will also conduct subgroup and meta-regression analyses, whenever feasible, to investigate the unexplained variation in effect size. The comparison-adjusted funnel plot will be used to evaluate small-study effects. The overall quality of evidence will be rated with the Confidence in Network Meta-Analysis tool. Data analysis will be conducted using Stata V.16.0. Ethics and dissemination This systematic review does not require ethical approval since it will not disseminate any private patient data. The results of this study will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publication. PROSPERO registration number CRD42020171429.

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  • 26.
    Boersma, Katja
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Södermark, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology.
    Flink, Ida K.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Efficacy of a transdiagnostic emotion-focused exposure treatment for chronic pain patients with comorbid anxiety and depression: a randomized controlled trial2019In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 160, no 8, p. 1708-1718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The comorbidity between chronic pain and emotional problems has proven difficult to address with current treatment options. This study addresses the efficacy of a transdiagnostic emotion-focused exposure treatment ("hybrid") for chronic pain patients with comorbid emotional problems. Adults (n = 115) with chronic musculoskeletal pain and functional and emotional problems were included in a 2-centre, parallel randomized controlled, open-label trial comparing this treatment to an active control condition receiving a guided Internet-delivered pain management treatment based on CBT principles (iCBT). The hybrid treatment (n = 58, 10-16 sessions) integrates exposure in vivo for chronic pain based on the fear-avoidance model with an emotion-regulation approach informed by procedures in Dialectical Behavior Therapy. The iCBT (n = 57; 8 treatment modules) addresses topics such as pain education, coping strategies, relaxation, problem solving, stress, and sleep management using standard CBT techniques. Patient-reported outcomes were assessed before and after treatment as well as at a 9-month primary end point. Across conditions, 78% participants completed post-treatment and 81% follow-up assessment. Intent-to-treat analyses showed that the hybrid had a significantly better post-treatment outcome on pain catastrophizing (d = 0.39) and pain interference (d = 0.63) and significantly better follow-up outcomes on depression (d = 0.43) and pain interference (d = 0.51). There were no differences on anxiety and pain intensity. Observed proportions of clinically significant improvement favoured the hybrid on all but one comparison, but no statistically significant differences were observed. We conclude that the hybrid emotion-focused treatment may be considered an acceptable, credible, and efficacious treatment option for chronic pain patients with comorbid emotional problems.

  • 27.
    Borssen, Åsa D.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Annika
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Rorsman, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Weiland, Ola
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Verbaan, Hans
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Nyhlin, Nils
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Werner, Marten
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Histological improvement of liver fibrosis in well-treated patients with autoimmune hepatitis A cohort study2017In: Medicine, ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 96, no 34, article id e7708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic autoimmune liver disease that if left untreated may lead to the development of cirrhosis. Previous studies on AIH patients have suggested that fibrosis and even cirrhosis can be reversed by medical treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of medical treatment for protection of developing fibrosis and cirrhosis. A total of 258 liver biopsies from 101 patients (72 women, 29 men) were analyzed by a single pathologist and classified according to the Ishak grading (inflammation) and staging (fibrosis) system. Liver histology was stratified according to the temporal changes of fibrosis stage (increased, decreased, or stable), and groups were compared. Complete or partial response to medical treatment was 94.9%. Reduction of fibrosis stage from the first to the last biopsy was seen in 63 patients (62.4%). We found an association between a reduction in the fibrosis stage and continuous glucocorticoid medication, as well as lowered scores of inflammation at last biopsy. Twenty-one patients had cirrhosis (Ishak stage 6) at least in one of the previous biopsies, but only 5 patients at the last biopsy. Histological improvement is common in AIH patients that respond to medical treatment, and a reduction or stabilization of fibrosis stage occurs in about 2/3 of such patients.

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  • 28.
    Brinck, Jonas
    et al.
    Patientområde Endokrinologi och njurmedicin - Stockholm, Sweden .
    Hagström, Emil
    Akademiska sjukhuset - Uppsala, Sweden .
    Benedek, Peter
    Karolinska institutet - Stockholm, Sweden .
    Hedelin, Rikard
    Norrlands universitetssjukhus - Umea, Sweden .
    Muhr, Thomas
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Svennberg, Lars
    Region Gävleborg - Gävle, Sweden .
    Reinhardt, Wolfgang
    Skånes universitetssjukhus Malmö, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset - Stockholm, Sweden.
    E78.0A – en unik, ny ICD-10-kod för familjär hyperkolesterolemi [Sweden introduces a new specific ICD-10 code for the disease familial hypercholesterolemia]2019In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the turn of the year 2018/19, a new ICD-10 code (E78.0A) will be introduced in Sweden for the hereditary blood lipid disorder familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Patients with FH have a significantly increased risk of developing atherosclerotic disease, such as myocardial infarction before the age of 50. However, early diagnosis and start of treatment of FH can ameliorate the diseases negative long term effects. The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare gave in its guidelines from 2015 a high priority to the work of identifying and diagnosing individuals with FH in the general population. The introduction of the ICD-10 code E78.0A for FH may, when properly used, be an effective tool in this work.

  • 29.
    Bro, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Worldwide ophthalmological research production 2000-2020, with special focus on the Nordic contribution2022In: Acta Ophthalmologica, ISSN 1755-375X, E-ISSN 1755-3768, Vol. 100, no 8, p. e1760-e1766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To explore the trends in worldwide ophthalmic research production over a 21-year period in relation to journals, contributing countries and dominating topics with special focus on the Nordic region. Methods Articles published between 2000 and 2020 in 20 top-ranked ophthalmology journals were included. Number of articles and impact points were measured per country for each year. The most frequently occurring keywords were calculated worldwide and for the top five contributing countries and the Nordic countries. Trends were explored using linear regression. Results The analysis included 65 220 articles. Linear regression showed an increase with 56 articles per year (beta = 56.3, R-2 = 0.72, p-value &lt; 0.01). The United States published the most articles, comprising 35% of the worldwide total, followed by the United Kingdom (9%) and Japan (7%). Population-adjusted productivity revealed that Iceland was the most prolific country with 10 articles per million inhabitants/year. Singapore was second and Denmark third with corresponding numbers of nine and seven. Analysing regional trends, Asia had the largest increase in yearly number of articles (beta = 29.1, R-2 = 0.89, p-value &lt; 0.01). The strongest positive trend was observed in China (beta = 15.7, R-2 = 0.94, p-value &lt; 0.01). The Nordic countries contributed with 3.6% of worldwide ophthalmological papers. Among these, Denmark was the only country with a significant positive trend in impact points per million inhabitants per year (beta = 0.6, R-2 = 0.54, p-value &lt; 0.01). The most frequently occurring eye disease within the whole time frame was myopia (5.8%) followed by macular degeneration (5.4%) and glaucoma (5.3%). Linear regression showed a significant increase in the proportion of articles about diabetic retinopathy (beta = 0.2%, R-2 = 0.88, p-value &lt; 0.01) a significant decrease in the proportion in articles about cataract (beta = -0.1%, R-2 = 0.70, p-value &lt; 0.01) and myopia (beta = -0.1%, R-2 = 0.67, p-value &lt; 0.01). Conclusions The worldwide ophthalmic research productivity has maintained a growing trend from 2000 to 2020. While North America and Europe are the major contributors, the scientific activity in Asia and especially China is growing impressively. With the current progress, Asia is forecast to outweigh Europe in 2025 and North America in 2033. Diabetic retinopathy was the most common eye disease in ophthalmologic papers in 2020, and also the topic with the strongest positive trend during 2000-2020.

  • 30.
    Bäck, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Leosdottir, Margret
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hagstrom, Emil
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Norhammar, Anna
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Capio Srt Gorans Hosp, Sweden.
    Hag, Emma
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hambraeus, Kristina
    Falun Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    The SWEDEHEART secondary prevention and cardiac rehabilitation registry (SWEDEHEART CR registry)2021In: European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes, ISSN 2058-5225, E-ISSN 2058-1742, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 431-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims The quality registry SWEDEHEART covers data across the patient pathway after an acute myocardial infarction (MI), from hospital care to secondary prevention. Although cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is strongly recommended after an MI, there is still heterogeneity regarding standards, uptake, and adherence rates. The aim of the SWEDEHEART-CR registry is to provide continuous information on secondary prevention and CR performance to support the audit and development of evidence-based practice. To facilitate quality improvement and research initiatives, a description of the characteristics and development of the SWEDEHEART-CR registry is needed. Methods and results The SWEDEHEART-CR registry starts with data obtained during hospital care and then collects data at out-patient visits 2 months and 1-year after discharge, and at start and end of an exercise-based CR programme. The registry data covers comorbidities, biochemistry, blood pressure, anthropometric variables, medication, psychosocial- and lifestyle variables, readmissions, patient-reported outcome measures, attendance in CR-related programmes, and physical fitness variables. Over 100 000 patients with MI have been included in the SWEDEHEART-CR registry since its start in 2005. From initially covering 35 centres (47%) and 2200 patients annually (27%), SWEDEHEART-CR has developed to a nation-wide registry with 75 centres (100%) and 8800 patients annually (80%) in 2020. Conclusion The SWEDEHEART-CR registry includes a high proportion of the national MI population entering a CR programme and is a powerful tool for quality audit, improvement, and research. The registry provides insights into the characteristics, treatment, and outcomes of evidence-based secondary preventive practice, ultimately leading to better cardiovascular health.

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  • 31.
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Jennersjö, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Arnlov, Johan
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Association of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 with nephropathy, cardiovascular events, and total mortality in type 2 diabetes2016In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 40-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis: Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) contribute to experimental diabetic kidney disease, a condition with substantially increased cardiovascular risk when present in patients. Therefore, we aimed to explore the levels of sTNFRs, and their association with prevalent kidney disease, incident cardiovascular disease, and risk of mortality independently of baseline kidney function and microalbuminuria in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. In pre-defined secondary analyses we also investigated whether the sTNFRs predict adverse outcome in the absence of diabetic kidney disease. Methods: The CARDIPP study, a cohort study of 607 diabetes patients [mean age 61 years, 44 % women, 45 cardiovascular events (fatal/non-fatal myocardial infarction or stroke) and 44 deaths during follow-up (mean 7.6 years)] was used. Results: Higher sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 were associated with higher odds of prevalent kidney disease [odd ratio (OR) per standard deviation (SD) increase 1.60, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.32-1.93, p &lt; 0.001 and OR 1.54, 95 % CI 1.21-1.97, p = 0.001, respectively]. In Cox regression models adjusting for age, sex, glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, higher sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 predicted incident cardiovascular events [hazard ratio (HR) per SD increase, 1.66, 95 % CI 1.29-2.174, p &lt; 0.001 and HR 1.47, 95 % CI 1.13-1.91, p = 0.004, respectively]. Results were similar in separate models with adjustments for inflammatory markers, HbA1c, or established cardiovascular risk factors, or when participants with diabetic kidney disease at baseline were excluded (p &lt; 0.01 for all). Both sTNFRs were associated with mortality. Conclusions/Interpretations: Higher circulating sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 are associated with diabetic kidney disease, and predicts incident cardiovascular disease and mortality independently of microalbuminuria and kidney function, even in those without kidney disease. Our findings support the clinical utility of sTNFRs as prognostic markers in type 2 diabetes.

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  • 32.
    Carlsson, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Fricke, Otto
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Dahlberg, Anton
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Crafoord, Sven
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Retinal surgery quality indicators for uncomplicated primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment without a national registry2022In: Acta Ophthalmologica, ISSN 1755-375X, E-ISSN 1755-3768, Vol. 100, no 8, p. e1589-e1594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The objective of this study was to evaluate the possibility of analysing quality indicators for uncomplicated primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in a hospital department of ophthalmology without the support of a national registry or need to collect data from referring ophthalmological centres. Methods In 2014, we operated 231 consecutive eyes with uncomplicated retinal detachment. Our quality indicators were primary anatomical success, final anatomical success and postoperative endophthalmitis. We reviewed medical records in our university surgical department retrospectively and compared them with medical records from the regional hospitals that had referred most of the operated patients and done their own postoperative examination. Our hypothesis was that any retinal re-detachment and/or serious postoperative complication would be reported back. Results The medical records at the surgical department revealed primary anatomic success for 91.3% of eyes and final anatomical success of 99.6%. The data from the regional hospitals confirmed that our hypothesis was correct. All patients with adverse outcomes were referred back for reoperation. Patients who were not referred again had an attached retina and showed no signs of endophthalmitis. Conclusion Our hypothesis that data in the surgical departments medical records would closely reflect those in referring hospitals was borne out. This supports, under current conditions, an effective strategy for analysing chosen quality indicators without relying on a national registry or reviewing records from regional hospitals.

  • 33.
    Carlén, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Hjärtspecialisterna i Linköping, Sverige.
    Oklar nytta av upprepade arbets-EKG hos brandmän [Pre-duty medical assessment in fire-fighters requires modernization - relevance of exercise ECG is questioned]2020In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medical assessment of Swedish smoke diving firefighters includes cardiac evaluation by maximal exercise testing with ECG recording. The exercise ECG procedure for firefighters was introduced in 1986, and remains consistent in the recently updated guidelines from 2019.  Exercise ECG is a non-invasive and easily available method for detection of chronic coronary syndromes, but due to the declining population risk in high-income countries, its ability to accurately detect disease has decreased. Thus, the clinical relevance of exercise ECG in firefighters is questioned and the pre-duty medical assessment requires modernization.

  • 34.
    Carstensen, John
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    André, Malin
    Landstinget i Uppsala län.
    Engström, Sven
    Landstinget i Jönköpings län.
    Magnusson, Henric
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    How does comorbidity influence healthcare costs? A population-based cross-sectional study of depression, back pain and osteoarthritis2012In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 2, p. e000809-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To analyse how comorbidity among patients with back pain, depression and osteoarthritis influences healthcare costs per patient. A special focus was made on the distribution of costs for primary healthcare compared with specialist care, hospital care and drugs.

    Design Population-based cross-sectional study.

    Setting The County of Östergötland, Sweden.

    Patients Data on diagnoses and healthcare costs for all 266 354 individuals between 20 and 75 years of age, who were residents of the County of Östergötland, Sweden, in the year 2006, were extracted from the local healthcare register and the national register of drug prescriptions.

    Main outcome measures The effects of comorbidity on healthcare costs were estimated as interactions in regression models that also included age, sex, number of other health conditions and education.

    Results The largest diagnosed group was back pain (11 178 patients) followed by depression (7412 patients) and osteoarthritis (5174 patients). The largest comorbidity subgroup was the combination of back pain and depression (772 patients), followed by the combination of back pain and osteoarthritis (527 patients) and the combination of depression and osteoarthritis (206 patients). For patients having both a depression diagnosis and a back pain diagnosis, there was a significant negative interaction effect on total healthcare costs. The average healthcare costs among patients with depression and back pain was SEK 11 806 lower for a patient with both diagnoses. In this comorbidity group, there were tendencies of a positive interaction for general practitioner visits and negative interactions for all other visits and hospital days. Small or no interactions at all were seen between depression diagnoses and osteoarthritis diagnoses.

    Conclusions A small increase in primary healthcare visits in comorbid back pain and depression patients was accompanied with a substantial reduction in total healthcare costs and in hospital costs. Our results can be of value in analysing the cost effects of comorbidity and how the coordination of primary and secondary care may have an impact on healthcare costs.

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  • 35.
    Cauwenberghs, Nicholas
    et al.
    Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Kobayashi, Yukari
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Vanassche, Thomas
    Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Haddad, Francois
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Kuznetsova, Tatiana
    Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    The 2013 ACC/AHA risk score and subclinical cardiac remodeling and dysfunction: Complementary in cardiovascular disease prediction2019In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 297, p. 67-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Echocardiography might enhance cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification beyond tools grading the risk for atherosclerotic CV diseases (ASCVD). We therefore studied the complementarity between the ASCVD risk score recommended by American cardiology societies and echocardiographic profiling in predicting adverse CV outcome in the community. Methods: 984 community-dwelling individuals between 40 and 79 years old (51.3% women) underwent CV risk profiling and echocardiography. We estimated their 10-year ASCVD risk from baseline risk factors using the Pooled Cohort Equations. Participants were categorized as at low (amp;lt;2.5%), borderline (2.5-amp;lt;7.5%) or intermediate-to-high (amp;gt;= 7.5%) ASCVD risk. Main outcome was the incidence of CV events collected on average 7.5 years later. Results: The probability for cardiac remodeling and/or dysfunction as assessed by echocardiography rose progressively with increasing 10-year ASCVD risk. During follow-up, 116 participants experienced at least one CV endpoint (15.8 events per 1000 person-years). With increasing 10-year ASCVD risk, the CV event rate increased stronger in participants with amp;gt;= 1 LV abnormality at baseline. Indeed, in individuals with an intermediate-to-high ASCVD risk and amp;gt;= 1 LV abnormality at baseline, the risk was significantly higher than the average population risk for a first CV event (HR: 3.00, P amp;lt; 0.001). Adding the presence of amp;gt;= 1 LV abnormality to a ASCVD risk score-based model yielded significant improvement in C-statistics (P = 0.024), integrated discrimination (P=0.0085) and net reclassification (P amp;lt; 0.001) for adverse CV events. Conclusions: Echocardiographic profiling enhanced CV risk stratification in individuals at intermediate-to-high ASCVD risk. Echocardiographic screening might supplement traditional ASCVD risk grading for CV disease prediction. (C) 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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  • 36.
    Chew, Michelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Puelacher, Christian
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery: facts, fallacies and how to approach clinically2021In: Current Opinion in Critical Care, ISSN 1070-5295, E-ISSN 1531-7072, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 670-675Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of review Acute myocardial injury occurs commonly during perioperative care. There is still considerable confusion regarding its diagnosis and definition, and a lack of consensus on who and how to screen, exacerbated by a lack of studies addressing how to manage patients with detected myocardial injury. Recent findings Far from a benign biochemical anomaly, myocardial injury occurring perioperatively is largely a silent disease and is not necessarily because of ischaemia. Preoperative, postoperative, and perioperative changes in cardiac troponins (cTns) are independently associated with increased mortality and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Routine screening with cTns is required for reliable detection of myocardial injury. Measurement of changes (from preoperative to postoperative) will detect acute events as well as identify patients with chronic troponin increases. This review aims to bring together current literature regarding myocardial injury that is detected perioperatively, identifies knowledge gaps for future research and provides suggestions for management.

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  • 37.
    Chow, Clara K.
    et al.
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Westmead Hosp, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Thiagalingam, Aravinda
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Westmead Hosp, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Santo, Karla
    Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Kok, Cindy
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Thakkar, Jay
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Westmead Hosp, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Stepien, Sandrine
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Billot, Laurent
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Jan, Stephen
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Joshi, Rohina
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Hillis, Graham S.
    Univ Western Australia, Australia.
    Brieger, David
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Concord Repatriat Gen Hosp, Australia.
    Chew, Derek P.
    Flinders Univ S Australia, Australia.
    Rådholm, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ödeshög.
    Atherton, John J.
    Royal Brisbane and Womens Hosp, Australia; Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Bhindi, Ravinay
    Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia.
    Collins, Nicholas
    John Hunter Hosp, Australia.
    Coverdale, Steven
    Sunshine Coast Univ Hosp, Australia.
    Hamilton-Craig, Christian
    Prince Charles Hosp, Australia; Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Kangaharan, Nadarajah
    Royal Darwin Hosp, Australia; Alice Springs Hosp, Australia.
    Maiorana, Andrew
    Curtin Univ, Australia; Fiona Stanley Hosp, Australia.
    McGrady, Michelle
    Royal Prince Alfred Hosp, Australia.
    Shetty, Pratap
    Wollongong Hosp, Australia.
    Thompson, Peter
    Sir Charles Gairdner Hosp, Australia.
    Rogers, Anthony
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Redfern, Julie
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Westmead Hosp, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    TEXT messages to improve MEDication adherence and Secondary prevention (TEXTMEDS) after acute coronary syndrome: a randomised clinical trial protocol2018In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 1, article id e019463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Identifying simple, low-cost and scalable means of supporting lifestyle change and medication adherence for patients following a cardiovascular (CV) event is important. Objective The TEXTMEDS (TEXT messages to improve MEDiGation adherence and Secondary prevention) study aims to investigate whether a cardiac education and support programme sent via mobile phone text message improves medication adherence and risk factor levels in patients following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Study design A single-blind, multicentre, randomised clinical trial of 1400 patients after an ACS with 12 months follow-up. The intervention group will receive multiple weekly text messages that provide information, motivation, support to adhere to medications, quit smoking (if relevant) and recommendations for healthy diet and exercise. The primary endpoint is the percentage of patients who are adherent to cardioprotective medications and the key secondary outcomes are mean systolic blood pressure (BP) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Secondary outcomes will also include total cholesterol, mean diastolic BP, the percentage of participants who are adherent to each cardioprotective medication class, the percentage of participants who achieve target levels of CV risk factors, major vascular events, hospital readmissions and all-cause mortality. The study will be augmented by formal economic and proGess evaluations to assess acceptability, utility and Gost-effectiveness. Summary The study will provide multicentre randomised trial evidence of the effects of a text message-based programme on cardioprotective medication adherence and levels of CV risk factors. Ethics and dissemination Primary ethics approval was received from Western Sydney Local Health District Human Research EthiGs Committee (HREC2012/12/4.1 (3648) AU RED HREC/13ANMEAD/15). Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and presentations at international conferences.

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  • 38.
    Cuomo, Belinda M.
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Ai Lim Lee, Elinda
    Curtin University, Australia; Cooperat Research Centre Living Autism Spectrum Disorders, Australia.
    Thompson, Craig
    Curtin University, Australia; Cooperat Research Centre Living Autism Spectrum Disorders, Australia.
    Rogerson, Jessica M.
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia; Cooperat Research Centre Living Autism Spectrum Disorders, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Effectiveness of Sleep-Based Interventions for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Meta-Synthesis2017In: Pharmacotherapy, ISSN 0277-0008, E-ISSN 1875-9114, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 555-578Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sleep problems are common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This meta-synthesis collated eight previously published systematic reviews examining the efficacy of sleep interventions in children with ASD in an attempt to present a clear analysis of trialed interventions. The collated reviews consider five major groups of sleep interventions for children with ASD: melatonin therapy, pharmacologic treatments other than melatonin, behavioral interventions, parent education/education programs, and alternative therapies (massage therapy, aromatherapy, and multivitamin and iron supplementation). These eight reviews were based on 38 original studies and address the efficacy of interventions across 17 sleep problem domains. The results of this meta-synthesis suggest that no single intervention is effective across all sleep problems in children with ASD. However, melatonin, behavioral interventions, and parent education/education program interventions appear the most effective at ameliorating multiple domains of sleep problems compared with other interventions. Due to the heterogeneous causative factors and presentations of disordered sleep, further research into the effectiveness of sleep interventions may target specific phenotypic subgroups rather than a broad analysis across the general ASD population. Similarly, future research needs to consider the efficacy of different polytherapeutic approaches in order to provide clinicians with evidence to inform best practice. In the meantime, this review supports clinicians decision making for a majority of the identified sleep problems in the ASD population.

  • 39.
    Davidson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindelof, Ann
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Wallen, Torbjorn
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Vastervik Hospital, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Point-of-care monitoring of warfarin treatment in community dwelling elderly - A randomised controlled study2015In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, ISSN 1357-633X, E-ISSN 1758-1109, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 298-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to assess clinical effectiveness and costs of launching point-of-care monitoring of warfarin treatment in community dwelling frail elderly patients. A prospective multicentre controlled randomised study over 12 months comparing a point-of-care strategy with usual monitoring routines was carried out in primary healthcare centres and anticoagulation clinics in southeast Sweden. The subjects were community dwelling elderly across rural southeast Sweden on chronic warfarin treatment. Main outcome measures were time in therapeutic range (TTR), rate of treatment-related adverse events and costs. The study comprised 103 elderly people (61% women) mean age 86 yrs (range 75-98) treated with warfarin for median 9 yrs (range 1-18). Patients randomised to start point-of-care monitoring (n = 55) showed 75.9% in TTR before trial vs. 72.6% during trial (ns). The patients randomised to continue on usual monitoring routines (n = 48) showed 75.2% in TTR prior to trial vs. 72.9% during trial (ns). The point-of-care monitoring showed potential savings of SEK 624 per patient annually (based partly on effects that were not statistically significant). The study shows that point-of-care monitoring of warfarin treatment in community dwelling elderly in rural areas is as effective as usual monitoring routines and that it may offer savings to society.

  • 40.
    Dell'Isola, Andrea
    et al.
    Lunds University, Lund, Sweden.
    Vinblad, Johanna
    Centre of Registers Västra Götaland, The Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Goteborg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lohmander, Stefan
    Lunds University, Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ann-Marie
    National Diabetes Register, Centre of Registers in Region Västra Götaland, Goteborg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Goteborg, Sweden.
    Turkiewicz, Aleksandra
    Lunds University, Lund, Sweden.
    Franzén, Stefan
    National Diabetes Register, Centre of Registers Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Goteborg, Sweden.
    Nauclér, Emma
    Centre of Registers Västra Götaland, The Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Goteborg, Sweden.
    W-Dahl, A
    Lund University, Lund, Sverige, Sweden; The Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register, Lund, Sweden.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Dahlberg, L
    Lunds University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rolfson, Ola
    Centre of Registers Västra Götaland, The Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Goteborg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Englund, Martin
    Lunds University, Lund, Sweden.
    Understanding the role of diabetes in the osteoarthritis disease and treatment process: A study protocol for the Swedish osteoarthitis and disease (SOAD) cohort2019In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, BMJ Open, Vol. 9, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and a leading cause of disability worldwide. Metabolic comorbidities such as type II diabetes occur with a higher rate in people with OA than in the general population. Several factors including obesity, hyperglycaemia toxicity and physical inactivity have been suggested as potential links between diabetes and OA, and have been shown to negatively impact patients’ health and quality of life. However, little is known on the role of diabetes in determining the outcome of non-surgical and surgical management of OA, and at the same time, how different OA interventions may affect diabetes control. Thus, the overall aim of this project is to explore (1) the impact of diabetes on the outcome of non-surgical and surgical OA treatments and (2) the impact of non-surgical and surgical OA treatments on diabetes control.

    Methods and analysis The study cohort is based on prospectively ascertained register data on a national level in Sweden. Data from OA patients who received a first-line non-surgical intervention and are registered in the National Quality Register for Better Management of Patients with Osteoarthritis will be merged with data from the Swedish Knee and Hip Arthroplasty Registers and the National Diabetes Register. Additional variables regarding patients’ use of prescribed drugs, comorbidities, socioeconomic status and cause of death will be obtained through other national health and population data registers. The linkage will be performed on an individual level using unique personal identity numbers.

    Ethics and dissemination This study received ethical approval (2019-02570) from the Swedish Ethical Review Authority. Results from this cohort will be submitted to peer-reviewed scientific journals and reported at the leading national and international meetings in the field.

  • 41.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Fischer, Marcelo Rivano
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Facing obesity in pain rehabilitation clinics: Profiles of physical activity in patients with chronic pain and obesity-A study from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP)2020In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 15, no 9, article id e0239818Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The obesity epidemic has influenced pain rehabilitation clinics. To date, little is known about baseline level of physical activity (PA) in patients referred to pain rehabilitation clinics. We aimed to investigate the PA levels of patients referred to pain rehabilitation clinics and to evaluate the effect of excess weight on PA level. Methods and findings Data were obtained from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation between 2016 and 2017. These data included PA time (everyday PA and physical exercise per week), Body Mass Index (BMI), sociodemographic factors, chronic pain and psychological aspects (e.g., pain intensity, depressive and anxiety symptoms and insomnia problems). Insufficient PA was defined as less than 150 minutes per week. We performed logistic regressions as well as orthogonal partial least square regression to estimate the effects of excess weight on PA. Over one-fourth of the patients were classified as obese (BMI &gt;= 30 kg/m(2), 871/3110, 25.3%) and nearly one-third of these patients were classified as severely obese (BMI &gt;= 35 kg/m(2), 242/871, 27.8%). Time estimations for physical exercise varied among the BMI groups, but patients in the higher BMI category were more likely to spend less time on everyday PA. Compared to normal weight, mild obesity [odds ratio (OR) 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-0.81] and severe obesity (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.42-0.74) were associated with less PA. Mild obese patients had an elevated risk of 65% and severe obese patients had an elevated risk of 96% for insufficient PA. Increased pain intensity was positively related to insufficient PA (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.06-1.29) among the obese patients. Conclusion Having low PA is very common for patients referred to pain rehabilitation clinics, especially for those with comorbid obesity. As a first step to increase PA, obese patients need to be encouraged to increase the intensity and amount of less painful daily PA.

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  • 42.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Is excess weight a burden for older adults who suffer chronic pain?2018In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 18, article id 270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundObesity and chronic pain are common comorbidities and adversely influence each other. Advanced age is associated with more comorbidities and multi-morbidities. In this study, we investigated the burden of overweight/obesity and its comorbidities and their associations with chronic pain in a random population sample of Swedish older adults.MethodsThe cross-sectional analysis involved a random sample of a population65years in south-eastern Sweden (N=6243). Data were collected from a postal questionnaire that addressed pain aspects, body mass index (BMI), and health experiences. Chronic pain was defined as pain during the previous three months. According to the 0-10 Numeric Rating Scale, pain scored 7 corresponds to severe pain. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the variables associated to pain aspects.ResultsA total of 2633 (42%) reported chronic pain. More obese older adults (BMI 30kg/m(2)) experienced chronic pain (58%) than those who were low-normal weight (BMI amp;lt;25kg/m(2), 39%) or overweight (25BMI amp;lt;30kg/m(2), 41%). Obese elderly more frequently had pain in extremities and lower back than their peers. In the multivariate model, obesity (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.59, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.33-1.91) but not overweight (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.95-1.22) was associated with chronic pain. Obesity (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.16-2.01) was also significantly related to severe pain. We also found other comorbidities - i.e., traumatic history (OR 2.52, 95% CI 1.99-3.19), rheumatic diseases (OR 5.21, 95% CI 4.54-5.97), age85years (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.22-2.25), and depression or anxiety diagnosis (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.32-2.53) - showed stronger associations with pain aspects than weight status. Conclusion: In older adults, excess weight (BMI 30 or above) is a potentially modifiable factor but not the only risk factor that is associated with chronic pain and severe pain. Future studies should investigate the effectiveness of interventions that treat comorbid pain and obesity in older adults.

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  • 43.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Tsamakis, Konstantinos
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Predictive association between immigration status and chronic pain in the general population: results from the SwePain cohort2020In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 1462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundPrevious studies suggest that immigration may influence the experience of pain.ObjectiveThis population-based study examines whether immigration status is associated with chronic pain (CP), chronic widespread pain (CWSP), and severe CP at a two-year follow-up. We also tested mediation by mood status (i.e., anxiety and depression).Methods15, 563 participants from a representative stratified random sample of 34,000 individuals living in south-eastern Sweden completed a postal survey, during 2013-2015, that included the following data: immigration status; presence of CP (pain lasting at least 3 months) and CWSP (a modified classification of widespread pain for use in epidemiological studies); severity of CP based on a numeric rating scale; and depression, anxiety, economic situation, and sociodemographic information. We applied logistic regressions using the generalized estimating equations (GEE), with Swedish-born as the reference group and path analyses models.ResultsCompared to the Swedish-born participants (n =14,093;90%), the immigrants (n =1470;10%) had an elevated risk of all pain outcomes (CP: odds ratio [OR]=1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI=1.04-1.33, CWSP: OR=1.39; 95% CI: 1.15-1.69 and severe CP: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.23-1.87) after adjustments. Path analyses showed that baseline age, immigrant status, and financial hardship had a significant influence on chronic pain outcomes at follow-up with baseline mood status as the mediator. Immigration status was also associated with age and financial hardship.ConclusionImmigrants may have increased risk of chronic pain, widespread pain, and severe pain and this risk is mediated by mood status. Targeted interventions better tailored to the socio-economic and psychological status of immigrants with chronic pain are warranted.

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  • 44.
    Dumarkaite, Austeja
    et al.
    Vilnius Univ, Lithuania.
    Truskauskaite-Kuneviciene, Inga
    Vilnius Univ, Lithuania.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kazlauskas, Evaldas
    Vilnius Univ, Lithuania.
    The Effects of Online Mindfulness-Based Intervention on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial With 3-Month Follow-Up2022In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 13, article id 799259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives:& nbsp;Mindfulness-based interventions have recently been shown to be a promising option for treating posttraumatic stress. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of an online mindfulness-based intervention on ICD-11 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and complex PTSD (CPTSD) symptoms at a 3-month follow-up.& nbsp;Methods:& nbsp;An RCT design with three measurement points (pre-intervention, post-intervention, and 3-month follow-up) was used to investigate the effects of an 8-week online mindfulness intervention. In total, 53 traumatized young adults (M-age = 23.21, SDage = 2.81; 84.9% female) participated in the study: 17 in the intervention group and 36 in the waiting list control group.& nbsp;Results:& nbsp;Intervention group and waiting list control group comparison revealed that the intervention was effective for reducing CPTSD disturbances in self-organization symptoms (d = -0.84 [-1.44; -0.24]), specifically, negative self-concept (d = -0.66 [-1.25; -0.07]) and disturbances in relationships (d = -0.87 [-1.47; -0.27]), at 3-month follow-up. There were no between-group effects for PTSD symptoms from pre-test to follow-up.& nbsp;Conclusion:& nbsp;This is one of the first RCT studies to report follow-up effects of an online mindfulness-based intervention for ICD-11 PTSD or CPTSD symptoms. Our study yielded that the effects of mindfulness-based internet intervention on CPTSD symptoms tend to retain over time.

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  • 45.
    Ebert, D. D.
    et al.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Donkin, L.
    University of Sydney, Australia; Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Andrews, G.
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Berger, T.
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Carlbring, P.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Rozenthal, A.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Choi, I.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Laferton, J. A. C.
    Psychol Hsch Berlin, Germany.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kleiboer, A.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Lange, A.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Lehr, D.
    Leuphana University of Luneburg, Germany.
    Reins, J. A.
    Leuphana University of Luneburg, Germany.
    Funk, B.
    Leuphana University of Luneburg, Germany.
    Newby, J.
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Perini, S.
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Riper, H.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Ruwaard, J.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Sheeber, L.
    Oregon Research Institute, OR 97403 USA.
    Snoek, F. J.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Titov, N.
    Macquarie University, Australia; Macquarie University, Australia.
    Unlu Ince, B.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    van Bastelaar, K.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Vernmark, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    van Straten, A.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Warmerdam, L.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Salsman, N.
    Xavier University, OH 45207 USA.
    Cuijpers, P.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Does Internet-based guided-self-help for depression cause harm? An individual participant data meta-analysis on deterioration rates and its moderators in randomized controlled trials2016In: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, Vol. 46, no 13, p. 2679-2693Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Almost nothing is known about the potential negative effects of Internet-based psychological treatments for depression. This study aims at investigating deterioration and its moderators within randomized trials on Internet-based guided self-help for adult depression, using an individual patient data meta-analyses (IPDMA) approach.

    Method: Studies were identified through systematic searches (PubMed, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Cochrane Library). Deterioration in participants was defined as a significant symptom increase according to the reliable change index (i.e. 7.68 points in the CES-D; 7.63 points in the BDI). Two-step IPDMA procedures, with a random-effects model were used to pool data.

    Results: A total of 18 studies (21 comparisons, 2079 participants) contributed data to the analysis. The risk for a reliable deterioration from baseline to post-treatment was significantly lower in the intervention v. control conditions (3.36 v. 7.60; relative risk 0.47, 95% confidence interval 0.29-0.75). Education moderated effects on deterioration, with patients with low education displaying a higher risk for deterioration than patients with higher education. Deterioration rates for patients with low education did not differ statistically significantly between intervention and control groups. The benefit-risk ratio for patients with low education indicated that 9.38 patients achieve a treatment response for each patient experiencing a symptom deterioration.

    Conclusions: Internet-based guided self-help is associated with a mean reduced risk for a symptom deterioration compared to controls. Treatment and symptom progress of patients with low education should be closely monitored, as some patients might face an increased risk for symptom deterioration. Future studies should examine predictors of deterioration in patients with low education.

  • 46.
    Edqvist, Jon
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Christina
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Karin
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjorck, Lena
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Dikaiou, Pigi
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Lind, Marcus
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; NU Hosp Grp, Sweden.
    Adiels, Martin
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rosengren, Annika
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Severe COVID-19 Infection in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes During the First Three Waves in Sweden2023In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 570-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE Type 2 diabetes is an established risk factor for hospitalization and death in COVID-19 infection, while findings with respect to type 1 diabetes have been diverging. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Using nationwide health registries, we identified all patients aged &gt;= 18 years with type 1 and type 2 diabetes in Sweden. Odds ratios (ORs) describe the general and age-specific risk of being hospitalized, need for intensive care, or dying, adjusted for age, socioeconomic factors, and coexisting conditions, compared with individuals without diabetes. Machine learning models were used to find predictors of outcomes among individuals with diabetes positive for COVID-19. RESULTS Until 30 June 2021, we identified 365 (0.71%) and 11,684 (2.31%) hospitalizations in 51,402 and 504,337 patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes, respectively, with 67 (0.13%) and 2,848 (0.56%) requiring intensive care unit (ICU) care and 68 (0.13%) and 4,020 (0.80%) dying (vs 7,824,181 individuals without diabetes [41,810 hospitalizations (0.53%), 8,753 (0.11%) needing ICU care, and 10,160 (0.13%) deaths). Although those with type 1 diabetes had moderately raised odds of being hospitalized (multiple-adjusted OR 1.38 [95% CI 1.24-1.53]), there was no independent effect on ICU care or death (OR of 1.21 [95% CI 0.94-1.52] and 1.13 [95% CI 0.88-1.48], respectively). Age and socioeconomic factors were the dominating features for predicting hospitalization and death in both types of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Type 2 diabetes was associated with increased odds for all outcomes, whereas patients with type 1 diabetes had moderately increased odds of hospitalization but not ICU care and death.

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  • 47.
    Eichentopf, Luzie
    et al.
    Heidelberg Univ, Germany.
    Hiemke, Christoph
    Univ Med Ctr Mainz, Germany; Arbeitsgemeinschaft Neuropsychopharmakol & Pharma, Germany.
    Conca, Andreas
    Arbeitsgemeinschaft Neuropsychopharmakol & Pharma, Germany; Sanit Agcy South Tyrol, Italy.
    Engelmann, Jan
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Germany.
    Gerlach, Manfred
    Arbeitsgemeinschaft Neuropsychopharmakol & Pharma, Germany; Univ Hosp Wurzburg, Germany.
    Havemann-Reinecke, Ursula
    Arbeitsgemeinschaft Neuropsychopharmakol & Pharma, Germany; Univ Gottingen, Germany.
    Hefner, Gudrun
    Arbeitsgemeinschaft Neuropsychopharmakol & Pharma, Germany; Vitos Clin Forens Psychiat, Germany.
    Florio, Vincenzo
    Comprensorio Sanitario Bolzano, Italy.
    Kuzin, Maxim
    Arbeitsgemeinschaft Neuropsychopharmakol & Pharma, Germany; Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Lieb, Klaus
    Univ Med Ctr Mainz, Germany.
    Reis, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Riemer, Thomas G.
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany; Free Univ Berlin, Germany; Humboldt Univ, Germany.
    Serretti, Alessandro
    Univ Bologna, Italy.
    Schoretsanitis, Georgios
    Arbeitsgemeinschaft Neuropsychopharmakol & Pharma, Germany; Univ Zurich, Switzerland; Zucker Hillside Hosp, NY USA; Zucker Sch Med Northwell Hofstra, NY USA.
    Zernig, Gerald
    Arbeitsgemeinschaft Neuropsychopharmakol & Pharma, Germany; Med Univ Innsbruck, Austria; Psychotherapy & Court Certified Witness, Austria.
    Gruender, Gerhard
    Heidelberg Univ, Germany; Arbeitsgemeinschaft Neuropsychopharmakol & Pharma, Germany.
    Hart, Xenia M.
    Heidelberg Univ, Germany; Arbeitsgemeinschaft Neuropsychopharmakol & Pharma, Germany.
    Systematic review and meta-analysis on the therapeutic reference range for escitalopram: Blood concentrations, clinical effects and serotonin transporter occupancy2022In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 13, article id 972141Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: A titration within a certain therapeutic reference range presupposes a relationship between the blood concentration and the therapeutic effect of a drug. However, this has not been systematically investigated for escitalopram. Furthermore, the recommended reference range disagrees with mean steady state concentrations (11-21 ng/ml) that are expected under the approved dose range (10-20 mg/day). This work systematically investigated the relationships between escitalopram dose, blood levels, clinical effects, and serotonin transporter occupancy.Methods: Following our previously published methodology, relevant articles were systematically searched and reviewed for escitalopram.Results: Of 1,032 articles screened, a total of 30 studies met the eligibility criteria. The included studies investigated escitalopram blood levels in relationship to clinical effects (9 studies) or moderating factors on escitalopram metabolism (12 studies) or serotonin transporter occupancy (9 studies). Overall, the evidence for an escitalopram concentration/effect relationship is low (level C).Conclusion: Based on our findings, we propose a target range of 20-40 ng/ml for antidepressant efficacy of escitalopram. In maintenance treatment, therapeutic response is expected, when titrating patients above the lower limit. The lower concentration threshold is strongly supported by findings from neuroimaging studies. The upper limit for escitaloprams reference range rather reflects a therapeutic maximum than a tolerability threshold, since the incidence of side effects in general is low. Concentrations above 40 ng/ml should not necessarily result in dose reductions in case of good clinical efficacy and tolerability. Dose-related escitalopram concentrations in different trials were more than twice the expected concentrations from guideline reports.

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  • 48.
    Elma, Ömer
    et al.
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Belgium; Univ Hosp Brussels, Belgium.
    Brain, Katherine
    Univ Newcastle, Australia; Hunter Integrated Pain Serv, Australia.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    The Importance of Nutrition as a Lifestyle Factor in Chronic Pain Management: A Narrative Review2022In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 11, no 19, article id 5950Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In everyday clinical practice, healthcare professionals often meet chronic pain patients with a poor nutritional status. A poor nutritional status such as malnutrition, unhealthy dietary behaviors, and a suboptimal dietary intake can play a significant role in the occurrence, development, and prognosis of chronic pain. The relationship between nutrition and chronic pain is complex and may involve many underlying mechanisms such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and glucose metabolism. As such, pain management requires a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach that includes nutrition. Nutrition is the top modifiable lifestyle factor for chronic non-communicable diseases including chronic pain. Optimizing ones dietary intake and behavior needs to be considered in pain management. Thus, this narrative review reports and summarizes the existing evidence regarding (1) the nutrition-related health of people experiencing pain (2) the underlying potential mechanisms that explain the interaction between nutrition and chronic pain, and (3) the role of nutrition screening, assessment and evaluation for people experiencing pain and the scope of nutrition practice in pain management. Future directions in the nutrition and chronic pain field are also discussed.

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  • 49.
    Engman, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Long-term coital behaviour in women treated with cognitive behaviour therapy for superficial coital pain and vaginismus2010In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 193-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate long-term coital behaviour in women treated with cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for superficial coital pain and vaginismus. Data were taken from a questionnaire concerning long-term coital behaviour sent to 59 women who presented to Linköping University Hospital because of superficial coital pain, had been diagnosed with vaginismus, and had been treated with CBT. Data were also traced from therapy records: mean follow-up time was 39 months, the women had suffered for an average of almost 4 years, and required a mean of 14 treatment sessions. Forty-four of the 59 women returned the questionnaire, for a response rate of 74.6%. At follow-up, 81% of the treated women had had intercourse. A majority (61%) rated their ability to have intercourse without pain as 6 or higher (on a scale from 0-10), and 61% rated their ability to enjoy intercourse as 6 or higher (on a scale from 0-10). The proportion of women with positive treatment outcome at follow-up ranged from 81% (able to have intercourse) to 6% (able to have pain-free intercourse). An ability to have intercourse at end of therapy was maintained at follow-up. Two-thirds of the women reported high fulfillment of individual treatment goals. At follow-up, the women estimated a significantly higher self-worth as sex partners, and as women and human beings, than before treatment. Twelve per cent of the original sample had healed after a few assessment sessions and without treatment.

  • 50.
    Ericsson, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Palstam, Annie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lofgren, Monika
    Danderyd Hospital Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Danderyd Hospital Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjersing, Jan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Kosek, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Resistance exercise improves physical fatigue in women with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial2016In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 18, no 176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fibromyalgia (FM) affects approximately 1-3 % of the general population. Fatigue limits the work ability and social life of patients with FM. A few studies of physical exercise have included measures of fatigue in FM, indicating that exercise can decrease fatigue levels. There is limited knowledge about the effects of resistance exercise on multiple dimensions of fatigue in FM. The present study is a sub-study of a multicenter randomized controlled trial in women with FM. The purpose of the present sub-study was to examine the effects of a person-centered progressive resistance exercise program on multiple dimensions of fatigue in women with FM, and to investigate predictors of the potential change in fatigue. Methods: A total of 130 women with FM (age 22-64 years) were included in this assessor-blinded randomized controlled multicenter trial examining the effects of person-centered progressive resistance exercise compared with an active control group. The intervention was performed twice a week for 15 weeks. Outcomes were five dimensions of fatigue measured with the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20). Information about background was collected and the women also completed several health-related questionnaires. Multiple linear stepwise regression was used to analyze predictors of change in fatigue in the total population. Results: A higher improvement was found at the post-treatment examination for change in the resistance exercise group, as compared to change in the active control group in the MFI-20 subscale of physical fatigue (resistance group Delta -1.7, SD 4.3, controls Delta 0.0, SD 2.7, p = 0.013), with an effect size of 0.33. Sleep efficiency was the strongest predictor of change in the MFI-20 subscale general fatigue (beta = -0.54, p = 0.031, R-2 = 0.05). Participating in resistance exercise (beta = 1.90, p = 0.010) and working fewer hours per week (beta = 0.84, p = 0.005) were independent significant predictors of change in physical fatigue (R-2 = 0.14). Conclusions: Person-centered progressive resistance exercise improved physical fatigue in women with FM when compared to an active control group.

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