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  • 1.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The housing situation of older people – Issues of investigations2017In: Book of abstracts, 2017, p. 51-51Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The housing situation of older people has been on the Swedish political agenda for some time. An increasing ageing population implies a demand for housing in correspodence to their needs. Assisted living facilities decreased with 30 000 places between 2002 and 2016, as a result, the majority of older people age in a dwelling in the ordinary housing market. In 2008 and 2015 respectively two government investigations on older people’s housing were presented. The investigations focused on the need for housing to bridge the gap between ordinary housing and assisted living facilities and issues of affordability and social community but also the lack of accessible housing in particular geographic areas. This paper aims to investigate the origins of the two investigations and relate them to changes in the housing market affecting older people, arguing that the strong emphasis on ageing in place has shifted the responsibility of having a good place to live from general welfare to older individuals themselves.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Eva K.
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Patterns of changing residential preferences during late adulthood2019In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 1752-1781, article id PII S0144686X18000259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier research on residential mobility has demonstrated a tendency for the young old of the 55+ population to prefer peripheral locations, whereas older age groups choose central locations. Here, we present survey results indicating that such late-adulthood differences in preferences are supported by age-related shifts corresponding to differences in housing preferences expressed by individuals in peripheral as well as central locations in Sweden. A sample of 2,400 individuals aged 55 years and over was asked to select the seven most important characteristics of a dwelling from a list of 21 alternatives (Survey of Housing Intentions among the ELDerly in Sweden (SHIELD), 2013). The preferences expressed were used as dependent variables in logistic regressions to determine to what extent the housing preferences of older people are linked to age, gender, socio-economic status and type of geographical area. The results demonstrated a close link between neighbourhood characteristics and housing preferences. Owning the dwelling, having a garden and access to nature were stressed as important by individuals living in non-metropolitan middle-class areas and in suburban elite areas. The youngest cohort expressed similar preferences. Older age groups instead stressed the importance of an elevator, single-storey housing and a good design for independent living; preferences that have similarities to those expressed by individuals living in large cities and smaller urban centres where such housing is more readily available.

  • 3.
    Antelius, Eleonor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kiwi, Mahin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Frankly, None of Us Know What Dementia Is: Dementia Caregiving Among Iranian Immigrants Living in Sweden2015In: Care Management Journals, ISSN 1521-0987, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 79-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In quite a short amount of time, Sweden has gone from being a relatively homogeneous society to a multicultural one, with a rapid expansion of immigrants having culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds growing old in Sweden. This is particularly interesting in relation to studying age-related dementia diseases. Research shows that not only do CALD persons with dementia diseases tend to mix languages, have difficulties with separation of languages, or revert to speaking only their native tongue as the disease progresses, but they also show tendencies to experience that they live in the cultural environment in which they were brought up, rather than in the current Swedish one. In this article, we explore findings in relation to one such CALD group in Sweden, Iranians. The article is empirically driven and based on data gathered in 2 separate settings with specific ethnocultural profiles, offering dementia care with Middle Eastern, Arab, and/or Persian profile. Observations were carried out in combination with semistructured in-depth interviews (n = 66). By using a combination of content and ethnographic analysis, 4 main findings related to ethnocultural dementia care were elucidated. These include (a) a wider recognition of people from different CALD backgrounds possibly having different perceptions of what dementia is, (b) a possibility that such ascribed meaning of dementia has a bearing on health maintenance and health-seeking behavior as well as the inclination to use formal services or not, (c) choosing to use formal service in the forms of ethnoculturally profiled dementia care facility seems to relate to being able to “live up to ideals of Iranian culture,” and (d) “culture,” however ambiguous and hotly debated a concept it is, appears to be a relevant aspect of people's lives, an aspect that is both acquired as well as ascribed to oneself and to others. As such, we argue that culture needs to be further addressed in relation to dementia care in multicultural societies because ascribing culture boxes people in as well as out. In addition, ethnocultural contextualization of dementia care needs to be understood in relation to this because it affects the care provided.

  • 4.
    Bjalkebring, Par
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Västfjäll, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Oregon, OR 97403 USA.
    Dickert, Stephan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Vienna University of Econ and Business, Austria.
    Slovic, Paul
    University of Oregon, OR 97403 USA.
    Greater Emotional Gain from Giving in Older Adults: Age-Related Positivity Bias in Charitable Giving2016In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older adults have been shown to avoid negative and prefer positive information to a higher extent than younger adults. This positivity bias influences their information processing as well as decision-making. We investigate age-related positivity bias in charitable giving in two studies. In Study 1 we examine motivational factors in monetary donations, while Study 2 focuses on the emotional effect of actual monetary donations. In Study 1, participants (n = 353, age range 20-74 years) were asked to rate their affect toward a person in need and then state how much money they would be willing to donate to help this person. In Study 2, participants (n = 108, age range 19-89) were asked to rate their affect toward a donation made a few days prior. Regression analysis was used to investigate whether or not the positivity bias influences the relationship between affect and donations. In Study 1, we found that older adults felt more sympathy and compassion and were less motivated by negative affect when compared to younger adults, who were motivated by both negative and positive affect. In Study 2, we found that the level of positive emotional reactions from monetary donations was higher in older participants compared to younger participants. We find support for an age-related positivity bias in charitable giving. This is true for motivation to make a future donation, as well as affective thinking about a previous donation. We conclude that older adults draw more positive affect from both the planning and outcome of monetary donations and hence benefit more from engaging in monetary charity than their younger counterparts.

  • 5.
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andreassen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öhman, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Using an interactive digital calendar with mobile phone reminders by senior people - a focus group study2019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundNew technologies such as mobile/smartphones have the potential to help senior people perform everyday activities. However, senior people may find it difficult using mobile/smartphones, especially the digital calendar and short text message features. Therefore, senior people might need user-friendly, flexible, and interactive digital calendars that provide them with active reminders about their everyday activities. This study focuses on community dwelling seniors experiences learning and using RemindMe, an interactive digital calendar with active reminders, as part of customizing an intervention appropriate for senior people with cognitive impairments.MethodsFour focus groups were conducted with 20 community dwelling seniors (11 men and 9 women) who all had used RemindMe for six weeks. The focus groups were tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using content analysis.ResultsFor participants in this study, using a calendar was an essential part of their everyday lives, but only a few had experiences using a digital calendar. Although the participants described RemindMe as easy to use, they had a difficult time incorporating RemindMe into their daily routines. In part, these difficulties were the result of the participants needing to change their mobile/smartphone routines. Some participants felt that using an interactive digital calendar was a sign of modernity allowing them to take part in the society at large, but others felt that their inability to use the technology was due to their age, dependence, and loss of function. Participants found that receiving active reminders through short text messages followed by actively acknowledging the reminder helped them perform more everyday life activities. This feature gave them a higher sense of independence and control.ConclusionsCommunity dwelling seniors found that RemindMe was easy to learn and to use, although they also found it challenging to integrate into their everyday lives. For senior people to make the effort to develop new routines for mobile/smartphone use, a prerequisite for using a digital calendar, they need to be motivated and believe that the technology will make their lives better.

  • 6.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Fallman, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Relations between Concurrent Longitudinal Changes in Cognition, Depressive Symptoms, Self-Rated Health and Everyday Function in Normally Aging Octogenarians2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 8, p. e0160742-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ability to predict and prevent incipient functional decline in older adults may help prolong independence. Cognition is related to everyday function and easily administered, sensitive cognitive tests may help identify at-risk individuals. Factors like depressive symptoms and self-rated health are also associated with functional ability and may be as important as cognition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between concurrent longitudinal changes in cognition, depression, self-rated health and everyday function in a well-defined cohort of healthy 85 year olds that were followed-up at the age of 90 in the Elderly in Linkoping Screening Assessment 85 study. Regression analyses were used to determine if cognitive decline as assessed by global (the Mini-Mental State Examination) and domain specific (the Cognitive Assessment Battery, CAB) cognitive tests predicted functional decline in the context of changes in depressive symptoms and self-rated health. Results showed deterioration in most variables and as many as 83% of these community-dwelling elders experienced functional difficulties at the age of 90. Slowing-down of processing speed as assessed by the Symbol Digits Modality Test (included in the CAB) accounted for 14% of the variance in functional decline. Worsening self-rated health accounted for an additional 6%, but no other variables reached significance. These results are discussed with an eye to possible preventive interventions that may prolong independence for the steadily growing number of normally aging old-old citizens.

  • 7.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Andersson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Long-term predictors of loneliness in old age: results of a 20-year national study2018In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 190-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The understanding of social phenomena is enhanced if individuals can be studied over longer periods. Regarding loneliness in old age, there is a general lack of longitudinal research. The aim of this study was to examine whether there is an association between loneliness in old age and social engagement 20 years earlier, as stated by life course theory and the convoy model.

    METHOD: Data from the nationally representative Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (2002 and 2011 data collection waves) and the Swedish Level of Living Survey (1981 and 1991 data collection waves) were used. The sample included 823 individuals with an average age of 62.2 years at baseline and 82.4 years at follow-up.

    RESULTS: Each form of social engagement in old age was significantly associated with the same form of social engagement 20 years earlier. Close forms of social engagement were associated with loneliness in old age; as were more distant forms of social engagement, but only when they were considered solely in old age.

    CONCLUSION: Patterns of social engagement in old age were established at least 20 years earlier and close forms of social engagement are long-term predictors of loneliness, although current social engagement tended to be more influential on loneliness. The study underlines the importance of interventions targeted at close relationships that can provide social support in old age.

  • 8.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Kathleen, Pichora-Fuller
    University of Toronto, Department of Psychology.
    Dupuis, Kate
    Baycrest Health Sciences, Rotman Research Institute.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Modeling the effect of early ageing and hearing loss on cognition and participation in social leisure activities2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are well-known age-related declines in hearing, cognition and social participation. Furthermore, previous studies have shown that hearing loss is associated with both cognitive decline and increased risk for social isolation and that engagement in social leisure activities is related to cognitive decline. However, it is unclear how the three concepts and age relate to each other. In the current study, behavioral measures of hearing and memory were examined in relation to self-reported participation in social leisure activities. Data from two different samples were analyzed with structural equation modeling. The first consisted of 297 adults from Umeå, Sweden, who participated in the Betula longitudinal study. The second consisted of 273 older adults who volunteered for lab-based research on aging in Toronto, Canada. Structural equation modeling yielded two models with similar statistical properties for both samples. The first model suggests that age contributes to both hearing and memory performance, hearing contributes to memory performance, and memory (but not hearing) contributes to participation in social leisure activities. The second model also suggests that age contributes to hearing and memory performance and that hearing contributes to memory performance, but that age also contributes to participation in social leisure activities, which in turn contributes to memory performance. The models were confirmed in both samples, indicating robustness in the findings, especially since the samples differed on background variables such as years of education and marital status. Few participants in both samples were candidates for hearing aids, but most of those who were candidates used them. This suggests that even early stages of hearing loss can increase demands on cognitive processing that may deter participation in social leisure activities.

  • 9.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
    University of Toronto, Department of Psychology .
    Dupuis, Kate
    Baycrest Health Sciences, Rotman Research Institute.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Modeling the effect of early age-related hearing loss on cognition and participation in social leisure activities2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are well-known age-related declines in hearing, cognition and social participation. Furthermore, previous studies have shown that hearing loss is associated with both cognitive decline and increased risk for social isolation and that engagement in social leisure activities is related to cognitive decline. However, it is unclear how the three concepts and age relate to each other. In the current study, behavioral measures of hearing and memory were examined in relation to self-reported participation in social leisure activities. Data from two different samples were analyzed with structural equation modeling. The first consisted of 297 adults from Umeå, Sweden, who participated in the Betula longitudinal study. The second consisted of 273 older adults who volunteered for lab-based research on aging in Toronto, Canada. Structural equation modeling yielded two models with similar statistical properties for both samples. The first model suggests that age contributes to both hearing and memory performance, hearing contributes to memory performance, and memory (but not hearing) contributes to participation in social leisure activities. The second model also suggests that age contributes to hearing and memory performance and that hearing contributes to memory performance, but that age also contributes to participation in social leisure activities, which in turn contributes to memory performance. The models were confirmed in both samples, indicating robustness in the findings, especially since the samples differed on background variables such as years of education and marital status. Few participants in both samples were candidates for hearing aids, but most of those who were candidates used them. This suggests that even early stages of hearing loss can increase demands on cognitive processing that may deter participation in social leisure activities.

  • 10.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Association of insomnia severity with well-being, quality of life and health care costs: A cross-sectional study in older adults with chronic pain (PainS65+)2018In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 414-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundInsomnia is one of the most common complaints in chronic pain. This study aimed to evaluate the association of insomnia with well-being, quality of life and health care costs. MethodsThe sample included 2790 older individuals (median age=76; interquartile range [IQR]=70-82) with chronic pain. The participants completed a postal survey assessing basic demographic data, pain intensity and frequency, height, weight, comorbidities, general well-being, quality of life and the insomnia severity index (ISI). Data on health care costs were calculated as costs per year (Euro prices) and measured in terms of outpatient and inpatient care, pain drugs, total drugs and total health care costs. ResultsThe overall fraction of clinical insomnia was 24.6% (moderate clinical insomnia: 21.9% [95% CI: 18.8-23.3]; severe clinical insomnia: 2.7% [95% CI: 1.6-3.2]). Persons who reported clinical insomnia were more likely to experience pain more frequently with higher pain intensity compared to those reported no clinically significant insomnia. Mean total health care costs were Euro 8469 (95% CI: Euro4029-Euro14,271) for persons with severe insomnia compared with Euro 4345 (95% CI: Euro4033-Euro4694) for persons with no clinically significant insomnia. An association between severe insomnia, well-being, quality of life, outpatient care, total drugs costs and total health care costs remained after controlling for age, sex, pain intensity, frequency, body mass index and comorbidities using linear regression models. ConclusionsOur results determine an independent association of insomnia with low health-related quality of life and increased health care costs in older adults with chronic pain. SignificanceThe concurrence and the severity of insomnia among older adults with chronic pain were associated with decreased well-being and quality of life, and increased health care costs to society.

  • 11.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Symptom burden among people with chronic disease2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Chronic diseases tend to increase with old age. Older people with chronic disease are commonly suffering from conditions which produce a multiplicity of symptoms and a decreased health-related quality of life. Nurses have a responsibility to prevent, ease or delay a negative outcome through symptom management, or assist in achieving an acceptable level of symptom relief.

    Aim: The overall aim of the thesis was to describe different aspects of symptom burden from the perspective of community-dwelling people with chronic disease.

    Methods: This thesis is based upon four papers that used both quantitative and qualitative data to describe different aspects of symptom burden, experienced by people with chronic diseases. Paper (I) is a cross-sectional study with 91 participants diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Papers (II and IV) are based upon secondary outcome data from a randomized controlled trial with 382 community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity. Paper (II) is a cross-sectional study and Paper (IV) has a descriptive and an explorative design reporting on the trajectory of symptom prevalence and symptom burden. Paper (III) is a qualitative study with participants from the AGe-FIT.

    Results: Among people diagnosed with COPD the most prevalent symptoms with the highest symptom burden scores were shortness of breath, dry mouth, cough, sleep problems, and lack of energy, with just a few differences between participants with moderate and severe airflow limitation (I). For older people with multimorbidity, pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence and burden. Other highly prevalent symptoms were lack of energy and a dry mouth. Poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diagnoses of the digestive system were independently related to the total symptom burden score (II). The symptoms experienced by the older people were persistent and the symptom burden remained high over time (IV). The experience of living with a high symptom burden was described as an endless struggle. The analysis revealed an overall theme, “To adjust and endure” and three sub-themes, “to feel inadequate and limited”, “to feel dependent”, and “to feel dejected” (III).

    Conclusions: The results of this thesis indicate the importance of early symptom identification. People with chronic diseases have an unmet need for optimized treatment that focuses on the total symptom burden, and not only disease specific symptoms. A large proportion of older people with multimorbidity suffer a high and persistent symptom burden, and the prevalence and trajectory of pain are high. Older people sometimes think their high age is the reason they experience a diversity of symptoms, and they do not always communicate these to their health-care provider.

    List of papers
    1. Symptom burden in stable COPD patients with moderate or severe airflow limitation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptom burden in stable COPD patients with moderate or severe airflow limitation
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 351-357Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    To describe a multidimensional symptom profile in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and determine whether symptom experience differed between patients with moderate or severe airflow limitations.

    BACKGROUND:

    Patients with severe airflow limitation experience numerous symptoms, but little is known regarding patients with moderate airflow limitation.

    METHODS:

    A multidimensional symptom profile (Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale) was assessed in 42 outpatients with moderate and 49 with severe airflow limitations.

    RESULTS:

    The mean number of symptoms in the total sample was 7.9 (±4.3) with no difference between patients with moderate and severe airflow limitations. The most prevalent symptoms with the highest MSAS symptom burden scores were shortness of breath, dry mouth, cough, sleep problems, and lack of energy in both groups.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Patients with moderate or severe airflow limitations experience multiple symptoms with high severity and distress. An assessment of their multidimensional symptom profile might contribute to better symptom management.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; Symptom assessment; Symptom experience; Respiratory nursing
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109384 (URN)10.1016/j.hrtlng.2014.04.004 (DOI)000338972500022 ()24856227 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-08-15 Created: 2014-08-15 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study
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    2015 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, the population is ageing and lives with several chronic diseases for decades. A high symptom burden is associated with a high use of healthcare, admissions to nursing homes, and reduced quality of life. The aims of this study were to describe the multidimensional symptom profile and symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity, and to describe factors related to symptom burden. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 378 community-dwelling people greater than= 75 years, who had been hospitalized greater than= 3 times during the previous year, had greater than= 3 diagnoses in their medical records. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale was used to assess the prevalence, frequency, severity, distress and symptom burden of 31 symptoms. A multiple linear regression was performed to identify factors related to total symptom burden. Results: The mean number of symptoms per participant was 8.5 (4.6), and the mean total symptom burden score was 0.62 (0.41). Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence, frequency, severity and distress. Half of the study group reported the prevalence of lack of energy and a dry mouth. Poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diagnoses of the digestive system were independently related to the total symptom burden score. Conclusion: The older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity in this study suffered from a high symptom burden with a high prevalence of pain. Persons with poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diseases of the digestive system are at risk of a higher total symptom burden and might need age-specific standardized guidelines for appropriate management.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2015
    Keywords
    Chronic disease; Older people; Symptom assessment
    National Category
    Sociology Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114010 (URN)10.1186/1471-2318-15-1 (DOI)000347569800001 ()25559550 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Faculty of Health sciences, Linkoping University; county council of Ostergotland; Signe and Olof Wallenius trust fund; Solstickan; Swedish Association of Geriatric Medicine; Mundipharma

    Available from: 2015-02-06 Created: 2015-02-05 Last updated: 2019-06-27
    3. To adjust and endure: a qualitative study of symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>To adjust and endure: a qualitative study of symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 322-327Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Context Older people with multimorbidity are vulnerable and often suffer from conditions that produce a multiplicity of symptoms and a reduced health-related quality of life. Objectives The aim of this study is to explore the experience of living with a high symptom burden from the perspective of older community-dwelling people with multi-morbidity.

    Method A qualitative descriptive design with semi-structured interviews, including 20 community-dwelling older people with multi-morbidity and a high symptom burden. The participants were 79-€“89 years old with a mean of 12 symptoms per person. Data were analyzed using content analyses.

    Results The experience of living with a high symptom burden revealed the overall theme, “To adjust and endure” and three sub-themes. The first sub-theme was "To feel inadequate and limited". Participants reported that they no longer had the capacity or the ability to manage, and they felt limited and isolated from friends or family. The second sub-theme was "To feel dependent". This was a new and inconvenient experience; the burden they put on others caused a feeling of guilt. The final sub-theme was "To feel dejected". The strength to manage and control their conditions was gone; the only thing left to do was to sit or lie down and wait for it all to pass.

    Conclusion This study highlights the importance of a holistic approach when taking care of older people with multi-morbidity. This approach should employ a broad symptom assessment to reveal diseases and conditions that are possible to treat or improve.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2015
    Keywords
    Multimorbidity, Older people, Symptom burden, Content analysis
    National Category
    Nursing Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122740 (URN)10.1016/j.apnr.2015.03.008 (DOI)000366148700012 ()
    Available from: 2015-11-19 Created: 2015-11-19 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
    4. Symptom trajectory and symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity, secondary outcome from the RCT AGe-FIT study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptom trajectory and symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity, secondary outcome from the RCT AGe-FIT study
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 2773-2783Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to follow the symptom trajectory of community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity and to explore the effect on symptom burden from an ambulatory geriatric care unit, based on comprehensive geriatric assessment.

    Background

    Older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity suffer from a high symptom burden with a wide range of co-occurring symptoms often resulting to decreased health-related quality of life. There is a need to move from a single-disease model and address the complexity of older people living with multimorbidity.

    Design

    Secondary outcome data from the randomized controlled Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT).

    Methods

    Symptom trajectory of 31 symptoms was assessed with the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. Data from 247 participants were assessments at baseline, 12 and 24 months, 2011–2013. Participants in the intervention group received care from an ambulatory geriatric care unit based on comprehensive geriatric assessment in addition to usual care.

    Results

    Symptom prevalence and symptom burden were high and stayed high over time. Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence and burden. Over the 2-year period 68–81% of the participants reported pain. Other highly prevalent and persistent symptoms were dry mouth, lack of energy and numbness/tingling in the hands/feet, affecting 38–59% of participants. No differences were found between the intervention and control group regarding prevalence, burden or trajectory of symptoms.

    Conclusions

    Older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity had a persistent high burden of symptoms. Receiving advanced interdisciplinary care at an ambulatory geriatric unit did not significantly reduce the prevalence or the burden of symptoms.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2016
    Keywords
    Registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446757 Keywords Symptom management, Community Care, Older people, Quality of care
    National Category
    Nursing Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122741 (URN)10.1111/jan.13032 (DOI)000386079500019 ()27222059 (PubMedID)
    Note

    At the time for thesis presentation publication was in status: Manuscript

    At the time for thesis presentation publication was named: Symptom trajectory and symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity, data from the RCT AGe-FIT study

    Available from: 2015-11-19 Created: 2015-11-19 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
  • 12.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Theander, Kersti
    Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Research and Education, Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden; Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Departmentof Neurobiology, Caring Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm,Sweden .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Symptom trajectory and symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity, secondary outcome from the RCT AGe-FIT study2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 2773-2783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to follow the symptom trajectory of community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity and to explore the effect on symptom burden from an ambulatory geriatric care unit, based on comprehensive geriatric assessment.

    Background

    Older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity suffer from a high symptom burden with a wide range of co-occurring symptoms often resulting to decreased health-related quality of life. There is a need to move from a single-disease model and address the complexity of older people living with multimorbidity.

    Design

    Secondary outcome data from the randomized controlled Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT).

    Methods

    Symptom trajectory of 31 symptoms was assessed with the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. Data from 247 participants were assessments at baseline, 12 and 24 months, 2011–2013. Participants in the intervention group received care from an ambulatory geriatric care unit based on comprehensive geriatric assessment in addition to usual care.

    Results

    Symptom prevalence and symptom burden were high and stayed high over time. Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence and burden. Over the 2-year period 68–81% of the participants reported pain. Other highly prevalent and persistent symptoms were dry mouth, lack of energy and numbness/tingling in the hands/feet, affecting 38–59% of participants. No differences were found between the intervention and control group regarding prevalence, burden or trajectory of symptoms.

    Conclusions

    Older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity had a persistent high burden of symptoms. Receiving advanced interdisciplinary care at an ambulatory geriatric unit did not significantly reduce the prevalence or the burden of symptoms.

  • 13.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Iingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    To adjust and endure: a qualitative study of symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity2015In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 322-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context Older people with multimorbidity are vulnerable and often suffer from conditions that produce a multiplicity of symptoms and a reduced health-related quality of life. Objectives The aim of this study is to explore the experience of living with a high symptom burden from the perspective of older community-dwelling people with multi-morbidity.

    Method A qualitative descriptive design with semi-structured interviews, including 20 community-dwelling older people with multi-morbidity and a high symptom burden. The participants were 79-€“89 years old with a mean of 12 symptoms per person. Data were analyzed using content analyses.

    Results The experience of living with a high symptom burden revealed the overall theme, “To adjust and endure” and three sub-themes. The first sub-theme was "To feel inadequate and limited". Participants reported that they no longer had the capacity or the ability to manage, and they felt limited and isolated from friends or family. The second sub-theme was "To feel dependent". This was a new and inconvenient experience; the burden they put on others caused a feeling of guilt. The final sub-theme was "To feel dejected". The strength to manage and control their conditions was gone; the only thing left to do was to sit or lie down and wait for it all to pass.

    Conclusion This study highlights the importance of a holistic approach when taking care of older people with multi-morbidity. This approach should employ a broad symptom assessment to reveal diseases and conditions that are possible to treat or improve.

  • 14.
    Ekström, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ferm, Ulrika
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Digital communication support and Alzheimer’s disease2017In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 711-731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Communication is one of the areas where people with dementia and their caregivers experience most challenges. The purpose of this study is to contribute to the understanding of possibilities and pitfalls of using personalized communication applications installed on tablet computers to support communication for people with dementia and their conversational partners. The study is based on video recordings of a woman, 52 years old, with Alzheimer’s disease interacting with her husband in their home. The couple was recorded interacting with and without a tablet computer including a personalized communication application. The results from the present study reveal both significant possibilities and potential difficulties in introducing a digital communication device to people with dementia and their conversational partners. For the woman in the present study, the amount of interactive actions and the number of communicative actions seem to increase with the use of the communication application. The results also indicate that problems associated with dementia are foregrounded in interaction where the tablet computer is used.

  • 15.
    Ekström, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samarbete och delaktighet2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström, Lars-Christer Hydén, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, p. 55-62Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Eriksson, Iréne
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Aronsson, Kerstin
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Jönköping University.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University.
    Jonsson, Margareta
    County Council of Jönköping.
    Wärnberg Gerdin, Elisabeth
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    The meaning of oral health-related quality of life for elderly persons with dementia2009In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 212-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Studies of oral health developments increasingly include self-reported assessments of how oral health affects quality of life (QoL), referred to as “oral health-related QoL”. People with dementia are often excluded in studies of oral health-related QoL and thus our aim in this study was to explore this area in elderly persons with dementia. Material and methods. Eighteen elderly individuals (aged between 78 and 94 years) with dementia of varying degrees of severity were interviewed with the aid of an interview guide; pictures and objects were used as stimulus material (triggers). The material was analyzed using grounded theory as point of departure, and a professional assessment of the oral health of the participants was used as reference. Results. Four categories were identified: the ability to chew and eat, independence, oral problems, and teeth are important. These factors are largely consistent with those that have emerged in earlier studies of the elderly, but in some cases less pronounced in persons with dementia. Conclusion. The use of triggers is a positive way to communicate oral health-related QoL among persons suffering from dementia, although the material used in this study needs further evaluation and development.

  • 17.
    Fjalldal, S.
    et al.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Follin, C.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Svärd, Daniel
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rylander, L.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gabery, S.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Petersen, A.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    van Westen, D.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sundgren, P. C.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bjorkman-Burtscher, I. M.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Latt, J.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ekman, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Johanson, A.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Erfurth, E. M.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Microstructural white matter alterations and hippocampal volumes are associated with cognitive deficits in craniopharyngioma2018In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 178, no 6, p. 577-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Patients with craniopharyngioma (CP) and hypothalamic lesions (HL) have cognitive deficits. Which neural pathways are affected is unknown. Objective: To determine whether there is a relationship between microstructural white matter (WM) alterations detected with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and cognition in adults with childhood-onset CP. Design: A cross-sectional study with a median follow-up time of 22 (6-49) years after operation. Setting: The South Medical Region of Sweden (2.5 million inhabitants). Participants: Included were 41 patients (24 women, amp;gt;= 17 years) surgically treated for childhood-onset CP between 1958-2010 and 32 controls with similar age and gender distributions. HI was found in 23 patients. Main outcome measures: Subjects performed cognitive tests and magnetic resonance imaging, and images were analyzed using DTI of uncinate fasciculus, fornix, cingulum, hippocampus and hypothalamus as well as hippocampal volumetry. Results: Right uncinate fasciculus was significantly altered (P amp;lt;= 0.01) Microstructural WM alterations in left ventral cingulum were significantly associated with worse performance in visual episodic memory, explaining approximately 50% of the variation. Alterations in dorsal cingulum were associated with worse performance in immediate, delayed recall and recognition, explaining 26-38% of the variation, and with visuospatial ability and executive function, explaining 19-29%. Patients who had smaller hippocampal volume had worse general knowledge (P = 0.028), and microstructural WM alterations in hippocampus were associated with a decline in general knowledge and episodic visual memory. Conclusions: A structure to function relationship is suggested between microstructural WM alterations in cingulum and in hippocampus with cognitive deficits in CP.

  • 18.
    Forsgren, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sundelin, Heléne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Sveinsson, Olafur
    Neurologiska kliniken, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Epilepsins orsaker, förekomst och prognos [Epilepsy: incidens, prevalens and causes]2018In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 115Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epilepsy affects people in all ages with the highest incidence in small children, particularly before age one year, and in elderly aged 65 years and older. In Sweden, between 4500-5000 persons develop epilepsy annually. Based on studies from North America and Europe, including the Nordic countries, the number of people with active epilepsy in Sweden is between 60000-70000. The lifetime risk for epilepsy up to age 85 years is 4-5 %, i.e. approximately every 25th person. The new epilepsy classification divides etiology into the following groups: structural, genetic, infectious, metabolic, immune and unknown. The majority (70%) of people with epilepsy eventually become seizure free. Epilepsy increases the risk of psychosocial problems and accidents. People with epilepsy have up to a 3-fold increase in mortality, mainly due to the underlying causes and epilepsy related deaths, e.g. status epilepticus, SUDEP and accidents. Somatic, psychiatric and neuropsychiatric comorbidities are common in epilepsy.

  • 19.
    Harding, Andrew J. E.
    et al.
    Univ Lancaster, England.
    Morbey, Hazel
    Univ Lancaster, England.
    Ahmed, Faraz
    Univ Lancaster, England.
    Opdebeeck, Carol
    Manchester Metropolitan Univ, England.
    Lasrado, Reena
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Williamson, Paula R.
    Univ Liverpool, England; Med Res Council North West Hub Trials Methodol Re, England.
    Swarbrick, Caroline
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Leroi, Iracema
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Challis, David
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Burns, Alistair
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Keady, John
    Univ Manchester, England; Greater Manchester Mental Hlth NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Reilly, Siobhan T.
    Univ Lancaster, England.
    What is important to people living with dementia?: the "long-list of outcome items in the development of a core outcome set for use in the evaluation of non-pharmacological community-based health and social care interventions2019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundCore outcome sets (COS) prioritise outcomes based on their importance to key stakeholders, reduce reporting bias and increase comparability across studies. The first phase of a COS study is to form a long-list of outcomes. Key stakeholders then decide on their importance. COS reporting is described as suboptimal and this first phase is often under-reported. Our objective was to develop a long-list of outcome items for non-pharmacological interventions for people with dementia living at home.MethodsThree iterative phases were conducted. First, people living with dementia, care partners, health and social care professionals, policymakers and researchers (n=55) took part in interviews or focus groups and were asked which outcomes were important. Second, existing dementia trials were identified from the ALOIS database. 248 of 1009 pharmacological studies met the inclusion criteria. Primary and secondary outcomes were extracted from a 50% random sample (n=124) along with eight key reviews/qualitative papers and 38 policy documents. Third, extracted outcome items were translated onto an existing qualitative framework and mapped into domains. The research team removed areas of duplication and refined the long-list in eight workshops.ResultsOne hundred seventy outcome items were extracted from the qualitative data and literature. The 170 outcome items were consolidated to 54 in four domains (Self-Managing Dementia Symptoms, Quality of Life, Friendly Neighbourhood amp; Home, Independence).ConclusionsThis paper presents a transparent blueprint for long-list development. Though a useful resource in their own right, the 54 outcome items will be distilled further in a modified Delphi survey and consensus meeting to identify core outcomes.

  • 20.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-ChristerLinköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Att leva med demens2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    För att personer med demenssjukdom ska kunna leva ett fullgott liv behövs mer kunskap. I grunden handlar det om att förändra föreställningar och attityder till personer som lever med en demenssjukdom så att personerna själva, deras anhöriga och personal inom hälso- och sjukvården och politiker, kan se nya möjligheter i stället för enbart förluster. I den här boken presenteras kunskap och forskning som sätter personer med demenssjukdom i centrum. Boken utgår alltså inte i första hand från vården eller anhöriga, utan från dem som lever med sjukdomen. På så sätt skapas en tankeram som ger stöd vid både utvecklingsarbete och reflektion bland människor som på olika sätt arbetar med och för personer med demenssjukdom.

    Cirka 110 000 och 170 000 svenskar har i dag en demenssjukdom. Om ett tiotal år är det betydligt fler: ökad livslängd och en större medvetenhet om demenssjukdomar gör att allt fler personer får en diagnos tidigt i förloppet. Som en konsekvens av detta kommer alltfler personer att leva med en demenssjukdom under lång tid, och ofta i hemmet. Detta innebär inte bara en utmaning för vård, omsorg och socialpolitik, utan väcker också frågor som berör såväl personer med demens, som anhöriga och andra i det sociala nätverket: Hur kan personer med demens leva och fungera i sitt hem tillsammans med eventuella familjemedlemmar? Hur kan de fungera som medborgare och delta i samhällslivet, ha makt över sitt eget vardagsliv och fatta egna beslut om sitt eget liv?

    I boken medverkar forskare från Centrum för demensforskning (CEDER) vid Linköpings universitet. Den innehåller många pedagogiska exempel och riktar sig till utbildningar inom vård, omvårdnad, socialt arbete och omsorg.

  • 21.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    The "not yet" horizon: Understandings of the future amongst couples living with dementia2016In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 1562-1585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The way in which persons with dementia and their spouses regard the future could influence how they experience the disease itself. This study aims to explore how the future is understood by couples living with dementia. The analysis reveals different ways in which couples understand the future. The findings show that persons with dementia describe the here and now in ways that take the gloomy future they dread as a point of reference, and as a result of this, they operate in what we term the not yet horizon. But while they take for granted that there is a horizon that they have not yet reached, their spouses always seem to focus on the horizons that they have already crossed. The article discusses the findings in relation to ideas such as critical periods, existential coordinates and possible selves, and problematizes the implicit assumptions about the future that dementia researchers tend to operate from.

  • 22.
    Johansson, Maria M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Maintaining health-related quality of life from 85 to 93 years of age despite decreased functional ability2019In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 82, no 6, p. 348-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The ‘oldest-old’ is the most rapidly growing age group in Sweden and in the western world. This group is known to be at great risk of increased functional dependency and the need for help in their daily lives. The aim of this research was to examine how the oldest-old change over time regarding health-related quality of life, cognition, depression and ability to perform activities of daily living and investigate what factors explain health-related quality of life at age 85 and 93 years.

    Methods

    In this study, 60 individuals from the Swedish Elderly in Linköping Screening Assessment study were followed from age 85 to 93 years. Measurements used were EQ-5D, Geriatric Depression Scale, Mini Mental State Examination and ability to perform activities of daily living. Nonparametric statistics and regression analyses were used.

    Results

    Although the individuals had increased mobility problems, decreased ability to manage activities of daily living, and thus had increased need of assistance, they scored their health-related quality of life at age 93 years at almost the same level as at age 85 years. No depression and low dependence in activities of daily living speaks in favour of higher health-related quality of life.

    Conclusions

    Health-related quality of life can be maintained during ageing despite decreased functional ability and increased need of assistance in daily life.

  • 23.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Univ Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fors, Stefan
    Univ Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Univ Stockholm, Sweden.
    Getting better all the time? Selective attrition and compositional changes in longitudinal and life course studies2017In: Longitudinal and life course studies, ISSN 1124-9064, E-ISSN 1757-9597, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 104-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Longitudinal surveys are valuable tools for investigating health and social outcomes across the life course. In such studies, selective mortality leads to changes in the social composition of the sample, but little is known about how selective survey participation affects the sample composition, in addition to the selective mortality. In the present paper, we followed a Swedish cohort sample over six waves 1968-2011. For each wave we recalculated the distribution of baseline characteristics in the sample among i) the sample still alive and ii) the sample still alive and with complete follow-up. The results show that the majority of the compositional changes in the cohort were modest and driven mainly by mortality. However, for some characteristics, class in particular, the selection was considerable and in addition, was substantially compounded by survey non-participation. We suggest that sample selections should be taken into account when interpreting the results of longitudinal studies, in particular when researching social inequalities.

  • 24.
    Kidd, Tara
    et al.
    Liverpool John Moores Univ, England.
    Mold, Freda
    Univ Surrey, England.
    Jones, Claire
    Univ Surrey, England.
    Ream, Emma
    Univ Surrey, England.
    Grosvenor, Wendy
    Univ Surrey, England.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carey, Nicola
    Univ Surrey, England.
    What are the most effective interventions to improve physical performance in pre-frail and frail adults? A systematic review of randomised control trials2019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 184Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundWith life expectancy continuing to rise in the United Kingdom there is an increasing public health focus on the maintenance of physical independence among all older adults. Identifying interventions that improve physical outcomes in pre-frail and frail older adults is imperative.MethodsA systematic review of the literature 2000 to 2017 following PRISMA guidelines and registered with PROSPERO (no. CRD42016045325).ResultsTen RCT trials fulfilled selection criteria and quality appraisal. The study quality was moderate to good. Interventions included physical activity; nutrition, physical activity combined with nutrition. Interventions that incorporated one or more physical activity components significantly improved physical outcomes in pre-frail and/or frail older adults.ConclusionsPhysical activity interventions are key to maintaining independence in pre-frail and frail older adults. A lack of consensus regarding the definition of frailty, and an absence of core measures to assess this means any attempt to create an optimal intervention will be impeded. This absence may ultimately impact on the ability of older and frail adults to live well and for longer in the community.

  • 25.
    Kiwi, Mahin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dementia across cultural borders: Reflections and thought patterns of elderly Iranians with dementia in Sweden, their relatives and staff at a culturally profiled nursing home2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Today’s multicultural society has resulted in major changes, with healthcare undergoing significant modifications. Healthcare workers and patients are increasingly confronted with “cultural” backgrounds other than their own. The world’s population is ageing, and the number of people with dementia is growing, resulting in a growing number of older people with a foreign background whose care needs have increased at different rates. Migration does not only mean moving from one place to another; it also involves the transition of an individual’s lifestyle, life views, social and economic adjustments that may lead to certain changes. These transitions from the “old” to the “new” way of life and from a life without dementia to a life with dementia involve making sense of life’s changes.

    Aim: The aim of study I was to explore the experiences and perceptions of dementia among Iranian staff working in a culturally profiled nursing home (CPNH). The aim of studies II and III was to explore relatives’ decisions to end caregiving at home, and Iranian families’ and relatives’ attitudes towards CPNHs in Sweden. The aim of study (IV) was to explore how the residents with dementia at the CPNH expressed the feeling of “home”.

    Method: This thesis is based on more than one year’s fieldwork. The empirical material is based on interviews and observations. Three groups of participants were interviewed and observed: 10 people with dementia (IV), 20 family caregivers and relatives (II and III, respectively) and 34 staff members (I). The interviews were conducted in Persian/Farsi, Azerbaijani, English and Swedish. The choice of language was always up to the participants. All the interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim in the respective languages and then translated later into Swedish. The analysis of the material was based on content analysis blended with ethnography.

    Results: Study I shows that people from different culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds could have different perceptions of what dementia entails. A lack of knowledge concerning dementia affects how staff approach these people.

    Study II shows that the CPNH is crucial when deciding to cease caregiving at home. It is important to ensure that relatives with dementia are cared for by someone who speaks the same mother tongue. The results indicate that positive feelings of relief or comfort are dominant responses among the participants, some of whom even feel pride in the high standard of care provided by the home.

    In Study III, most participants based their views on a comparison between the CPNH and Iranian nursing homes after the Islamic Revolution. Negative views of the nursing home were evaluated alongside what the respondents considered to be typically Iranian. In Study IV, the results show that people with dementia’s personal experiences of home played a great role, and although none of the participants felt at home, all of them stated that the CPNH was a place to live in.

    Conclusion: Perceptions of dementia can be based on cultural and traditional understanding, although this can shift through transition and knowledge accumulation. A lack of knowledge concerning dementia and residents’ sociocultural background, generational differences and incoherence, aligned with staff members’ different sociocultural backgrounds, created many challenges. The staff wanted to learn more about dementia, to be able to manage daily communication with the residents. On another point, the staff admitted that only being able to speak a person’s native language was not enough to claim that they were actually communicating. Family caregivers’ decisions to end caregiving at home involve mutuality, capability and management, but decision-making sometimes has nothing to do with violating a person’s autonomy and is more about protecting the person. The family caregivers do care for frail elderly family members. What has changed due to a transition is the structure and construction of family caregiving. The consequences of communication difficulties between staff and the residents have led to a small degree of social involvement, which in turn affects residents’ daily social state. Overall, many family members stated that the CPNH resembled Iran too much, which disturbed them.

    The residents thought of home as a geographical location, but also connected it with both positive and negative feelings. Furthermore, the CPNH reminded some of the residents of the nicer side of life back home in Iran, while for others it brought back sad experiences and memories from the past. Nevertheless, the nursing home, due to memories and experiences of life in Iran, “home”, was a place to be and to live.

    List of papers
    1. Frankly, None of Us Know What Dementia Is: Dementia Caregiving Among Iranian Immigrants Living in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Frankly, None of Us Know What Dementia Is: Dementia Caregiving Among Iranian Immigrants Living in Sweden
    2015 (English)In: Care Management Journals, ISSN 1521-0987, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 79-94Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In quite a short amount of time, Sweden has gone from being a relatively homogeneous society to a multicultural one, with a rapid expansion of immigrants having culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds growing old in Sweden. This is particularly interesting in relation to studying age-related dementia diseases. Research shows that not only do CALD persons with dementia diseases tend to mix languages, have difficulties with separation of languages, or revert to speaking only their native tongue as the disease progresses, but they also show tendencies to experience that they live in the cultural environment in which they were brought up, rather than in the current Swedish one. In this article, we explore findings in relation to one such CALD group in Sweden, Iranians. The article is empirically driven and based on data gathered in 2 separate settings with specific ethnocultural profiles, offering dementia care with Middle Eastern, Arab, and/or Persian profile. Observations were carried out in combination with semistructured in-depth interviews (n = 66). By using a combination of content and ethnographic analysis, 4 main findings related to ethnocultural dementia care were elucidated. These include (a) a wider recognition of people from different CALD backgrounds possibly having different perceptions of what dementia is, (b) a possibility that such ascribed meaning of dementia has a bearing on health maintenance and health-seeking behavior as well as the inclination to use formal services or not, (c) choosing to use formal service in the forms of ethnoculturally profiled dementia care facility seems to relate to being able to “live up to ideals of Iranian culture,” and (d) “culture,” however ambiguous and hotly debated a concept it is, appears to be a relevant aspect of people's lives, an aspect that is both acquired as well as ascribed to oneself and to others. As such, we argue that culture needs to be further addressed in relation to dementia care in multicultural societies because ascribing culture boxes people in as well as out. In addition, ethnocultural contextualization of dementia care needs to be understood in relation to this because it affects the care provided.

    Keywords
    dementia, caregiving, illness, ethnoculturally profiled care
    National Category
    Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119110 (URN)10.1891/1521-0987.16.2.79 (DOI)
    Projects
    Ethnic diversity and dementia: cultural, social and linguistic aspects
    Funder
    Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
    Available from: 2015-06-09 Created: 2015-06-09 Last updated: 2018-11-20
    2. Deciding upon Transition to Residential Care for Persons Living with Dementia: why Do Iranian Family Caregivers Living in Sweden Cease Caregiving at Home?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deciding upon Transition to Residential Care for Persons Living with Dementia: why Do Iranian Family Caregivers Living in Sweden Cease Caregiving at Home?
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, ISSN 0169-3816, E-ISSN 1573-0719, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 21-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown how filial piety is strong among people of Iranian background and that traditional Iranian culture result in most families’ preferring to care for their elderly (and sick) family members at home. While acknowledging this, this article highlights what living in diaspora could mean in terms of cultural adaption and changing family values. By interviewing people with Iranian background living in Sweden (n = 20), whom all have been former primary caregivers to a relative living with dementia, we are able to show how the decision to cease caregiving at home is taken, and what underlying factors form the basis for such decision. Results indicate that although the existence of a Persian profiled dementia care facility is crucial in the making of the decision, it is the feeling of ‘sheer exhaustion’ that is the main factor for ceasing care at home. And, we argue, the ability to make such a decision based upon ‘being too tired’ must be understood in relation to transition processes and changes in lifestyle having an affect upon cultural values in relation to filial piety. Because, at the same time the changes on cultural values might not change accordingly among the elderly who are the ones moving into residential care, resulting in them quite often being left out of the actual decision.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer-Verlag New York, 2018
    Keywords
    Caregiver, Dementia diseases, Iranian immigrants, Care at home, Care at residential nursing home, Transition
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152760 (URN)10.1007/s10823-017-9337-1 (DOI)000427289500002 ()29170865 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85034757762 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2018-11-20 Created: 2018-11-20 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
    3. Iranian relatives' attitudes towards culturally profiled nursing homes for individuals living with dementia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Iranian relatives' attitudes towards culturally profiled nursing homes for individuals living with dementia
    2017 (English)In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses Iranian family members attitudes towards the culturally profiled nursing home, their relationships with the staff, the obstacles, their hopes and their fears. This study is based on qualitative research using 29 semi-structured interviews with family members who had previously been informal caregivers, as well as using fieldwork, all in the same nursing home. The interviews were analysed by the three steps of content analysis. The results show the identification of three main categories with nine main subcategories. The categories and subcategories in the table clarify and explain how the interviewees tended to compare the situation in Iran with that in Sweden, how they perceived the situation in Sweden and finally how they also saw the culturally profiled nursing home.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 2017
    Keywords
    culturally profiled nursing home; nursing home
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-144853 (URN)10.1177/1471301217743835 (DOI)29192514 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2018-02-05 Created: 2018-02-05 Last updated: 2018-11-20Bibliographically approved
  • 26.
    Klompstra, Leonie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekdahl, Anne W.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Factors related to health-related quality of life in older people with multimorbidity and high health care consumption over a two-year period2019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe prevalence of multimorbidity is increasing worldwide, and older people with multimorbidity are frequent users of health care services. Since multimorbidity has a significant negative impact on Health-related Quality of Life (HrQoL) and is more common in older age it would be expected that factors related to HrQoL in this group might have been thoroughly researched, but this is not the case. Furthermore, it is important to look at old people living at home, considering the shift from residential to home-based care. Therefore, we aim to investigate factors that are related to HrQoL in older people with multimorbidity and high health care consumption, living at home.MethodsThis is a secondary analysis of a RCT study conducted in a municipality in south-eastern Sweden. The study had a longitudinal design with a two-year follow-up period assessing HrQoL, symptom burden, activities of daily living, physical activity and depression.ResultsIn total, 238 older people with multimorbidity and high health care consumption, living at home were included (mean age 82, 52% female). A multiple linear regression model including symptom burden, activities of daily living and depression as independent variables explained 64% of the HrQoL. Higher symptom burden, lower ability in activities of daily living and a higher degree of depression were negatively related to HrQoL. Depression at baseline and a change in symptom burden over a two-year period explained 28% of the change in HrQoL over a two-year period variability. A higher degree of depression at baseline and negative change in higher symptom burden were related to a decrease in HrQoL over a two-year period.ConclusionIn order to facilitate better delivery of appropriate health care to older people with high health care consumption living at home it is important to assess HrQoL, and HrQoL over time. Symptom burden, activities of daily living, depression and change in symptom burden over time are important indicators for HrQoL.Trial registrationClinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446757, the trial was registered prospectively with the date of trial registration October 5(th), 2011.

  • 27.
    Källdalen, Anette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Interests among older people in relation to gender, function and health-related quality of life2013In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 87-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Introduction: Older people should have opportunities to be active participants in society as aspects such as lifestyle, physical and social environment and physical and mental status have influence on active ageing. The purpose was to explore the interests pursued by 85-year-old people living in ordinary housing in relation to gender, cognition, depression and health-related quality of life.

    Method: A sample of 240 participants completed a postal questionnaire including the EuroQoL health-related quality of life measurement. Additional instruments used during a subsequent home visit were the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, Mini Mental State Examination and Geriatric Depression scale.

    Results: Women experienced poorer health than men, lived alone to a greater extent and used more mobility devices. Compared to men, women had a larger number of interests within household management, but no gender differences in the leisure area. Lower number of interests in active recreation was associated with lower cognitive function, poorer health-related quality of life and a higher risk of depressive symptoms.

    Conclusion: The main finding is that engaging in active recreation interests is associated with better cognition, less depression and higher health-related quality of life in these 85-year-old people and is therefore a concern of occupational therapists.

  • 28.
    Lannering, Christina
    et al.
    Futurum, Sweden.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Midlov, Patrik
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Molstad, Sigvard
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Factors related to falls, weight-loss and pressure ulcers - more insight in risk assessment among nursing home residents2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 7-8, p. 940-950Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesTo describe how the included items in three different scales, Downton Fall Risk Index, the short form of Mini Nutritional Assessment and the Modified Norton Scale are associated to severe outcomes as falls, weight loss and pressure ulcers. BackgroundFalls, malnutrition and pressure ulcers are common adverse events among nursing home residents and risk scoring are common preventive activities, mainly focusing on single risks. In Sweden the three scales are routinely used together with the purpose to improve the quality of prevention. DesignLongitudinal quantitative study. MethodsDescriptive analyses and Cox regression analyses. ResultsOnly 4% scored no risk for any of these serious events. Longitudinal risk scoring showed significant impaired mean scores indicating increased risks. This confirms the complexity of this populations status of general condition. There were no statistical significant differences between residents categorised at risk or not regarding events. Physical activity increased falls, but decreased pressure ulcers. For weight loss, cognitive decline and the status of general health were most important. ConclusionsRisk tendencies for falls, malnutrition and pressure ulcers are high in nursing homes, and when measure them at the same time the majority will have several of these risks. Items assessing mobility or items affecting mobility were of most importance. Care processes can always be improved and this study can add to the topic. Relevance to clinical practiceA more comprehensive view is needed and prevention can not only be based on total scores. Mobility is an important factor for falls and pressure ulcers, both as a risk factor and a protective factor. This involves a challenge for care - to keep the inmates physical active and at the same time prevent falls.

  • 29.
    Larsson, Elias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Recycling narratives as a joint accomplishment in interaction with people with dementia2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation focuses on recycling of stories in conversations involving people with dementia. In dementia, communicative ability gradually deteriorates as the disease progresses typically leading to profound decline of communicative skills in the late stage. Of all of the domains affected by dementia diseases, communication is one of the areas where people with dementia and their caregivers experience most challenges. A significant characteristic for persons with dementia is a tendency to tell the same stories over and over (e.g. Hydén et al., 2013). While the significance conversational partners have on the organization of stories told by people with dementia are highly recognized (e.g. Hydén, et al., 2013; Hydén, 2011), how conversational partners to people with dementia orient toward recycling of stories are still in need of further investigation. In previous research, the phenomenon of recycling stories is mainly credited to the person with dementia. In our present study, we would like to propose another parallel point of view in which caregivers also tend to recycle stories repetitively in conversation with persons with dementia. We argue that recycling of stories in interaction involving people with dementia is a highly collaborative activity, and sometimes even initiated by conversational partners to people with dementia. In this presentation, we focus on how recycling of stories are sequentially organized is ordinary interaction between people with dementia and professional caregivers. The data consist of video recordings of 4 dyads (one person diagnosed with dementia and a professional caregiver in each dyad) totaling approximately 2,5 hours of recordings. In the analyses, we have focused specifically on how the telling of recycled stories is initiated in conversation, and what kind of feedback such stories receive. Our analyses show that recycled stories told by persons with dementia receive strong interactional support from conversational partners by, for example, the use of responses signaling newness and surprise (cf. Hydén et al., 2013). Conversational partners are also actively involved in the telling of recycled stories by, for example, asking guiding questions expanding the stories and use prompting techniques in cases where the person with dementia seem to have difficulties telling the whole story. In our analyses, we have also seen examples where conversational partners to people with dementia not only support the telling of recycled stories, but actually initiate such stories by instructing the person with dementia to talk about a specific topic.

  • 30.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    All the things I have - handling one’s material room in old age2014In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 31, p. 110-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores how old people who live in their ordinary home, reason and act regarding their ‘material room’ (technical objects, such as household appliances, communication tools and things, such as furniture, personal belongings, gadgets, books, paintings, and memorabilia). The interest is in how they, as a consequence of their aging, look at acquiring new objects and phasing out older objects from the home. This is a broader approach than in most other studies of how old people relate to materiality in which attention is mostly paid either to adjustments to the physical environment or to the importance of personal possessions. In the latter cases, the focus is on downsizing processes (e.g. household disbandment or casser maison) in connection with a move to smaller accommodation or to a nursing home. The article is based on a study in which thirteen older people (median age 87), living in a Swedish town of medium size were interviewed (2012) for a third time. The questions concerned the need and desire for new objects, replacement of broken objects, sorting out the home or elsewhere, most cherished possessions, and the role of family members such as children and grandchildren. The results reveal the complexity of how one handles the material room. Most evident is the participants' reluctance to acquire new objects or even to replace broken things. Nearly all of them had considered, but few had started, a process of sorting out objects. These standpoints in combination resulted in a relatively intact material room, which was motivated by an ambition to simplify daily life or to facilitate the approaching dissolution of the home. Some objects of special value and other cherished objects materialized the connections between generations within a family. Some participants wanted to spare their children the burden of having to decide on what to do with their possessions. Others (mostly men), on the contrary, relied on their children to do the sorting out after they had died.

  • 31.
    Larsson, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reducing the material room in old age - The Casser maison-process of elderly people living at home2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Larsson, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The materialized connections of objects to other generations for elderly people living at home who are reducing their material room in old age2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Subsyndromal depression hos äldre äldre personer2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Subsyndromal depression (SSD) eller subklinisk depression är ett vanligt affektivt tillstånd som kan beskrivas som depressivitet under gränsen för vad som kallas syndromal eller egentlig depressiv episod. Förekomsten av SSD har rapporterats vara ungefär 10 % i populationen, eller ungefär 2-3 gånger högre än förekomsten av syndromal depression. SSD jämfört med icke-depression (ND) är associerat med en lägre aktivitetsförmåga (ADL, Activities of Daily Living), lägre kognitiv funktion, lägre subjektiv hälsa, sämre psykiska utfall och en högre dödlighet. Emellertid har flertalet studier om SSD hos äldre gjorts i åldersgruppen yngre äldre (60-80 års ålder), medan få studier har undersökt SSD hos äldre äldre personer (80+ års ålder). Eftersom många aspekter (t ex multisjukdom, skörhet, funktionsförmågor och socialt beroende) generellt förändras mellan yngre äldre och äldre äldre åldrar, så finns det ett behov av ökad kunskap om SSD hos äldre äldre. Syftet med denna avhandling var att beskriva SSD, eller det komplexa området mellan syndromal depression och normalt åldrande, hos äldre äldre personer.

    Metod: studie 1 baserades på kvalitativa intervjuer (n=27), medan studier 2-4 till stor del baserades på data från en prospektiv observationsstudie av en kohort, ”Elderly in Linköping Screening Assessment” (ELSA85). ELSA85 hade en populationsbaserad design där man följde personer från 85 års ålder i tre uppföljande mätvågor. Depressivitet mättes med 15- frågeversionen av Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), som också användes för att definiera SSD i studierna.

    Resultat: Analysen av de kvalitativa intervjuerna (studie 1) resulterade i fyra teman (livet går ned och kroppen sviktar, att klara sig själv, att hänga med, och att ta en dag i taget), vilka tillsammans gav en helhetsbild av SSD i de högsta åldrarna. I en jämförelse mellan SSD, ND och syndromal depression, så skiljde sig SSD kvalitativt från syndromal depression, men däremot inte tydligt från ND. En tvärsnittsanalys av data från baslinjen av studien (studie 2) identifierade associerade faktorer till SSD bland äldre äldre personer, och enligt analysen med multipel logistisk respektive linjär regression så var det fyra domäner (sociodemografiska faktorer, sviktande fysisk funktion, neuropsykiatriska faktorer och existentiella faktorer) som var signifikant associerade med SSD.

    I en fem års longitudinell uppföljning (studie 3) visades att direkta hälso- och sjukvårdskostnader per överlevnadsmånad och person var förhöjd hos personer med SSD jämfört med ND med ett storleksförhållande 1.45 (€634 vs €436), vilket var en signifikant skillnad även när man kontrollerade för somatisk multisjukdom. I en åtta års longitudinell uppföljning visades att dödligheten var förhöjd (dödsintensitet eller Hazard ratio (HR))=1.33) för personer med SSD jämfört med ND, liksom sjuklighet avseende personlig ADL (P-ADL), instrumentell ADL (IADL), ensamhet, subjektiv hälsa, och depressivitet. Däremot var inte kognitiv snabbhet, exekutiva funktioner eller global kognitiv funktion signifikant försämrade när man hade kontrollerat för relevanta variabler.

    Slutsatser: SSD hos äldre äldre personer ser olika ut hos olika personer, och personal i hälso- och sjukvården bör vara uppmärksamma på även andra depressiva tecken förutom de klassiska symtomen i diagnosregistren. SSD hos äldre äldre är associerat med förhöjda sjukvårdskostnader, förhöjd sjuklighet och dödlighet. Med tanke på den höga förekomsten av SSD och den demografiska utvecklingen med ökande antal äldre äldre personer i samhället, så indikerar fynden behovet av att utveckla kliniska och samhälleliga strategier för att förebygga SSD och associerade negativa utfall.

    List of papers
    1. Normal Aging or Depression? A Qualitative Study on the Differences Between Subsyndromal Depression and Depression in Very Old People.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Normal Aging or Depression? A Qualitative Study on the Differences Between Subsyndromal Depression and Depression in Very Old People.
    2015 (English)In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 760-769Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of the Study: The aim of this study was to make a qualitative comparison of experiences of being in very old people with subsyndromal depression (SSD), in relation to the experiences of very old people with syndromal depression or nondepression. Through investigation and deeper understanding of the interface between depressive disease and normal aging, clinicians might give more accurate prevention or treatment to those very old persons who need such help.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted for 27 individuals of 87-88 years of age, who were categorized in the 3 strata of nondepressive, SSD, and syndromal depression. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative content analysis within each stratum and later with a comparison between the strata.

    RESULTS: The content analysis resulted in 4 themes in people with SSD, as defined by a self-report depression screening instrument, giving a comprehensive picture of SSD in very old people, and also showed qualitative differences between the SSD, syndromal depression, and nondepressive groups. A main finding was that SSD differs qualitatively from syndromal depression but not clearly from nondepression.

    IMPLICATIONS: The results might indicate that SSD in very old people is not related to pathology but to normal aging, even though the condition correlates with negative health parameters. Overlooking certain psychosocial aspects of living in the very old may pose a risk of both underdiagnosis and overdiagnosis in the spectrum of depressive disorders.

    Keywords
    Coping, Frailty, Healthy aging, Subthreshold depression, Successful aging
    National Category
    Psychiatry Geriatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120848 (URN)10.1093/geront/gnt162 (DOI)000362984500006 ()24398652 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Östergötland County Council
    Available from: 2015-08-27 Created: 2015-08-27 Last updated: 2018-07-26Bibliographically approved
    2. Markers of subsyndromal depression in very old persons.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Markers of subsyndromal depression in very old persons.
    2016 (English)In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 619-628Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate factors associated with subsyndromal depression (SSD) in very old persons, and to develop a model for prediction of SSD among very old persons.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional, population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden. Data were collected from a postal questionnaire, assessments in the participants' homes and at reception visits. Depressiveness was screened with GDS-15 (Geriatric Depression Scale), and the results were classified into three outcome categories: non-depression (ND), SSD and syndromal depression. Data were analysed with binary logistic, ordinal logistic and linear regression.

    RESULTS: With univariate logistic regression 20 factors associated with SSD were identified in very old persons, and the four hypothesized domains-sociodemographic factors, declining physical functioning, neuropsychiatric factors and existential factors-significantly related to SSD. The multivariate logistic model included seven independent factors that increase the likelihood of SSD instead of ND (lower self-perceived health, life not meaningful, problems with self-care, use of tranquilizing medication, no contact with neighbours, history of affective disorder and history of stroke). The ordinal logistic and the linear regression models resulted in seven partly different factors for predicting SSD and depressiveness, in the very old.

    CONCLUSIONS: The identified markers may help clinicians with the detection, prevention and treatment of SSD in very old persons. The findings indicate the importance of a comprehensive functional approach to diagnosing and treating depressiveness in this population, and the findings might be interpreted as offering support for the coexistence of a dimensional and a categorical view on depressive disorders.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
    National Category
    Geriatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127480 (URN)10.1002/gps.4369 (DOI)000374700000009 ()26489528 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2016-04-27 Created: 2016-04-27 Last updated: 2018-07-26
    3. Direct Costs of Very Old Persons with Subsyndromal Depression: A 5-Year Prospective Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Direct Costs of Very Old Persons with Subsyndromal Depression: A 5-Year Prospective Study
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry, ISSN 1064-7481, E-ISSN 1545-7214, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 741-751Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    This study aimed to compare, over a 5-year period, the prospective direct healthcare costs and service utilization of persons with subsyndromal depression (SSD) and non-depressive persons (ND), in a population of very old persons. A second aim was to develop a model that predicts direct healthcare costs in very old persons with SSD.

    Design and Setting

    A prospective population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden.

    Measurements

    Depressiveness was screened with the Geriatric Depression Scale at baseline and at 1-year follow-up, and the results were classified into ND, SSD, and syndromal depression. Data on individual healthcare costs and service use from a 5-year period were derived from national database registers. Direct costs were compared between categories using Mann-Whitney U tests, and a prediction model was identified with linear regression.

    Results

    For persons with SSD, the direct healthcare costs per month of survival exceeded those of persons with ND by a ratio 1.45 (€634 versus €436), a difference that was significant even after controlling for somatic multimorbidity. The final regression model consisted of five independent variables predicting direct healthcare costs: male sex, activities of daily living functions, loneliness, presence of SSD, and somatic multimorbidity.

    Conclusions

    SSD among very old persons is associated with increased direct healthcare costs independently of somatic multimorbidity. The associations between SSD, somatic multimorbidity, and healthcare costs in the very old need to be analyzed further in order to better guide allocation of resources in health policy.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2018
    Keywords
    Subthreshold depression; multimorbidity; oldest old; elderly; cost-of-illness; late-life depression
    National Category
    Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149695 (URN)10.1016/j.jagp.2018.03.007 (DOI)000436629200003 ()29673895 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045544057 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2018-07-24 Created: 2018-07-24 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
  • 34.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Subsyndromal Depression in Very Old Persons2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Subsyndromal depression (SSD) or subthreshold depression is a common affective condition that can be described as depressiveness below the threshold of what is called a syndromal or a major depressive episode. The point prevalence for SSD has been reported to be about 10% in the community, or about two or three times higher than the prevalence for syndromal depression. In elderly persons, SSD compared to non-depression (ND) is associated with impaired activities of daily living, lower cognitive function, lower self-perceived health, worse psychiatric outcomes and higher mortality. However, most studies on SSD in elderly persons have been done in the young old age group (age 60-80 years), while few studies have investigated SSD in very old persons (age 80+). As many aspects (e.g. multimorbidity, frailty, functional decline and social dependence) change between the young old and the very old ages, there is a need for more knowledge about SSD in the very old. The overall aim of this doctoral thesis was to describe SSD, or the complex area between syndromal depression and normal aging, in very old persons.

    Method: Paper 1 was based on qualitative interviews (n=27), while papers 2-4 were based largely on data from a prospective observational cohort study “Elderly in Linköping Screening Assessment” (ELSA85), with a population-based design following the participants from the age of 85 in three waves of follow-up. The 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) was used for measuring depressiveness and to define SSD in the studies.

    Results: The analysis of the qualitative interviews (paper 1) resulted in four themes (life curve and the body go down, to manage on one’s own, to keep up with life, and taking one day at a time), giving a comprehensive picture of SSD in very old age. In a comparison among SSD, ND and syndromal depression, SSD differed qualitatively from syndromal depression, but not clearly from ND. A cross-sectional analysis of data from baseline (paper 2) identified factors associated with SSD in very old persons, and according to analyses with multiple logistic and linear regressions, four domains (sociodemographic factors, declining physical functioning, neuropsychiatric factors, and existential factors) were significantly associated with SSD.

    A five-year longitudinal follow-up (paper 3) showed that direct healthcare costs per month of survival for persons with SSD exceeded those of persons with ND by a ratio of 1.45 (€634 vs €436), a difference that was significant even after controlling for somatic multimorbidity.

    An eight-year longitudinal follow-up (paper 4) showed that mortality was elevated (hazard ratio=1.33) for persons with SSD compared to ND, as were morbidity regarding basic ADL, IADL, loneliness, self-perceived health and depressiveness, whereas cognitive speed, executive functions and global cognitive function were not significantly impaired when adjusting for covariates.

    Conclusion: SSD in very old persons has a different presentation in different persons, and healthcare personnel should be attentive to other depressive signs beside the classical ones in the diagnostic classification registries. SSD in the very old is associated with elevated direct healthcare costs, morbidity and mortality. Considering the high prevalence of SSD and the demographic development of increasing numbers of very old people, the findings highlight the need to develop clinical and societal strategies to prevent SSD and associated negative outcomes.

    List of papers
    1. Normal Aging or Depression? A Qualitative Study on the Differences Between Subsyndromal Depression and Depression in Very Old People.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Normal Aging or Depression? A Qualitative Study on the Differences Between Subsyndromal Depression and Depression in Very Old People.
    2015 (English)In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 760-769Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of the Study: The aim of this study was to make a qualitative comparison of experiences of being in very old people with subsyndromal depression (SSD), in relation to the experiences of very old people with syndromal depression or nondepression. Through investigation and deeper understanding of the interface between depressive disease and normal aging, clinicians might give more accurate prevention or treatment to those very old persons who need such help.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted for 27 individuals of 87-88 years of age, who were categorized in the 3 strata of nondepressive, SSD, and syndromal depression. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative content analysis within each stratum and later with a comparison between the strata.

    RESULTS: The content analysis resulted in 4 themes in people with SSD, as defined by a self-report depression screening instrument, giving a comprehensive picture of SSD in very old people, and also showed qualitative differences between the SSD, syndromal depression, and nondepressive groups. A main finding was that SSD differs qualitatively from syndromal depression but not clearly from nondepression.

    IMPLICATIONS: The results might indicate that SSD in very old people is not related to pathology but to normal aging, even though the condition correlates with negative health parameters. Overlooking certain psychosocial aspects of living in the very old may pose a risk of both underdiagnosis and overdiagnosis in the spectrum of depressive disorders.

    Keywords
    Coping, Frailty, Healthy aging, Subthreshold depression, Successful aging
    National Category
    Psychiatry Geriatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120848 (URN)10.1093/geront/gnt162 (DOI)000362984500006 ()24398652 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Östergötland County Council
    Available from: 2015-08-27 Created: 2015-08-27 Last updated: 2018-07-26Bibliographically approved
    2. Markers of subsyndromal depression in very old persons.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Markers of subsyndromal depression in very old persons.
    2016 (English)In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 619-628Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate factors associated with subsyndromal depression (SSD) in very old persons, and to develop a model for prediction of SSD among very old persons.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional, population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden. Data were collected from a postal questionnaire, assessments in the participants' homes and at reception visits. Depressiveness was screened with GDS-15 (Geriatric Depression Scale), and the results were classified into three outcome categories: non-depression (ND), SSD and syndromal depression. Data were analysed with binary logistic, ordinal logistic and linear regression.

    RESULTS: With univariate logistic regression 20 factors associated with SSD were identified in very old persons, and the four hypothesized domains-sociodemographic factors, declining physical functioning, neuropsychiatric factors and existential factors-significantly related to SSD. The multivariate logistic model included seven independent factors that increase the likelihood of SSD instead of ND (lower self-perceived health, life not meaningful, problems with self-care, use of tranquilizing medication, no contact with neighbours, history of affective disorder and history of stroke). The ordinal logistic and the linear regression models resulted in seven partly different factors for predicting SSD and depressiveness, in the very old.

    CONCLUSIONS: The identified markers may help clinicians with the detection, prevention and treatment of SSD in very old persons. The findings indicate the importance of a comprehensive functional approach to diagnosing and treating depressiveness in this population, and the findings might be interpreted as offering support for the coexistence of a dimensional and a categorical view on depressive disorders.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
    National Category
    Geriatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127480 (URN)10.1002/gps.4369 (DOI)000374700000009 ()26489528 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2016-04-27 Created: 2016-04-27 Last updated: 2018-07-26
    3. Direct Costs of Very Old Persons with Subsyndromal Depression: A 5-Year Prospective Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Direct Costs of Very Old Persons with Subsyndromal Depression: A 5-Year Prospective Study
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry, ISSN 1064-7481, E-ISSN 1545-7214, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 741-751Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    This study aimed to compare, over a 5-year period, the prospective direct healthcare costs and service utilization of persons with subsyndromal depression (SSD) and non-depressive persons (ND), in a population of very old persons. A second aim was to develop a model that predicts direct healthcare costs in very old persons with SSD.

    Design and Setting

    A prospective population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden.

    Measurements

    Depressiveness was screened with the Geriatric Depression Scale at baseline and at 1-year follow-up, and the results were classified into ND, SSD, and syndromal depression. Data on individual healthcare costs and service use from a 5-year period were derived from national database registers. Direct costs were compared between categories using Mann-Whitney U tests, and a prediction model was identified with linear regression.

    Results

    For persons with SSD, the direct healthcare costs per month of survival exceeded those of persons with ND by a ratio 1.45 (€634 versus €436), a difference that was significant even after controlling for somatic multimorbidity. The final regression model consisted of five independent variables predicting direct healthcare costs: male sex, activities of daily living functions, loneliness, presence of SSD, and somatic multimorbidity.

    Conclusions

    SSD among very old persons is associated with increased direct healthcare costs independently of somatic multimorbidity. The associations between SSD, somatic multimorbidity, and healthcare costs in the very old need to be analyzed further in order to better guide allocation of resources in health policy.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2018
    Keywords
    Subthreshold depression; multimorbidity; oldest old; elderly; cost-of-illness; late-life depression
    National Category
    Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149695 (URN)10.1016/j.jagp.2018.03.007 (DOI)000436629200003 ()29673895 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045544057 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2018-07-24 Created: 2018-07-24 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
  • 35.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Direct Costs of Very Old Persons with Subsyndromal Depression: A 5-Year Prospective Study2018In: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry, ISSN 1064-7481, E-ISSN 1545-7214, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 741-751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    This study aimed to compare, over a 5-year period, the prospective direct healthcare costs and service utilization of persons with subsyndromal depression (SSD) and non-depressive persons (ND), in a population of very old persons. A second aim was to develop a model that predicts direct healthcare costs in very old persons with SSD.

    Design and Setting

    A prospective population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden.

    Measurements

    Depressiveness was screened with the Geriatric Depression Scale at baseline and at 1-year follow-up, and the results were classified into ND, SSD, and syndromal depression. Data on individual healthcare costs and service use from a 5-year period were derived from national database registers. Direct costs were compared between categories using Mann-Whitney U tests, and a prediction model was identified with linear regression.

    Results

    For persons with SSD, the direct healthcare costs per month of survival exceeded those of persons with ND by a ratio 1.45 (€634 versus €436), a difference that was significant even after controlling for somatic multimorbidity. The final regression model consisted of five independent variables predicting direct healthcare costs: male sex, activities of daily living functions, loneliness, presence of SSD, and somatic multimorbidity.

    Conclusions

    SSD among very old persons is associated with increased direct healthcare costs independently of somatic multimorbidity. The associations between SSD, somatic multimorbidity, and healthcare costs in the very old need to be analyzed further in order to better guide allocation of resources in health policy.

  • 36.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Education, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Baking together-the coordination of actions in activities involving people with dementia2016In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 38, p. 37-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores interaction and collaboration between people with dementia and their spouses in relation to the performance of household chores with the focus on instruction as an interactional context to engage the person with dementia in collaboration to accomplish joint activities. Dementia is generally associated with pathological changes in peoples cognitive functions such as diminishing memory functions, communicative abilities and also diminishing abilities to take initiative as well as to plan and execute tasks. Using video recordings of everyday naturally occurring activities, we analyze the sequential organization of actions (see Schegloff, 2007) oriented toward the accomplishment of a joint multi-task activity of baking. The analysis shows the specific ways of collaboration through instructional activities in which the person with dementia exhibits his competence and skills in accomplishing the given tasks through negotiating the instructions with his partner and carrying out instructed actions. Although the driving force of the collaboration seems to be a series of directive sequences only initiated by the partner throughout the baking activity, our analyses highlight how the person with dementia can actively use the material environment including collaborating partners to compensate for challenges and difficulties encountered in achieving everyday, tasks. The sequential organization of instructions and instructed actions are in this sense argued to provide an interactional environment wherein the person with dementia can make contributions to the joint activity in an efficient way. While a collaborator has been described as necessary for a person with dementia to be able to partake in activities, this study shows that people with dementia are not only guided by their collaborators in joint activities but they can also actively use their collaborators in intricate compensatory ways. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 37.
    Mall, John-Peter Ganda
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Ostlund-Lagerstrom, Lina
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Carl Marten
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Algilani, Samal
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Rasoal, Dara
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Repsilber, Dirk
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Brummer, Robert J.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schoultz, Ida
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Are self-reported gastrointestinal symptoms among older adults associated with increased intestinal permeability and psychological distress?2018In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 18, article id 75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite the substantial number of older adults suffering from gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms little is known regarding the character of these complaints and whether they are associated with an altered intestinal barrier function and psychological distress. Our aim was to explore the relationship between self-reported gut health, intestinal permeability and psychological distress among older adults. Methods: Three study populations were included: 1) older adults with GI symptoms (n = 24), 2) a group of older adults representing the general elderly population in Sweden (n = 22) and 3) senior orienteering athletes as a potential model of healthy ageing (n = 27). Questionnaire data on gut-health, psychological distress and level of physical activity were collected. Intestinal permeability was measured by quantifying zonulin in plasma. The level of systemic and local inflammation was monitored by measuring C-reactive protein (CRP), hydrogen peroxide in plasma and calprotectin in stool samples. The relationship between biomarkers and questionnaire data in the different study populations was illustrated using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Results: Older adults with GI symptoms displayed significantly higher levels of both zonulin and psychological distress than both general older adults and senior orienteering athletes. The PCA analysis revealed a separation between senior orienteering athletes and older adults with GI symptoms and showed an association between GI symptoms, psychological distress and zonulin. Conclusions: Older adults with GI symptoms express increased plasma levels of zonulin, which might reflect an augmented intestinal permeability. In addition, this group suffer from higher psychological distress compared to general older adults and senior orienteering athletes. This relationship was further confirmed by a PCA plot, which illustrated an association between GI symptoms, psychological distress and intestinal permeability.

  • 38.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal University, India.
    Taylor, Brian
    Taylor Audio LLC, MN USA.
    Dockens, Ashley L.
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Tran, Nicole R.
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Lane, Kayla
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Castle, Mariana
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Grover, Vibhu
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Applications of direct-to-consumer hearing devices for adults with hearing loss: a review2017In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, ISSN 1176-9092, E-ISSN 1178-1998, Vol. 12, p. 859-871Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This systematic literature review is aimed at investigating applications of direct-to-consumer hearing devices for adults with hearing loss. This review discusses three categories of direct-to-consumer hearing devices: 1) personal sound amplification products (PSAPs), 2) direct-mail hearing aids, and 3) over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids. Method: A literature review was conducted using EBSCOhost and included the databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO. After applying prior agreed inclusion and exclusion criteria, 13 reports were included in the review. Results: Included studies fell into three domains: 1) electroacoustic characteristics, 2) consumer surveys, and 3) outcome evaluations. Electroacoustic characteristics of these devices vary significantly with some meeting the stringent acoustic criteria used for hearing aids, while others producing dangerous output levels (ie, over 120-dB sound pressure level). Low-end (or low-cost) devices were typically poor in acoustic quality and did not meet gain levels necessary for most adult and elderly hearing loss patterns (eg, presbycusis), especially in high frequencies. Despite direct-mail hearing aids and PSAPs being associated with lower satisfaction when compared to hearing aids purchased through hearing health care professionals, consumer surveys suggest that 5%-19% of people with hearing loss purchase hearing aids through direct-mail or online. Studies on outcome evaluation suggest positive outcomes of OTC devices in the elderly population. Of note, OTC outcomes appear better when a hearing health care professional supports these users. Conclusion: While some direct-to-consumer hearing devices have the capability to produce adverse effects due to production of dangerously high sound levels and internal noise, the existing literature suggests that there are potential benefits of these devices. Research of direct-to-consumer hearing devices is limited, and current published studies are of weak quality. Much effort is needed to understand the benefits and limitations of such devices on people with hearing loss.

  • 39.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Garvin, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Psychological Resources Are Independently Associated with Markers of Inflammation in a Middle-Aged Community Sample2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 611-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To elucidate possible independent associations of psychological resources with inflammatory markers, all linked with coronary heart disease (CHD). Method In a middle-aged general population (n = 944), psychological resources (coping, self-esteem, and sense of coherence (SOC)), a global measure of quality of life (Cantrils self-anchoring ladder, also called "ladder of life"), and psychological risk factors (hopelessness, vital exhaustion, and depressive symptoms) were used in linear regression models to evaluate associations with the inflammatory markers interleukin (IL)-6, C-reactive protein (CRP), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Adjustments were done for age, sex, medical conditions, and cardiovascular risk factors. Results After full adjustments, self-esteem was independently associated with all three biomarkers. Ladder of life was associated with IL-6 and log-CRP; coping, vital exhaustion, and depressive symptoms with IL-6; and SOC with MMP-9 (p amp;lt; 0.05 for all associations). Conclusion Numerous significant associations of psychological resources and risk factors with IL-6, CRP, and MMP-9 were found in a community-based sample. The associations of psychological resources were mostly independent, while the psychological risk factors seemed preferentially dependent on lifestyle factors as smoking, physical activity, and body mass index (BMI). This suggests that the psychological resources (in particular self-esteem) protective effects on CHD are linked to inflammatory markers.

  • 40.
    Mok, Zaneta
    et al.
    La Trobe University, Australia.
    Müller, Nicole
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette, USA.
    Staging casual conversations for people with dementia.2014In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 834-853Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social isolation is a key concern for individuals with dementia in long-term care. A possible solution is to promote social interaction between residents. A first step toward facilitating positive relationships between residents with dementia is to understand the mechanisms behind their interactions with each other, and also how their relationships with each other are built through such interactions. Drawing on casual conversations between residents in a special care unit for dementia, this paper uses systemic functional linguistics to examine how people with dementia use language to enact and construct their role-relations with each other. Results suggest people with dementia are able and willing conversationalists. However, factors such as the extent of communication breakdown and compatibility of the interlocutors may influence whether positive relations develop or not. Casual conversation is suggested to be a promising activity to encourage positive interpersonal processes between individuals with dementia in residential care.

  • 41.
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    et al.
    German Centre for Gerontology, Manfred-von-Richthofen-Strasse 2, 12101, Berlin, Germany.
    von Kondratowitz, Hans-Joachim
    German Centre for Gerontology, Manfred-von-Richthofen-Strasse 2, 12101, Berlin, Germany.
    Tesch-Römer, Clemens
    German Centre for Gerontology, Manfred-von-Richthofen-Strasse 2, 12101, Berlin, Germany.
    Social inequality in the later life: Cross-national comparison of quality of life2004In: European Journal of Ageing, ISSN 1613-9372, E-ISSN 1613-9380, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 6-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses quality of life and inequality in old age in an international comparative and a life course perspective. Quality of life is seen as an outcome of unequal chances in life. We distinguish between overall and domain specific expressions of quality of life which allows us to analyse the determinants of overall quality of life and their development over the life course. The data presented come from the research project “OASIS - Old Age and Autonomy: The Role of Service Systems and Intergenerational Family Solidarity”. This data set is based on an age stratified random sample of the urban population (25–102 years) in Norway, England, Germany, Spain, and Israel (n=6,106). With advancing age, there are decreasing mean levels and increasing variation of quality of life. With age, the impact of physical health on overall quality of life increases, while the predictive power of other domains decreases. The results support the hypothesis of differentiation as well as the age-dependency hypothesis. For both these both aspects, international comparisons show similar results in different societies. These uniform age tendencies in modern European societies point to a limited importance of societal embeddedness and support the interpretation of age group differences as being life course effects.

  • 42.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mok, Zaneta
    La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    “Getting to know you”: Situated and distributed cognition in conversation with dementia2014In: Dialogue and Dementia: Cognitive and Communicative Resources for Engagement / [ed] Robert Schrauf, Nicole Müller, New York: Psychology Press, 2014, p. 61-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Schrauf, Robert
    The Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA.
    Conversation as cognition: reframing cognition in dementia2014In: Dialogue and Dementia: Cognitive and Communicative Resources for Engagement / [ed] Robert Schrauf, Nicole Müller, New York: Psychology Press, 2014, p. 3-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    O'Connor, Deborah
    Centre for Research on Personhood and Dementia, University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Editorial introduction: Special issue on Citizenship and Dementia.2016In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 285-288Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Support, protection and citizenship: The case of people living with dementia in Sweden2016In: Risk and resilience: global learning across the age span / [ed] Charlotte Clarke, Sarah Rhynas, Matthias Schwannauer and Julie Taylor, Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic Press, 2016, p. 116-129Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    To protect and to support: How citizenship and self-determination are legally constructed and managed in practice for people living with dementia in Sweden2016In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 343-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since living with dementia implies increasing difficulties in taking charge of rights due to cognitive as well as communicative impairments, many people with dementia are vulnerable and in need of support in order to realize full citizenship. In Sweden, all adults right to self-determination is strongly emphasized in law, regulations, and policies. Further, and in contrast to the situation in many other countries, people living with dementia cannot be declared as incompetent of making decisions concerning social care and their right to self-determination cannot legally be taken away. The article shows that in the Swedish welfare system, the focus is more on protecting the self-determination of citizens than on supporting people in making decisions and exercising citizenship. Subsequently, this causes legally constructed zones of inclusion and exclusion. This article examines and problematizes how different institutional contexts, legal constructions, norms, and practices in Sweden affect the management of issues concerning guardianship, supported decision-making and self-determination, and outline the implications for people living with dementia.

  • 47.
    Nielsen, T. Rune
    et al.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Antelius, Eleonor
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Waldemar, Gunhild
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cognitive Advantages in Adult Turkish Bilingual Immigrants - a Question of the Chicken or the Egg2019In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, ISSN 0169-3816, E-ISSN 1573-0719, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 115-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of studies suggest both cognitive disadvantages and advantages of bilingualism. In the current study, it is attempted to provide an account of the cognitive advantages associated with bilingualism in a Turkish immigrant population in Denmark.The total sample consisted of 71 middle-aged and older adults born and raised in Turkey who had migrated to Denmark in their teenage years or later. All participants were assessed with a neuropsychological test battery and degree of Turkish-Danish bilingualism was estimated via rater assessment according to a three-point scale. Associations between bilingualism and cognitive function were established for five cognitive domains: executive function, memory, language, visuospatial function and speed. Analysis of covariance was used to estimate the independent association between bilingualism and cognitive function for each cognitive domain. Covariates included education, gender, ethnicity, and proportion of life lived in Denmark. In unadjusted analyses, greater degree of bilingualism was associated with better executive functioning (pamp;lt;.001), visuospatial functioning (p=.002) and speed (pamp;lt;.001). However, in analyses adjusted for covariates only executive functioning (p=.01) and task switching ability (p=.01) remained significant, while a trend for better memory function was found in those with a high degree of bilingualism (p=.07).The current study indicates that bilingual Turkish immigrants have better executive functioning and episodic memory compared to Turkish immigrant monolinguals. Whether this is due to the effects of bilingualism or reflects inherent cognitive abilities in those able to acquire bilingualism in later life remains to be resolved.

  • 48.
    Nordgren, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Arts and Humanities. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Emerging technologies and vulnerable people: The case of assistive technologies for persons with dementia2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dementia has emerged as a problem to be tackled by various assistive technologies, for example, mobile safety alarms with GPS positioning, fall detectors and adapted internet for social contact. However, persons with dementia are vulnerable, suggesting that such technologies should be used with caution. It is a common experience among care professionals that persons with dementia often show resistiveness to care. This resistiveness is an indication of their vulnerable condition. They are sometimes not aware of what is in their best interest. In this paper I discuss how to handle resistiveness to assistive technologies among these patients. Some assistive technologies for persons with dementia can be beneficial provided that they are used with special consideration of their vulnerable condition. However, it can be a delicate task to overcome resistiveness while at the same time respecting their autonomy. I suggest how this can be done in a stepwise manner. Special attention is given to the concept of nudging. I also indicate under which circumstances some form of coercion might be justified.

  • 49.
    Pham, Tuan D
    et al.
    Aizu Research Cluster for Medical Engineering and Informatics, Center for Advanced Information Science and Technology, The University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, Japan.
    Oyama-Higa, Mayumi
    Chaos Technology Research Lab, Shiga, Japan.
    Truong, Cong-Thang
    School of Computer Science and Engineering, The University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, Japan.
    Okamoto, Kazushi
    School of Nursing and Health, Aichi Prefectural University, Aichi, Japan.
    Futaba, Terufumi
    Faculty of Intercultural Communication, Ryukoku University, Shiga, Japan.
    Kanemoto, Shigeru
    School of Computer Science and Engineering, The University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, Japan.
    Sugiyama, Masahide
    School of Computer Science and Engineering, The University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, Japan.
    Lampe, Lisa
    Discipline of Psychiatry, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    Computerized assessment of communication for cognitive stimulation for people with cognitive decline using spectral-distortion measures and phylogenetic inference2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 1-29, article id e0118739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Therapeutic communication and interpersonal relationships in care homes can help people to improve their mental wellbeing. Assessment of the efficacy of these dynamic and complex processes are necessary for psychosocial planning and management. This paper presents a pilot application of photoplethysmography in synchronized physiological measurements of communications between the care-giver and people with dementia. Signal-based evaluations of the therapy can be carried out using the measures of spectral distortion and the inference of phylogenetic trees. The proposed computational models can be of assistance and cost-effectiveness in caring for and monitoring people with cognitive decline.

  • 50.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Toronto, Canada; Toronto Rehabil Institute, Canada; Rotman Research Institute, Canada.
    Dupuis, Kate
    University of Toronto, Canada; Toronto Rehabil Institute, Canada; Baycrest Health Science, Canada.
    Smith, Sherri L.
    Vet Affairs Medical Centre, TN USA; E Tennessee State University, TN 37614 USA.
    EFFECTS OF VOCAL EMOTION ON MEMORY IN YOUNGER AND OLDER ADULTS2016In: Experimental Aging Research, ISSN 0361-073X, E-ISSN 1096-4657, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 18-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Study Context: Emotional content can enhance memory for visual stimuli, and older adults often perform better if stimuli portray positive emotion. Vocal emotion can enhance the accuracy of word repetition in noise when vocal prosody portrays attention-capturing emotions such as fear and pleasant surprise. In the present study, the authors examined the effect of vocal emotion on the accuracy of repetition and recall in younger and older adults when words are presented in quiet or in a background of competing babble.Methods: Younger and older adults (M-age = 20 and 72years, respectively) participated. Lists of 100 items (carrier phrase plus target word) were presented in recall sets of increasing size. Word repetition accuracy was tested after each item and recall after each trial in each set size. In Experiment 1, one list spoken in a neutral voice and another with emotion (fear, pleasant surprise, sad, neutral) were presented in quiet (n = 24 per group). In Experiment 2, participants (n = 12 per group) were presented the emotional list in noise.Results: In quiet, word repetition accuracy was near perfect for both groups and did not vary systematically with set size for the list spoken in a neutral voice; however, for the emotional list, repetition was less accurate, especially for the older group. Recall in quiet was higher for younger than older adults; collapsed over groups, recall was higher for the neutral than for the emotional list and it decreased with increasing set size. In noise, emotion-specific effects emerged; word repetition for the older group and word recall for both groups (more for younger than older) was best for fear or pleasant surprise and worst for sad.Conclusion: In quiet, vocal emotion reduced the word repetition accuracy of the older group and recall accuracy for both groups. In noise, there were emotion-specific effects on the repetition accuracy of older adults and the recall accuracy of both groups. Both groups, but especially the younger group, performed better for items portraying fear or pleasant surprise and worse for items portraying sadness or neutral emotion. The emotion-specific effects on word repetition cascade to recall, especially in older listeners.

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