liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 102
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Anderson, Tony
    et al.
    University of Strathclyde, UK.
    Wiggins, Sally
    University of Strathclyde, UK.
    Criticising the critic: Comments on Jahoda's (2012) Critique of discursive social psychology2014In: Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour, ISSN 0021-8308, E-ISSN 1468-5914, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 123-129Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Jahoda (2012) criticizes discursive social psychology (DSP) on several differentgrounds; specifically, he argues that DSP has opaque methodological procedures,is of questionable scientific merit, involves over-interpretation of its data, andimplicitly claims its findings to be universal rather than contextually specific. Wechallenge these criticisms by arguing that observational studies of the kind typicalwithin DSP research have a perfectly valid place within a scientific social psychol-ogy, that the interpretations made by DSP researchers should be seen in thecontext of a temporally extended research process in which they are subject tocriticism and potential replication, and that Jahoda is himself guilty of over-interpretation by inferring claims of universality when such an inference is notwarranted by the data (i.e. the qualitative content of the sample of research papersconsidered by Jahoda).

  • 2.
    Andrén, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Children's expressive handling of objects in a shared world2017In: Intercorporeality: Emerging Socialities in Interaction / [ed] Christian Meyer, J Streeck and J. Scott Jordan, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 105-141Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theories of embodied interaction and environmental coupling have come a long way in their struggle with the slippery notions of mind, matter and sociality, but there is a need for systematic documentation of actual social practices to be carried out from this perspective, especially in relation to children. When parent- child interaction takes place in contexts where physical objects are involved, the handling of an object may suddenly stand out as having expressive (gestural) qualities over and above the instrumental aspects that may also be involved. What sort of expressive qualities may be found in such actions? What is it about these movements, in their context, that provide for their expressive qualities? In short, how do they come to mean (see also Cuffari & Streeck, this volume)? The aim is to provide a principled and systematic approach to address these questions, by focusing on micro-ecologies of expression that have their basis in how human bodies handle objects. The approach is applied to data from five Swedish children, recorded longitudinally between 18–30 months, in an attempt to begin answering the questions above. Asking such questions — empirically, theoretically, and conceptually — is a logical consequence of an approach to intersubjectivity that views it as emergent from embodied interaction. This view of intersubjectivity is a synthesis of, first and foremost, the work of Schutz, Mead and Merlau-Ponty.

  • 3.
    Birkehag, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ansvariga mammor, valbara pappor och ojämställda "andra": Psykologers konstruktioner av kön samt etnicitet och ras relaterat till föräldraskap inom barn- och ungdomspsykiatrin2015Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Psykologer och barn- och ungdomspsykiatrin kan förstås som delar av de professioner och institutioner som i Sverige är med och formar föräldraskapets innehåll och utformning. Syftet med studien var att undersöka hur psykologer inom barn- och ungdomspsykiatrin i Sverige konstruerar kön och etnicitet/ras i relation till föräldraskap samt att undersöka vilken funktion konstruktionerna har för att upprätthålla eller utmana hegemoniska konstruktioner av kön och etnicitet/ras. Tio psykologer verksamma inom barn- och ungdomspsykiatrin intervjuades och materialet analyserades med metoden kritisk diskurspsykologi.

    Resultatet visade att psykologer konstruerar kön som att moderskap består av självklar och nödvändig närvaro och faderskap av valbar, positiv och kompletterande närvaro. Moderskap konstrueras vidare som tillgänglighet och omsorgsfullhet, och som en möjlig orsak till barnets problem eller psykiska ohälsa. Psykologerna konstruerar även föräldrarnas kön heteronormativt samt konstruerar kön relaterat till föräldraskap som könsneutralt. Psykologerna konstruerar etnicitet/ras relaterat till föräldraskap som att etnicitet inte har någon betydelse, varvat med en konstruktion av ”vi mot dem”, där svenskar ställs mot icke-europeiska föräldrar, och där ”de andras” familjerelationer konstrueras som präglade av könsmakt. Konstruktionernas funktion diskuteras och värdera slutligen.

  • 4. Blomberg, Stefan
    Individen i organisationen2015In: Organisationspsykologi / [ed] Johan Näslund, Stefan Jern, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, p. 223-244Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Blomberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Arbets- och miljömedicin, Linköpings universitetssjukhus.
    Mobbning på jobbet: Uttryck och åtgärder2016 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad är egentligen mobbning och vad skiljer det från vanliga konflikter? Hur påverkas de utsatta? Hur ska mobbning bäst hanteras på en arbetsplats och hur kan samhället motverka mobbning? Baserat på den senaste forskningen och utifrån stor egen erfarenhet av att möta utsatta människor besvarar författaren ingående dessa frågor. Varje kapitel inleds med utförliga fallbeskrivningar som levandegör de olika perspektiv som lyfts fram.

    Boken vänder sig till universitetsstuderande inom t.ex. personalarbete och psykologi, liksom till praktiker såsom chefer, fackliga representanter och personer verksamma inom personalarbete och företagshälsovård. Boken är också värdefull för kliniskt verksamma personer som i sitt arbete möter utsatta. Boken kan dessutom läsas av personer som av eget intresse vill lära sig mer om mobbning i arbetslivet.

  • 6.
    Bouchard, Karen
    et al.
    Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
    Forsberg, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Smith, David J
    Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Showing friendship. fighting back, and getting even: resisting bullying victimisation within adolescent girls´friendships2018In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1141-1158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research suggests that about a quarter of bullying incidences occur within friendships. Yet little attention is given to the underlying social processes and wider macro-system forces that shape friendship victimization experiences. Guided by constructivist grounded theory and Wade's work on resistance, this research explored the phenomenon of victimization within adolescent girls’ friendships. Canadian women reflecting on their school-based victimization experiences were interviewed for this study. Results suggest that participants resisted victimization in important ways but that their resistance strategies were negotiated within gender expectations and ambient discursive constructions of resistance and victimization. Our findings illuminate the ways that discourses concealing women's resistance and privileging overt responses to bullying run counter to gendered expectations for resistance, leaving women in a double bind. Consequently, we found that retaliatory relational aggression allowed girls to deny their victim status while complying with gendered expectations for resistance but led to their bullying experiences being normalized and overlooked.

  • 7.
    Broth, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Levin, Lena
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI).
    Showing where you're going: Instructing the accountable use of the indicator in live traffic2018In: International Journal of Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0802-6106, E-ISSN 1473-4192, Vol. 28, p. 248-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article takes an interest in how students at a driving school areinstructed how to make the car's behaviour intelligible (accountable)to other road users in traffic. Taking the indicator as an example,the analytic focus is on the ways in which the indicator'srelevance is instructed and its timely activation practiced, andhow activating the indicator is instructed as part of moreencompassing turning procedures. The indicator is one of the centralresources built into cars for displaying to others a driver'sintention about where to go next. Although indicating does not,in itself, affect the movement of the car, activating the indicatoris crucial for allowing others to anticipate a car's movement inspace, and coordinate themselves with it. The analysis showshow instructors manage trainee drivers' instructed actions duringdriving by providing descriptions of what using the indicatoraccomplishes before a directive to turn (a), after a directive to turn(b), and as accounts for initiating correction of trainee driver carcontrol activity (c).

  • 8.
    Brüggemann, Adrianus Jelmer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Forsberg, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Colnerud, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Bystander passivity in health care and school settings: Moral disengagement, moral distress, and opportunities for moral education2018In: Journal of Moral Education, ISSN 0305-7240, E-ISSN 1465-3877, article id 1471391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bystander passivity has received increased attention in the prevention of interpersonal harm, but it is poorly understood in many settings. In this article we explore bystander passivity in three settings based on existing literature: patient abuse in health care; bullying among schoolchildren; and oppressive treatment of students by teachers. Throughout the article we develop a theoretical approach that connects Obermann's unconcerned and guiltybystanders to theories of moral disengagement and moral distress respectively. Despite differences between the three settings, we show striking similarities between processes of disengagement, indicators of distress, and the constraints for intervention that bystanders identify. In relation to this, we discuss moral educational efforts that aim to strengthen bystanders’ moral agency in health care and school settings. Many efforts emphasize shared problem descriptions and collective responsibilities. As challenging as such efforts may be, there can be much to gain in terms of welfare and justice.

  • 9.
    Cornell, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Dahlström, Alexandra
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Zenkovic, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    ”Jag tror att alla upplever stress”: – En studie om studenters upplevelser av stress2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie har som syfte att få en förståelse för vilka aspekter av stress det finns bland studenter som läser fristående kurs på Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande vid Linköpings Universitet. Studien undersöker hur studenter upplever stress samt vilken omfattning inre och yttre stressorer påverkar studentens studieliv. Studien tillämpar först en kvalitativ metod som sedan följs av en kvantitativ metod. Studien nyttjar två olika förhållningssätt, inledningsvis är studien induktiv och sedan kompletteras studien deduktivt. Studien består av nio kvalitativa intervjuer där fyra informanter representerar enheterna CSN, Studentbostäder, Studenthälsan samt Studievägledning vid Linköpings Universitet och fem informanter är studenter som läser fristående kurs på Linköpings Universitet. Studien består även av en enkätundersökning av 72 informanter som är studenter som läser fristående kurs på Linköpings Universitet. Studiens resultat är uppdelade i en kvalitativ och en kvantitativ del för att sedan analyserats och diskuterats i relation till varandra. I resultatet framgår att det både finns yttre samt inre stressorer som bidrar till att en student som läser fristående kurs upplever stress.

  • 10.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Conversation analysis and emergency calls2013In: The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics / [ed] Carol A. Chapelle, Wiley-Blackwell, 2013, p. 982-985Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calls for emergency assistance are operated by a range of organizations across the world, including local police authorities, medical institutions, and dedicated dispatch centers.

  • 11.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Working towards trouble: Some categorial resources for accomplishing disputes in a correctional youth facility2012In: Disputes in Everyday Life: Social and Moral Orders of Children and Young People / [ed] Susan Danby & Maryanne Theobald, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2012, p. 141-163Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Volume 15 of Sociological Studies of Children and Youth investigates the interactional procedures used by children and young people as disputes arise in varying contexts of their everyday life. Disputes are a topic of angst and anxiety for children, young people and adults alike, and yet are important times for interactional matters to be addressed. A particular intention of the book is its ethnomethodological focus, bringing a fine-grained analysis and understanding to disputes and related interactional matters. Such analysis highlights the in situ competency of children and young people as they manage their social relationships and disputes to offer insight into how children arrange their social lives within the context of school, home, neighbourhood, correctional, club and after school settings. This volume offers a contemporary understanding of the relational matters of childrens peer cultures to better understand and address the complex nature of children and young peoples everyday lives in todays society. 

  • 12.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Persson-Thunqvist, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    ‘‘SOS 112 what has occurred?’’: Managing openings in children’s emergency calls2012In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 183-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the initial exchanges in calls to the Swedish emergency services, focusing on callers’ responses to the standardised opening phrase “SOS one one two, what has occurred?”. Comparisons across three age groups – children, teenagers and adults – revealed significant differences in caller behaviour. Whereas teenagers and adults offered reports of the incident, child callers were more prone to request dispatch of specific assistance units. This pattern was only observable when children were accompanied by an adult relative, which leads us to propose that child callers may be operating under prior adult instruction concerning how to request help. The second part of the analysis examines the local organisation of participants' actions, showing how turn-design and sequencing manifest the local concerns of the two parties. The analysis thus combines quantitative and qualitative methods to explore the ways through which the parties jointly produce an early sense of emergency incidents. These results are discussed in terms of children's agency and competence as informants granted to them by emergency operators, and how such competence ascriptions run against commonsense conceptualisations of children as less-than-full-fledged members of society.

  • 13.
    Einarsson, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Konflikter mellan grupper: teorier om intergruppskonflikter1996Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     

    The aim of this report is to present and discuss different theories about intergroup conflicts.  By  way  of  introduction  some  concepts  are  discussed  and  explored; intergroup behaviour and relations, interpersonal relations, intergroup relations and boundaries.  Further,  how  conflicts  between  groups  arise  are  explored.  Different theories trying to explain intergroup conflicts are presented and discussed.

    A conclusion in the report is that most of the theories explaining intergroup conflicts are  based  on  individual psychology theories.  The  extent to  what  these  different theories can explain intergroup conflicts differs. An extension of group theories ought be a better way to explain this area.

  • 14.
    Eriksson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies – CKS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Brukarrörelsen som drivkraft för en mer (psyko)social psykiatri2017In: Socialpsykiatrins grunder: människans villkor / [ed] Magnus Englander, Karin Ingvarsdotter, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2017, 1, p. 71-91Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Per A
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Moderators of the disapproval of peer punishment.2016In: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, ISSN 1368-4302, E-ISSN 1461-7188, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 152-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have found disapproval of peer punishment of norm violations. This seems puzzling, given the potential benefits peer punishers contribute to the group. We suggest part of the answer is that peer punishers tend to come across as aggressive and as such may be viewed as more problematic than beneficial to have around. We used simple computer animations of geometric shapes to enact 15 precise variations of social sanctions against a norm violator. More than 1,800 subjects were recruited to watch an animation and judge the behavior and character of the animated agents. They also completed a trait aggression measure. Across the variations peer punishment was typically disapproved of, especially when severe or openly aggressive, and especially by subjects low on trait aggression. We conclude that there seems to be a social norm against peer punishment and that dislike of aggressiveness seems to be part of the reason why.

  • 16.
    Forsberg, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rosenbaum, Laura
    Georgia State University.
    Smith, Jennifer
    Georgia State University.
    Varjas, Kristen
    Georgia State University.
    Meyers, Joel
    Georgia State University.
    Jungert, Tomas
    Lunds universitet.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    A cross-cultural study on students' reasons for defending or not defending as a bystander to bullying2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Forsberg, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Bystanders to bullying: Fourth- to seventh-grade students' perspectives on their reactions2014In: Research Papers in Education, ISSN 0267-1522, E-ISSN 1470-1146, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 557-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim with the present study was to investigate bystander actions in bullying situations as well as reasons behind these actions as they are articulated by Swedish students from fourth to seventh grade. Forty-three semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with students. Qualitative analysis of data was performed by methods from grounded theory. The analysis of the student voices of being a bystander in bullying reveals a complexity in which different definition-of-situation processes are evoked (a) relations (friends and social hierarchy), (b) defining seriousness, (c) victim’s contribution to the situation, (d) social roles and intervention responsibilities, and (e) distressing emotions. There are often conflicted motives in how to act as a bystander, which could evoke moral distress among the students. Our analysis is unique in that it introduces the concept of moral distress as a process that has to be considered in order to better understand bystander actions among children The findings also indicate bystander reactions that could be associated with moral disengagement, such as not perceiving a moral obligation to intervene if the victim is defined as a non-friend (‘none of my business’), protecting the friendship with the bully, and blaming the victim.

  • 18.
    Forsberg, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The social ordering of belonging: Students’ perspectives on bullying2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Forsberg, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fourth- to seventh grade students' perspectives on bystander roles and bullying situations2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Forsberg, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Wood, Laura
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Smith, Jennifer
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Varjas, Kristen
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Meyers, Joel
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Jungert, Tomas
    Lunds universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Students’ views of factors affecting their bystander behaviors in response to school bullying: a cross-collaborative conceptual qualitative analysis2018In: Research Papers in Education, ISSN 0267-1522, E-ISSN 1470-1146, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 127-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to focus on how students articulate and discuss what factors influence students’ decisions to defend or not defend victims when witnessing bullying. In this unique qualitative cross-collaborative study, where two research teams collected interviews from two cultural contexts, eighty-nine students with an age-range from 9 to 14 years old participated. Participants included 43 Swedish students and 46 US students (50 girls, 39 boys). The interviews were analysed through a collaborative qualitative analysis aimed at constructing shared concepts of our data as a whole. The results revealed five broad factors among the students when they reasoned about how they act as a bystander in bullying situations: (a) informed awareness, (b) bystander expectations, (c) personal feelings, (d) behavioural seriousness, and (e) sense of responsibility. The results indicated that each of these considerations could make the students more or less likely to defend as well as to defend in a certain way. According to these five broad factors, students seemed to adjust their bystander acts, which suggests that students’ bystander acts vary depending on situational factors that influence bystanders’ interpretations of bullying and decision-making about how to respond to observed bullying.

  • 21.
    Gordon-Finlayson, Alastair
    et al.
    Teeside University, Middlesbrough, Storbritannien.
    Sullivan, Cath
    University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK.
    Becker, Sue
    Teeside University, Middlesbrough, Storbritannien.
    Wiggins, Sally
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Qualitative undergraduate dissertation supervision in psychology: Current practice, needs and support for supervisors2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Hallqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nya karriärval mitt i livet: omställningsprocesser och biografiska brott2015In: Karriärvägledning: en forskningsöversikt / [ed] Anders Lovén, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, p. 293-314Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Hendry, Gillian
    et al.
    University of Strathclyde , Glasgow, UK.
    Wiggins, Sally
    University of Strathclyde , Glasgow, UK.
    Anderson, Tony
    University of Strathclyde , Glasgow, UK.
    “Anyway, back to the point”: A discursive psychological approach to topic shift in group work interaction2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Hendry, Gillian
    et al.
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Wiggins, Sally
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Anderson, Tony
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Are you still with us?: Managing group togetherness and mobile phone use in PBL tutorials2016In: Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-based Learning, ISSN 1541-5015, Vol. 10, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As mobile phone technology becomes more advanced, so too does its presence in everyday life. Research has shown, for instance, that students are using their mobile phones in classroom settings, a practice that holds both potential advantages and disadvantages. In group work, these interactions may have consequences for group dynamics in that orienting to a mobile phone can display a shift in an individual’s attention to the group. The current essay details a research project conducted on problem-based learning (PBL) tutorials in the United Kingdom in which student groups were video-recorded as they worked. A discursive psychological analysis focused on instances of interaction in which a group member picked up his or her mobile phone in the middle of a working session and how the accountability for the phone use was managed by either the phone user or a fellow group member. In understanding more about the microprocesses that take place in such environments, we are better positioned to support students’ learning and socialization as they progress through college.

  • 25.
    Hendry, Gillian
    et al.
    University of Strathclyde , Glasgow, UK.
    Wiggins, Sally
    University of Strathclyde , Glasgow, UK.
    Anderson, Tony
    University of Strathclyde , Glasgow, UK.
    Constructing cohesion through laughter2014In: Proceedings from the 9th GRASP conference, Linköping University, May 2014 / [ed] Robert Thornberg; Tomas Jungert, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2014, Vol. 001, p. 1-16Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most consistently studied constructs within group dynamics literature is that of cohesiveness; the extent to which individuals within a group feel connected. Members of strongly cohesive groups are more inclined to participate and stay with the group, and past research has reported that laughter has the ability to enhance cohesion between individuals, although there is limited work showing exactly how this happens. Twenty two students comprising eight groups from two UK universities were video-recorded as they partook in group work, with the resultant sixty four hours of video data being analysed using discursive psychology centring on episodes of laughter in interaction. As ‘sticking together’ is a defining feature of cohesiveness, the analysis focused on instances in which a group member did the opposite of this by group-deprecating; revealing a weakness about the group, with findings showing that cohesion is constructed through the acceptance of and expansion upon the disparagement.

  • 26.
    Hendry, Gillian
    et al.
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Wiggins, Sally
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Anderson, Tony
    University of Strathclyde , Glasgow, UK.
    Constructing knowledge through talk: Unpacking the dynamics of group interaction in problem-based learning2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Hendry, Gillian
    et al.
    University of Strathclyde , Glasgow, UK.
    Wiggins, Sally
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Anderson, Tony
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    “That’s me being stupid”: Using discursive psychology to analyse self-deprecating humour as a means of constructing group cohesion in problem-based learning2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Hendry, Gillian
    et al.
    School of Psychological Sciences and Health, University of Strathclyde, UK.
    Wiggins, Sally
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. School of Psychological Sciences and Health, University of Strathclyde, UK.
    Anderson, Tony
    School of Psychological Sciences and Health, University of Strathclyde, UK.
    The discursive construction of group cohesion in problem-based learning (PBL) tutorials2016In: Psychology Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1475-7257, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 180-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that educators may be reluctant to implement group work in their teaching due to concerns about students partaking in off-task behaviours. However, such off-task interactions have been shown to promote motivation, trust, and rapport-building. This paper details a study in which student groups were video recorded as they engaged in problem-based learning tutorials, with the aim of examining the social interaction within such settings. Eighty-five hours of data were collected from nine groups, with discursive psychology being used to analyse how group cohesion is constructed through off-topic talk such as gossiping and teasing. Two case studies are detailed in which we demonstrate how cohesion is established through a process of collective action against the ‘other’: highlighting the differences between ‘us’ and ‘them’, and how this can impact on group dynamics. There is often a discrepancy between self-reported and observed behaviour in groups and so the more we know about what actually happens in such environments, the better placed we are to support student learning. The paper concludes with recommendations on how analyses of social interaction and the management of psychological issues in problem-based learning tutorials can inform the use of problem-based learning as a teaching and learning approach.

  • 29.
    Hendry, Gillian
    et al.
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Wiggins, Sally
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Anderson, Tony
    University of Strathclyde , Glasgow, UK.
    “Who does she think she is, eh?” Using discursive psychology to demonstrate the collaborative nature of teasing, and how it can enhance cohesion in student groups.2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Hendry, Gillian
    et al.
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Wiggins, Sally
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Anderson, Tony
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    “You decide ‘cause you’re the Chair”: Using discursive psychology to show how students ‘do’ group decision making2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Hepburn, Alexa
    et al.
    Loughborough University, UK.
    Wiggins, Sally
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Developments in discursive psychology2014In: Qualitative research in psychology: Ten Volume Set / [ed] Brendan Gough, Jeremy Miles and Brian Stucky, London: Sage Publications, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Forsblad, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Collaborative Remembering in Dementia: A Focus on Joint Activities2017In: Collaborative Remembering: Theories, Research, and Applications / [ed] Michelle L. Meade, Celia B. Harris, Penny Van Bergen, John Sutton, and Amanda J. Barnier, Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 436-455Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter we consider collaborative remembering and joint activates in everyday life in the case of people living with dementia.

    First, we review past research of practices that scaffolds the participation of persons with dementia in everyday chores under different stages of dementia diseases. We do so by suggesting three analytical types of scaffolding: when the scaffolding practices (i) frame the activity, (ii) guide actions, or (iii) are part of repair activities. Second, we review two aspects of collaborative remembering that are especially important in the case of dementia: training of scaffolding practices, and the sustaining and presentation of identities through collaborative storytelling. Finally, theoretical and methodological tendencies of the research field are summarized and future research needs are formulated.

  • 33.
    Jansson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    Stockholms universitet, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning; Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för utbildning, kultur och kommunikation.
    Cooperation and Shared Beliefs about Trust in the Assurance Game2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 12, article id e0144191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Determinants of cooperation include ingroup vs. outgroup membership, and individual traits, such as prosociality and trust. We investigated whether these factors can be overridden by beliefs about people’s trust. We manipulated the information players received about each other’s level of general trust, “high” or “low”. These levels were either measured (Experiment 1) or just arbitrarily assigned labels (Experiment 2). Players’ choices whether to cooperate or defect in a stag hunt (or an assurance game)—where it is mutually beneficial to cooperate, but costly if the partner should fail to do so—were strongly predicted by what they were told about the other player’s trust label, as well as by what they were told that the other player was told about their own label. Our findings demonstrate the importance for cooperation in a risky coordination game of both first- and second-order beliefs about how much people trust each other. This supports the idea that institutions can influence cooperation simply by influencing beliefs.

  • 34.
    Jeppsson-Grassman, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jegermalm, Magnus
    Ersta Sköndal högskola.
    De äldsta som aktörer i civilsamhället: omfattning, förändringar och profiler2015In: Med kärlek till det oordnade / [ed] Johan von Essen, Magnus Karlsson, Lena Blomquist, Emilia Forsell, Lars Trädgårdh, Stockholm: Ersta Sköndal högskola , 2015, p. 157-178Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Johansson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies – CKS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kangasvieri, Nadja
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Att motverka kriminalitet genom samverkan: Studie av Social insatsgrupp i Linköping2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sociala insatsgrupper riktar sin verksamhet mot unga i åldern 15–25 år. I Linköping har man dock satt en flexibel åldersgräns till 13- 25 år för målgruppen i Sociala insatsgruppen, en åldersindelning man tolkar flexibelt. Enligt regeringsuppdraget ska Social insatsgrupp vända sig dels till unga som riskerar att rekryteras till kriminella nätverk eller utveckla en kriminell livsstil. Dels ska verksamheten rikta sig till unga som önskar lämna ett kriminellt nätverk eller en kriminell livsstil. I Social insatsgrupp (SIG) Linköping kan vi se att fokus i denna fråga kan skilja sig något åt mellan informanterna. Medan vissa betonar det förebyggande arbetet lyfter andra upp behovet av att stödja avhoppare.

    Social insatsgrupp syftar till att motverka kriminalitet genom samverkan. Detta ska ske genom att identifiera nyrekrytering av unga till kriminalitet, men det ska även ske genom att hjälpa de personer som önskar lämna en kriminell livsstil eller ett kriminellt nätverk. Verksamhetens målgrupp kan därmed sägas vara tudelad; de som riskerar att hamna i kriminalitet och de som önskar hoppa av kriminalitet. I våra intervjuer är det tydligt att informanterna upplever en stor svårighet i att stödja unga som vill hoppa av kriminell verksamhet s.k. ”avhoppare”. Inom arbetsgruppen finns det en enighet om att målgruppens behov ställer stora krav på såväl SIG som på samhället i stort. Detta tudelade verksamhetssyfte kan i sig vara känsligt då denna grupp unga kräver resurser som kan väcka normativa åsikter.

    Vår samlade bedömning är att SIG, av studiens informanter upplevs ha gett positiva effekter för många klienter. Effekterna uppfattas vara varierande; från att ha varit ”livsavgörande” till att ha bidragit till en minskad brottsaktivitet. Vi kan också se att informanterna upplever att SIG inte utgör en garanti för att klienter inte börjar begå kriminella handlingar igen. Det finns sålunda en upplevelse av att en uppföljning eller en ytterligare insats skulle kunna vara på sin plats. Det finns behov av ökat samförstånd kring målgruppen, särskilt om verksamheten ska fokusera på det brottsförebyggande arbetet eller på den s.k. ”avhoppardelen”. Det finns även behov av mer kunskap om målgruppens situation såväl inom myndigheter som i samhället i stort.

    Utöver synen på verksamhetens syfte och målgrupp är det tydligt att det finns en konsensus kring arbetsformens betydelse i Social insatsgrupp. Samverkan antas kunna motverka kriminalitet. I intervjuerna påtalar informanterna hur viktigt samordnade insatser är i arbetet med unga som riskerar att hamna i kriminalitet eller som önskar lämna en kriminell livsstil. Trots (eller kanske tack vare) två organisatoriska förändringar inom SIG finns en tilltro till att nuvarande verksamhet leder till en effektiv process i arbetet med en klient. Genom att parterna har en direkt ingång till varandras organisationer kan insatser snabbt koordineras.

    Upplevelsen av att arbetsgruppen är personbunden uppfattar vissa av informanterna dock som ett problem. Det finns en rädsla för att arbetet i Social insatsgrupp skulle försämras om resursstarka och engagerade personer skulle lämna verksamheten. Utifrån intervjuerna kan vi se att informanterna har positiva upplevelser av arbetsformen i Social insatsgrupp. De organisatoriska fördelarna i form av snabba kommunikationsvägar och ett öppet arbetsklimat förklaras bero på det engagemang och den kompetens som personerna i arbetsgruppen har. Dock kan vi i det empiriska materialet se att det finns en viss organisatorisk otydlighet inom arbetsgruppen. Detta gäller dels arbetsfördelningen mellan koordinatorn och Frivårdens representant, dels handlar det om rollen som Råd & Stöds representant har i Social insatsgrupp.

    Av det empiriska materialet är vår sammantagna bedömning att informanterna upplever att arbetsformen i verksamheten fungerar väl. Centrala aspekter av samverkan, såsom gemensam problemformulering, samförstånd kring syfte och arbetsform, verkar sålunda ha präglat arbetsprocessen.

    I vår studie kan vi se att det finns en positiv upplevelse av arbetet i Social insatsgrupp bland samverkansparterna.

  • 36.
    Jonsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dangerous, Chaotic and Unpleasant: Crowd Theory Today2014In: lo Squaderno, ISSN 1973-9141, E-ISSN 1973-9141, no 33, p. 9-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stefan Jonsson reviews the traditional image conveyed by crowd theory – the crowd as ‘dangerous, chaotic and unpleasant’ – stressing the continuing and even renewed importance of crowd action today. According to Jonsson, if crowds inevitably raise the issue of the foundations of power, it is because their act is, in the horizon of modernity, an essentially politically constituent one.

  • 37.
    Jonsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society.
    Juraschitz, Norbert
    Germany.
    Masse und Demokratie: Zwischen Revolution und Faschismus2015 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Stefan Jonsson untersucht in seiner brillanten und fesselnd geschriebenen Studie das Phänomen der Massen in Deutschland und Österreich aus ästhetischer, kultur- und geisteswissenschaftlicher sowie politikwissenschaftlicher Perspektive und arbeitet dabei die Bedeutung der »Masse« als Schattenagent in einer folgenschweren Phase europäischer Geschichte heraus. Deutlich wird das Ringen um ein Verständnis von dem Phänomen der Masse in einer hochgradig nervösen Zeit - Jonsson ergründet das Spannungsfeld, das sich zwischen Bedrohung und Faszination öffnete. Gegenstand der interdisziplinären Untersuchung sind u. a. die Werke von Theodor W. Adorno, Hannah Arendt, Walter Benjamin, Marianne Brandt, Bertolt Brecht, Hermann Broch, Elias Canetti, Sigmund Freud, Theodor Geiger, Walter Gropius, Ernst Jünger, Siegfried Kracauer, Karl Kraus, Fritz Lang, László Moholy-Nagy, Robert Musil, Erwin Piscator, Georg Simmel und Ernst Toller.

    »Jonsson versteht es, den Zeitgeist jener Epoche so plastisch zu vermitteln, als hätte er selbst in dieser Zeit gelebt.« (Hannah Bethke, FAZ)

  • 38.
    Julia, Simonson
    et al.
    Deutsches Zentrum für Altersfragen, Manfred-von Richthofen-Str. 2, 12101, Berlin, Deutschland .
    Hagen, Christine
    Deutsches Zentrum für Altersfragen, Manfred-von Richthofen-Str. 2, 12101, Berlin, Deutschland .
    Vogel, Claudia
    Deutsches Zentrum für Altersfragen, Manfred-von Richthofen-Str. 2, 12101, Berlin, Deutschland .
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    Deutsches Zentrum für Altersfragen, Manfred-von Richthofen-Str. 2, 12101, Berlin, Deutschland .
    Ungleichheit sozialer Teilhabe im Alter2013In: Zeitschrift für Gerontologie und Geriatrie (Print), ISSN 0948-6704, E-ISSN 1435-1269, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 410-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of active ageing comprises the maintenance of societal participation throughout the life span into old age. “Good” ageing in line with this activity paradigm develops into a starting point of social inequality rather than being its result. Based on the German Ageing Survey (DEAS) we investigated access to volunteering and to educational activities depending on social and spatial aspects of inequality. Societal participation is socially and spatially structured. Individuals from a lower social class are less often involved in educational activities or in volunteering. Moreover, individuals living in economically disadvantaged regions are less likely to participate than in economically strong regions. Disadvantages cumulate if low individual resources overlap with poor economic conditions in the living area. Measures to facilitate participation should be taken on the local level to enhance opportunities for volunteering and educational activities. This should help to sustainably increase the participation of individuals from lower social classes.

  • 39.
    McQuade, Robert
    et al.
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Storbritannien.
    Wiggins, Sally
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ventura-Medina, Esther
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Storbritannien.
    'Doing' disagreement without being disagreeable: How students deal with conversational norms in group work2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing prevalence of group work in psychology places requirements on students to learn not only their subject matter, but also social and educational skills such as working with their peers. In problem-based learning (PBL), a crucial element is that students should challenge each other in terms of ideas or assumptions (Azer, 2004). Through disagreeing, it is argued that students will develop a more sophisticated understanding of the knowledge. Disagreements in conversation, however, have already been shown by conversation analytic work to be socially troublesome (Pomerantz, 1984), so it is vital that students learn to disagree‘ appropriately’ (Marra, 2012). The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how research in social psychology and discourse can provide empirical insights into how students might learn to interact more effectively in group-work settings. The paper reports on analyses from a project that aims to understand how engineering students develop the ‘soft skills’ of group work alongside their academic knowledge by examining the interactional practices and processes within PBL tutorials. In particular, we focus on how students ‘do’ disagreements in tutorial interaction. The data is taken from 30 hours of video-recorded data from PBL tutorials at a Scottish university. Using conversation analysis, we focus on sequences in which students disagree with one another, and illustrate the different ways in which this is achieved. The paper will discuss the interactional barriers to disagreeing with other students in group work and will offer insights from empirical data to illustrate how these might be overcome.

  • 40.
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Soziologie des Alters: Walker, Alan, und Liam Foster (Hrsg.): The Political Economy of Ageing and Later Life: Critical Perspectives. ISBN : 9787-1-84376248-52015In: Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie, ISSN 0023-2653, E-ISSN 1861-891X, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 820-822Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Klaus, Daniela
    Deutsches Zentrum für Altersfragen, Berlin, Deutschland.
    Simonson, Julia
    Deutsches Zentrum für Altersfragen, Berlin, Deutschland.
    Befragungen von älteren und alten Menschen2015In: Handbuch Methoden der empirischen Sozialforschung / [ed] Nina Baur, Jörg Blasius, Fachmedien Wiesbaden: Springer, 2015, p. 781-786Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Der demografische Wandel ist eine der großen aktuellen gesellschaftlichen Herausforderungen. Niedrige Fertilität, zunehmende Migration und die Verlängerung der Lebensspanne verändern die Gesellschaft. Die Lebenserwartung hat im 20. Jahrhundert stetig um zwei bis drei Jahre pro Jahrzehnt zugenommen und steigt weiter. Das lange Leben bringt gesellschaftliche und individuelle Entwicklungschancen mit sich, geht aber zugleich mit bisher unbekannten Herausforderungen einher.

  • 42.
    Musk, Nigel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Modern Languages. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mobilising distributed memory resources in English project work2017In: Memory practices and learning: interactional, institutional and sociocultural perspectives / [ed] Åsa Mäkitalo, Per Linell, Roger Säljö, Charlotte: Information Age Publishing, 2017, p. 145-174Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Näslund, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Field Research in Sweden: Different Methods, Same Approach: Conceptual developments in clinical group supervision2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Persson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of health, care, and social welfare, Sweden.
    The Impact of a Robotic Cat on Dementia Caregivers’ Psychosocial Work Environment – a Pilot Study2015In: Proceedings of the New Friend 2015 conference / [ed] Marcel Heerink and Michiel de Jong, Almere, 2015, p. 16-17Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Rohracher, Harald
    et al.
    University of Klagenfurt, Austria.
    Mert, Wilma
    Inter-University Research Centre for Technology, Work and Culture, Austria.
    Improving the public perception of bioenergy2012In: Handbook Biomass Gasification (Second Edition) / [ed] Harrie Knoef, Enschede: BTG , 2012, 2nd, p. 433-448Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Silvén Hagström, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Breaking the silence: parentally suicide-bereaved youths’ self-disclosure on the internet and the social responses of others related to stigma2017In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1077-1092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suicide stigma’ contributes to the silencing of parental suicide within family and social networks. This article departs from a narrative theoretical framework on grief and identity to analyse suicide-bereaved youths ‘breaking the silence’ through self-disclosure in self-initiated chat threads on the Internet, which is their way of actively seeking social support, telling of their experiences and opening up space for a renegotiation of the meanings around suicide. The article investigates which narrative frameworks for the interpretation of suicide are operating in these contexts, and whether and, if so, how stigma is reproduced or counteracted. Two frameworks are identified: ‘Who is to blame for suicide?’; and ‘What caused the suicide?’. The former is utilized by the newly bereaved chat-initiators, who attribute blame for suicide to the parent and/or themselves in accordance with stigmatizing discourses. These are reproduced in the responses first and foremost of the non-suicide-bereaved, who construct a dichotomy between the deceased parent as ‘perpetrator’ and the child as ‘victim’ in order to relieve blame. A lack of contact with other suicide-bereaved youths can reinforce feelings of otherness. Identities, however, can potentially be de-stigmatized by the meanings drawn from the latter framework.

  • 47.
    Sparrman, Anna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Seeing (with) the 'sexy' body: young children's visual enactment of sexuality2015In: Children, sexuality and sexualization / [ed] Emma Renold, Jessica Ringrose and R. Danielle Egan, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 123-140Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 48.
    St. John, Oliver
    et al.
    Örebro Universitet, Sverige.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Crafting instructions collaboratively: Student questions and dual addressivity in classroom task instructions2016In: Discourse processes, ISSN 0163-853X, E-ISSN 1532-6950, ISSN 0163-853X, Vol. 53, p. 252-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines classroom task instructions—phases traditionally associatedwith noninteractional objectives and operations—and reveals their compositionas interactionally complex and cocrafted. Analyses of video sequences of taskinstructional activity from three different secondary school lessons show thatstudent questions routinely contribute to making task instructions followable. In thisenvironment, student questions set up tensions between the demand to respond tothe individual and responsibility to uphold the general instructional agenda. Datashow that, as addressees of student questions, instructors take great care to meetboth individual and collective accountabilities. To meet obligation to the addresseeand exploit the instructional benefit of the question for the cohort, dualaddressivity—targeting two or more addressees in response to a student question—proves a crucial method for achieving such principled practice. Educationally, itappears vital to recognize student instructed action as integral to task-relatedlearning.

  • 49.
    Stjernberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Trygghets2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Världen har alltid varit fylld av faror, men idag är vi tryggare än någonsin. Ändå känns det inte så. Massmedierna matar oss ständigt med nya larm: att duscha varje dag kan ge hjärnskador, kaffe ger Alzheimer, chips ger cancer och så vidare. Ska man tro allt som skrivs verkar vi tvärtom leva i den farligaste av världar. Tar man intryck av alla dessa larm leder det lätt till att man försöker eliminera alla tänkbara risker: man drabbas av trygghets. Paradoxalt nog kan denna strategi få motsatt effekt och bli mycket farlig. Så hur bör vi agera i en värld som trots allt innehåller många risker? Trygghets redogör för den moderna forskningen om risker och vår förmåga att bedöma dem i relation till miljön, ekonomin och flera andra områden som är centrala i våra liv.

  • 50.
    Strimling, Pontus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Regulating the regulation: norms about punishment2014In: Reward and punishment in social dilemmas / [ed] Paul A. M. van Lange, Bettina Rockenbach, Toshio Yamagishi, New York: Oxford University Press, 2014, p. 52-69Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rules about punishment dictate how one must behave to ensure that one’s punishment behavior is not met with social disapproval. These rules can be both prescriptive, telling us when we have to punish and how much we must punish at a minimum, and restrictive, telling us when we cannot punish or what the maximum punishment can be. In this chapter we investigate the general features of these rules, focusing on punishment of norm violations in social dilemmas.

    Researchers have often viewed the provision of punishment as a costly public good that must itself be enforced, creating a second order social dilemma that requires prescriptive norms for people to "cooperate", i.e., to punish. We argue that this is a misunderstanding of the nature of punishment and go through theoretical reasons for why prescriptive rules about punishment might not be important. Instead, we discuss the reasons that restrictive norms could benefit the group and review experiments where this is shown to be the case.

    Finally we report the results of four surveys that use real world situations to assess people’s views about punishment in several countries. We find that punishment behavior is regulated by generally agreed upon views (i.e., norms), which are largely restrictive rather than prescriptive. Results show a strong consistency across scenarios and countries, indicating that these norms follow general principles.

123 1 - 50 of 102
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf