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  • 1.
    Abbey, Susan E.
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    De Luca, Enza
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Mauthner, Oliver E.
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    McKeever, Patricia
    Bloorview Research Institute, Bloorview Kids Rehab, Canada.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queen's University, Belfast, Northern Ireland.
    Poole, Jennifer M.
    Ryerson University, Canada.
    Gewarges, Mena
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Ross, Heather J.
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Qualitative interviews versus standardised self-report questionnaires in assessing qualityb of life in heart transplant recipients2011In: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, ISSN 1053-2498, E-ISSN 1557-3117, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 963-966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality of life (QoL) studies in heart transplant recipients (HTRs) using validated, quantitative, self-report questionnaires have reported poor QoL in approximately 20% of patients. This consecutive mixed methods study compared self-report questionnaires, the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey (MOS SF-36) and the Atkinson Life Satisfaction Scale, with phenomenologically informed audiovisual (AV) qualitative interview data in 27 medically stable HTRs (70% male; age 53 ± 13.77 years; time since transplant 4.06 ± 2.42 years). Self-report questionnaire data reported poor QoL and more distress compared with previous studies and normative population samples; in contrast, 52% of HTRs displayed pervasive distress according to visual methodology. Using qualitative methods to assess QoL yields information that would otherwise remain unobserved by the exclusive use of quantitative QOL questionnaires.

  • 2.
    Aburto Maldonado, Jennifer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences.
    Eklind, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences.
    Tolksamarbete inom logopediska verksamheter: en enkätstudie ur tolkarnas perspektiv2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The need for interpreters in health care has increased as the number of multilingual individuals increases in today´s society. This entails greater demands on healthcare services to maintain a high quality of healthcare for all. Speech therapists often encounter multilingual people and are then in many cases in need of interpreters during assessments or interventions. Currently, there are only a few studies available that describe challenges that may occur in collaborationsbetween interpreters and speech and language therapist, viewed from the interpreters’perspective. The purpose of this study is thus to investigate the role of interpreters and emphasise their perspective on speech and language therapy activities (e.g. assessment and intervention) for multilingual people. Increased knowledge of the interpreters’ perspective may reveal challenges, as well as identify well-functioning working methods that exist. Results of the study may contribute to strengthening the collaboration between interpreters and speech and language therapists.The material for the study consists of questionnaire responses from 209 interpreters from different parts of Sweden. To provide a comprehensive overview of their answers,information about the interpreters was compiled in tables. Free text answers were an accompanying option to many of the fixed questions. The interpreters' free text answers were analysed using thematic analysis. Overall, the results showed that many of the interpreters perceived the collaboration with the speech therapists as positive, but that there are areas for improvement. The most commonly addressed area was that the interpreters felt that the speech therapists did not have sufficient knowledge of how interpreters are required to perform their profession (by oath of conduct). An improved understanding of each other's professions might increase the degree of satisfaction in the collaboration between interpreter and speech and language pathologist. Getting access to the materials that are to be used for assessment or intervention, before the appointment to be interpreted, would provide the interpreter with a fair chance to prepare appropriately. This is something that a majority of the interpreters in the present study pressed would improve their own performance and thus also increase patient safety.

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    Tolksamarbete inom logopediska verksamheter: en enkätstudie ur tolkarnas perspektiv
  • 3.
    Alexandrou, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Rutberg, Stina
    Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Johansson, Linnea
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    User experiences of an app-based mHealth intervention (MINISTOP 2.0) integrated in Swedish primary child healthcare among Swedish-, Somali- and Arabic-speaking parents and child healthcare nurses: A qualitative study2023In: Digital Health, E-ISSN 2055-2076, Vol. 9, article id 20552076231203630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundPreventive and scalable interventions, accessible to all, to counteract childhood obesity are urgently needed. We have recently developed a novel, digital parental intervention (MINISTOP 2.0 app) available in Swedish, Somali, Arabic and English. We have previously reported its positive effects on childrens health behaviors and on parental self-efficacy. However, before introducing the app at scale in primary child healthcare, implementation aspects also need to be explored.AimThis study aims to explore and describe user experiences as well as acceptability and feasibility of the MINISTOP 2.0 app-based intervention in a diverse group of parents (end-users) and Swedish child healthcare nurses (implementers).MethodsIndividual interviews were conducted with Swedish- (n = 9), Somali- (n = 9), Arabic- (n = 5) and English-speaking (n = 1) parents as well as Swedish primary child healthcare nurses (n = 15). Data was analyzed using content analysis with an inductive latent approach.ResultsParents described how the app facilitated behavior change through increased awareness regarding current diet and physical activity behaviors. Furthermore, the evidence-based app content further facilitated trust and behavior change. Both parents and nurses acknowledged the apps preventive potential and the potential for reaching parents with diverse backgrounds or in need of extra support.ConclusionThe MINISTOP 2.0 app was perceived as a useful tool for health promotion both by parents and healthcare professionals, especially since it was adapted to several languages. These findings coupled with the previously shown beneficial effects on health behaviors support the large-scale implementation of the app in primary child healthcare.

  • 4.
    Allemann, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andreasson, Frida
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Lennart
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    The co-design of an online support programme with and for informal carers of people with heart failure: A methodological paper2023In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 32, no 19-20, p. 7589-7604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe the co-designing process of an online support programme with and for informal carers of people with heart failure.Design A co-design process built on core concepts and ideas embedded in co-design methodology.Data sources Our co-design process included three phases involving 32 informal caregivers and 25 content creators; (1) Identification of topics and content through literature searches, focus group interviews and user group sessions; (2) Development of the online support programme and; (3) Refinement and finalization which included testing a paper prototype followed by testing the online version and testing and approval of the final version of the support programme.Outcomes The co-design process resulted in a support programme consisting of 15 different modules relevant to informal carers, delivered on a National Health Portal.Conclusion Co-design is an explorative process where researchers need to balance a range of potentially conflicting factors and to ensure that the end users are genuinely included in the process.Relevance to clinical practice Emphasizing equal involvement of end users (e.g. carers or patients) in the design and development of healthcare interventions aligns with contemporary ideas of person-centred care and provides a valuable learning opportunity for those involved. Furthermore, a co-designed online support programme has the capacity to be both accessible and meet end users information and support needs, thereby optimizing their self-care abilities. Additionally, an online support programme provides the opportunity to address current challenges regarding scarce resources and the lack of healthcare personnel.Reporting methods Consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ).Patient or public contribution Both informal carers and content creators were involved in developing the support programme.

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  • 5.
    Allemann, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Liljeroos, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Perceptions of Information and Communication Technology as Support for Family Members of Persons With Heart Failure: Qualitative Study2019In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 21, no 7, article id e13521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heart failure (HF) affects not only the person diagnosed with the syndrome but also family members, who often have the role of informal carers. The needs of these carers are not always met, and information and communications technology (ICT) could have the potential to support them in their everyday life. However, knowledge is lacking about how family members perceive ICT and see opportunities for this technology to support them. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of ICT solutions as supportive aids among family members of persons with HF. Methods: A qualitative design was applied. A total of 8 focus groups, comprising 23 family members of persons affected by HF, were conducted between March 2015 and January 2017. Participants were recruited from 1 hospital in Sweden. A purposeful sampling strategy was used to find family members of persons with symptomatic HF from diverse backgrounds. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The analysis revealed 4 categories and 9 subcategories. The first category, about how ICT could provide relevant support, included descriptions of how ICT could be used for communication with health care personnel, for information and communication retrieval, plus opportunities to interact with persons in similar life situations and to share support with peers and extended family. The second category, about how ICT could provide access, entailed how ICT could offer solutions not bound by time or place and how it could be both timely and adaptable to different life situations. ICT could also provide an arena for family members to which they might not otherwise have had access. The third category concerned how ICT could be too impersonal and how it could entail limited personal interaction and individualization, which could lead to concerns about usability. It was emphasized that ICT could not replace physical meetings. The fourth category considered how ICT could be out of scope, reflecting the fact that some family members were generally uninterested in ICT and had difficulties envisioning how it could be used for support. It was also discussed as more of a solution for the future. Conclusions: Family members described multiple uses for ICT and agreed that ICT could provide access to relevant sources of information from which family members could potentially exchange support. ICT was also considered to have its limitations and was out of scope for some but with expected use in the future. Even though some family members seemed hesitant about ICT solutions in general, this might not mean they are unreceptive to suggestions about their usage in, for example, health care. Thus, a variety of factors should be considered to facilitate future implementations of ICT tools in clinical practice.

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  • 6.
    Almberg, Maria
    et al.
    Mobil Centre Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Selander, Helena
    Mobil Centre Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin University, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia.
    Experiences of facilitators or barriers in driving education from learner and novice drivers with ADHD or ASD and their driving instructors2017In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 59-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Little is known about whether individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) experience any specific facilitators or barriers to driving education. Objective: To explore the facilitators or barriers to driving education experienced by individuals with ASD or ADHD who obtained a learners permit, from the perspective of the learner drivers and their driving instructors. Methods: Datawere collected from33 participants with ASD or ADHD, and nine of their driving instructors. Results: Participants with ASD required twice asmany driving lessons andmore on-road tests than those with ADHD. Participants with ADHD repeated the written tests more than those with ASD. Driving license theory was more challenging for individuals with ADHD, whilst individuals with ASD found translating theory into practice and adjusting to "unfamiliar driving situations to be the greatest challenges. Conclusion: Obtaining a driving license was associated with stressful training experience.

  • 7.
    Al-Motlaq, Mohammad
    et al.
    Hashemite Univ, Jordan.
    Neill, Sarah
    Univ Plymouth, England.
    Foster, Mandie Jane
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Perth Childrens Hosp, Australia.
    Coyne, Imelda
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Ireland; Trinity Coll Dublin, Ireland.
    Houghton, Davina
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Rising-Holmstrom, Malin
    Mid Sweden Univ, Sweden.
    Majamanda, Maureen
    Univ Malawi, Malawi; Consortium Adv Training Africa CARTA, Kenya.
    Position statement of the international network for child and family centered care: Child and family centred care during the COVID19 pandemic2021In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 61, p. 140-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is the position of the International Network for Child and Family Centered Care (INCFCC) that COVID-19 restrictions pose tremendous challenges for the health care team in their efforts to provide child and family centered care (CFCC). COVID-19 restrictions impact on the familys right to be presernt with their ill child and to contribute to the caring process. A limited number of articles have discussed challenges about the successful delivery of CFCC during the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on current literature, the INCFCC stresses the need for continuous facilitation implementation of child and family centred care as, it is essential for childrens physical and psychological wellbeing. Furthermore we believe that the families presence and participation holds more benefits than risks to the health of children, their families, and the health care team. (C) 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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  • 8.
    Alwin, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eckard, Nathalie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fixartjänster i Sveriges kommuner: Kartläggning och samhällsekonomisk analys. Regeringsuppdrag2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report deals with so called minor home help services. These services are primarily meant for older persons with the aim to prevent injuries caused by falling in domestic environments (ones home). The minor home help services are mostly provided by the municipalities in Sweden, although it is not mandatory to provide these services. The extent of the provision and use of minor home help services has previously not been studied on a national level. The aim of this study was to delineate the minor home help services run by the municipalities in Sweden and further to examine and estimate the societal costs and consequences of providing these services.

    Out of the 290 municipalities in Sweden, 191 (66 %) offer minor home help services to their citizens. The tasks carried out are primarily aimed at preventing falls from furniture such as step stools or ladders, removing items that may cause falls (cords, carpets etc.) and providing an overhaul of injury risks in the home. A few municipalities also offer outdoor services such as removing snow in wintertime. In the majority of the municipalities (58 %) the services are offered free of charge but the user has to pay for the materials, in 32 % the services are completely free of charge and in 9 % of the municipalities an amount is charged for the services. The minor home help services are organized in various ways in the municipalities: the services can be completely run by the municipality where the services are carried out by one or several employed persons, by persons with disabilities (involved in daily activity programmes in the municipality) or by persons involved in work programmes; or the minor home help services can be carried out by the community rescue service or companies paid by the municipality to offer these services to the citizens. There are also organizations with volunteers that carry out minor home help services, these are however not included in the main results since the focus in this report is on municipal minor home help services. Ninety nine municipalities do not offer minor home help services to their citizens. Reasons for this are e.g. economic restraints and low demand.

    Experienced gains with minor home help services from the perspectives of the municipalities are prevention of falls, facilitation of the possibility to remain living in one’s own home, contribution to social wellbeing and being able to offer meaningful work tasks for persons in work programmes or persons with disabilities. Problems that have been brought forward are low demand of the services, problems with providing the target group with information and difficulties to measure the effect on fall injuries.

    A socioeconomic model was constructed for the analysis of costs and consequences of fall injuries. The model includes the large cost items as well as outcomes such as mortality and loss of quality of life when affected by a fall injury. The total direct costs in Sweden for fall injuries has previously been calculated to approximately 5 billion SEK, which includes only the direct costs during the first year of the injury. A calculation exercise was performed and applied to a hypothetical municipality with 50 000 inhabitants. This calculation exercise shows that if only a small amount of falls that lead to serious injuries (fractures) can be prevented by minor home help services, then the costs saved are approximately equivalent to the mean budget of minor home help services with one employed person. Calculations using real data including both costs and effects need to be performed.

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  • 9.
    Ammenwerth, Elske
    et al.
    Univ Hlth Sci Med Informat & Technol UMIT, Austria.
    Duftschmid, Georg
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Al-Hamdan, Zaid
    Jordan Univ Sci & Technol, Jordan.
    Bawadi, Hala
    Univ Jordan, Jordan.
    Cheung, Ngai T.
    Hosp Author, Peoples R China.
    Cho, Kyung-Hee
    Seoul Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Goldfarb, Guillermo
    Hosp Ninos Dr Ricardo Gutierrez, Argentina.
    Gulkesen, Kemal H.
    Akdeniz Univ, Turkey.
    Harel, Nissim
    Holon Inst Technol, Israel.
    Kimura, Michio
    Hamamatsu Univ, Japan.
    Kirca, Onder
    Mem & Medstar Oncol Ctr, Turkey.
    Kondoh, Hiroshi
    Tottori Univ Hosp, Japan.
    Koch, Sabine
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Health Informatics Centre, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lewy, Hadas
    Holon Inst Technol, Israel.
    Mize, Dara
    Vanderbilt Univ, TN 37235 USA.
    Palojoki, Sari
    Univ Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Park, Hyeoun-Ae
    Seoul Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Pearce, Christopher
    Outcome Hlth, Australia.
    de Quiros, Fernan G. B.
    Hosp Italiano Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Saranto, Kaija
    Univ Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Seidel, Christoph
    Minist Social Affairs Hlth & Equal Opportun, Germany.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Were, Martin C.
    Vanderbilt Univ, TN USA.
    Westbrook, Johanna
    Macquarie Univ, Australia.
    Wong, Chung P.
    Hong Kong Soc Med Informat, Peoples R China.
    Haux, Reinhold
    TUBraunschweig, Germany; Hannover Med Sch, Germany.
    Lehmann, Christoph U.
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, TX 75390 USA.
    International Comparison of Six Basic eHealth Indicators Across 14 Countries: An eHealth Benchmarking Study2020In: Methods of Information in Medicine, ISSN 0026-1270, Vol. 59, no S2, p. e46-e63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Many countries adopt eHealth applications to support patient-centered care. Through information exchange, these eHealth applications may overcome institutional data silos and support holistic and ubiquitous (regional or national) information logistics. Available eHealth indicators mostly describe usage and acceptance of eHealth in a country. The eHealth indicators focusing on the cross-institutional availability of patient-related information for health care professionals, patients, and care givers are rare. Objectives This study aims to present eHealth indicators on cross-institutional availability of relevant patient data for health care professionals, as well as for patients and their caregivers across 14 countries (Argentina, Australia, Austria, Finland, Germany, Hong Kong as a special administrative region of China, Israel, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, South Korea, Sweden, Turkey, and the United States) to compare our indicators and the resulting data for the examined countries with other eHealth benchmarks and to extend and explore changes to a comparable survey in 2017. We defined "availability of patient data" as the ability to access data in and to add data to the patient record in the respective country. Methods The invited experts from each of the 14 countries provided the indicator data for their country to reflect the situation on August 1, 2019, as date of reference. Overall, 60 items were aggregated to six eHealth indicators. Results Availability of patient-related information varies strongly by country. Health care professionals can access patients most relevant cross-institutional health record data fully in only four countries. Patients and their caregivers can access their health record data fully in only two countries. Patients are able to fully add relevant data only in one country. Finland showed the best outcome of all eHealth indicators, followed by South Korea, Japan, and Sweden. Conclusion Advancement in eHealth depends on contextual factors such as health care organization, national health politics, privacy laws, and health care financing. Improvements in eHealth indicators are thus often slow. However, our survey shows that some countries were able to improve on at least some indicators between 2017 and 2019. We anticipate further improvements in the future.

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  • 10.
    Andersen, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Anderzen, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Kjerstin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Positive experiences of a vocational rehabilitation intervention for individuals on long-term sick leave, the Dirigo project: a qualitative study2017In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, article id 790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The process of returning to work after long-term sick leave can sometimes be complex. Many factors, (e.g. cooperation between different authorities and the individual as well as individual factors such as health, emotional well-being and self-efficacy) may have an impact on an individuals ability to work. The aim of this study was to investigate clients experiences with an individually tailored vocational rehabilitation, the Dirigo project, and encounters with professionals working on it. The Dirigo project was based on collaboration between rehabilitation authorities, individually tailored interventions and a motivational interviewing approach. Methods: A descriptive qualitative design was used with data collected through interviews. Fourteen individuals on long-term sick leave took part in individual semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed using content analysis. Results: The analysis showed overall positive experience of methods and encounters with professionals in a vocational rehabilitation project. The positive experiences were based on four key factors: 1. Opportunities for receiving various dimensions of support. 2. Good overall treatment by the professionals. 3. Satisfaction with the working methods of the project, and 4. Opportunities for personal development. Conclusions: The main result showed that the clients had an overall positive experience of a vocational rehabilitation project and encounters with professionals who used motivational interviewing as a communication method. The overall positive experience indicated that their interactions with the different professionals may have affected their self-efficacy in general and in relation to transition to work. The knowledge is essential for the professionals working in the area of vocational rehabilitation. However, vocational rehabilitation interventions also need a societal approach to be able to offer clients opportunities for job training and real jobs.

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  • 11.
    Andersson, Elinor
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vad är speciellt med handledare vid klinisk undervisningsavdelning (KUA)?-En kvalitativ studie2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Supervising students in a clinical training ward (CTW) has been used for some 20 years. Studies show that interprofessional learning gives students an opportunity to get a comprehensive view of a particular patient’s health-care needs, as well as an increased and mutual understanding of their colleague’s position and knowledge. Only a few studies have focused on the supervisor’s view of his or her own role within the activity of the CTW. The purpose of the study was to describe the CTW supervisor and his or her own perception of her role as an interprofessional supervisor as well as to describe interprofessional learning on its own at the CTW. A qualitative method was used, and 19 interprofessional supervisors from and within occupational therapy, along with physicians, physiotherapists, and nurses, were interviewed.

    The texts were content-analysed. Three categories were identified: ‘the supervisor’, ‘the supervision’, and ‘the concept of CTW’. It turned out that the interprofessional supervisor has a genuine interest and commitment to supervise, to work pedagogically, to collaborate, and to work with students. The supervisors all used different strategies, and they worked with the team in focus, partly for the benefit of the students but also to show the team’s importance in relation to the patient’s health care situation. The CTW concept requires lots of time and dedication from the supervisor, but it is perceived as a good concept where students can develop interprofessional collaboration. The supervisor’s understanding and approach to student learning makes a huge difference in the process of supervision. Being an interprofessional supervisor requires a pedagogical knowledge and understanding of a group and of the group process. The student’s team knowledge influences the CTW, which affects the supervision. The concept of the CTW has a positive impact on the supervisors, and the interprofessional supervision is perceived to be stimulating and challenging.

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  • 12.
    Appelgren Engstrom, Helene
    et al.
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Haggstrom-Nordin, Elisabet
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Borneskog-Sinclair, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Northumbria Univ, England.
    Almqvist, Anna-Lena
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Mothers in same-sex relationships-Striving for equal parenthood: A grounded theory study2019In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, no 19-20, p. 3700-3709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To get a deeper understanding of how mothers in same-sex relationships think and reason about their parenthood in terms of gender equality, and how they experience early parental support from child healthcare professionals. Background There is an increasing amount of research on how women in same-sex relationships experience healthcare services when forming a family. Yet there is limited knowledge of what kind of early parental support these women may request. Design Grounded theory. Follows guidelines for qualitative research (COREQ). Method Twenty women ranging from 25 to 42 years of age participated in semi-structured interviews. Data collection and analysis took place in parallel, as recommended in grounded theory methodology. Results The results are described by the core category Same-sex mothers request professional support to achieve equal parenthood, which includes five categories: (a) equality in everyday life, (b) diversity in mother and child attachment, (c) justification of the family structure, (d) ambivalent thoughts about their childs future and (e) a special need for networking and request for professional support. These findings provide a deeper understanding of how same-sex mothers experience their parenthood and the parental support that is offered. Conclusion Child healthcare professionals need to be sensitive and recognise both mothers as equal parents and offer early parenting groups where two-mother families feel included and supported. Relevance to clinical practice Healthcare professionals need to be aware of diverse family formations and meet each parent as a unique individual without heteronormative assumptions. Same-sex mothers must be treated as equal parents and acknowledged as mothers. Healthcare professionals should offer inclusive and supportive parental groups to same-sex families. They should also inform and support nonbirth mothers about the possibility to breastfeed.

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  • 13.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Peter
    Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids: Data From a Large Swedish Quality Register Database2017In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 443-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze a database of completed International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) questionnaires obtained from over 100,000 clients fitted with new hearing aids in Sweden during the period of 2012-2016. Mean IOI-HA total scores were correlated with degree of hearing loss, unilateral versus bilateral fitting, first-time versus return clients, gender, and variation among dispensing clinics. The correlations with expectations, service quality, and technical functioning of the hearing aids were also analyzed. Method: Questionnaires containing the 7 IOI-HA items as well as questions concerning some additional issues were mailed to clients 3-6 months after fitting of new hearing aids. The questionnaires were returned to and analyzed by an independent research institute. Results: More than 100 dispensing clinics nationwide take part in this project. A response rate of 52.6% resulted in 106,631 data sets after excluding incomplete questionnaires. Forty-six percent of the responders were women, and 54% were men. The largest difference in mean score (0.66) was found for the IOI-HA item "use" between return clients and first-time users. Women reported significantly higher (better) scores for the item "impact on others" compared with men. The bilaterally fitted subgroup reported significantly higher scores for all 7 items compared with the unilaterally fitted subgroup. Experienced users produced higher scores on benefit and satisfaction items, whereas first-time users gave higher scores for residual problems. No correlation was found between mean IOI-HA total score and average hearing threshold level (pure-tone average [ PTA]). Mean IOI-HA total scores were found to correlate significantly with perceived service quality of the dispensing center and with the technical functionality of the hearing aids. Conclusions: When comparing mean IOI-HA total scores from different studies or between groups, differences with regard to hearing aid experience, gender, and unilateral versus bilateral fitting have to be considered. No correlation was found between mean IOI-HA total score and degree of hearing loss in terms of PTA. Thus, PTA is not a reliable predictor of benefit and satisfaction of hearing aid provision as represented by the IOI-HA items. Identification of a specific lower fence in PTA for hearing aid candidacy is therefore to be avoided. Large differences were found in mean IOI-HA total scores related to different dispensing centers.

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  • 14.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jonköping University, Sweden; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    How are the activity and participation aspects of the ICF used? Examples from studies of people with intellectual disability2015In: NeuroRehabilitation (Reading, MA), ISSN 1053-8135, E-ISSN 1878-6448, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 45-49Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Interdisciplinary differences regarding understanding the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) concepts activity/participation may hinder its unifying purpose. In the ICF model, functioning (and disability) is described as a tripartite concept: 1) Body structures/functions, 2) Activities, and 3) Participation. Activities refer to an individual perspective on disability that does not tally with the basic structure of social models. OBJECTIVE: To review how activity and participation are actually used in studies of intellectual disability (ID). CONCLUSION: Based on 16 papers, four different usages of activity/participation were found. 1) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept with attempts to use it. 2) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept without actual use of activities. 3) "Atheoretical" approach with implicit focus on participation. 4) Theoretical reference to bipartite concept with corresponding use of terms. The highlighted studies have in common a focus on participation. However, the usage of the term "activity" differs both within and between studies. Such terminology will probably confuse interdisciplinary communication rather than facilitating it. Also, the use of an explicit underlying theory differs, from references to a tripartite to references to a bipartite concept of disability. This paper is focused on ID, but the discussed principles regarding the ICF and interdisciplinary disability theory are applicable to other diagnostic groups within rehabilitation practices.

  • 15.
    Ball, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    The Establishment of DisorderedSpeechBank: A digital archive of disordered speech across languages2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Ball, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Isaksson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Elias
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dysarthria in Swedish2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Ball, Martin J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Principles of clinical phonology: theoretical approaches2016 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Those working on the description of disordered speech are bound to be also involved with clinical phonology to some extent. This is because interpreting the speech signal is only the first step to an analysis. Describing the organization and function of a speech system is the next step. However, it is here that phonologists differ in their descriptions, as there are many current approaches in modern linguistics to undertaking phonological analyses of both normal and disordered speech.

    Much of the work in theoretical phonology of the last fifty years or so is of little use in either describing disordered speech or explaining it. This is because the dominant theoretical approach in linguists as a whole attempts elegant descriptions of linguistic data, not a psycholinguistic model of what speakers do when they speak. The latter is what is needed in clinical phonology. In this text, Martin J. Ball addresses these issues in an investigation of what principles should underlie a clinical phonology. This is not, however, simply another manual on how to do phonological analyses of disordered speech data, though examples of the application of various models of phonology to such data are provided. Nor is this a guide on how to do therapy, though a chapter on applications is included. Rather, this is an exploration of what theoretical underpinnings are best suited to describing, classifying, and treating the wide range of developmental and acquired speech disorders encountered in the speech-language pathology clinic.

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  • 18.
    Ball, Martin J.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Howard, Sara
    Esling, John
    Dickson, Craig
    Revisions to the extIPA and VoQS symbol sets.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Bang, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology.
    Meera, Shoba S.
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bengaluru, India.
    Igelström, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brief Report: The Broad Autism Phenotype in Swedish Parentsof Children With and Without Autism Spectrum Conditions2022In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 52, no 10, p. 4575-4582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The broad autism phenotype (BAP) is a set of characteristics often observed in typically developing people with a genetic load for autism, such as parents of autistic children. The Broad Autism Phenotypic Questionnaire (BAPQ) is a 36-item questionnaire developed to identify the BAP in first-degree relatives of autistic people. We translated the BAPQ into Swedish and examined its psychometric properties in a Swedish sample consisting of 45 parents of children with ASC and 74 parents of non-autistic children. We found support for the original 3-factor structure (aloof, pragmatic language and rigid), good internal consistency and convergent validity with the Autism Quotient. Thus, the Swedish BAPQ exhibits acceptable psychometric properties and may be useful for assessing the BAP in non-clinical populations.

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  • 20.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    Natl Inst Hlth & Sci Ageing INRCA, Italy; Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Natl Inst Hlth & Sci Ageing INRCA, Italy.
    Andréasson, Frida
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr NKA, Sweden.
    Salzmann, Benjamin
    Natl Inst Hlth & Sci Ageing INRCA, Italy; Wir Pflegen eV, Germany.
    Papa, Roberta
    Natl Inst Hlth & Sci Ageing INRCA, Italy.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr NKA, Sweden; Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Efthymiou, Areti
    Eurocarers, Belgium; Cyprus Univ Technol, Cyprus.
    Doehner, Hanneli
    Wir Pflegen eV, Germany.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    Natl Inst Hlth & Sci Ageing INRCA, Italy.
    Civerchia, Patrizia
    Natl Inst Hlth & Sci Ageing INRCA, Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    Natl Inst Hlth & Sci Ageing INRCA, Italy.
    A Web-Based Psychosocial Intervention for Family Caregivers of Older People: Results from a Mixed-Methods Study in Three European Countries2016In: JMIR Research Protocols, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 5, no 4, article id e196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Informal caregiving is the main source of care for older people in Europe. An enormous amount of responsibility and care activity is on the shoulders of family caregivers, who might experience problems in their psychological well-being and in reconciling caregiving and their personal sphere. In order to alleviate such burden, there is increasing interest and growing research in Europe on Web-based support addressing family caregivers and their needs. However, the level of development and penetration of innovative Web-based services for caregivers is still quite low and the access to traditional face-to-face services can be problematic for logistic, availability, and quality reasons. Objective: As part of the European project INNOVAGE, a pilot study was conducted for developing and testing a Web-based psychosocial intervention aimed at empowering family caregivers of older people in Italy, Sweden, and Germany. The program offered information resources and interactive services to enable both professional and peer support. Methods: A mixed-methods, sequential explanatory design was adopted. Caregivers psychological well-being, perceived negative and positive aspects of caregiving, and social support received were assessed before and after the 3-month intervention. Poststudy, a subsample of users participated in focus groups to assist in the interpretation of the quantitative results. Results: A total of 94 out of 118 family caregivers (79.7%) from the three countries used the Web platform at least once. The information resources were used to different extents in each country, with Italian users having the lowest median number of visits (5, interquartile range [IQR] 2-8), whereas German users had the highest number (17, IQR 7-66) (P<.001). The interactive services most frequently accessed (more than 12 times) in all countries were the social network (29/73, 40%) and private messages (27/73, 37%). The pretest-posttest analysis revealed some changes, particularly the slight worsening of perceived positive values of caregiving (Carers of Older People in Europe [COPE] positive value subscale: P=.02) and social support received (COPE quality-of-support subscale: P=.02; Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support subscale: P=.04), in all cases with small effect size (r range -.15 to -.18). Focus groups were conducted with 20 family caregivers and the content analysis of discussions identified five main themes: online social support, role awareness, caregiving activities, psychological well-being, and technical concerns. The analysis suggested the intervention was useful and appropriate, also stimulating a better self-efficacy and reappraisal of the caregivers role. Conclusions: The intervention seemed to contribute to the improvement of family caregivers awareness, efficacy, and empowerment, which in turn may lead to a better self-recognition of their own needs and improved efforts for developing and accessing coping resources. A major implication of the study was the finalization and implementation of the InformCare Web platform in 27 European countries, now publicly accessible (www.eurocarers.org/informcare).

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  • 21.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    McCambridge, Jim
    University of York, York, United Kingdom.
    Reducing Alcohol Consumption Among Risky Drinkers in the General Population of Sweden Using an Interactive Mobile Health Intervention: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial2019In: JMIR Research Protocols, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e13119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Harmful use of alcohol continues to be a leading contributor to premature deaths globally. Not only does harmful drinking have consequences for the individuals consuming at increased levels, but it may also result in a range of negative consequences for their family members and friends. Interventions delivered via mobile phones (mobile health [mHealth] interventions) could potentially support risky drinkers seeking help to reduce their alcohol consumption.

    Objective: This protocol describes a randomized controlled trial that aims to validly estimate the effect of a novel mHealth intervention targeting risky drinkers in the general population of Sweden. Nested within the trial are 3 substudies that focus on methodological and user satisfaction research questions.

    Methods: A 2-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial will be employed to estimate the effect of the novel intervention. Participants will be recruited through Web advertisements and social media. The inclusion criteria are as follows: 18 years or older, ownership of a mobile phone, and being classified as a risky drinker according to Swedish guidelines. Participants allocated to the intervention group will receive a novel mHealth intervention. The intervention consists of weekly screening, personalized feedback on current consumption, functions allowing for planning of future consumption, as well as a series of messages delivered throughout the week. Participants allocated to the control group will receive a short message regarding negative consequences of alcohol consumption and a hyperlink that offers more information. Following 2 and 4 months after randomization, both groups will be asked to complete follow-up questionnaires (2-month interval being primary). Primary outcomes are weekly alcohol consumption and heavy episodic drinking. Participants in the control group will be given access to the novel intervention after completing the 4-month follow-up. The trial includes 3 substudies: We will explore whether the mode of presenting information before participants giving informed consent affects participation rates and recall of trial parameters, investigate if the content of the short message received by the control group affects study outcomes and requests for more information, and explore user satisfaction with the intervention and reactions of the control group.

    Results: Participant recruitment is planned to begin in April 2019 and to last for a maximum of 24 months. The first dataset will be available approximately 2 months after the final participant has been recruited, and the final dataset will be available approximately 2 months later. No participants had been recruited at the time of submitting this protocol.

    Conclusions: If found effective, the intervention has the potential to reduce negative consequences of alcohol consumption for individuals. The technology has been designed to have potential for extensive reach among those who may benefit.

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  • 22.
    Bennett, Rebecca J.
    et al.
    Ear Sci Inst Australia, Australia; Univ Western Australia, Australia.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon Med, Denmark.
    Eikelboom, Robert H.
    Ear Sci Inst Australia, Australia; Univ Western Australia, Australia; Univ Pretoria, South Africa.
    How Do Hearing Aid Owners Respond to Hearing Aid Problems?2019In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 77-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although hearing aids can improve hearing and communication, problems that arise following the acquisition of hearing aids can result in their disuse. This study aimed to gather perspectives of hearing aid owners and hearing health care clinicians about how hearing aid owners respond to problems that arise following hearing aid fitting, and then use these perspectives to generate a conceptual framework to better understand these responses. Methods: Seventeen hearing aid owners and 21 hearing health care clinicians generated, sorted, and rated statements regarding how hearing aid owners respond to problems associated with hearing aid use. Concept mapping was used to identify key themes and to develop a conceptual framework. Results: Participants identified four concepts regarding how hearing aid owners respond to problems associated with hearing aids: (1) Seeking External Help; (2) Problem Solving; (3) Putting Up with Problems; and (4) Negative Emotional Response. Participants described behaviors of the clinician and significant others that influenced their decision to seek help for hearing aid problems. Participants recognized that these behaviors could either have a helpful or unhelpful impact. Conclusions: Despite the ongoing support offered to clients after they acquire hearing aids, they are hesitant to seek help from their clinician and instead engage in a myriad of helpful and unhelpful behaviors in response to problems that arise with their hearing aid. Previous positive or negative experiences with the clinic, clinician, or significant other influenced these actions, highlighting the influential role of these individuals in the success of the rehabilitation program. The data generated from this study suggests that clinicians could improve hearing aid problem resolution by providing technical and emotional support, including to significant others, and promoting client empowerment and self-management.

  • 23.
    Bennett, Rebecca J.
    et al.
    Ear Sci Inst Australia, Australia; Univ Western Australia, Australia.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Res Ctr, Denmark.
    Meyer, Carly J.
    Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Eikelboom, Robert H.
    Ear Sci Inst Australia, Australia; Univ Western Australia, Australia; Univ Pretoria, South Africa.
    Exploring Hearing Aid Problems: Perspectives of Hearing Aid Owners and Clinicians2018In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 172-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To gather perspectives of hearing aid owners and hearing healthcare clinicians with regard to problems that arise after hearing aid fitting and use these perspectives to generate a conceptual framework to gain a better understanding of these problems. Design: Participants included a group of 17 hearing aid owners and a group of 21 hearing healthcare clinicians; data collection occurred separately for each group. Participants each attended two group sessions in Perth, Western Australia, wherein they: (1) generated statements describing the problems associated with hearing aids and (2) grouped and rated the statements to identify key themes. Concept mapping was used to generate a conceptual framework. Results: Participants identified four concepts regarding hearing aid problems as follows: (1) hearing aid management; (2) hearing aid sound quality and performance; (3) feelings, thoughts, and behaviors; and (4) information and training. While hearing aid owners and clinicians generated similar results regarding the concepts derived, the clinicians reported that the problems identified had a greater negative impact on hearing aid success than did hearing aid owners. Conclusions: The magnitude and diversity of hearing aid problems identified in this study highlight the ongoing challenges that hearing aid owners face and suggest that current processes for hearing aid fitting can be improved. Problems relating to hearing aid management were most often deemed to have the greatest impact on hearing aid success and be the most preventable/solvable, and thus are a good starting point when addressing hearing aid-related problems.

  • 24.
    Berg, Jessica
    et al.
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden.
    Levin, Lena
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    “I want complete freedom”: car use and everyday mobility among the newly retired2015In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 7, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To investigate car use among newly retired people, to explore to what extent car transport is used for everyday mobility and how it is valued in comparison to other transport modes.

    Methods

    The data consists of travel diaries and qualitative interviews with 24 individuals, aged between 61 and 67, living in a middle-sized Swedish city. They were recruited via the local branch of one of the main associations of pensioners, one large employer in the municipality, and through another study. The informants filled in a travel diary during 1 week that were analysed by VISUAL- TimePAcTS, an application for visualising and exploring activity diary data. The semi-structured qualitative interviews were analysed using a qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    The car was used for several trips daily and often for short trips. The informants had a lot of everyday projects that they would not be able to perform if they did not have access to a car. The importance of the car does not seem to have changed upon retirement, albeit it is partly used for other reasons than before. The informant’s social context implies new space-time constraints. Commitments to family members, engagement in associations and spouses’ occupations affect how much and when they use the car, and their overall mobility.

    Conclusions

    In contrast to much research on older people’s mobility that has studied slightly older people, this study have focused on a specific group that are relatively healthy, well-off, and have the possibility to choose between different modes of transport. By combining travel diaries and qualitative interviews, we have explored how newly retired people reason as regard their travel behaviour but also how they actually travel. Although the car was used more than other transport modes, being able to walk and cycle now that they had more time as retirees was highly valued. Our results indicate that urban residents that are retiring now and in the future are a key target group in transport planning when it comes to reduce car use in favour of slow modes of transport.

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  • 25.
    Berglund, Josefin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hasselquist, Kaisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fonologi hos svenska 5- och 6-åringar med typisk språkutveckling: Referensmaterial till det fonologiska testmaterialet LINUS2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A new phonological test, LINUS, for Swedish-speaking children between the ages of three and seven, has been developed at the speech and language pathology department at Linköping University. The aim of the present study was to create a reference manual for the long version of the new test. The participants in the present study were children between the ages of five to seven in a medium-sized municipality in the Northern part of Kalmar County, Sweden. In total, 124 native Swedish-speaking children (58 girls and 66 boys) with typical language development participated. The children were divided into two age groups, 5;0-5;11;31 and 6;0-6;11;31 years. The collected data was analysed with respect to acquisition of phonemes and word structure processes. Percentage of correctly produced words (PWC), consonants (PCC) and vowels (PVC) were calculated.All phonemes, except /s/, were established in both age groups. The phoneme /s/ was found to be either substituted or distorted. Among the 5-year old children /s/ was established for 84%, substitutions of /s/ were found in 7% and distortions were found in 23%. Among the 6-year old children /s/ was established for 88%. Substitutions of /s/ were found in 3% and distortions in 16% of the 6-year old children. The phoneme /r/ proved to be a borderline case for acquisition in the younger age group (91%). The most common word structure process in both groups was assimilation. A significant difference between the two age groups was found for assimilation (p=0,022), with lower occurrence in the older group. Two-consonant clusters (CC) and three-consonant clusters (CCC) were not frequently reduced, although it was found that CC-clusters were reduced more frequently than CCC-clusters. Both the age groups had high percentages of correctly produced words, consonants and vowels. The analysis revealed the following results: PWC for 5-years olds was 93% and 6-years olds 97%. PCC for 5-year olds was 98% and for 6-year olds 99%. PVC for both age groups was 100%. An age difference was shown for PWC, but not for the other measures. No gender differences were found.

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    Fonologi hos svenska 5- och 6-åringar med typisk språkutveckling Referensmaterial till det fonologiska testmaterialet LINUS
  • 26.
    Bergman, Pia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Jonkoping Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    The Outcome of Unilateral Cochlear Implantation in Adults: Speech Recognition, Health-Related Quality of Life and Level of Anxiety and Depression: a One- and Three-Year Follow-Up Study2020In: International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 1809-9777, E-ISSN 1809-4864, Vol. 24, no 03, p. 338-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Hearing impairment is a common disease worldwide, with a comprehensive impact, and cochlear implantation (CI) is an intervention for profound hearing impairment. Objective To study the outcome one and three years after unilateral CI on hearing, health-related quality of life and level of depression and anxiety, and the correlation between the outcomes. Second, to study whether age, gender, etiology, operated side, residual hearing or cognitive performance can predict the outcome. Methods A prospective longitudinal study including adults with profound postlingual hearing impairment, with respect to hearing (speech recognition), health-related quality of life (Health Utilities Index 3) and level of depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale), pre-CI, and one and three years post-CI. The total sample was composed of 40 participants (40% of men), with a mean age of 71 years. Results Speech recognition and the overall health-related quality of life improved one year post-CI (p = 0.000), without correlation (rho= 0.27), and with no difference three years post-CI. The hearing attribute (in the health-related quality of life instrument) improved one and three years post-CI (p = 0.000). The level of anxiety did not change one and three years post-CI. The level of depression improved one year post-CI (p = 0.036), and deteriorated three years post-CI (p = 0.031). Age, etiology, operated side, residual hearing and cognitive performance did not predict the outcome, but the female gender did significantly improve speech recognition compared with men (p = 0.009). Conclusion The CI significantly improved speech recognition, health-related quality of life and level of depression one year post-CI without mutual correlation, and women performed significantly better than men. There were no further improvements three years post-CI, apart from the hearing attribute.

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  • 27.
    Bergsten, Sophia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Ågren, Pauline
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Sexuell hälsa hos kvinnor med ADHD: en strukturerad intervjustudie via Facebook2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background The number of people diagnosed with ADHD increases. In order to apply person-centered care, knowledge and understanding of how women with ADHD experience their sexual health, is required. Midwives meets women of all ages and should apply person-centered care in the meeting with all woman.

    Aim To describe experiences of sexual health among women with ADHD. Study design A qualitative study with inductive approach. A structured interview form was answered by 267 women. They were recruited via the Facebook group "ADHD Sverige". The data collection was analyzed by Hsieh and Shannon's (2005) conventional content analysis. Results The analysis resulted in two categories, Sexual Satisfaction and Sex that Causes Harm. The categories describe the factors that, according to the women's experiences, influenced their sexual health. Conclusions The women described the sexual desire as an important aspect of their sexual health. Mental illness and/or drug treatment was said to be a cause of impaired sexual desire in women. The women who were in a relationship stated that good communication and gender equality promoted their sexual health. Furthermore, sexual illness proved to be related to reduced self-esteem. The midwife should keep this in mind in order to be able to acquire a complete sexual anamnesis, thus identifying risk factors for sexual illness.

  • 28.
    Bernard, Christophe
    et al.
    Aix Marseille Université, INS, Marseille, France; Inserm, UMR_S 1106, Marseille, France.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Malliaras, George G
    Department of Bioelectronics, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, CMP-EMSE, MOC, Gardanne, France.
    Organic Bioelectronics for Interfacing with the Brain2016In: The WSPC Reference on Organic Electronics: Organic Semiconductors: Volume 2: Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Applications / [ed] Seth R Marder, Jean-Luc Bredas, World Scientific, 2016, p. 345-368Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how the brain works represents probably the most important fundamental endeavor of humankind and holds the key for the development of new technologies that can help improve the lives of people suffering from neurological conditions such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease. Over the past decade, the use of organic electronic devices to interface with the biological world has received a great deal of attention and bloomed into a field now called “organic bioelectronics”. One of the key differences of organic from traditional electronic materials is their capacity to exchange ions with electrolytes. We discuss how this property can be leveraged to design new types of devices that interface with the brain.Read 

  • 29.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Nottingham Biomed Res Ctr, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Audiologist-Guided Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Adults With Tinnitus in the United Kingdom: A Randomized Controlled Trial2018In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 423-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Specialist tinnitus services are in high demand as a result of the negative effect tinnitus may have on quality of life. Additional clinically and cost-effective tinnitus management routes are needed. One potential route is providing Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for tinnitus via the Internet (iCBT). This study aimed to determine the efficacy of guided iCBT, using audiological support, on tinnitus distress and tinnitus-related comorbidities, in the United Kingdom. A further aim was to establish the stability of intervention effects 2-months postintervention. The hypothesis was that iCBT for tinnitus would be more effective at reducing tinnitus distress than weekly monitoring. Design: A randomized, delayed intervention efficacy trial, with a 2-month follow-up was implemented to evaluate the efficacy of iCBT in the United Kingdom. Participants were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 73) or weekly monitoring control group (n = 73) after being stratified for tinnitus severity and age. After the experimental group completed the 8-week long iCBT intervention, the control group undertook the same intervention. Intervention effects were, therefore, evaluated in two independent groups at two time points. The primary outcome was a change in tinnitus distress between the groups as assessed by the Tinnitus Functional Index. Secondary assessment measures were included for insomnia, anxiety, depression, hearing disability, hyperacusis, cognitive failures, and satisfaction with life. These were completed at baseline, postintervention, and at a 2-month postintervention follow-up. Results: After undertaking the iCBT intervention, the experimental group had a greater reduction in tinnitus distress when compared with the control group. This reduction was statistically significant (Cohens d = 0.7) and was clinically significant for 51% of the experimental group and 5% of the control group. This reduction was evident 4 weeks after commencing the iCBT intervention. Furthermore, the experimental group had a greater reduction in insomnia, depression, hyperacusis, cognitive failures, and a greater improvement in quality of life, as evidenced by the significant differences in these assessment measures postintervention. Results were maintained 2 months postintervention. Conclusions: Guided (using audiological support) iCBT for tinnitus resulted in statistically significant reductions in tinnitus distress and comorbidities (insomnia, depression, hyperacusis, cognitive failures) and a significant increase in quality of life. These effects remained stable at 2-months postintervention. Further trials to determine the longer term efficacy of ICBT to investigate predictors of outcome and to compare iCBT with standard clinical care in the United Kingdom are required.

  • 30.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Anglia Ruskin Univ, TX USA.
    Fagelson, Marc
    East Tennessee State Univ, TN USA; Vet Affairs Med Ctr, TN USA.
    Aronson, Elizabeth Parks
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Munoz, Maria F.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Manipal Univ, India; Audiol India, India.
    Readability Following Cultural and Linguistic Adaptations of an Internet-Based Intervention for Tinnitus for Use in the United States2020In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 97-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: An Internet-based tinnitus intervention for use in the United States could improve the provision of tinnitusrelated services. Although clinical trials of such interventions were completed in Europe, the United Kingdom, and Australia, their suitability for adults with tinnitus in the United States is yet to be established. The aim of this study was to improve the cultural and linguistic suitability, and lower the readability level, of an existing program for tinnitus to ensure its suitability for U.S. English- and Spanish-speaking populations. Method: Guidelines for adaptation were followed and involved four phases: (a) cultural adaptations, as interventions targeted at specific cultures have been shown to improve outcomes; (b) creating Spanish materials to improve access of the materials to the large Spanish-speaking population in the United States; (c) professional review of the materials for acceptability as an intervention tool for a U.S. population; and (d) literacy-level adjustments to make the content accessible to those with lower levels of health literacy skills. Results: Cultural adaptations were made by using word substitutions, changing examples, and modifying the spelling of certain words. The materials were then translated into Spanish and cross-checked. Professional review ensured suitability of the chapters. Literacy-level adjustments ensured all chapters were within the guidelines for readability grade levels below the sixth-grade level. Conclusions: The previously developed tinnitus materials were revised to adhere to best practice guidelines and ensure cultural suitability for adults with tinnitus in the United States. As it is also available in Spanish, members of the large Hispanic community also have access to the intervention in their first language. Further studies should determine whether these changes improve patients self-efficacy, engagement, and motivation to complete the intervention.

  • 31.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Terlizzi, Paige M.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Nottingham Biomed Res Ctr, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Situationally influenced tinnitus coping strategies: a mixed methods approach2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 24, p. 2884-2894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The primary aim of this study was to identify coping strategies used to manage problematic tinnitus situations. A secondary aim was to determine whether different approaches were related to the level of tinnitus distress, anxiety, depression, and insomnia experienced. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional survey design was implemented. The study sample was adults interested in undertaking an Internet-based intervention for tinnitus. Self-reported measures assessed the level of tinnitus distress, depression, anxiety, and insomnia. An open-ended question was used to obtain information about how problematic tinnitus situations were dealt with. Responses were investigated using qualitative content analysis to identify problematic situations. Further data analysis comprised of both qualitative and quantitative methods. Results: There were 240 participants (137 males, 103 females), with an average age of 48.16 years (SD: 22.70). Qualitative content analysis identified eight problematic tinnitus situations. Participants had either habituated to their tinnitus (7.9%), used active (63.3%), or passive (28.8%) coping styles to manage these situations. Those who had habituated to tinnitus or used active coping strategies had lower levels of tinnitus distress, anxiety, and depression. Conclusions: The main problematic tinnitus situations for this cohort were identified. Both active and passive coping styles were applied to approach these situations. The coping strategies used most frequently and utilised in the widest range of problematic situations were using sound enrichment and diverting attention.

  • 32.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Collaborat Initiat Univ Colorado Sch Med & Univ P, CO 80045 USA.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Collaborat Initiat Univ Colorado Sch Med & Univ P, CO 80045 USA; Univ Colorado, CO USA; Univ Colorado Hosp, CO USA; Univ Pretoria, South Africa; Manipal Acad Higher Educ, India.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Reg Stockholm, Sweden.
    Maidment, David W.
    Loughborough Univ, England.
    Application of the Behavior Change Wheel Within the Context of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Tinnitus Management2022In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 433-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Although experiencing tinnitus can lead to many difficulties, these can be reduced by using techniques derived from cognitive behavioral therapy. Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) has been developed to provide an accessible intervention. The aim of this study was to describe how ICBT can facilitate tinnitus management by identifying the active ingredients of the intervention from the perspective of health behavior change. Method: The ICBT intervention was evaluated using the Behavior Change Wheel in eight steps across the following three stages: (1) understanding the behavior, (2) identifying intervention options, and (3) identifying content and implementation options. Results: Target behaviors identified to reduce tinnitus distress, as well as additional problems associated with tinnitus, included goal setting, an increased understanding of tinnitus, encouraging deep breathing and progressive muscle relaxation, identifying and restructuring unhelpful thoughts, engaging in positive imagery, and reducing avoidance behaviors. ICBT provided the required components for individuals to be physically and psychologically capable of adapting to tinnitus, providing social and environmental opportunities to manage hearing loss through practice and training, and facilitated automatic and reflective motivation. Conclusion: Understanding ICBT in the context of the Behavior Change Wheel has helped identify how its effectiveness can be improved and can be used for future tinnitus intervention planning.

  • 33.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; NIHR, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Process evaluation of Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for adults with tinnitus in the context of a randomised control trial2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 98-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The research objective was to identify processes that could either facilitate or hinder clinical implementation of an Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy intervention for tinnitus in the UK. This was done by exploring the research context, the intervention components and the factors that contributed to the outcomes obtained. Design: This study investigated eight processes including the recruitment strategies, reach, research context, treatment dose delivered and received, implementation fidelity, barriers to implementation and effectiveness of the intervention. Study sample: Of the 169 registered participants, 146 were randomly assigned to the experimental or control groups (23 were excluded). The mean age was 55.57 years with an average tinnitus duration of 11.63 years. Results: The intended sample of people with distressing tinnitus who were underserved with evidence-based tinnitus interventions was reached. The full guided intervention was delivered. The recommended modules were read more than the optional modules. Intervention components such as the easily readable format and the benefits of the applied relaxation programme facilitated significant positive post-intervention outcomes. Barriers hampering the intervention application included time pressures and low self-motivation. Conclusions: Results of this process evaluation together with the outcome data can be used to facilitate translating this research into clinical practice.

  • 34.
    Black, Melissa H.
    et al.
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Milbourn, Benjamin
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Chen, Nigel T. M.
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    McGarry, Sarah
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Wali, Fatema
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Ho, Armilda S. V
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Lee, Mika
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Boelte, Sven
    Curtin Univ, Australia; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Sweden; Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    The use of wearable technology to measure and support abilities, disabilities and functional skills in autistic youth: a scoping review2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology, E-ISSN 2245-8875, Vol. 8, p. 48-69Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Wearable technology (WT) to measure and support social and non-social functioning in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has been a growing interest of researchers over the past decade. There is however limited understanding of the WTs currently available for autistic individuals, and how they measure functioning in this population. Objective: This scoping review explored the use of WTs for measuring and supporting abilities, disabilities and functional skills in autistic youth. Method: Four electronic databases were searched to identify literature investigating the use of WT in autistic youth, resulting in a total of 33 studies being reviewed. Descriptive and content analysis was conducted, with studies subsequently mapped to the ASD International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core-sets and the ICF Child and Youth Version (ICF-CY). Results: Studies were predominately pilot studies for novel devices. WTs measured a range of physiological and behavioural functions to objectively measure stereotypical motor movements, social function, communication, and emotion regulation in autistic youth in the context of a range of environments and activities. Conclusions: While this review raises promising prospects for the use of WTs for autistic youth, the current evidence is limited and requires further investigation.

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  • 35.
    Bohnstedt, Cathrine
    et al.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Stenmarker, Margaretha
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olersbacken, Linn
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Schmidt, Lone
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Larsen, Hanne B.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Schmiegelow, Kjeld
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hansson, Helena
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Participation, challenges and needs in children with down syndrome during cancer treatment at hospital: a qualitative study of parents' experiences2023In: FRONTIERS IN REHABILITATION SCIENCES, ISSN 2673-6861, Vol. 4, article id 1099516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundStudies report that it can be challenging to assess and treat side-effects and symptoms among children who have impairments and difficulties in expressing their needs. Children with Down syndrome have an increased vulnerability and an increased risk for contracting leukaemia. There is sparse knowledge about the parental experience of how treatment and side-effects affect children with Down syndrome with leukaemia, as well as the role of participation during treatment.PurposeThis study aimed to explore the perceptions of parents of children with Down syndrome and leukaemia regarding their childs treatment, side effects and participation during hospital care.MethodsA qualitative study design was used, and interviews were conducted with a semi-structured interview-guide. Fourteen parents of 10 children with Down syndrome and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia from Sweden and Denmark, 1-18 years of age, participated. All children had completed therapy or had a few months left before the end of treatment. Data was analysed according to qualitative content analysis.ResultsFour sub-themes were identified: (1) Continuously dealing with the childs potential susceptibility; (2) Confidence and worries regarding decisions related to treatment regulation; (3) Challenges in communication, interpretation, and participation; and (4) Facilitating participation by adapting to the childs behavioural and cognitive needs. The sub-themes were bound together in an overarching theme, which expressed the core perception "Being the childs spokesperson to facilitate the childs participation during treatment". The parents expressed this role as self-evident to facilitate communication regarding the needs of the child, but also regarding how the cytotoxic treatment affected the vulnerable child. Parents conveyed the struggle to ensure the childs right to receive optimal treatment.ConclusionThe study results highlight parental challenges regarding childhood disabilities and severe health conditions, as well as communication and ethical aspects regarding to act in the best interests of the child. Parents played a vital role in interpreting their child with Down syndrome. Involving parents during treatment enables a more accurate interpretation of symptoms and eases communication and participation. Still, the results raise questions regarding issues related to building trust in healthcare professionals in a context where medical, psychosocial and ethical dilemmas are present.

  • 36. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Support in school and the occupational transition process: Adolescents and young adults with neuropsychiatric disabilities2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis was to describe and explore the experiences of support in school of adolescents and young adults with neuropsychiatric disabilities. Furthermore, the aim was to explore support that influences the occupational transition to upper secondary school, further education and work. The two first studies investigated computer use in educational activities and during leisure activities by adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Study II also aimed to explore how traditional leisure activities and Internet activities interrelate among adolescents with ADHD. In Studies I and II data was collected using a questionnaire focusing on information and communication technology (ICT) use in school and leisure. Adolescents with ADHD (n = 102) aged 12-18 years were compared with adolescents with physical disabilities (Study I) and adolescents from the general population (Studies I and II). In Study III the aim was to describe the experiences of support at school among young adults with AS and ADHD, and to explore what support they, in retrospect, described as influencing learning. Study IV aimed to describe the occupational transition process to upper secondary school, further education and/or work and to explore what support influenced the process from the perspectives of young adults with AS or ADHD. Studies III (n=13) and IV (n=15) used qualitative semi-structured interviews with young adults with AS or ADHD, aged 18-30 years and were analysed using hermeneutics according to Gadamer.

    The findings of Study I showed that students with ADHD reported significantly less frequent use of computers for almost all educational activities compared with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population. They reported low satisfaction with computer use in school and a desire to use computers more often and for more activities in school compared with students with physical disabilities. Study II showed that Internet activities among adolescents with ADHD during leisure, tended to focus on online games. Furthermore, analysis demonstrated that Internet activities were broadening leisure activities among adolescents with ADHD, rather than being a substitute for traditional leisure activities. Study III found that young adults with AS or ADHD experienced difficulties at school that included academic, social, and emotional aspects, all of which influenced learning. Support addressing difficulties with academic performance was described as insufficient and only occasionally provided in school. In conclusion, support for learning among students with AS or ADHD needs to combine academic and psychosicial support. The findings of Study IV identified three different pathways following compulsory school. Support influencing the occupational transition process included: occupational transition preparation in compulsory school, practical work experience in a safe environment, and support beyond the workplace. Support from community-based day centres was described both as an important step towards work in the regular labour market, as well as being too far away from the regular labour market.

    In conclusion, this thesis revealed that support in school among students with AS or ADHD needs to combine academic and psychosocial support. Despite being regarded as facilitating learning, individuals with ADHD or AS reported limited computer and Internet use in school. Based on the results it is suggested that Internet activities may provide adolescents with neuropsychiatric disabilities with new opportunities for social interaction and educational activities. On the basis of the results it is suggested that the occupational transition process should be viewed as a longitudinal one, starting in compulsory school and continuing on until young adults obtain and are able to remain in work or further education. This thesis revealed that extended transition planning, inter-service collaboration and support from communitybased day centres were aspects of the environment that influenced the occupational transition process.

    List of papers
    1. Computer use in educational activities by students with ADHD
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computer use in educational activities by students with ADHD
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 357-364Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate computer use in educational activities by students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in comparison with that of students with physical disabilities and students from the general population.

    Methods: The design of the study was cross-sectional with group comparison. Students with ADHD (n = 102) were pair-matched in terms of age and sex with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population (n = 940) were used as a reference group.

    Results: The study showed that less than half of the students with ADHD had access to a computer in the classroom. Students with ADHD reported significantly less frequent use of computers for almost all educational activities compared with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population. Students with ADHD reported low satisfaction with computer use in school. In addition, students with ADHD reported a desire to use computers more often and for more activities in school compared with students with physical disabilities.

    Conclusions: These results indicate that occupational therapists should place more emphasize on how to enable students with ADHD to use computers in educational activities in school.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informa Healthcare, 2013
    Keywords
    Information and communication technology (ICT), computer access, school-based practice, physical disabilities
    National Category
    Occupational Therapy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-86782 (URN)10.3109/11038128.2012.758777 (DOI)000323943600006 ()
    Available from: 2013-01-04 Created: 2013-01-04 Last updated: 2024-01-10Bibliographically approved
    2. Internet Activities During Leisure: A Comparison Between Adolescents With ADHD and Adolescents From the General Population
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet Activities During Leisure: A Comparison Between Adolescents With ADHD and Adolescents From the General Population
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Attention Disorders, ISSN 1087-0547, E-ISSN 1557-1246, Vol. 22, no 12, p. 1131-1139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Adolescents’ leisure activities are increasingly focusing on Internet activities, and today, these coexist with traditional leisure activities such as sport and meeting friends. The purpose of the present study was to investigate leisure activities, particularly Internet activities, among boys and girls with ADHD, and compare these with boys and girls from the general population. The objective was also to explore how traditional leisure activities and Internet activities interrelate among adolescents with ADHD. 

    Method: Adolescents with ADHD (n = 102) were compared with adolescents from the general population on leisure activities and Internet use. 

    Results: Leisure activities among adolescents with ADHD tended to focus on Internet activities, particularly online games. Internet activities were broadening leisure activities among adolescents with ADHD, rather than being a substitute for traditional leisure activities. 

    Conclusion: Internet activities may provide adolescents with ADHD accessible means of social interaction.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 2018
    Keywords
    adolescent ADHD, computer games, principal components analysis, peer relationships
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123871 (URN)10.1177/1087054715613436 (DOI)000444488700005 ()26610742 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-01-12 Created: 2016-01-12 Last updated: 2024-01-10Bibliographically approved
    3. Support for learning- goes beyond academic support: voices of students with Asperger’s disorder and ADHD
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Support for learning- goes beyond academic support: voices of students with Asperger’s disorder and ADHD
    2016 (English)In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 183-195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe and explore the experiences of support at school among young adults with Asperger’s disorder (AS) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and also to examine what support they, in retrospect, described as influencing learning. Purposive sampling was used to enroll participants. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with thirteen young adults aged between 20-29 years. A qualitative analysis, based on interpreting people’s experiences was conducted by grouping and searching for patterns in data. The findings indicate that the participants experienced difficulties at school that included academic, social and emotional conditions, all of which could influence learning. Support for learning included small groups, individualized teaching methods, teachers who cared, and practical and emotional support. These clusters together confirm the overall understanding that support for learning aligns academic and psychosocial support. In conclusion, academic support combined with psychosocial support at school seems to be crucial for learning among students with AS and ADHD.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 2016
    Keywords
    Autism Spectrum Disorders, ADHD/ADD, psychosocial support, education, educational provision, services, qualitative research, special needs students
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115117 (URN)10.1177/1362361315574582 (DOI)000372880100007 ()
    Available from: 2015-03-10 Created: 2015-03-09 Last updated: 2024-01-10Bibliographically approved
    4. The Occupational Transition Process to Upper Secondary School, Further Education and/or Work in Sweden: As Described by Young Adults with Asperger Syndrome and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Occupational Transition Process to Upper Secondary School, Further Education and/or Work in Sweden: As Described by Young Adults with Asperger Syndrome and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
    2017 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 667-679Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe the occupational transition process to upper secondary school, further education and/or work, and to discover what support influences the process from the perspectives of young adults with Asperger’s disorder (AS) or attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This qualitative study comprised semi-structured interviews with 15 young adults with AS or ADHD, eight men and seven women (aged 20 to 29 years). Most of the participants were attending community-based day centres at local businesses. Analysis identified three different occupational transition pathways following compulsory school. Support influencing the occupational transition process included: occupational transition preparation in compulsory school, practical work experience in a safe environment, and support beyond the workplace. The overall understanding shows that the occupational transition process was a longitudinal one starting as early as in middle school, and continuing until the young adults with AS and ADHD obtained and were able to remain in employment or further education. Support from community-based day centres was described both as an important step towards finding employment in the regular labour market in which participants could develop practical work experience, and as being too far away from the regular labour market.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2017
    Keywords
    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder/attention deficit disorder, autism spectrum disorders, employment, education, qualitative research, services
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123872 (URN)10.1007/s10803-016-2986-z (DOI)000396815400014 ()
    Available from: 2016-01-12 Created: 2016-01-12 Last updated: 2024-01-10Bibliographically approved
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  • 37.
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Hellberg, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden .
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    The Occupational Transition Process to Upper Secondary School, Further Education and/or Work in Sweden: As Described by Young Adults with Asperger Syndrome and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder2017In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 667-679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe the occupational transition process to upper secondary school, further education and/or work, and to discover what support influences the process from the perspectives of young adults with Asperger’s disorder (AS) or attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This qualitative study comprised semi-structured interviews with 15 young adults with AS or ADHD, eight men and seven women (aged 20 to 29 years). Most of the participants were attending community-based day centres at local businesses. Analysis identified three different occupational transition pathways following compulsory school. Support influencing the occupational transition process included: occupational transition preparation in compulsory school, practical work experience in a safe environment, and support beyond the workplace. The overall understanding shows that the occupational transition process was a longitudinal one starting as early as in middle school, and continuing until the young adults with AS and ADHD obtained and were able to remain in employment or further education. Support from community-based day centres was described both as an important step towards finding employment in the regular labour market in which participants could develop practical work experience, and as being too far away from the regular labour market.

  • 38.
    Bolic, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellberg, Kristina
    Specialpedagogiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Support for learning- goes beyond academic support: voices of students with Asperger’s disorder and ADHD2016In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 183-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe and explore the experiences of support at school among young adults with Asperger’s disorder (AS) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and also to examine what support they, in retrospect, described as influencing learning. Purposive sampling was used to enroll participants. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with thirteen young adults aged between 20-29 years. A qualitative analysis, based on interpreting people’s experiences was conducted by grouping and searching for patterns in data. The findings indicate that the participants experienced difficulties at school that included academic, social and emotional conditions, all of which could influence learning. Support for learning included small groups, individualized teaching methods, teachers who cared, and practical and emotional support. These clusters together confirm the overall understanding that support for learning aligns academic and psychosocial support. In conclusion, academic support combined with psychosocial support at school seems to be crucial for learning among students with AS and ADHD.

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  • 39.
    Brulin, Emma
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Landstad, Bodil J.
    Mid Sweden Univ, Sweden; Ostersund Hosp, Sweden.
    Lidwall, Ulrik
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Swedish Social Insurance Agcy, Sweden.
    Sjostrom, Malin
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Wilczek, Alexander
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Money talks: performance-based reimbursement systems impact on perceived work, health and patient care for physicians in Sweden2023In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, article id 1216229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionThe study aimed to investigate in which way performance-based reimbursement (PBR) systems in Swedish healthcare services (1) subjectively impacted physicians work and patient care and (2) were associated with the occurrence of stress-induced exhaustion disorders among physicians. MethodThe study applied a mixed-method design. Data were collected from a representative sample of Swedish physicians. In the questionnaire, respondents were asked to answer an open-ended question regarding their reflections on PBR. The answers to the open-ended question were analysed using thematic analysis. Respondents were also asked to rate the impact of PBR on their work. The association between PBR and self-rated stress-induced exhaustion disease was analysed with logistic regressions. Stress-induced exhaustion disorder was measured using the Burnout Assessment Scale. ResultsThematic analysis resulted in four themes: (1) Money talks, (2) Patients are affected, (3) Medical morals are challenged, and (4) PBR increase the quantity of illegitimate tasks. Logistic regressions showed that physicians who experienced PBR had an impact on their work and had a two-fold higher risk of stress-induced exhaustion disorder. DiscussionOur findings suggest that current reimbursement systems in Sweden play an essential role in Swedish healthcare and negatively influence physicians work and health. Also, current PBR impact patients negatively. No previous study has explored the potentially harmful impact of PBR on how physicians perceive work, health and patient care. Results indicate that policymakers should be encouraged to deeply review PBR systems and focus on ways that they can limit the negative impact on physicians work and health while meeting future challenges.

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  • 40.
    Clark, Grace T
    et al.
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York University, NY. USA.
    Reuterskiöld, Christina
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York University, NY. USA.
    Orthographic Support for Word Learning in Clinical Populations: A Systematic Review.2021In: Language, speech & hearing services in schools, ISSN 0161-1461, E-ISSN 1558-9129, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 937-948Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose A systematic review was performed to determine the extent to which orthographic facilitation, a strategy to improve word learning, has been demonstrated in the literature for children and adolescents from clinical categories such as developmental language disorders (DLD), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), Down syndrome, dyslexia, hearing impairment, intellectual disability, and cerebral palsy.

    Method Five databases were searched for all studies published through December 2019. Eligible studies included participants from a clinical population (DLD, ASD, dyslexia, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, hearing impairment, etc.) and compared word learning with and without orthography. Selected studies were extracted for pertinent information. In addition, assessment of the methodological rigor was performed for each study.

    Results The review yielded five studies that targeted word learning with orthographic facilitation for children from various clinical populations including DLD, verbal children with autism, Down syndrome, and dyslexia. All studied populations showed a benefit for word learning in picture naming posttests when words were trained in the presence of orthography.

    Conclusions For the studied populations, training words in the presence of orthography will improve word learning accuracy and retention. The review highlights the need for more research in this area across other clinical populations.

    Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.14632791.

  • 41.
    Classon, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Working memory compensates for hearing related phonological processing deficit2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acquired hearing impairment is associated with gradually declining phonological representations. According to the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model, poorly defined representations lead to mismatch in phonologically challenging tasks. To resolve the mismatch, reliance on working memory capacity (WMC) increases. This study investigated whether WMC modulated performance in a phonological task in individuals with hearing impairment. A visual rhyme judgment task with congruous or incongruous orthography, followed by an incidental episodic recognition memory task, was used. In participants with hearing impairment, WMC modulated both rhyme judgment performance and recognition memory in the orthographically similar non-rhyming condition; those with high WMC performed exceptionally well in the judgment task, but later recognized few of the words. For participants with hearing impairment and low WMC the pattern was reversed; they performed poorly in the judgment task but later recognized a surprisingly large proportion of the words. Results indicate that good WMC can compensate for the negative impact of auditory deprivation on phonological processing abilities by allowing for efficient use of phonological processing skills. They also suggest that individuals with hearing impairment and low WMC may use a non-phonological approach to written words, which can have the beneficial side effect of improving memory encoding.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES:

    Readers will be able to: (1) describe cognitive processes involved in rhyme judgment, (2) explain how acquired hearing impairment affects phonological processing and (3) discuss how reading strategies at encoding impact memory performance.

  • 42.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nelson, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ten years of simulation-based shoulder dystocia training-impact on obstetric outcome, clinical management, staff confidence, and the pedagogical practice - a time series study2018In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 18, article id 361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To assess the impact of 10 years of simulation-based shoulder dystocia training on clinical outcomes, staff confidence, management, and to scrutinize the characteristics of the pedagogical practice of the simulation training. Methods: In 2008, a simulation-based team-training program (PROBE) was introduced at a medium sized delivery unit in Linkoping, Sweden. Data concerning maternal characteristics, management, and obstetric outcomes was compared between three groups; prePROBE (before PROBE was introduced, 2004-2007), early postPROBE (2008-2011) and late postPROBE (2012-2015). Staff responded to an electronic questionnaire, which included questions about self-confidence and perceived sense of security in acute obstetrical situations. Empirical data from the pedagogical practice was gathered through observational field notes of video-recordings of maternity care teams participating in simulation exercises and was further analyzed using collaborative video analysis. Results: The number of diagnosed shoulder dystocia increased from 0.9/1000 prePROBE to 1.8 and 2.5/1000 postPROBE. There were no differences in maternal characteristics between the groups. The rate of brachial plexus injuries in deliveries complicated with shoulder dystocia was 73% prePROBE compared to 17% in the late postPROBE group (p amp;gt; 0.05). The dominant maneuver to solve the shoulder dystocia changed from posterior arm extraction to internal rotation of the anterior shoulder between the pre and postPROBE groups. The staff questionnaire showed how the majority of the staff (48-62%) felt more confident when handling a shoulder dystocia after PROBE training. A model of facilitating relational reflection adopted seems to provide ways of keeping the collaboration and learning in the interprofessional team clearly focused. Conclusions: To introduce and sustain a shoulder dystocia training program for delivery staff improved clinical outcome. The impaired management and outcome of this rare, emergent and unexpectedly event might be explained by the learning effect in the debriefing model, clearly focused on the team and related to daily clinical practice.

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  • 43.
    Dahlin, Emilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    de Laval, Agnes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Par- och gruppintervention för personer med afasi och deras partner2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Afasi är ett samlingsbegrepp för förvärvade språkstörningar. Symptomen förekommer i högst utsträckning hos personer som drabbats av en stroke. Personer som drabbats av någon typ av afasi upplever ofta att deras kommunikativa förmåga i hög grad begränsats efter insjuknandet, vilket kan leda till stor eller mycket stor social inskränkning. De psykologiska faktorer som påverkas rör kognition och emotion, sociala strukturer och relationer, exempelvis personliga relationer, yrkesliv eller utbildning. Därmed relateras de psykosociala konsekvenserna av afasi till hur tillståndet påverkar vardagslivet och förmågan till att interagera med den sociala omgivningen. Idag sker intervention för personer med afasi individuellt och gruppintervention eller anhöriginkludering ses som sekundära komplement till den individuella behandlingen.

    I föreliggande studie undersöks en form av intervention där personer med afasi och deras anhöriga gemensamt får ta del av kommunikativa strategier och tilldelas individanpassade råd. Inspiration har hämtats från den befintliga anhöriginkluderande metoden SPPARC. Målet med interventionen var att den vardagliga kommunikationen skulle stärkas och effektiviseras. Interventionen skedde under en fem veckor lång period och utförts i två olika konstellationer; ett par och en mindre grupp. Gruppkonstellationerna har sedan jämförts med varandra. Båda koncepten utvärderades positivt av deltagarna. De förefaller därmed vara tillämpbara båda två, men beroende på deltagarnas förväntningar och psykosociala behov kan något av koncepten föredras på ett individuellt plan.

    Resultatet av föreliggande studie indikerar att det finns ett psykosocialt behov av att inkludera anhöriga till personer med afasi i intervention. En ökad medvetenhet hos deltagarna noterades gällande flera av de kommunikativa strategier som behandlades under interventionens gång, bland annat gestikulering och prompting. Deltagarnas utvärdering av perioden tyder på att interventionsperioden framför allt fungerat som ett forum för samtal kring afasi och kommunikation och att den har tjänat sitt syfte i psykosocial bemärkelse. Deltagarna uppgav dock under utvärderingen att interventionen är bäst lämpad som en tidig insats efter personen med afasis insjuknande.

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  • 44.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
    University of Toronto, Department of Psychology .
    Dupuis, Kate
    Baycrest Health Sciences, Rotman Research Institute.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Modeling the effect of early age-related hearing loss on cognition and participation in social leisure activities2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are well-known age-related declines in hearing, cognition and social participation. Furthermore, previous studies have shown that hearing loss is associated with both cognitive decline and increased risk for social isolation and that engagement in social leisure activities is related to cognitive decline. However, it is unclear how the three concepts and age relate to each other. In the current study, behavioral measures of hearing and memory were examined in relation to self-reported participation in social leisure activities. Data from two different samples were analyzed with structural equation modeling. The first consisted of 297 adults from Umeå, Sweden, who participated in the Betula longitudinal study. The second consisted of 273 older adults who volunteered for lab-based research on aging in Toronto, Canada. Structural equation modeling yielded two models with similar statistical properties for both samples. The first model suggests that age contributes to both hearing and memory performance, hearing contributes to memory performance, and memory (but not hearing) contributes to participation in social leisure activities. The second model also suggests that age contributes to hearing and memory performance and that hearing contributes to memory performance, but that age also contributes to participation in social leisure activities, which in turn contributes to memory performance. The models were confirmed in both samples, indicating robustness in the findings, especially since the samples differed on background variables such as years of education and marital status. Few participants in both samples were candidates for hearing aids, but most of those who were candidates used them. This suggests that even early stages of hearing loss can increase demands on cognitive processing that may deter participation in social leisure activities.

  • 45.
    Denfeld, Quin E.
    et al.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, OR USA; Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, OR 97239 USA.
    Jha, Sunita R.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, OR USA.
    Fung, Erik
    Univ Notre Dame, Australia; Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China; Prince Wales Hosp, Peoples R China; Shenzhen Univ, Peoples R China.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Maurer, Mathew S.
    Columbia Univ, NY USA.
    Reeves, Gordon R.
    Wake Forest Univ, NC 27101 USA.
    Afilalo, Jonathan
    McGill Univ, Canada; McGill Univ, Canada.
    Beerli, Nadine
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Bellumkonda, Lavanya
    Yale Sch Med, CT USA.
    De Geest, Sabina
    Univ Basel, Switzerland; Acad Ctr Nursing & Midwifery, Belgium.
    Gorodeski, Eiran Z.
    Univ Hosp Cleveland Med Ctr, OH USA; Case Western Reserve Univ, OH USA.
    Joyce, Emer
    Mater Misericordiae Univ Hosp, Ireland; Univ Coll Dublin, Ireland.
    Kobashigawa, Jon
    Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, CA USA.
    Mauthner, Oliver
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Mcdonagh, Julee
    Univ Wollongong, Australia; Blacktown Hosp, Australia.
    Uchmanowicz, Izabella
    Wroclaw Med Univ, Poland.
    Dickson, Victoria Vaughan
    Univ Connecticut, CT USA.
    Lindenfeld, Joann
    Vanderbilt Heart & Vasc Inst, TN USA.
    Macdonald, Peter
    St Vincents Hosp, Australia; Victor Chang Cardiac Res Inst, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Assessing and managing frailty in advanced heart failure: An International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation consensus statement2024In: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, ISSN 1053-2498, E-ISSN 1557-3117, Vol. 43, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Frailty is increasingly recognized as a salient condition in patients with heart failure (HF) as previous studies have determined that frailty is highly prevalent and prognostically significant, particularly in those with advanced HF. Definitions of frailty have included a variety of domains, including physical performance, sarcopenia, disability, comorbidity, and cognitive and psychological impairments, many of which are common in advanced HF. Multiple groups have recently recommended incorporating frailty assessments into clinical practice and research studies, indicating the need to standardize the definition and measurement of frailty in advanced HF. Therefore, the purpose of this consensus statement is to provide an integrated perspective on the definition of frailty in advanced HF and to generate a consensus on how to assess and manage frailty. We convened a group of HF clinicians and researchers who have expertise in frailty and related geriatric conditions in HF, and we focused on the patient with advanced HF. Herein, we provide an overview of frailty and how it has been applied in advanced HF (including potential mechanisms), present a definition of frailty, generate suggested assessments of frailty, provide guidance to differentiate frailty and related terms, and describe the assessment and management in advanced HF, including with surgical and nonsurgical interventions. We conclude by outlining critical evidence gaps, areas for future research, and clinical implementation. J Heart Lung Transplant 2024;43:1-27 (c) 2023 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  • 46.
    Dernroth, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Aldenholt, Annzofie
    En samtalsanalytisk studie av kommunikativa strategier och professionell interaktion mellan logoped-patient med afasi och arbetsterapeutpatient med afasi2012Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, the institutional discourse in health care was examined, focusing onspeech therapists and occupational therapists in interaction with a common patient withaphasia. The purpose of the present study was to identify common communication strategiesused in the professional conversation between a speech therapist and a patient and between anoccupational therapist and the same patient. Specific research questions were: Whatcommunicative strategies are used in interaction between a speech therapist and a patient withaphasia and between the occupational therapist and the same patient? Are theredifferences/similarities between how speech therapists and occupational therapists interactwith patients with aphasia?Six people in total, two patients in interaction with a speech therapist and an occupationaltherapist respectively, were recorded during treatment sessions of each profession. Generaland specific aspects of the institutional interaction were then analysed according to principlesof conversation analysis.Similarities in the use of closed questions as a strategy to increase the effectiveness ininteraction could be seen between the two different professions studied. The use ofevaluations in interaction was also relatively similar between the two occupations.Some differences were identified in the ways that each profession used repetitious behavior,co-constructions and non-verbal communication. In terms of use of communication aids tosupport the patient's understanding, clear differences between the professions were observed.

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  • 47. Divanoglou, Anestis
    et al.
    Georgiou, Margarita
    Perceived effectiveness and mechanisms of community peer-based programmes for Spinal Cord Injuries—a systematic review of qualitative findings2016In: Spinal Cord, ISSN 1362-4393, E-ISSN 1476-5624, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 225-234Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Divanoglou, Anestis
    et al.
    Tasiemski, Tomasz
    Augutis, Marika
    Trok, Katarzyna
    Active Rehabilitation—a community peer-based approach for persons with spinal cord injury: international utilisation of key elements2017In: Spinal Cord, ISSN 1362-4393, E-ISSN 1476-5624, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 545-552Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Divanoglou, Anestis
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Stapi v. Hringbraut, IS-101, Reykjavik, Iceland; School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia.
    Tasiemski, Tomasz
    Department of Adapted Physical Activity, Poznań University of Physical Education, ul. Królowej Jadwigi 27/39, 61-871, Poznań, Poland.
    Jörgensen, Sophie
    Department of Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine Research Group, Lund University, PO Box 157, SE-221 00, Lund, Sweden; Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    INTERnational Project for the Evaluation of “activE Rehabilitation” (inter-PEER) – a protocol for a prospective cohort study of community peer-based training programmes for people with spinal cord injury2020In: BMC Neurology, E-ISSN 1471-2377, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Active Rehabilitation (AR) is a community peer-based concept for people with spinal cord injury (SCI) that is primarily delivered through brief residential training programmes. Despite a plethora of positive anecdotal evidence of AR programmes as life-changing experiences, the effects of AR-programmes have not been evaluated scientifically. Here, we present the protocol of the INTERnational Project for the Evaluation of “activE Rehabilitation” (inter-PEER) aiming to evaluate the effects of AR training programmes on community-dwelling individuals with SCI.

    Methods

    International prospective cohort study that recruits consecutive participants in AR training programmes. Evaluation is conducted through a web-based survey at 3 time-points: at the commencement and completion of the training programme, and 3 months after the end of the training programme. Evaluation also includes a practical wheelchair skills test at the first two time-points.

    The primary outcome measures are the Spinal Cord Independence Measure Self-report (SCIM-SR), the Queensland Evaluation of Wheelchair Skills test (QEWS), the Wheelchair Skills Test Questionnaire (WST-Q) and the Moorong Self-Efficacy Scale (MSES). The secondary outcome measures are the 11-item Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-11), the Utrecht Scale for Evaluation of Rehabilitation-Participation (USER-Participation), the Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire for people with SCI (LTPAQ-SCI) and the 10-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC-10).

    We piloted the implementation of the protocol in Sweden in 7 participants with diverse SCI and sociodemographic characteristics and collected feedback from participants and peer-mentors about study procedures through interviews, a workshop and field observations.

    Discussion

    Inter-PEER is the first initiative to propose a systematic evaluation of the effects of AR training programmes among individuals with SCI. The project is a collaborative work of multiple stakeholders, including researchers, clinicians, peer mentors with SCI, and administrators of organisations providing AR programmes. The inter-PEER uses standardised outcome measures relevant to the AR context, it will facilitate quality evaluations of community peer-based programmes, stimulate international collaborations, and inform the design of randomised controlled trials on the effects of AR training programmes.

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  • 50.
    Divanoglou, Anestis
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Queensland, Australia.
    Trok, Katarzyna
    Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Jörgensen, Sophie
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Hultling, Claes
    Spinalis, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sekakela, Kobamelo
    Princess Marina Hospital, Gaborone, Botswana.
    Tasiemski, Tomasz
    Department of Adapted Physical Activity, Poznań University of Physical Education, Poznań, Poland.
    Active Rehabilitation for persons with spinal cord injury in Botswana – effects of a community peer-based programme2019In: Spinal Cord, ISSN 1362-4393, E-ISSN 1476-5624, Vol. 57, no 10, p. 897-905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study design:

    Prospective cohort study with a repeated measures analysis.

    Objectives:

    To measure the effects of the Active Rehabilitation (AR) training programme for community-dwelling individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) in Botswana on physical independence, wheelchair mobility, self-efficacy, life satisfaction, level of physical activity and community participation.

    Setting:

    The inaugural AR training programme in Botswana, a community peer-based programme for people with SCI. The 10-day residential programme in Botswana was led by an international team of peer mentors and health professionals.

    Methods:

    Participants with SCI (on average 4 years after injury) completed a survey comprising a battery of standardised outcome measures at three timepoints: at the start, on completion and at 5 months after the programme (n = 14). Participants also completed a practical wheelchair skills test at start and completion of the programme (n = 17).

    Results:

    Participants improved in the mobility subscale of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure Self Report on completion (p = 0.011, d = 0.85) and at 5-month follow-up (p = 0.005, d = 0.93) as compared to baseline. They also achieved moderate improvement in self-efficacy to manage their condition (physical function domain of Moorong Self-Efficacy Scale) and large improvements in wheelchair mobility as assessed through the Queensland Evaluation of Wheelchair Skills test and the Wheelchair Skills Test Questionnaire. All positive results were retained at 5-month follow-up.

    Conclusions:

    Findings indicate that the peer-based programme AR can play an important role in promoting physical independence, wheelchair mobility and injury-management self-efficacy in community-dwelling individuals with SCI in Botswana.

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