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  • 1.
    Bengtsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. LunaMicro AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Christoffersson, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Robinson, Nathaniel D
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. LunaMicro AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    A clip-on electroosmotic pump for oscillating flow in microfluidic cell culture devices2018In: Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, ISSN 1613-4982, E-ISSN 1613-4990, Vol. 22, no 3, article id 27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent advances in microfluidic devices put a high demand on small, robust and reliable pumps suitable for high-throughput applications. Here we demonstrate a compact, low-cost, directly attachable (clip-on) electroosmotic pump that couples with standard Luer connectors on a microfluidic device. The pump is easy to make and consists of a porous polycarbonate membrane and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) electrodes. The soft electrode and membrane materials make it possible to incorporate the pump into a standard syringe filter holder, which in turn can be attached to commercial chips. The pump is less than half the size of the microscope slide used for many commercial lab-on-a-chip devices, meaning that these pumps can be used to control fluid flow in individual reactors in highly parallelized chemistry and biology experiments. Flow rates at various electric current and device dimensions are reported. We demonstrate the feasibility and safety of the pump for biological experiments by exposing endothelial cells to oscillating shear stress (up to 5 dyn/cm2) and by controlling the movement of both micro- and macroparticles, generating steady or oscillatory flow rates up to ± 400 μL/min.

  • 2.
    Cedersund, G
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elimination of the initial value parameters when identifying a system close to a Hopf bifurcation.2006In: IEE Proceedings - Systems Biology, ISSN 1741-2471, E-ISSN 1741-248X, Vol. 153, no 6, p. 448-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the biggest problems when performing system identification of biological systems is that it is seldom possible to measure more than a small fraction of the total number of variables. If that is the case, the initial state, from where the simulation should start, has to be estimated along with the kinetic parameters appearing in the rate expressions. This is often done by introducing extra parameters, describing the initial state, and one way to eliminate them is by starting in a steady state. We report a generalisation of this approach to all systems starting on the centre manifold, close to a Hopf bifurcation. There exist biochemical systems where such data have already been collected, for example, of glycolysis in yeast. The initial value parameters are solved for in an optimisation sub-problem, for each step in the estimation of the other parameters. For systems starting in stationary oscillations, the sub-problem is solved in a straight-forward manner, without integration of the differential equations, and without the problem of local minima. This is possible because of a combination of a centre manifold and normal form reduction, which reveals the special structure of the Hopf bifurcation. The advantage of the method is demonstrated on the Brusselator.

  • 3.
    Danø, Sune
    et al.
    Copenhagen University.
    Madsen, Mads F
    Copenhagen University.
    Schmidt, Henning
    Chalmers Technical University.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reduction of a biochemical model with preservation of its basic dynamic properties.2006In: The FEBS Journal, ISSN 1742-464X, E-ISSN 1742-4658, Vol. 273, no 21, p. 4862-4877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complexity of full-scale metabolic models is a major obstacle for their effective use in computational systems biology. The aim of model reduction is to circumvent this problem by eliminating parts of a model that are unimportant for the properties of interest. The choice of reduction method is influenced both by the type of model complexity and by the objective of the reduction; therefore, no single method is superior in all cases. In this study we present a comparative study of two different methods applied to a 20D model of yeast glycolytic oscillations. Our objective is to obtain biochemically meaningful reduced models, which reproduce the dynamic properties of the 20D model. The first method uses lumping and subsequent constrained parameter optimization. The second method is a novel approach that eliminates variables not essential for the dynamics. The applications of the two methods result in models of eight (lumping), six (elimination) and three (lumping followed by elimination) dimensions. All models have similar dynamic properties and pin-point the same interactions as being crucial for generation of the oscillations. The advantage of the novel method is that it is algorithmic, and does not require input in the form of biochemical knowledge. The lumping approach, however, is better at preserving biochemical properties, as we show through extensive analyses of the models.

  • 4.
    Hernandez, Frank J
    Biodonostia Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain.
    Hernandez, Luiza I.
    Biodonostia Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain.
    Ozalp, Veli C.
    Istanbul Kemerburgaz University, School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Nanocapsules in biomedicine: promises and challenges2015In: Advanced Theranostics Materials / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari et al, John Wiley & Sons, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Jonsson, Amanda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Song, Zhiyang
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, David
    Acreo Swedish ICT AB, SE-601 17 Norrköping, Sweden.
    Meyerson, Björn A.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Linderoth, Bengt
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Therapy using implanted organic bioelectronics2015In: Science Advances, ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 1, no 4, article id e1500039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many drugs provide their therapeutic action only at specific sites in the body, but are administered in ways that cause the drug’s spread throughout the organism. This can lead to serious side effects. Local delivery from an implanted device may avoid these issues, especially if the delivery rate can be tuned according to the need of the patient. We turned to electronically and ionically conducting polymers to design a device that could be implanted and used for local electrically controlled delivery of therapeutics. The conducting polymers in our device allow electronic pulses to be transduced into biological signals, in the form of ionic and molecular fluxes, which provide a way of interfacing biology with electronics. Devices based on conducting polymers and polyelectrolytes have been demonstrated in controlled substance delivery to neural tissue, biosensing, and neural recording and stimulation. While providing proof of principle of bioelectronic integration, such demonstrations have been performed in vitro or in anesthetized animals. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of an implantable organic electronic delivery device for the treatment of neuropathic pain in an animal model. Devices were implanted onto the spinal cord of rats, and 2 days after implantation, local delivery of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was initiated. Highly localized delivery resulted in a significant decrease in pain response with low dosage and no observable side effects. This demonstration of organic bioelectronics-based therapy in awake animals illustrates a viable alternative to existing pain treatments, paving the way for future implantable bioelectronic therapeutics. Keywords

  • 6.
    Lundström, Claes
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Characterizing visual analytics in diagnostic imaging2011In: EuroVA 2011: International Workshop on Visual Analytics, 2011, p. 1-4Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many necessary and desired improvements in healthcare are dependent on progress in medical imaging. As shown in this paper, the challenges targeted by visual analytics (VA) coincide with main challenges for radiologists' diagnostic work. Key prerequisites for VA in this application domain have been identified through analysis of a survey among 22 radiologists at a university hospital. Two major findings are that efficiency is perceived as the most challenging aspect of their diagnostic work and that an exploratory approach is necessary in everyday image review. The presented characterization constitutes a validated input for design of future VA research initiatives within medical imaging.

  • 7.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    Imagining the heart: incorporations, intrusions and identity2011In: Keynote address, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    Some Reflections on the Socio-cultural and Bioscientific Limits of Bodily Integrity2010In: Body & Society, ISSN 1357-034X, E-ISSN 1460-3632, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 11-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carnie, Andrew
    Southampton Univ, England.
    Wright, Alexa
    Univ Westminster, England.
    McKeever, Patricia
    Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabil Hosp, Canada.
    Jan, Emily Huan-Ching
    Concordia Univ, Canada.
    De Luca, Enza
    Univ Hlth Network, Canada.
    Bachmann, Ingrid
    Concordia Univ, Canada.
    Abbey, Susan
    Univ Hlth Network, Canada.
    Dal Bo, Dana
    Concordia Univ, Canada.
    Poole, Jennifer
    Ryerson Univ, Canada.
    El-Sheikh, Tammer
    Concordia Univ, Canada.
    Ross, Heather
    Univ Hlth Network, Canada.
    Messy entanglements: research assemblages in heart transplantation discourses and practices2018In: Medical Humanities, ISSN 1468-215X, E-ISSN 1473-4265, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 46-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper engages with a variety of data around a supposedly single biomedical event, that of heart transplantation. In conventional discourse, organ transplantation constitutes an unproblematised form of spare part surgery in which failing biological components are replaced by more efficient and enduring ones, but once that simple picture is complicated by employing a radically interdisciplinary approach, any biomedical certainty is profoundly disrupted. Our aim, as a cross-sectorial partnership, has been to explore the complexities of heart transplantation by explicitly entangling research from the arts, biosciences and humanities without privileging any one discourse. It has been no easy enterprise yet it has been highly productive of new insights. We draw on our own ongoing funded research with both heart donor families and recipients to explore our different perceptions of what constitutes data and to demonstrate how the dynamic entangling of multiple data produces a constitutive assemblage of elements in which no one can claim priority. Our claim is that the use of such research assemblages and the collaborations that we bring to our project breaks through disciplinary silos to enable a fuller comprehension of the significance and experience of heart transplantation in both theory and practice.

  • 10.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    et al.
    Queens University, Belfast.
    McKeever, Patricia
    Bloorview Research Institute, University of Toronto.
    Abbey, Susan
    University Health Network, Toronto.
    Poole, Jennifer
    Ryerson University, Toronto.
    Ross, Heather
    University Health Network, Toronto.
    Troubling dimensions of heart transplantation2009In: Medical Humanities, ISSN 1468-215X, E-ISSN 1473-4265, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 35-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart transplantation is now the accepted therapy for end-stage heart failure that is resistant to medical treatment. Families of deceased donors routinely are urged to view the heart as a "gift of life" that will enable the donor to live on by extending and sustaining the life of a stranger. In contrast, heart recipients are encouraged to view the organ mechanistically--as a new pump that was rendered a spare, reusable part when a generous stranger died. Psychosocial and psychoanalytic research, anecdotal evidence and first-person accounts indicate that after transplant, many recipients experience unexpected changes or distress that cannot be understood adequately using biomedical explanatory models alone. In this paper it is argued that phenomenological philosophy offers a promising way to frame an ongoing empirical study that asks recipients to reflect on what it is like to incorporate the heart of another person. Merleau-Ponty and others have posited that any change to the body inevitably transforms the self. Hence, it is argued in this paper that replacing failing hearts with functioning hearts from deceased persons must be considered much more than a complex technical procedure. Acknowledging the disturbances to embodiment and personal identity associated with transplantation may explain adverse outcomes that heretofore have been inexplicable. Ultimately, a phenomenological understanding could lead to improvements in the consent process, preoperative teaching and follow-up care.

  • 11.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Poole, Jennifer
    Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Ross, Heather
    University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.
    Mauthner, Oliver
    University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.
    Abbey, Susan
    University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.
    Life on the Heart Transplant Waiting List: Life on Hold? Life at All?2013Other (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Vastesson, Alexander
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Micro-Structuring of New Materials Combined with Electronic Polymers for Interfaces with Cells2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Materials based on novel Off-Stoichiometry Thiol-Ene polymers, abbreviated OSTE, show promising properties as materials forlow cost and scalable manufacturing of micro- and nanosystems such as lab-on-chip devices. The OSTE materials have tunablemechanical properties, offer possibility for low temperature bonding to many surfaces via tunable surface chemistry, and can beused in soft lithography. Unlike the commonly used elastomer poly(dimethylsiloxane), PDMS, the OSTE materials have lowpermeability for gasses, are resistant to common solvents and can be more permanently surface modified.In this master’s thesis project, the OSTE materials have been evaluated with focus on compatibility with cells, possibility fornanostructuring using soft lithography and the use of OSTE as a flexible support for conducting polymers.Results from cell seeding studies with HEP G2 cells suggest that cells can proliferate on a low thiol off-stoichiometry OSTEmaterial for at least five days. The biocompatibility for this type of OSTE material may be similar to poly(styrene). However, highlevels of free thiol monomers in the material decrease cell viability considerably.By using soft lithography techniques it is possible to fabricate OSTE nanochannels with at least the dimensions of 400 nm x 15nm. Combined with the advantages of using the OSTE materials, such as low temperature bonding and possibility for stablesurface modifications, a candidate construction material for future development of systems for DNA analysis is at hand.OSTE can serve as a flexible support for an adsorbed film of a conducting polymer with the possibility for future applicationssuch as electronic interfaces in microsystems. In this project, a film of PEDOT:PSS with the electrical resistance of ~5 kΩ wascreated by adsorption to an flexible OSTE material. Furthermore, results suggest that it is possible to further optimize theconductivity and water resistance of PEDOT:PSS films on OSTE.

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