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  • 1.
    Lundgren, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Swedish Studies and Comparative Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zetterqvist Carlsson, Mari
    MZ Equitation, Sweden.
    “And now the ancle a bit further back”: Interaction analyses of trainers and riders work with horse-rider communication in dressage training2014In: CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS 10TH INTERNATIONAL EQUITATION SCIENCE CONFERENCE, DCA - Danish Centre for Food and Agriculture , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the equestrian sports we agree that the communication between horse and rider forms the core of good riding. This communication is therefore often the main focus of for instance a dressage training session. However, in-depth analyses of how the communication between horse and rider is used as an educational resource in training are scarce. Here, theories and methods from communication and learning science are brought together to show how trainers and riders together address this communication during intermediate level dressage training. The results presented are based on a qualitative, mixed methods study, combining interactional analyses of 15 hrs of video recordings of dressage trainings and phenomenographic analysis of interviews with the participants. Analyses of the interviews show the complexity of these learning situations: the foci of the training sessions vary depending on the riders’ and the horses’ condition and the goals set up by the human participants as well as on the experience of the horse and the rider. Regardless of the didactical focus (on training the rider, training the rider to train the horse or training the horse) and the scope of the training session, the analyses of the video recordings show how all trainers orient towards the horse-rider interaction in essentially the same three ways. The trainers give verbal instructions aimed at modifying the horse-rider communication, they use their own bodies as models and they intervene physically by for instance altering the posture of the rider, the position of parts of the rider’s body or showing the correct degree of pressure to be applied in a certain situation (and combinations of the above). However, trainers do not always set the agenda for the discussions. When given the opportunity, many riders participate actively the discussions. During the presentation, extracts from the video material will be used as illustrations of these findings. By enlightening the complex interaction between the participants as well as the interaction’s intrinsic connections to the goals of the training, it becomes possible to discuss (and further develop) the communication in the horse-rider-trainer triad within both the equestrian and the scientific communities.

  • 2.
    Lönning, Jennifer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology.
    Göth, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology.
    Flykting söker bonde: Hur nyanlända flyktingars kompetens kan tillvaratas i lantbruksföretag2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Despite technological progress and efficiency in the agricultural sector there is a need for labor. Meanwhile it has been shown that newly arrived refugees have skills and experience in agriculture that are not taken advantage of but they have difficulty accessing the farming industry. Our purpose was to examine and understand the conditions existing in the Swedish Agricultural business and to be able to develop an employment strategy involving newly arrived refugees. In order to achieve that purpose we interviewed five newly arrived refugees, three farmers, three project managers and two representatives from the Employment Service. The result shows that there are several parts involved that are significant to enable an employment strategy in acricultural business by utilizing the skills of newly arrived refugees. Due to the different situations, conditions and purposes of these parts it is found to be a comlex process. The result shows a number of different obstacles and opportunities on both an individual, organizational and societal level which are important and should be considered in the design of such an employment strategy. 

  • 3.
    Mandere, Nicodemus
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Persson, Andreas
    Lunds universitet.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pilesjö, Petter
    Lunds universitet.
    Tropical Sugar Beet Land Evaluation Scheme: TSBLES: Development, validation and application under Kenyan conditions2010In: GeoJournal, ISSN 0343-2521, E-ISSN 1572-9893, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 215-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Kenya the government is promoting diversification of crops to embrace high value crops and drought resistant crop varieties in efforts to reduce poverty in rural areas. Sugar beet is one of the crops considered as an option in this context and it is therefore important to increase knowledge about the potentials in the country for cultivating this crop. Sugar beet trials conducted in Nyandarua and Butere Mumias Districts of Kenya have shown that the crop yields are comparable to those obtained in traditional sugar-beet cultivation regions of Europe. Since sugar beet yield is affected by climate and soils, the results of Nyandarua and Butere Mumias sugar beet trials are not adequate to propose that comparable yields can be obtained elsewhere in the country and other tropical regions. Physical land evaluations assessing the potentials and constraints for sugar beet production are therefore essential. The objectives of this study was to develop a Tropical Sugar Beet Land Evaluation Scheme (TSBLES) that can aid assessment of the suitability of different areas in the tropics for sugar beet cultivation; and to test this scheme for an assessment of suitable sugar beet zones and land areas in Kenya. The development of the scheme was based on various literature sources and expert judgment on sugar beet requirements, and a Tropical Sugar Beet yield prediction Model. The TSBLES accounts for physical conditions of land i.e. climatic, edaphic and topographic conditions. According to the assessment results 27% of the land area in Kenya is suitable for sugar beet cultivation. Of this area, 5% is highly suitable, another 5% is moderately suitable and 17% is marginally suitable. Most of the highly suitable land area is concentrated in Rift Valley, Central and Nyanza provinces. The Rift Valley has the highest share of the suitable land area.

  • 4.
    Nkurunziza, Libère
    et al.
    Department of Crop Production Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    de Toro, Alfredo
    Department of Crop Production Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    von Rosen, Dietrich
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematical Statistics . Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Department of Crop Production Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Eckersten, Henrik
    Department of Crop Production Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Effects of extreme weather on yields of major cereal crops in Sweden: Analysis of long-term experiment data2015In: Aspects of Applied Biology, ISSN 0265-1491, Vol. 128, p. 165-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Weather is one of the key factors controlling crop growth and development. To support decision making, it is essential to know how often extreme weather events have affected crop production and the weather indices that cause them. We used long-term experiment data at four locations in Sweden to evaluate the effects of extreme weather on four major cereal crops: winter wheat, spring wheat, barley and oats. Yield reductions during 1965-2010 differed between crops and locations; with greater variation for spring cereals than winter wheat. For about 2-8 years and 1-2 years, out of the 45 years, yield reductions were 30% and 50%, respectively. For these years the total precipitation during early growth and/or harvest time deviated more than 30% from normal more often, than for years with yield reductions less than 30% (or higher yields). However, such deviations in precipitation were common for the whole 46 year period, and using these weather indices as single predictors of yield reductions would fail in the majority of years.

  • 5.
    Solberg, Svein Øivind
    et al.
    Nordic Genetic Resource Center, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Kolodinska Brantestam, Agnese
    University of Latvia, Institute of Biology, Salaspils LV-2169, Latvia.
    Olsson, Kestin
    Nordic Genetic Resource Center, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Leino, Matti
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. National Museum of Cultural History (Nordiska Museet), Julita, Sweden.
    Weibull, Jens
    Swedish Board of Agriculture, Plant and Environment Department, Plant Regulations Division, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Yndgaard, Flemming
    Nordic Genetic Resource Center, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Diversity in local cultivars of Pisum sativum collected from home gardens in Sweden2015In: Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, ISSN 0305-1978, E-ISSN 1873-2925, Vol. 62, p. 194-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although one would assume that finding any local cultivars in home gardens in a modern society such as Sweden is unlikely, such cultivars were in fact found. More than 170 seed accessions of vegetables, pulses and other seed-propagated garden crops maintained in home gardens and dating back at least to the 1950s have been assembled following the nationwide ‘Seed Call’. Of these, 32 garden pea accessions were taxonomically characterized and compared with 43 accessions already present in the gene bank. In addition tomorphological descriptors, SSR and retrotransposon-based iPBS markers were applied. Based on five SSR markers, potential duplicates could be located within nine pair/groups, or 25% of the accessions. Through combining this analysis with iPBS markers, the potential duplicates were reduced to five pair/groups. Combination of markers and the morphological descriptors further reduced the number to two groups; one group including four wrinkle-seeded accessions and one including two other wrinkle-seeded accessions. Acombination of genotypic and phenotypic markers proved a good method to identify trueand false duplicates. The results showed that the ‘Seed Call’ complements the NordGen collection and broadens the collection's genetic diversity. No clustering according to region of origin could be found, suggesting that the collected material predominantly represents old cultivars.

  • 6.
    Zetterqvist Carlsson, Mari
    et al.
    MZ Equitation, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Swedish Studies and Comparative Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Riders´ perception of their communication with the horse2014In: CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS 10TH INTERNATIONAL EQUITATION SCIENCE CONFERENCE: ISES 2014 10TH INTERNATIONAL EQUITATION SCIENCE CONFERENCE, DCA- Danish Centre for Food and Agriculture , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is part of a project with the overall aim to improve riding education through a better understanding of the interplay between rider, riding instructor and horse. The rider influences the horse through a combination of weight, leg and rein aids together with the voice. The horse responds to these and the rider receives and interprets these responses. The current study aimed to describe and analyse the riders´ perceptions and views on this communication. Fifteen experienced riders (all female) of intermediate level in dressage were recruited to participate in the study, most of them riding their own horses. The riders received private training from five experienced riding instructors/trainers. One training of each rider was video and audio recorded. Directly after the training, the riders watched 10 minutes from the video recording (stimulated recall) followed by a semi-structured in-depth interview. The riders were asked to give a general description of how they communicated with their horses. They were also asked to describe how they interpreted the horse’s responses to the rider’s signals and how they acted when the horse responded/or did not respond to their signals. The results showed that all riders were well aware of the importance of giving clear and precise signals to the horse and to remove a given signal (aid) as soon as the horse responds. Most riders (12 of 15) agreed that it is essential to check that the horse responds to the rider’s basic signals in the beginning of each training session. The riders also pointed out that it is important to adjust the aids to the character of the horse and to the current physical and mental status of their horse. When the horses responded correctly on the rider’s aids, the riders praised the horse either by using their voice or by petting the horse. When the horse did not respond as the rider wished, the riders generally repeated or strengthened their signals until they received a desired response. Interestingly, a major part of the riders (13 of 15) blamed themselves when the communication with the horse failed. In conclusion, the riders seemed to be aware of the practical application of the basic principles of learning theory, even if they were not familiar with the terminology. However, the riders also reported that in practice they perceived difficulties to control their own bodies and to adequately give and release their signals.

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