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  • 1.
    Aamodt, Ina Thon
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Lycholip, Edita
    Vilnius Univ, Lithuania.
    Celutkiene, Jelena
    Vilnius Univ, Lithuania.
    von Lueder, Thomas
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Atar, Dan
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Falk, Ragnhild Sorum
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Helleso, Ragnhild
    Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lie, Irene
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Self-Care Monitoring of Heart Failure Symptoms and Lung Impedance at Home Following Hospital Discharge: Longitudinal Study2020In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 22, no 1, article id e15445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Self-care is key to the daily management of chronic heart failure (HF). After discharge from hospital, patients may struggle to recognize and respond to worsening HF symptoms. Failure to monitor and respond to HF symptoms may lead to unnecessary hospitalizations. Objective: This study aimed to (1) determine the feasibility of lung impedance measurements and a symptom diary to monitor HF symptoms daily at home for 30 days following hospital discharge and (2) determine daily changes in HF symptoms of pulmonary edema, lung impedance measurements, and if self-care behavior improves over time when patients use these self-care monitoring tools. Methods: This study used a prospective longitudinal design including patients from cardiology wards in 2 university hospitals-one in Norway and one in Lithuania. Data on HF symptoms and pulmonary edema were collected from 10 participants (mean age 64.5 years; 90% (9/10) male) with severe HF (New York Heart Association classes III and IV) who were discharged home after being hospitalized for an HF condition. HF symptoms were self-reported using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale for Heart Failure. Pulmonary edema was measured by participants using a noninvasive lung impedance monitor, the Cardio Set Edema Guard Monitor. Informal caregivers aided the participants with the noninvasive measurements. Results: The prevalence and burden of shortness of breath varied from participants experiencing them daily to never, whereas lung impedance measurements varied for individual participants and the group participants, as a whole. Self-care behavior score improved significantly (P=.007) from a median of 56 (IQR range 22-75) at discharge to a median of 81 (IQR range 72-98) 30 days later. Conclusions: Noninvasive measurement of lung impedance daily and the use of a symptom diary were feasible at home for 30 days in HF patients. Self-care behavior significantly improved after 30 days of using a symptom diary and measuring lung impedance at home. Further research is needed to determine if daily self-care monitoring of HF signs and symptoms, combined with daily lung impedance measurements, may reduce hospital readmissions.

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  • 2.
    Aarts, B.
    et al.
    Netherlands Forensic Institute, Biological Traces and DNA, The Hague, Netherlands.
    Kokshoorn, B.
    Netherlands Forensic Institute, Biological Traces and DNA, The Hague, Netherlands.
    Mc Kenna, L.G.
    Forensic Science Ireland, DNA department, Dublin, Ireland.
    Drotz, W.
    Swedish National Forensic Centre, DNA department, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ansell, Ricky
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Forensic Centre, DNA department, Linköping, Sweden.
    van Oorschot, R.A.
    Office of the Chief Forensic Scientist, Victoria Police Forensic Services Department, Macleod- Victoria, Australia.
    Kloosterman, A.D.
    Netherlands Forensic Institute, Biological Traces and DNA, The Hague, Netherlands.
    DNActivity: International cooperation in activity level interpretation of forensic DNA evidence.2015In: Abstract book, 7th European Academy of Forensic Science, EAFS, Prag, Tjeckien, 2015., 2015, p. 555-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Questions posed to expert witnesses by the legal community and the courts are expanding to include not just those relating to source level (i.e. ‘who is the donor of the trace?’) but also those relating to activitity level (i.e. ‘how did the DNA get there?’). The answers to these questions are usually formulated as the probability of the evidence under alternative scenarios. As activity level questions are part of investigative and legal considerations it is of paramount importance that expert witnesses are provided with knowledge and tools to address these questions.

    To answer such questions within a probabilistic framework, empirical data is needed to estimate probabilities of transfer, persistence and recovery of DNA as well as background levels of DNA on everyday objects. There is a paucity of empirical data on these topics, but the number of studies is increasing both through in-house experiments and experimental data published in international scientific journals.

    Laboratories that conduct such studies all use different experimental setups, trace recovery strategies and techniques and DNA analysis systems and equipment. It is essential for the forensic genetics community in general to establish whether the data generated by different labs are in concordance, and can therefore be readily used by the forensic community.

    Moreover, if existing data and data generated from future experiments are made available to the (forensic) community, knowledge is needed on the key factors that underlie potential interlaboratory variation.

    The aims and objectives of this ENFSI Monopoly 2013 project are to conduct a study of methodologies and data from different laboratories and to assess the comparability of the scientific data on transfer, persistence and recovery of DNA. This comparison will allow us to identify key factors that underlie potential variation. This information will be used to setup guidelines to enable sharing and database-storage of relevant scientific

    data. This will improve the ability of forensic scientists and other professionals of the Criminal Justice System to give evidence-based answers to questions that relate to the activity level of the crime under investigation.

  • 3.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The housing situation of older people – Issues of investigations2017In: Book of abstracts, 2017, p. 51-51Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The housing situation of older people has been on the Swedish political agenda for some time. An increasing ageing population implies a demand for housing in correspodence to their needs. Assisted living facilities decreased with 30 000 places between 2002 and 2016, as a result, the majority of older people age in a dwelling in the ordinary housing market. In 2008 and 2015 respectively two government investigations on older people’s housing were presented. The investigations focused on the need for housing to bridge the gap between ordinary housing and assisted living facilities and issues of affordability and social community but also the lack of accessible housing in particular geographic areas. This paper aims to investigate the origins of the two investigations and relate them to changes in the housing market affecting older people, arguing that the strong emphasis on ageing in place has shifted the responsibility of having a good place to live from general welfare to older individuals themselves.

  • 4.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    I takt med framtiden: Utveckling av ett nytt interprofessionellt curriculum vid Hälsouniversitetet i Linköping2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hälso- och sjukvårdsutbildningarnas ansvar att utbilda professionella som kan samarbetaoch förstå varandras kompetens, för att utföra och utveckla patientsäker vård, betonas alltmer i den globala debatten om framtidens hälso- och sjukvård. Modern professionsutbildning inom hälso- och sjukvården måste idag därför innehålla moment av god kvalitet där studenter lär med, av och om varandra för att utveckla interprofessionell kompetens. Hälsouniversitetet i Linköping är pionjär, både nationellt och internationellt, när det gäller interprofessionellt lärande tack vare satsningen på integrerade utbildningsmoment som funnits med sedan från starten 1986. Den här rapporten är en sammanställning av den interna process som har genomförts för att initiera ett pedagogiskt utvecklingsprojekt med avsikt att revidera och utveckla dessa gemensamma utbildningsmoment inriktade mot interprofessionellt lärande. Texten är upplagd kronologiskt och inleds med det direktiv som fakultetsledningen gav för att en utvald grupp lärare skulle kunna utarbeta ett förslag på hur de interprofessionella lärandemomenten vid Hälsouniversitetet skulle kunna förbättras. Härefter följer den rapport som utredningsgruppen lämnade, och som sedan skickades på remiss till olika intressenter. Rapporten följs av en sammanställning och bearbetning av de inkomna remissvaren och till sist följer fakultetsstyrelsens beslut om hur curriculum för interprofessionell utbildning inom Hälsouniversitetet ska utvecklas eller förändras. Det är vår förhoppning att dokumentationen av processen för att förnya fakultetens interprofessionella utbildning ska ge inspiration för fortsatt förändrings- och utvecklingsarbete både inom och utom Linköpings universitet.

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  • 5.
    Ackerley, R
    et al.
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / SDS Clinic, ESRS accredited Sleep Research Laboratory, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Badre, G
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / SDS Clinic, ESRS accredited Sleep Research Laboratory, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / SDS Clinic, ESRS accredited Sleep Research Laboratory, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Positive Effects of a Weighted Blanket on Insomnia2015In: Journal of Sleep Medicine & Disorders, ISSN 2379-0822, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insomnia is a common occurrence and can have a negative impact on physiological, psychological and social well-being. There is a need for simple, effective solutions to increase sleep quality. It has been suggested that weighted blankets and vests can provide a beneficial calming effect, especially in clinical disorders. Hence, we aimed to investigate the effects of a chain weighted blanket on insomnia, using objective and subjective measures. Objectively, we found that sleep bout time increased, as well as a decrease in movements of the participants, during weighted blanket use. Subjectively, the participants liked sleeping with the blanket, found it easier to settle down to sleep and had an improved sleep, where they felt more refreshed in the morning. Overall, we found that when the participants used the weighted blanket, they had a calmer night’s sleep. A weighted blanket may aid in reducing insomnia through altered tactile inputs, thus may provide an innovative, non-pharmacological approach and complementary tool to improve sleep quality.

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  • 6.
    Adolfsson, Emma
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Kling, Daniel
    Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet & Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet & Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Green, Anna
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Whole exome sequencing of FFPE samples - expanding the horizon of forensic molecular autopsies2023In: International journal of legal medicine, ISSN 0937-9827, E-ISSN 1437-1596, Vol. 137, p. 1215-1234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forensic molecular autopsies have emerged as a tool for medical examiners to establish the cause of death. It is particularly useful in sudden unexplained deaths where the cause of death cannot be determined with a regular medical autopsy. We provide the first study of exome data from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples (FFPE) paired with data from high-quality blood samples in forensic applications. The approach allows exploration of the potential to use FFPE samples for molecular autopsies and identify variants in extensive exome data. We leverage the high uniformity of the hybridization capture approach provided by Twist Bioscience to target the complete exome and sequence the libraries on a NextSeq 550. Our findings suggest that exome sequencing is feasible for 24 out of a total of 35 included FFPE samples. When successful, the coverage across the exome is comparatively high (> 90% covered to 20X) and uniform (fold80 below 1.5). Detailed variant comparisons for matched FFPE and blood samples show high concordance with few false variants (positive predictive value of 0.98 and a sensitivity of 0.97) with no distinct FFPE artefacts. Ultimately, we apply carefully constructed forensic gene panels in a stepwise manner to find genetic variants associated with the clinical phenotype and with relevance to the sudden unexplained death.

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  • 7.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Maret, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Development and validation of a questionnaire evaluating patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging: the Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ)2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 6, p. 1368-1380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To develop and validate a new instrument measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations, Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire. Background. Questionnaires measuring patients anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations have been the same as used in a wide range of conditions. To learn about patients experience during examination and to evaluate interventions, a specific questionnaire measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging is needed. Design. Psychometric cross-sectional study with test-retest design. Methods. A new questionnaire, Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire, was designed from patient expressions of anxiety in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-scanners. The sample was recruited between October 2012-October 2014. Factor structure was evaluated with exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency with Cronbachs alpha. Criterion-related validity, known-group validity and test-retest was calculated. Results. Patients referred for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of either the spine or the heart, were invited to participate. The development and validation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire resulted in 15 items consisting of two factors. Cronbachs alpha was found to be high. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire correlated higher with instruments measuring anxiety than with depression scales. Known-group validity demonstrated a higher level of anxiety for patients undergoing Magnetic Resonance Imaging scan of the heart than for those examining the spine. Test-retest reliability demonstrated acceptable level for the scale. Conclusion. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire bridges a gap among existing questionnaires, making it a simple and useful tool for measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations.

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  • 8.
    Ahlner, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Anita
    Swedish National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Jones, A Wayne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Demographics and post-mortem toxicology findings in deaths among people arrested multiple times for use of illicit drugs and/or impaired driving2016In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 265, p. 138-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Multiple arrests for use of illicit drugs and/or impaired driving strongly suggests the existence of a personality disorder and/or a substance abuse problem. Methods: This retrospective study (1993-2010) used a national forensic toxicology database (TOXBASE), and we identified 3943 individuals with two or more arrests for use of illicit drugs and/or impaired driving. These individuals had subsequently died from a fatal drug poisoning or some other cause of death, such as trauma. Results: Of the 3943 repeat offenders 1807 (46%) died from a fatal drug overdose and 2136 (54%) died from other causes (p amp;lt; 0.001). The repeat offenders were predominantly male (90% vs 10%) and mean age of drug poisoning deaths was 5 y younger (mean 35 y) than other causes of death (mean 40 y). Significantly more repeat offenders (46%) died from drug overdose compared with all other forensic autopsies (14%) (p amp;lt; 0.001). Four or more drugs were identified in femoral blood in 44% of deaths from poisoning (drug overdose) compared with 18% of deaths by other causes (p amp;lt; 0.001). The manner of death was considered accidental in 54% of deaths among repeat offenders compared with 28% for other suspicious deaths (p amp;lt; 0.001). The psychoactive substances most commonly identified in autopsy blood from repeat offenders were ethanol, morphine (from heroin), diazepam, amphetamines, cannabis, and various opioids. Conclusions: This study shows that people arrested multiple times for use of illicit drugs and/or impaired driving are more likely to die by accidentally overdosing with drugs. Lives might be saved if repeat offenders were sentenced to treatment and rehabilitation for their drug abuse problem instead of conventional penalties for drug-related crimes. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 9.
    Ahlström, Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Sweden.
    Thiblin, Ingemar
    Natl Board Forens Med, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet & Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet & Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Characteristics of post-mortem beta-hydroxybutyrate-positivet cases - A retrospective study on age, sex and BMI in 1407 forensic autopsies2021In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 325, article id 110878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Post-mortem biochemistry, including the analysis of beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), is increasingly employed in forensic medicine, especially in conditions such as diabetes and chronic alcoholism. However, not much is known about the associations between age, body mass index (BMI), and sex and BHB concentrations in ketoacidotic conditions. Aim: To retrospectively study the association between age, BMI and sex in several conditions, such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA), and elevated post-mortem BHB concentrations. Methods: 1407 forensic autopsy cases analysed for BHB were grouped by diagnosis: DKA, AKA, HHS [hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state], acidosis NOS [not otherwise specified], or hypothermia. Age, sex, BMI and the concentrations of blood alcohol, vitreous glucose and blood BHB were recorded. Results: Cases of AKA and DKA were most numerous (184 and 156, respectively). In DKA and in its male subgroup, cases with severe ketosis (BHB > 1000 mu g/g) were younger and had a lower BMI than those with moderate ketosis (BHB 250-1000 mu g/g) and controls (P < 0.001). In DKA and in its female subgroup, cases with moderate ketosis cases were older (P = 0.0218 and P = 0.0083) than controls. In AKA and in its male subgroup, cases with severe ketosis had a lower BMI than those with moderate ketosis (P = 0.0391 and P = 0.0469) and controls (P < 0.001). Cases with moderate ketosis had a lower BMI than controls (P < 0.001). Conclusions: BHB concentration is associated with BMI in DKA and AKA, and with both BMI and age in DKA. Constitutional factors should, therefore, be considered in potential AKA and DKA cases. (c) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. CC_BY_4.0

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  • 10.
    Ahmad, Irma
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Matilda
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Brus, Ole
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Ekman, Carl Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hammar, Åsa
    Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Landén, Mikael
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordanskog, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Axel
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Validity of diagnoses, treatment dates, and rating scales in the Swedish national quality register for electroconvulsive therapy2022In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The Swedish national quality register for electroconvulsive therapy (Q-ECT) contains data on patients receiving treatment with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in Sweden. Aim This study determined the validity of diagnoses, treatment dates, and rating scales in the Q-ECT by investigating the degree of accordance between data from the Q-ECT and patient records. Materials and methods From January 2016 to December 2017, 200 treatment series were randomly selected from the Q-ECT. The corresponding patient records were requested from the treating hospitals. Data on the indicative diagnosis, dates for the first and the last ECT session, and rating scales were compared between the Q-ECT and patient records using (i) a strict and (ii) a liberal method of assessment. Using the liberal method, each variable was assessed as accordant if it belonged to the same diagnosis group, or if the dates differed by less than 1 week, or ratings differed by only 1 point on the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI- S), or no more than 3 points on the Montgomery angstrom sberg Depression Rating Scale between the Q-ECT and the patient record. Results A total of 179 patient records were received. The strict method of assessment showed an accordance of 89% or higher for all studied variables. The liberal method showed an accordance of 95% or higher. Conclusions We conclude that data on the studied variables in the Q-ECT have high validity. However, limited use of some rating scales makes the results uncertain. Measures can be taken to further improve the data quality.

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  • 11.
    Ajanovic, Dina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Korjenic, Dalida
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Utarbetning av språkpillerböcker skrivna på bosniska/kroatiska/serbiska för barn med BKS som modersmål: En kontrastiv grammatisk analys2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Projektet ”Språkpiller” har utformats genom ett samarbete mellan logopeder och biblioteken i Östergötland. Projektet syftar till att stimulera språket hos barn med språkstörning och fungerar i första hand som ett komplement till logopedisk behandling (Linköpings kommun, 2012).

    Föreliggande studie syftar till att undersöka om bilderböcker skrivna på bosniska/kroatiska/serbiska (BKS) tränar samma grammatiska struktur som motsvarande bilderböcker på svenska gör. Syftet är även att granska huruvida böckerna i föreliggande studie går att rekommendera som träningsmaterial för barn med språkliga svårigheter.

    En kontrastiv analys mellan BKS och svenska har genomförts av totalt tre bilderböcker. Böckerna i studien innehåller skillnader mellan BKS och svenska inom de flesta grammatiska kategorier och stämmer väl överrens med vad som beskrivits i litteraturen. Det föreliggande materialet antas därför kunna användas som träningsmaterial till vissa grammatiska strukturer.

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    Utarbetning av språkpillerböcker skrivna på bosniska/kroatiska/serbiska för barn med BKS som modersmål - En kontrastiv grammatisk analys
  • 12.
    Albinsson, L.
    et al.
    Swedish National Forensic Centre - NFC, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hedman, J.
    Swedish National Forensic Centre - NFC, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ansell, Ricky
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Forensic Centre - NFC, Linköping, Sweden.
    Mixed DNA profiles from single-donors2015In: Abstract book, 7th European Academy of Forensic Science, EAFS, Prag, Tjeckien, 2015, 2015, p. 538-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mosaicism and chimerism in individuals can complicate the interpretation and even lead to misinterpretation of DNA profiles in forensic casework. If a person has different DNA profiles in different tissue types, i.e. a true chimaera, wrongful exclusions can be made. Additionally, mixed chimaeras can have DNA profiles that may be mistaken for mixtures. We have set-up automatic DNA databasing processes to handle atypical single-donor DNA profiles, i.e. profiles having one or several “extra” alleles.

    Studying all reference samples analysed at NFC from 2006 until spring 2014, 2‰ of the samples showed atypical DNA profiles. To be able to set routines for handling these DNA profiles, each one was manually searched in CODIS with adjusted settings, to evaluate the frequency of false-positive hits. To tag these profiles in LIMS a new result status was implemented. Additionally, all such DNA profiles must be confirmed by analysing at least two discrete samples. In LIMS, the results are manually recorded to compose of all alleles from the samples from a suspect, i.e. containing most possible genetic information. LIMS automatically categorises the atypical DNA profiles with a special CODIS index, called “Multi-allelic offender”. The first time an atypical profile is searched, the matches are manually investigated. If a match is false, its disposition will be set to “no match” to prevent this from occurring in future searches. Automatic searches will then be performed in every day routine with moderate stringency, allowing the atypical DNA profile to match either a genotype or a mixture. If the match is true, a match-report will be created and sent to the police from the LIMS.

     

  • 13.
    Alfredsson Ågren, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Access to and Use of the Internet among Adolscents and Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in Everyday Settings.2020In: Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability, ISSN 1366-8250, E-ISSN 1469-9532, no 1, p. 89-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim is to explore and describe access to the internet and how it is used among adolescents and young adults with mild and moderate intellectual disabilities in their everyday settings. Method: Data were collected through observations of and interviews with 15 participants with intellectual disabilities, aged 13-25, on access and use of the internet in school or work and at home or in their free time. A qualitative content analysis was used. Results: Main findings were categorised into: Access to the internet in different settings, Challenges when using the internet and Strategies to handle the digital environment and take part in internet activities.Conclusions: This study revealed that participants had access to internet connections and to a high number of internet-enabled devices. Participants use the internet through strategies when doing internet activities, for example using pictures and reducing the number of internet-enabled devices used in their everyday settings.

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  • 14.
    Alm Mårtensson, Anna
    et al.
    Länsstyrelsen i Jönköping, Sverige.
    Boström, Anita
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper, Karlstads universitet, Sverige.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för naturvetenskap och biomedicin, Sverige.
    Lundgren, Charlie
    Länsstyrelsen Västerbotten, Sverige.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine.
    Simmons, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Att möta våldsutsatta äldre personer2022In: Äldre personers utsatthet för våld i nära relationer: Interprofessionella perspektiv / [ed] Lena Östlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB , 2022, p. 183-220Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Amundin, Mats
    et al.
    Kolmården Wildlife Park.
    Hållsten, Henrik
    Filosofiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Eklund, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Molinder, Lars
    Carnegie Investment Bank, Swedden.
    A proposal to use distributional models to analyse dolphin vocalisation2017In: Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Vocal Interactivity in-and-between Humans, Animals and Robots, VIHAR 2017 / [ed] Angela Dassow, Ricard Marxer & Roger K. Moore, 2017, p. 31-32Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper gives a brief introduction to the starting points of an experimental project to study dolphin communicative behaviour using distributional semantics, with methods implemented for the large scale study of human language.

    Download full text (pdf)
    A proposal to use distributional models to analyse dolphin vocalisation
  • 16.
    Andersson, Eva K.
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Patterns of changing residential preferences during late adulthood2019In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 1752-1781, article id PII S0144686X18000259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier research on residential mobility has demonstrated a tendency for the young old of the 55+ population to prefer peripheral locations, whereas older age groups choose central locations. Here, we present survey results indicating that such late-adulthood differences in preferences are supported by age-related shifts corresponding to differences in housing preferences expressed by individuals in peripheral as well as central locations in Sweden. A sample of 2,400 individuals aged 55 years and over was asked to select the seven most important characteristics of a dwelling from a list of 21 alternatives (Survey of Housing Intentions among the ELDerly in Sweden (SHIELD), 2013). The preferences expressed were used as dependent variables in logistic regressions to determine to what extent the housing preferences of older people are linked to age, gender, socio-economic status and type of geographical area. The results demonstrated a close link between neighbourhood characteristics and housing preferences. Owning the dwelling, having a garden and access to nature were stressed as important by individuals living in non-metropolitan middle-class areas and in suburban elite areas. The youngest cohort expressed similar preferences. Older age groups instead stressed the importance of an elevator, single-storey housing and a good design for independent living; preferences that have similarities to those expressed by individuals living in large cities and smaller urban centres where such housing is more readily available.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hummerdal, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bergman Nordgren, Lise
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Psychology , Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    A 3.5-year follow-up of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for major depression2013In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 155-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundInternet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for major depression has been tested in several trials, but only with follow-ups up to 1.5 years.

    AimThe aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of ICBT 3.5 years after treatment completion.Methods

    A total of 88 people with major depression were randomized to either guided self-help or e-mail therapy in the original trial. One-third was initially on a waiting-list. Treatment was provided for eight weeks and in this report long-term follow-up data were collected. Also included were data from post-treatment and six-month follow-up. A total of 58% (51/88) completed the 3.5-year follow-up. Analyses were performed using a random effects repeated measures piecewise growth model to estimate trajectory shape over time and account for missing data.

    ResultsResults showed continued lowered scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). No differences were found between the treatment conditions. A large proportion of participants (55%) had sought and received additional treatments in the follow-up period. A majority (56.9%) of participants had a BDI score lower than 10 at the 3.5-year follow-up.

    ConclusionsPeople with mild to moderate major depression may benefit from ICBT 3.5-years after treatment completion.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    "Om vikten av att bli berörd som behandlare": Metodforum - En arena för reflekterande över den vardagliga praktiken2012Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Föreliggande uppsats är en praxisnära fenomenologisk studie genomförd på en mindre skol- och behandlingsverksamhet i Täby, som heter Svalnäs. På Svalnäs samlas personalen en gång per vecka i något de kallar metodforum. I detta forum delas och reflekteras det kring erfarenheter från den dagliga praktiken som på olika sätt berört personalen. Metodforum är ett svårfångat och komplext fenomen och därmed också svårt att beskriva. Denna uppsats är ett försök att beskriva metoden från insidan, via deltagarnas upplevelser av metoden.I uppsatsen presenteras Svalnäs och den värdegrund och kultur ur vilken metodforum uppkommit. Studien bygger i huvudsak på intervjuer med samtliga (9) behandlare i verksamheten. Frågeställningarna i uppsatsen rör deltagarnas beskrivning av metoden, deras upplevelser kring vad i metoden som är verksamt samt metodens eventuella nytta eller användbarhet. En deskriptiv fenomenologisk metod har använts och resultatet redovisas i en illustrativ beskrivning av fenomenets meningsbärande innebörder samt i en sammanfattande generell struktur. I diskussionen reflekteras det över metodforum i relation till presenterad teori och metodens generella användbarhet.

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  • 19. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Dealing with Digits: Arithmetic, Memory and Phonology in Deaf Signers2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Deafness has been associated with poor abilities to deal with digits in the context of arithmetic and memory, and language modality-specific differences in the phonological similarity of digits have been shown to influence short-term memory (STM). Therefore, the overall aim of the present thesis was to find out whether language modality-specific differences in phonological processing between sign and speech can explain why deaf signers perform at lower levels than hearing peers when dealing with digits. To explore this aim, the role of phonological processing in digit-based arithmetic and memory tasks was investigated, using both behavioural and neuroimaging methods, in adult deaf signers and hearing non-signers, carefully matched on age, sex, education and non-verbal intelligence. To make task demands as equal as possible for both groups, and to control for material effects, arithmetic, phonological processing, STM and working memory (WM) were all assessed using the same presentation and response mode for both groups. The results suggested that in digit-based STM, phonological similarity of manual numerals causes deaf signers to perform more poorly than hearing non-signers. However, for  digit-based WM there was no difference between the groups, possibly due to differences in allocation of resources during WM. This indicates that similar WM for the two groups can be generalized from lexical items to digits. Further, we found that in the present work deaf signers performed better than expected and on a par with hearing peers on all arithmetic tasks, except for multiplication, possibly because the groups studied here were very carefully matched. However, the neural networks recruited for arithmetic and phonology differed between groups. During multiplication tasks, deaf signers showed an increased  reliance on cortex of the right parietal lobe complemented by the left inferior frontal gyrus. In contrast, hearing non-signers relied on cortex of the left frontal and parietal lobes during multiplication. This suggests that while hearing non-signers recruit phonology-dependent arithmetic fact retrieval processes for multiplication, deaf signers recruit non-verbal magnitude manipulation processes. For phonology, the hearing non-signers engaged left lateralized frontal and parietal areas within the classical perisylvian language network. In deaf signers, however, phonological processing was limited to cortex of the left occipital lobe, suggesting that sign-based phonological processing does not necessarily activate the classical language network. In conclusion, the findings of the present thesis suggest that language modality-specific differences between sign and speech in different ways can explain why deaf signers perform at lower levels than hearing non-signers on tasks that include dealing with digits.

    List of papers
    1. Similar digit-based working memory in deaf signers and hearing non-signers despite digit span differences
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Similar digit-based working memory in deaf signers and hearing non-signers despite digit span differences
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    2013 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 4, no 942Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Similar working memory (WM) for lexical items has been demonstrated for signers and non-signers while short-term memory (STM) is regularly poorer in deaf than hearing individuals. In the present study, we investigated digit-based WM and STM in Swedish and British deaf signers and hearing non-signers. To maintain good experimental control we used printed stimuli throughout and held response mode constant across groups. We showed that deaf signers have similar digit-based WM performance, despite shorter digit spans, compared to well-matched hearing non-signers. We found no difference between signers and non-signers on STM span for letters chosen to minimize phonological similarity or in the effects of recall direction. This set of findings indicates that similar WM for signers and non-signers can be generalized from lexical items to digits and suggests that poorer STM in deaf signers compared to hearing non-signers may be due to differences in phonological similarity across the language modalities of sign and speech.

    Keywords
    deaf signers, working memory, short term memory, phonological similarity, Cross-cultural
    National Category
    Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102262 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00942 (DOI)000331572800002 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 20051353Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2008-0846Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P2008-0481:1-E
    Available from: 2013-12-04 Created: 2013-12-04 Last updated: 2023-12-28Bibliographically approved
    2. Deaf signers use phonology to do arithmetic
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deaf signers use phonology to do arithmetic
    2014 (English)In: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 32, p. 246-253Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Deaf students generally lag several years behind hearing peers in arithmetic, but little is known about the mechanisms behind this. In the present study we investigated how phonological skills interact with arithmetic. Eighteen deaf signers and eighteen hearing non-signers took part in an experiment that manipulated arithmetic and phonological knowledge in the language modalities of sign and speech. Independent tests of alphabetical and native language phonological skills were also administered. There was no difference in performance between groups on subtraction, but hearing non-signers performed better than deaf signers on multiplication. For the deaf signers but not the hearing non-signers, multiplicative reasoning was associated with both alphabetical and phonological skills. This indicates that deaf signing adults rely on language processes to solve multiplication tasks, possibly because automatization of multiplication is less well established in deaf adults.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Deaf signers; Arithmetic; Phonology
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108812 (URN)10.1016/j.lindif.2014.03.015 (DOI)000336820400028 ()
    Available from: 2014-07-07 Created: 2014-07-06 Last updated: 2023-12-28
    3. Phonology and arithmetic in the language-calculation network
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phonology and arithmetic in the language-calculation network
    2015 (English)In: Brain and Language, ISSN 0093-934X, E-ISSN 1090-2155, Vol. 143, p. 97-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Arithmetic and language processing involve similar neural networks, but the relative engagement remains unclear. In the present study we used fMRI to compare activation for phonological, multiplication and subtraction tasks, keeping the stimulus material constant, within a predefined language-calculation network including left inferior frontal gyrus and angular gyrus (AG) as well as superior parietal lobule and the intraparietal sulcus bilaterally. Results revealed a generally left lateralized activation pattern within the language-calculation network for phonology and a bilateral activation pattern for arithmetic, and suggested regional differences between tasks. In particular, we found a more prominent role for phonology than arithmetic in pars opercularis of the left inferior frontal gyrus but domain generality in pars triangularis. Parietal activation patterns demonstrated greater engagement of the visual and quantity systems for calculation than language. This set of findings supports the notion of a common, but regionally differentiated, language-calculation network. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2015
    Keywords
    Phonology; Arithmetic; Brain imaging; Perisylvian language network
    National Category
    Basic Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117794 (URN)10.1016/j.bandl.2015.02.004 (DOI)000352659600010 ()25797099 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2005-1353].

    The previous status of this article was Manuscript and the working title was Phonological but not arithmetic processing engages left posterior inferior frontal gyrus.

    Available from: 2015-05-11 Created: 2015-05-08 Last updated: 2023-12-28Bibliographically approved
    4. Deaf signers use magnitude manipulatioin strategies for mulitplication: fMRI evidence
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deaf signers use magnitude manipulatioin strategies for mulitplication: fMRI evidence
    Show others...
    2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence suggests that the lag reported in mathematics for deaf signers derives from difficulties related to the verbal system of number processing as described in the triple code model. For hearing individuals the verbal system has been shown to be recruited for both arithmetic and language tasks. In the present study we investigate for the first time neuronal representations of arithmetic in deaf signers. We examine if the neural network supporting arithmetic and language, including the horizontal portion of the intraparietal sulcus (HIPS), the superior parietal lobule (SPL) bilaterally, the left angular gyrus (AG), pars opercularis (POPE) and pars triangularis (PTRI) of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), is differently recruited for deaf and hearing individuals. Imaging data were collected from 16 deaf signers and 16 well-matched hearing nonsigners, using the same stimulus material for all tasks, but with different cues. During multiplication, deaf signers recruited rHIPS more than hearing non-signers, suggesting greater involvement of magnitude manipulation processes related to the quantity system, whereas there was no evidence that the verbal system was recruited. Further, there was no support for the notion of a common representation of phonology for sign and speech as previously suggested.

    Keywords
    Arithmetic; phonology; fMRI; deaf; sign language; magnitude manipulation
    National Category
    Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111560 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-10-24 Created: 2014-10-24 Last updated: 2023-12-28Bibliographically approved
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    Dealing with Digits: Arithmetic, Memory and Phonology in Deaf Signers
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  • 20.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sverige.
    Broling, Lillemor
    Primary Health Care, Kalmar County Council, Sverige.
    Enhanced participation, safety and security for older people and their carers with health supportive e-services2015In: Presented at the 6th International Carers Conference - Care and caring: future proofing the new demographics, Gothenburg, Sweden, September 3-6, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sverige.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sverige.
    Dissemination event Sweden2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sverige.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sverige.
    Online support for carers2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sweden.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sweden.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Papa, Roberta
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Poli, Arianna
    Italian National Institute of Health and Science on Aging (INRCA), Italy; Linköping University, Sweden.
    Salzmann, Benjamin
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Döhner, Hanneli
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Efthymiou, Areti
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Anhörigstöd via internet: InformCare2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sweden.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Kalmar.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Papa, Roberta
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Online support for carers: using a social forum and social network as a means of developing the role of informal caregiving2015In: Presented at the 6th International Carers Conference - Care and caring: future proofing the new demographics, Gothenburg, Sweden, September 3-6, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sweden.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Papa, Roberta
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    The INNOVAGE-Eurocarers platform and current ICT-based services for informal carers of older people in Sweden2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Different support services for family carersare available in Sweden through information andcommunication technologies (ICTs) since late 1990s, likeACTION, My Joice, IPPI, ‘The Gap’, and Carer Sweden’son-line ‘Carer’s Book’. The INNOVAGE-Eurocarersplatform aimed to complement the offer of web services tocarers through the provision of a new tailored package.

    Methods: The Swedish pilot test enrolled around 50carers through contacts with professionals working withcarers in different municipalities. They could access thefollowing web-based services: information resources;individual support via e-mail and private messages; groupsupport via social network and forum. Periodical writingactivities were asked to active users in the forum,alternating expressive writing (EW) and time management(TM) writing tasks. Periodical reminders were sent in orderto increase user involvement.

    Results: Users were predominantly older, female carers,of which two thirds were over 65 years old. The webplatform was perceived as a flexible tool, potentiallyaccessible at any time, which gave users the possibility toexploit their experience as carers with others in similarsituations. This peer exchange seemed to improve selfempowerment,sense of solidarity and mutual learning.However, usage of the web platform was limited due to thelow level of digital skills of some carers.

    Conclusions: Although results confirmed usefulness andappropriateness of implemented web services, it isfundamental to address the issue of usability andaccessibility in order to ensure a wider accessibility. Anoption might be to offer initial digital skill training andcontinuous technical support for computer novices.

  • 26.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sweden.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Papa, Roberta
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    The INNOVAGE-Eurocarers platform and current ICT-based services for informal carers of older people in Sweden2015In: Irish Ageing Studies Review, ISSN 1649-9972, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 88-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Different support services for family carers are available in Sweden through information and communication technologies (ICTs) since late 1990s, like ACTION, My Joice, IPPI, ‘The Gap’, and Carer Sweden’s online ‘Carer’s Book’. The INNOVAGE-Eurocarers platform aimed to complement the offer of web services to carers through the provision of a new tailored package.

    Methods: The Swedish pilot test enrolled around 50 carers through contacts with professionals working with carers in different municipalities. They could access the following web-based services: information resources; individual support via e-mail and private messages; group support via social network and forum. Periodical writing activities were asked to active users in the forum, alternating expressive writing (EW) and time management (TM) writing tasks. Periodical reminders were sent in order to increase user involvement.

    Results: Users were predominantly older, female carers, of which two thirds were over 65 years old. The web platform was perceived as a flexible tool, potentially accessible at any time, which gave users the possibility to exploit their experience as carers with others in similar situations. This peer exchange seemed to improve self empowerment, sense of solidarity and mutual learning. However, usage of the web platform was limited due to the low level of digital skills of some carers.

    Conclusions: Although results confirmed usefulness and appropriateness of implemented web services, it is fundamental to address the issue of usability and accessibility in order to ensure a wider accessibility. An option might be to offer initial digital skill training and continuous technical support for computer novices.

  • 27.
    Ansell, Ricky
    et al.
    National Laboratory of Forensic Science (SKL), Linköping, Sweden.
    Rasmusson, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Swedish PerspectiveThe Forensic Use of Bioinformation: Ethical Issues: Nuffield Council on Bioethics2008In: BioSocieties, ISSN 1745-8552, E-ISSN 1745-8560, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 88-92Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nuffield Report is well-written, clear, extensive and up to date, and it covers most of the major ethical issues in the field of forensic DNA analysis and database searching. The ethical analysis is thorough and based on solid theoretical ground.

  • 28.
    Ansell, Ricky
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Widén, Christina
    Biology Unit, Swedish National Forensic Centre (NFC), Link€oping, Sweden.
    Swedish Legislation Regarding Forensic DNA Elimination Databases2016In: Forensic Science Policy & Management: An International Journal , ISSN 1940-9044, Vol. 7, no 1-2, p. 20-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence contaminated with DNA from staff, police, and other individuals can have a dramaticimpact on an investigation and can mislead police inquiries. Forensic DNA elimination databases(EDB) are used to minimize the risks associated with DNA contamination. Central issues withmaintaining such databases include the basis for sample collection, sample, and profile integrity, aswell as retention times, database access, and procedures when a database match occurs. Followingyears of discussion, debate, and the use of an “in house” EDB at the Swedish National ForensicCentre (NFC), these issues have now been resolved by passing legislation on DNA EDB. According tothe legislation, sampling for EDB purposes is mandatory for certain forensic professionals, as well asfor other individuals who need access to the premises handling DNA evidence. In the event of adatabase match, the match can only be reviewed and evaluated for quality purposes and the nameof the donor cannot be disclosed to the crime inquiry. Thus, as a consequence, if a contaminationevent is not the probable cause the legal limitation opens for impunity for individuals included inthe database.KEYWORDSContamination; DNA;elimination database;forensic science; legislationIntroduction

  • 29.
    Antelius, Eleonor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kiwi, Mahin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Frankly, None of Us Know What Dementia Is: Dementia Caregiving Among Iranian Immigrants Living in Sweden2015In: Care Management Journals, ISSN 1521-0987, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 79-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In quite a short amount of time, Sweden has gone from being a relatively homogeneous society to a multicultural one, with a rapid expansion of immigrants having culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds growing old in Sweden. This is particularly interesting in relation to studying age-related dementia diseases. Research shows that not only do CALD persons with dementia diseases tend to mix languages, have difficulties with separation of languages, or revert to speaking only their native tongue as the disease progresses, but they also show tendencies to experience that they live in the cultural environment in which they were brought up, rather than in the current Swedish one. In this article, we explore findings in relation to one such CALD group in Sweden, Iranians. The article is empirically driven and based on data gathered in 2 separate settings with specific ethnocultural profiles, offering dementia care with Middle Eastern, Arab, and/or Persian profile. Observations were carried out in combination with semistructured in-depth interviews (n = 66). By using a combination of content and ethnographic analysis, 4 main findings related to ethnocultural dementia care were elucidated. These include (a) a wider recognition of people from different CALD backgrounds possibly having different perceptions of what dementia is, (b) a possibility that such ascribed meaning of dementia has a bearing on health maintenance and health-seeking behavior as well as the inclination to use formal services or not, (c) choosing to use formal service in the forms of ethnoculturally profiled dementia care facility seems to relate to being able to “live up to ideals of Iranian culture,” and (d) “culture,” however ambiguous and hotly debated a concept it is, appears to be a relevant aspect of people's lives, an aspect that is both acquired as well as ascribed to oneself and to others. As such, we argue that culture needs to be further addressed in relation to dementia care in multicultural societies because ascribing culture boxes people in as well as out. In addition, ethnocultural contextualization of dementia care needs to be understood in relation to this because it affects the care provided.

  • 30.
    Arnes, Marit
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Bachs, Liliana
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Al Sammarai, Mohammad
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Jones, A Wayne
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hoiseth, Gudrun
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Rate of elimination of gamma-hydroxybutyrate from blood determined by analysis of two consecutive samples from apprehended drivers in Norway2020In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 314, article id 110374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a common drug of abuse with an elimination half-life of 20-45 min. However, there is some evidence that GHB might exhibit saturation kinetics after ingesting high recreational doses. The aim of this study was to investigate the elimination kinetics of GHB from blood in people apprehended by the police for impaired driving and secondary to describe concentrations in all GHB-positive drivers. Methods: Two consecutive blood samples were taken about 30-40 min apart from N =16 apprehended drivers in Norway. GHB was determined in blood by an Ultra High-Performance Liquid ChromatographyTandem Mass Spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method. The changes in GHB between the two consecutive blood samples allowed estimating GHBs elimination half-life, assuming first-order and zero-order elimination kinetics. GHB concentrations are also reported for N =1276 apprehended drivers with GHB in blood. Results: The median time interval between collecting the two blood samples was 36 min (range 20 56 min). The median concentration of GHB in the first blood sample was 56.5 mg/L (range 14.1 142 mg/L) compared with 47.8 mg/L in the second sample (range 9.75 113 mg/L). The median elimination half-life was 103 min (range 21 187 min), and GHBs median zero-order elimination rate constant was 21.0 mg/L/h (range 6.71-45A mg/L/h). Back-calculation to the time of driving resulted in GHB concentrations up to 820 mg/L assuming first-order kinetics and up to 242 ma assuming zeroorder kinetics. In all drivers (N 1276), the median GHB concentration was 73.7 ma and highest was 484 mg/L. Conclusion: The elimination half-life of GHB in blood samples from apprehended drivers was longer than expected compared with results of controlled dosing studies. Zero-order kinetics seems a more appropriate model for GHB when concentrations are back-calculated. and the median elimination rate was 21 mg/L/h. (C) 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

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  • 31.
    Arundale, Amelia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fältström, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    TUCK JUMP SCORE IS NOT RELATED TO HOPPING PERFORMANCE OR PATIENT-REPORTED OUTCOME MEASURES IN FEMALE SOCCER PLAYERS2020In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY, ISSN 2159-2896, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 395-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The tuck jump assessment was developed to identify players at risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries or gauge a players progress through rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction. A tuck jump score of >= 6 out of 10 has been labeled poor and thought to identify players with high risk landing patterns. Purpose: The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine if there was a relationship between tuck jump score, particularly tuck jump scores >= 6, hopping performance, and patient-reported outcome measures in female soccer players with ACL reconstruction (ACLR) and knee-healthy controls. Study Design: Secondary analysis of prospective cohort study Methods: Female soccer players (117 after ACLR, 117 knee-healthy) performed the single hop for distance, tuck jump assessment, and drop vertical jump (DVJ). All players were categorized based on as having a total tuck jump score >= 6 or < 6. Analyzing all players together, Spearmans rank correlations assessed if there were relationships between total tuck jump score or tuck jump scores >= 6 and single-legged hop limb symmetry or DVJ measures. Players with an ACLR also filled out the International Knee Documentation Committee 2000 Subjective Knee Form and the Knee injury Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Spearmans rank correlations assessed if there were relationships between total tuck jump score or tuck jump scores >= 6 and patient-reported outcome measures. Results: The mean tuck jump scores was 4.8 +/- 1.8 (tuck jump score >= 6, 6.7 +/- 0.9, tuck jump score < 6, 3.7 +/- 1.1) with 87 (37%) athletes having tuck jump score >= 6. There were no significant relationships between tuck jump score or tuck jump score >= 6 and hopping performance or patient-reported outcome measures. Conclusion: The results of this current study indicate that tuck jump scores, including tuck jump scores >= 6, may not be related to functional or patient-reported outcome measures. Further work is needed to examine the clinical utility of the tuck jump assessment.

  • 32.
    Asaid, Dina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Erenmalm, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Logopeders bedömarreliabilitet vid perceptuell röstanalys av utvalda röstexempel: en början till ett referensröstmaterial2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Interrater and intrarater reliability are of great importance in the selection of reference voice examples. The purpose of this study is to investigate the reliability of experienced speech and language pathologists’ evaluations of selected voice samples. The aim is to begin a collection of male and female reference voice examples which represent different voice quality parameters according to the Stockholm Voice Evaluation Approach (SVEA). The specific questions are: How well do speech and language pathologists agree when rating voices along different voice quality parameters? Are any of the voice quality parameters in the speech samples prominent enough to be qualified as reference voice examples? The authors selected 15 voice samples out of a database consisting of 65 voice samples. The voices were evaluated by seven experienced speech and language pathologists using the SVEA protocol. The results were statistically analyzed to study interrater reliability. In order to investigate intrarater reliability a second evaluation session was carried out in which the speech and language pathologists evaluated three voice samples randomly selected from the 15 samples used in the first evaluation session. The results showed a wide range in the raters’ evaluations, which had an impact on the correlations. However, a closer look at separate parameters indicated considerably higher similarity in the ratings. Based on these results three reference voice examples were selected. Even though high correlation values were found in several of the other twelve voice samples, the ratings in these were not high enough to qualify them as reference voice examples in this study. Nevertheless, these voices can still be used to exemplify various degrees of deviation. The conclusions are that there is a great variation regarding reliability between and within raters and also regarding how the different speech and language pathologists rate the voices. The authors also conclude that the search for clear reference voice examples is highly motivated and ought to be continued, preferably with the method used in this study. 

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  • 33.
    Asaid, Dina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Erenmalm, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Narrativ förmåga vid afasi: analys av strategier vid gemensamt berättande2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aphasia is a linguistic impairment which affects communication and may have an impact on a person’s narrative ability. The purpose of the present study was to analyse the narrative ability in aphasia by narrative interviews with people with aphasia and their partners. The interviews were scrutinised for strategies used in joint narration involving couples where one of the spouses has aphasia. The definition of strategies was methods to cope with communicative difficulties often due to aphasia. Strategies were also studied in an assessment of independent narration. The specific questions were: Which strategies do couples, consisting of one person with aphasia and their partner, use in joint narration? Which strategies does the person with aphasia use in independent narration? Are there any differences in the use of strategies in joint narration compared to independent narration? Five couples were recruited from conversational groups for people with aphasia in the south of Sweden. The couples were asked questions which were meant to encourage joint narration and the interviews were filmed. In addition to the interview, the narrative ability of the individuals with aphasia was assessed with the Swedish aphasia test A-ning. The interviews and the assessments were transcribed according to principles from conversation analysis. The result showed a variation regarding type of strategies occurring in the couples’ narrations and the frequency of these strategies. In joint narration, repetition was the strategy most commonly used by individuals with aphasia, followed by self-initiated self-repair, word search and gestures. The partners also used repetition to a high extent as well as appendor production. The conclusion of this study is that the narrative ability of the persons with aphasia in independent narration to some extent corresponded with their ability in joint narration. However, there were great differences between how the individuals with aphasia and their partners used strategies to cope with difficulties in joint narration.

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  • 34.
    Askman, Sanna
    et al.
    Dept Hlth Med & Caring Sci, Malmo, Sweden.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Maddison, Ralph
    Deakin Univ, Australia.
    Nourse, Rebecca
    Deakin Univ, Australia.
    Feasibility and Acceptability of Wearable Cameras to Assess Self-care in People With Heart Failure: Pilot Study2023In: JMIR Formative Research, E-ISSN 2561-326X, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heart failure (HF) is a common chronic condition that affects over 26 million people worldwide. It is a progressive and debilitating disease with a broad symptom profile, intermittently marked by periods of acute decompensation. People with HF generally do not self-manage their condition well (eg, monitoring symptoms, taking medications regularly, physical activity, etc). A better understanding of self-care activities and what factors may indicate deterioration is warranted.Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and acceptability of using wearable cameras to assess self-care activities in people with HF. The study objectives were to (1) explore whether changes in self-care activities could be identified prior to hospitalization and (2) determine the acceptability of wearable cameras to people with HF.Methods: A total of 30 people recently diagnosed with HF wore a camera for a maximum of 30 days; the camera took a photo every 30 seconds in the forward-facing direction. At the end of the study, all 30 participants were presented with 8 statements of acceptability, scored on a 5-point Likert scale. To determine whether camera images could identify changes in self-care activities and lifestyle risk factors before hospitalization, we analyzed images from participants (n=8) who were hospitalized during the 30-day study period. Images from the period immediately prior to hospitalization and a comparison were selected for each participant. Images were manually coded according to 9 different event categories relating to self-care and lifestyle risk factors, and events were compared between the 2 periods.Results: The participants reported high acceptability for wearing the cameras, as most strongly agreed or agreed that they were comfortable to wear (28/30, 93%) and easy to use (30/30, 100%). The results of the camera image analysis showed that participants undertook fewer activities of daily living (P=.008) and were more sedentary (P=.02) prior to being hospitalized, compared to a period nonadjacent to hospitalization.Conclusions: Adults with HF were accepting of using a wearable camera for periods within a 30-day time frame. Wearable cameras were a feasible approach for providing data on selected self-care activities and lifestyle risk factors for HF and offer the potential to be a valuable tool for improving our understanding of self-care.

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  • 35.
    Ax, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Nordin, Karin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Short- and long-term effect of high versus low-to-moderate intensity exercise to optimise health-related quality of life after oncological treatment - results from the Phys-Can project2022In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 30, p. 5949-5963Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the effect of high intensity (HI) vs low-to-moderate intensity (LMI) exercise on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) up to 18 months after commencement of oncological treatment in patients with breast, colorectal or prostate cancer. In addition, we conducted a comparison with usual care (UC). Methods Patients scheduled for (neo)adjuvant oncological treatment (n = 577) were randomly assigned to 6 months of combined resistance and endurance training of HI or LMI. A longitudinal descriptive study (UC) included participants (n = 89) immediately before the RCT started. HRQoL was assessed by EORTC QLQ-C30 at baseline, 3, 6 and 18 months (1 year after completed exercise intervention) follow-up. Linear mixed models were used to study the groups over time. Results Directly after the intervention, HI scored significant (P = 0.02), but not clinically relevant, higher pain compared with LMI. No other significant difference in HRQoL was found between the exercise intensities over time. Clinically meaningful improvements in HRQoL over time were detected within both exercise intensities. We found favourable significant differences in HRQoL in both exercise intensities compared with UC over time. Conclusion This study adds to the strong evidence of positive effect of exercise and shows that exercise, regardless of intensity, can have beneficial effects on HRQoL during oncological treatment and also for a substantial time after completion of an exercise intervention. In this study, for one year after. Implications for cancer survivors Patients can be advised to exercise at either intensity level according to their personal preferences, and still benefit from both short-term and long-term improvements in HRQoL.

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  • 36.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Malardalens Univ, Sweden.
    Ödman, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    A Swedish cultural adaptation of the participation questionnaire Functional Scale of the Disability Evaluation System - Child version2022In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 1720-1727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim was to culturally validate a questionnaire about childrens/youths participation to be used in a Swedish context. Methods: FUNDES-Child, based on the well-established CASP, was chosen. Questions about engagement and hindering factors were added to the existing questions about frequency and independence in 20 activity areas. Using a qualitative, explorative design, 16 interviews with children/youths/caregivers were made to explore opinions about the questionnaire. Follow-up interviews confirmed the result of the revised questionnaire. Qualitative content analysis was performed. Results: The interviews provided support for the questionnaires relevance by being a tool to assess important aspects of participation, to gain insights into ones own/the childs participation, and to promote ideas about what causes the degree of participation. To achieve comprehensiveness, no activity area was found to be missing nor superfluous. However, some examples were needed to be modified where "parades" are unusual in Sweden and therefore removed, while "singing in choir" was added. In search for comprehensibility, opinions about the layout of the first version were raised and a varying degree of understanding of wording and concepts were found and thus taken into account. Conclusions: The questionnaire can be used for establishing meaningful goals and to potentially increase childrens participation.

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  • 37.
    Azios, Jamie H.
    et al.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Bellon-Harn, Monica
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Dockens, Ashley L.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Quality and readability of English-language internet information for aphasia2019In: International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, ISSN 1754-9507, E-ISSN 1754-9515, Vol. 21, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Little is known about the quality and readability of treatment information in specific neurogenic disorders, such as aphasia. The purpose of this study was to assess quality and readability of English-language Internet information available for aphasia treatment. Method: Forty-three aphasia treatment websites were aggregated using five different country-specific search engines. Websites were then analysed using quality and readability assessments. Statistical calculations were employed to examine website ratings, differences between website origin and quality and readability scores, and correlations between readability instruments. Result: Websites exhibited low quality with few websites obtaining Health On the Net (HON) certification or clear, thorough information as measured by the DISCERN. Regardless of website origin, readability scores were also poor. Approximate educational levels required to comprehend information on aphasia treatment websites ranged from 13 to 16 years of education. Significant differences were found between website origin and readability measures with higher levels of education required to understand information on websites of non-profit organisations. Conclusion: Current aphasia treatment websites were found to exhibit low levels of quality and readability, creating potential accessibility problems for people with aphasia and significant others. Websites including treatment information for aphasia must be improved in order to increase greater information accessibility.

  • 38.
    Ball, Martin J
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Granese, Angela
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette.
    Towards an evidence-base for /r/ therapy in English.2013In: Journal of Clinical Speech and Language Studies, ISSN 0791-5985, Vol. 20, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Ball, Martin J
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Müller, NicoleLinköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.Nelson, Ryan L.University of Louisiana at Lafayette, LA, USA.
    Handbook of qualitative research in communication disorders2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume provides a comprehensive and in-depth handbook of qualitative research in the field of communication disorders. It introduces and illustrates the wide range of qualitative paradigms that have been used in recent years to investigate various aspects of communication disorders.

    The first part of the Handbook introduces in some detail the concept of qualitative research and its application to communication disorders, and describes the main qualitative research approaches. The contributions are forward-looking rather than merely giving an overview of their topic. The second part illustrates these approaches through a series of case studies of different communication disorders using qualitative methods of research.

    This Handbook is an essential resource for senior undergraduate and graduate students, researchers and practitioners, in communication disorders and related fields.

  • 40.
    Ball, Martin J
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rutter, Ben
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Kroll, Tobias
    Texas Tech University, USA.
    Interactional phonetics: background and examples.2014In: Handbook of qualitative research in communication disorders / [ed] Martin J. Ball, Nicole Müller, and Ryan L. Nelson, New York: Psychology Press, 2014, p. 311-328Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Ballantyne, Kaye N.
    et al.
    Erasmus MC University, Netherlands Victoria Police Forens Serv Department, Australia .
    Ralf, Arwin
    Erasmus MC University, Netherlands .
    Aboukhalid, Rachid
    Mohammed V Agdal University, Morocco .
    Achakzai, Niaz M.
    University of Punjab, Pakistan .
    Anjos, Maria J.
    National Institute Legal Medical and Forens Science IP, Portugal .
    Ayub, Qasim
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, England .
    Balazic, Joze
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia .
    Ballantyne, Jack
    University of Central Florida, FL 32816 USA University of Central Florida, FL 32816 USA .
    J. Ballard, David
    Kings Coll London, England .
    Berger, Burkhard
    Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria .
    Bobillo, Cecilia
    University of Buenos Aires, Argentina Consejo Nacl Invest Cient and Tecn, Argentina .
    Bouabdellah, Mehdi
    Mohammed V Agdal University, Morocco .
    Burri, Helen
    University of Zurich, Switzerland .
    Capal, Tomas
    Institute Criminalist Prague, Czech Republic .
    Caratti, Stefano
    University of Turin, Italy .
    Cardenas, Jorge
    University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain .
    Cartault, Francois
    Site Centre Hospital Felix Guyon, Reunion .
    F. Carvalho, Elizeu
    University of Estado Rio De Janeiro, Brazil .
    Carvalho, Monica
    National Institute Legal Medical and Forens Science IP, Portugal .
    Cheng, Baowen
    Yunnan Prov Department Public Secur, Peoples R China .
    D. Coble, Michael
    NIST, MD 20899 USA .
    Comas, David
    University of Pompeu Fabra, Spain .
    Corach, Daniel
    University of Buenos Aires, Argentina Consejo Nacl Invest Cient and Tecn, Argentina .
    E. DAmato, Maria
    University of Western Cape, South Africa .
    Davison, Sean
    University of Western Cape, South Africa .
    de Knijff, Peter
    Leiden University, Netherlands .
    Corazon A. De Ungria, Maria
    University of Philippines, Philippines .
    Decorte, Ronny
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium .
    Dobosz, Tadeusz
    Wroclaw Medical University, Poland .
    M. Dupuy, Berit
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway .
    Elmrghni, Samir
    University of Benghazi, Libya .
    Gliwinski, Mateusz
    Medical University of Gdansk, Poland .
    C. Gomes, Sara
    University of Madeira, Portugal .
    Grol, Laurens
    Netherlands Forens Institute, Netherlands .
    Haas, Cordula
    University of Zurich, Switzerland .
    Hanson, Erin
    University of Central Florida, FL 32816 USA .
    Henke, Juergen
    Institute Blutgruppenforsch LGC GmbH, Germany .
    Henke, Lotte
    Institute Blutgruppenforsch LGC GmbH, Germany .
    Herrera-Rodriguez, Fabiola
    Poder Judicial, Costa Rica .
    R. Hill, Carolyn
    NIST, MD 20899 USA .
    Holmlund, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Honda, Katsuya
    University of Tsukuba, Japan .
    Immel, Uta-Dorothee
    University of Halle Wittenberg, Germany .
    Inokuchi, Shota
    National Research Institute Police Science, Japan .
    A. Jobling, Mark
    University of Leicester, England .
    Kaddura, Mahmoud
    University of Benghazi, Libya .
    S. Kim, Jong
    Supreme Prosecutors Off, South Korea .
    H. Kim, Soon
    National Forens Serv, South Korea .
    Kim, Wook
    Dankook University, South Korea .
    E. King, Turi
    University of Leicester, England .
    Klausriegler, Eva
    Salzburg University, Austria .
    Kling, Daniel
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway .
    Kovacevic, Lejla
    Institute Genet Engn and Biotechnol, Bosnia and Herceg .
    Kovatsi, Leda
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece .
    Krajewski, Pawel
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland .
    Kravchenko, Sergey
    NASU, Ukraine .
    H. D. Larmuseau, Maarten
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium .
    Young Lee, Eun
    Yonsei University, South Korea .
    Lessig, Ruediger
    University of Halle Wittenberg, Germany .
    A. Livshits, Ludmila
    NASU, Ukraine .
    Marjanovic, Damir
    Institute Genet Engn and Biotechnol, Bosnia and Herceg .
    Minarik, Marek
    Genomac Forens Institute, Czech Republic .
    Mizuno, Natsuko
    National Research Institute Police Science, Japan .
    Moreira, Helena
    University of Aveiro, Portugal .
    Morling, Niels
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Mukherjee, Meeta
    Govt India, India .
    Munier, Patrick
    Site Centre Hospital Felix Guyon, Reunion .
    Nagaraju, Javaregowda
    Centre DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnost, India .
    Neuhuber, Franz
    Salzburg University, Austria .
    Nie, Shengjie
    Kunming Medical University, Peoples R China .
    Nilasitsataporn, Premlaphat
    Royal Thai Police, Thailand .
    Nishi, Takeki
    University of Tsukuba, Japan .
    H. Oh, Hye
    Supreme Prosecutors Off, South Korea .
    Olofsson, Jill
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Onofri, Valerio
    University of Politecn Marche, Italy .
    U. Palo, Jukka
    University of Helsinki, Finland .
    Pamjav, Horolma
    Minist Public Adm and Justice, Hungary .
    Parson, Walther
    Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria Penn State University, PA 16802 USA .
    Petlach, Michal
    Genomac Forens Institute, Czech Republic .
    Phillips, Christopher
    University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain .
    Ploski, Rafal
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland .
    P. R. Prasad, Samayamantri
    Centre DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnost, India .
    Primorac, Dragan
    Penn State University, PA 16802 USA University of New Haven, CT USA University of Split, Croatia University of Osijek, Croatia .
    A. Purnomo, Gludhug
    Eijkman Institute Molecular Biol, Indonesia .
    Purps, Josephine
    Charite, Germany .
    Rangel-Villalobos, Hector
    University of Guadalajara CUCienega UdeG, Mexico .
    Rebala, Krzysztof
    Medical University of Gdansk, Poland .
    Rerkamnuaychoke, Budsaba
    Mahidol University, Thailand .
    Rey Gonzalez, Danel
    University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain .
    Robino, Carlo
    University of Turin, Italy .
    Roewer, Lutz
    Charite, Germany .
    Rosa, Alexandra
    University of Madeira, Portugal University of Madeira, Portugal .
    Sajantila, Antti
    University of Helsinki, Finland University of N Texas, TX USA .
    Sala, Andrea
    University of Buenos Aires, Argentina Consejo Nacl Invest Cient and Tecn, Argentina .
    M. Salvador, Jazelyn
    University of Philippines, Philippines .
    Sanz, Paula
    University of Pompeu Fabra, Spain .
    Schmitt, Cornelia
    University of Cologne, Germany .
    K. Sharma, Anil
    Govt India, India .
    A. Silva, Dayse
    University of Estado Rio De Janeiro, Brazil .
    Shin, Kyoung-Jin
    Yonsei University, South Korea .
    Sijen, Titia
    Netherlands Forens Institute, Netherlands .
    Sirker, Miriam
    University of Cologne, Germany .
    Sivakova, Daniela
    Comenius University, Slovakia .
    Skaro, Vedrana
    Genos Ltd, Croatia .
    Solano-Matamoros, Carlos
    University of Costa Rica, Costa Rica .
    Souto, Luis
    University of Aveiro, Portugal .
    Stenzl, Vlastimil
    Institute Criminalist Prague, Czech Republic .
    Sudoyo, Herawati
    Eijkman Institute Molecular Biol, Indonesia .
    Syndercombe-Court, Denise
    Kings Coll London, England .
    Tagliabracci, Adriano
    University of Politecn Marche, Italy .
    Taylor, Duncan
    Forens Science South Australia, Australia Flinders University of S Australia, Australia .
    Tillmar, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden .
    S. Tsybovsky, Iosif
    State Comm Forens Expertises, Byelarus .
    Tyler-Smith, Chris
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, England .
    J. van der Gaag, Kristiaan
    Leiden University, Netherlands .
    Vanek, Daniel
    Forens DNA Serv, Czech Republic Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    Volgyi, Antonia
    Minist Public Adm and Justice, Hungary .
    Ward, Denise
    Forens Science South Australia, Australia .
    Willemse, Patricia
    Leiden University, Netherlands .
    P. H. Yap, Eric
    DSO National Labs, Singapore .
    Y. Y. Yong, Rita
    DSO National Labs, Singapore .
    Zupanic Pajnic, Irena
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia .
    Kayser, Manfred
    Erasmus MC University, Netherlands .
    Toward Male Individualization with Rapidly Mutating Y-Chromosomal Short Tandem Repeats2014In: Human Mutation, ISSN 1059-7794, E-ISSN 1098-1004, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 1021-1032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relevant for various areas of human genetics, Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) are commonly used for testing close paternal relationships among individuals and populations, and for male lineage identification. However, even the widely used 17-loci Yfiler set cannot resolve individuals and populations completely. Here, 52 centers generated quality-controlled data of 13 rapidly mutating (RM) Y-STRs in 14,644 related and unrelated males from 111 worldwide populations. Strikingly, greater than99% of the 12,272 unrelated males were completely individualized. Haplotype diversity was extremely high (global: 0.9999985, regional: 0.99836-0.9999988). Haplotype sharing between populations was almost absent except for six (0.05%) of the 12,156 haplotypes. Haplotype sharing within populations was generally rare (0.8% nonunique haplotypes), significantly lower in urban (0.9%) than rural (2.1%) and highest in endogamous groups (14.3%). Analysis of molecular variance revealed 99.98% of variation within populations, 0.018% among populations within groups, and 0.002% among groups. Of the 2,372 newly and 156 previously typed male relative pairs, 29% were differentiated including 27% of the 2,378 father-son pairs. Relative to Yfiler, haplotype diversity was increased in 86% of the populations tested and overall male relative differentiation was raised by 23.5%. Our study demonstrates the value of RMY-STRs in identifying and separating unrelated and related males and provides a reference database.

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  • 42.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Efthymiou, Areti
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Poli, Arianna
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Andréasson, Frida
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sweden.
    Salzmann, Benjamin
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA).
    Döhner, Hanneli
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Goodwin, Frank
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    A multilingual web platform supporting informal carers in 27 EU member states2015In: Broader, bigger, better: AAL solutions for Europe. Proceedings of the 6th AAL Forum 2014 / [ed] Adrian Curaj & Ioana Trif, Bucharest: UEFISCDI , 2015, p. 169-172Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Informal care is a hot topic in research and policy agendas at European and national level, since it greatly contributes to the sustainability and efficiency of national health care systems. A specific intervention – part of the wider INNOVAGE project funded by FP7 – was planned for developing and testing a new multilingual web platform for informal carers of dependent older people in the EU-27. Preliminary results of the pilot study, conducted in Italy, Germany and Sweden will be discussed. The final platform will be accessible in all official languages of the EU-27 and publicly available in spring 2015.

  • 43.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Andréasson, Frida
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sweden.
    Papa, Roberta
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Poli, Arianna
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Salzmann, Benjamin
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Efthymiou, Areti
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    How web-based services can support family carers of older people: New ways to promote social inclusion and quality of life2015In: Irish Ageing Studies Review, ISSN 1649-9972, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 87-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Family carers can be negatively influenced by their situation, in terms of stress, social isolation, economic constraints and other difficulties. Web-based services addressing carers’ needs represent an efficient support. The goal of the INNOVAGE work package 3(WP3) study was to develop and test a new multilingual web platform for supporting family carers of older people, to be implemented in 27 European countries.

    Methods: A review of good practices and a consultation with stakeholders were conducted for identifying most appropriate types of services to be developed and tested. The prototype of web platform included information resources and interactive services for both peer and professional support. A convenient, overall sample of around 130 family carers was enrolled in three countries (Italy, Germany and Sweden) and could access services for 12-17 weeks. Data were collected through questionnaires and focus groups concerning impact onquality of life, social support, self-perception of carer’s role, as well as usability, usefulness and appropriateness of services.

    Results: Active users were generally satisfied with support (information, advice, counselling) provided by moderators (social workers or psychologists) and peers. Usability and appropriateness were confirmed, although some refinements were suggested and users with low digital skills often needed technical support. A portion of the sample remained inactive even if stimulation strategies were adopted.

    Conclusions: The pilot study confirmed the INNOVAGE Eurocarers web platform is a useful tool for family carers. Some challenges still exist for implementation in relation to digital skills required and users’ preferences on services at country level.

  • 44.
    Barimani, Mia
    et al.
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Att leda föräldragrupper på mödrahälsovården ur ett föräldrastödsperspektiv2022In: Reproduktiv hälsa: barnmorskans kompetensområde / [ed] Helena Lindgren, Kyllike Christensson, Anna-Karin Dykes, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, 2, p. 424-434Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Barr, Gordon A
    et al.
    Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA / Department of Developmental Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York, USA.
    Moriceau, Stephanie
    Department of Zoology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA / Emotional Brain Institute, Nathan Kline Institute, Orangeburg, New York, USA / Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York, USA.
    Shionoya, Kiseko
    Department of Zoology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA.
    Muzny, Kyle
    Department of Zoology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA.
    Gao, Puhong
    Department of Developmental Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York, USA.
    Wang, Shaoning
    Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA / Department of Developmental Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York, USA.
    Sullivan, Regina M
    Department of Zoology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA / Emotional Brain Institute, Nathan Kline Institute, Orangeburg, New York, USA / Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York, USA.
    Transitions in infant learning are modulated by dopamine in the amygdala2009In: Nature Neuroscience, ISSN 1097-6256, E-ISSN 1546-1726, Nature Neuroscience, Vol. 12, p. 1367-1369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Behavioral transitions characterize development. Young infant rats paradoxically prefer odors that are paired with shock, but older pups learn aversions. This transition is amygdala and corticosterone dependent. Using microarrays and microdialysis, we found downregulated dopaminergic presynaptic function in the amygdala with preference learning. Corticosterone-injected 8-d-old pups and untreated 12-d-old pups learned aversions and had dopaminergic upregulation in the amygdala. Dopamine injection into the amygdala changed preferences to aversions, whereas dopamine antagonism reinstated preference learning.

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    Transitions in infant learning are modulated by dopamine in the amygdala
  • 46.
    Barton, Jason J. S.
    et al.
    University of British Columbia, Canada University of British Columbia, Canada University of British Columbia, Canada .
    Hanif, Hashim M.
    University of British Columbia, Canada University of British Columbia, Canada University of British Columbia, Canada .
    Eklinder Bjornstrom, Laura
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hills, Charlotte
    University of British Columbia, Canada University of British Columbia, Canada University of British Columbia, Canada .
    The word-length effect in reading: A review2014In: Cognitive Neuropsychology, ISSN 0264-3294, E-ISSN 1464-0627, Vol. 31, no 5-6, p. 378-412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The finding that visual processing of a word correlates with the number of its letters has an extensive history. In healthy subjects, a variety of methods, including perceptual thresholds, naming and lexical decision times, and ocular motor parameters, show modest effects that interact with high-order effects like frequency. Whether this indicates serial processing of letters under some conditions or indexes low-level visual factors related to word length is unclear. Word-length effects are larger in pure alexia, where they probably reflect a serial letter-by-letter strategy, due to failure of lexical whole-word processing and variable dysfunction in letter encoding. In pure alexia, the word-length effect is systematically related to mean naming latency, with the word-length effect becoming proportionally greater as naming latency becomes more delayed in severe cases. Other conditions may also generate enhanced word-length effects. This occurs in right hemianopia: Computer simulations suggest a criterion of 160 ms/letter to distinguish hemianopic dyslexia from pure alexia. Normal reading development is accompanied by a decrease in word-length effects, whereas persistently elevated word-length effects are characteristic of developmental dyslexia. Little is known about word-length effects in other reading disorders. We conclude that the word-length effect captures the efficiency of the perceptual reading process in development, normal reading, and a number of reading disorders, even if its mechanistic implications are not always clear.

  • 47.
    Beck, Olof
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ullah, Shahid
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kronstrand, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    First evaluation of the possibility of testing for drugged driving using exhaled breath sampling2019In: Traffic Injury Prevention, ISSN 1538-9588, E-ISSN 1538-957X, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 238-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Driving under the influence of psychoactive drugs causes an increased risk for accidents. In combating this, sobriety tests at the roadside are common practice in most countries. Sampling of blood and urine for forensic investigation cannot be done at the roadside and poses practical problems associated with costs and time. An alternative specimen for roadside testing is therefore warranted and the aerosol particles in exhaled breath are one such alternative.Methods: The present study investigated how the exhaled breath sample compared with the routine legal investigations of blood and urine collected from suspects of drugged driving at 2 locations in Sweden. Exhaled breath was collected using a simple filter collection device and analyzed with state-of-the-art mass spectrometry technique.Results: The total number of cases used for this investigation was 67. In 54 of these cases (81%) the results regarding a positive or negative drug test result agreed and in 13 they disagreed. Out of these, the report from the forensic investigation of blood/urine was negative in 21 cases. In 6 of these, analytical findings were made in exhaled breath and these cases were dominated by the detection of amphetamine. In 7 cases a positive drug test from the forensic investigation was not observed in the breath sample and these cases were dominated by detection of tetrahydrocannabinol in blood. In total, 45 samples were positive with breath testing and the number of positives with established forensic methods was 46.Conclusion: The promising results from this study provide support to exhaled breath as a viable specimen for testing of drugged driving. The rapid, easy, and convenient sampling procedure offers the possibility to collect a drug test specimen at the roadside. The analytical investigation must be done in a laboratory at present because of the need for a highly sensitive instrument, which is already in use in forensic laboratories. The analytical work is not more challenging than for blood or oral fluid and should not cause an increase in cost. However, more studies need to be done before exhaled breath drug testing can be applied routinely for drugged driving investigation.

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  • 48.
    Beckman, Elsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jönsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gesters påverkan på talflytet2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Oflyt i tal är något som förekommer hos alla talande människor och likadant är det med gester. Det är dock inte självklart hur de är relaterar till varandra. Det finns få studier inom området och ännu färre med svensktalande försökspersoner. Denna studies syfte är att se hur gester påverkar talflytet hos personer med svenska som modersmål och om det finns någon skillnad rörande detta mellan olika kontexter.

    Studien genomfördes med åtta försökspersoner i åldrarna 20–30 år som har svenska som modersmål. Alla försökspersoner fick individuellt svara på fyra frågor varav två med spatialt innehåll och två med abstrakt innehåll. Under första halvan av testningen fick försökspersonerna använda gester och resterande tid fick de sitta på sina händer för att inte kunna använda gester.

    Resultatet visade att ikoniska gester användes oftare vid spatialt innehåll och metaforiska gester användes mer frekvent vid abstrakt innehåll, vilket var en signifikant skillnad. Ytterligare en signifikant skillnad noterades mellan spatialt och abstrakt innehåll vid mätning av tallängd. Detta oberoende av fri respektive begränsad användning av gester.

    De få studier som gjorts på området ger ingen tydlig bild av hur tal och gester är relaterade till varandra. Denna studie understryker komplexiteten inom området tal och gester.

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  • 49.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ulfsdotter Gunnarsson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    McCambridge, Jim
    Univ York, England.
    Effects of a waiting list control design on alcohol consumption among online help-seekers: protocol for a randomised controlled trial2021In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 11, no 8, article id e049810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Sparse attention has been given to the design of control conditions in trials, despite their important role as contrasts for novel treatments, and thus as a key determinant of effect sizes. This undermines valid inferences on effect estimates in trials, which are fundamentally comparative in nature. Such challenges to understanding also makes generalisation of effect estimates complex, for example, it may not be clear to what degree real-world alternatives to the novel treatments in pragmatic trials are similar to the control conditions studied. The present study aims to estimate the effects of being allocated to a waiting list control condition. Methods and analysis Individuals searching online for help to reduce their drinking will be invited to take part in a study. Individuals aged 18 years or older, who in the past month consumed six or more drinks on one occasion, or consumed 10 or more drinks the past week, will be eligible to participate. Both groups will receive identical feedback and advice on behaviour change; however, one group will be informed that they have to wait 1 month for the intervention materials. One month postrandomisation, participants will receive an email with the follow-up questionnaire measuring the primary outcomes: (1) frequency of heavy episodic drinking (defined as at study entry) in the past month; and (2) overall past week alcohol consumption. Differences between groups will be analysed using negative binomial regression models estimated using Bayesian inference. Recruitment will begin in October 2021. A Bayesian group sequential design will be employed to determine when to end enrolment (expected to be between 500 and 1500 individuals). Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Swedish Ethical Review Authority on 2021-01-25 (Dnr 2020-06267). Findings will be disseminated in open access peer-reviewed journals no later than 2023.

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  • 50.
    Benschop, Corina C G
    et al.
    Division of Biological Traces, Netherlands Forensic Institute.
    Connolly, Edward
    Forensic Science Ireland.
    Ansell, Ricky
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Forensic Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kokshoorn, Bas
    Division of Biological Traces, Netherlands Forensic Institute.
    Results of an inter and intra laboratory exercise on the assessment of complex autosomal DNA profiles.2017In: Science & justice, ISSN 1355-0306, E-ISSN 1876-4452, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interpretation of complex DNA profiles may differ between laboratories and reporting officers, which can lead to discrepancies in the final reports. In this study, we assessed the intra and inter laboratory variation in DNA mixture interpretation for three European ISO17025-accredited laboratories. To this aim, 26 reporting officers analyzed five sets of DNA profiles. Three main aspects were considered: 1) whether the mixed DNA profiles met the criteria for comparison to a reference profile, 2) the actual result of the comparison between references and DNA profiling data and 3) whether the weight of the DNA evidence could be assessed. Similarity in answers depended mostly on the complexity of the tasks. This study showed less variation within laboratories than between laboratories which could be the result of differences between internal laboratory guidelines and methods and tools available. Results show the profile types for which the three laboratories report differently, which informs indirectly on the complexity threshold the laboratories employ. Largest differences between laboratories were caused by the methods available to assess the weight of the DNA evidence. This exercise aids in training forensic scientists, refining laboratory guidelines and explaining differences between laboratories in court. Undertaking more collaborative exercises in future may stimulate dialog and consensus regarding interpretation. For training purposes, DNA profiles of the mixed stains and questioned references are made available.

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