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  • 1.
    Balli, Faruk
    et al.
    Massey Univ, New Zealand.
    Shahzad, Syed Jawad Hussain
    Montpellier Business Sch, France.
    Uddin, Gazi Salah
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A tale of two shocks: What do we learn from the impacts of economic policy uncertainties on tourism?2018In: Tourism Management, ISSN 0261-5177, E-ISSN 1879-3193, Vol. 68, p. 470-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of the economic policy uncertainties on the tourism demand, by using multiple and partial wavelet analysis. We find that global economic policy uncertainties (EPUs) impact on tourism demand in various levels for different countries. The effect is on peak and stay longer in certain periods; such as GFC or 9/11. More importantly, novel to the literature, the domestic EPUs significantly affect the tourist inflows, indicating that policy holders need to take into account EPU fluctuations in forecasting the short-term and medium term tourism demand.

  • 2.
    Bienkowska, Dzamila
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lundmark, Mats
    Örebro University.
    Malmberg, Anders
    Uppsala University.
    Brain circulation and flexible adjustment: Labour mobility as a cluster advantage2011In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 21-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the role of labour mobility as a potential cluster advantage. We review the theoretical arguments as for how and why labour mobility could enhance the dynamism and performance of clusters of similar and related firms. A combination of quantitative and qualitative data from two information and communication technology (ICT) clusters is used to answer two research questions: (1) What is the role of mobility enhancing (or restricting) institutions in clusters? and (2) In what ways does labour mobility contribute to knowledge transfer within clusters? The two ICT clusters studied in the article generally seem to have higher levels of mobility, compared to the labour market at large. Although it is regarded as beneficial in theory, most cluster firms try to restrict mobility of workers since they fear the risk and costs of losing staff. Labour mobility is also rarely viewed as a viable way to increase the knowledge bases or contact networks of firms. However, when firms need to recruit the clustered labour markets seem to benefit them by facilitating the use of informal recruitment processes. By way of conclusion it is suggested that cluster firms might be under-investing in mobility and that innovative institutional solutions could help realize clusters mobility potential.

  • 3.
    Busch, Henner
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Green Attraction: Transnational Municipal Climate Networks and Green City Branding2015In: Journal of Management and Sustainability, ISSN 1925-4733, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we investigate the nexus of green city branding and municipal climate networks. In recent decades, a number of formal transnational municipal climate networks have emerged and their membership continues to increase. In parallel, city branding that is based on green policies, has gained importance. Based on quantitative and qualitative data, we assess how and to what extent German cities use their membership in transnational municipal climate networks to communicate green city brands. In contrast to our expectations, we encountered very few indications of green city branding efforts by German cities. Our analysis shows that in general, branding considerations only play a negligible role in the involvement of cities in transnational municipal climate networks or climate policies. Instead, it seems that German cities use their membership in climate networks, to genuinely improve local climate change strategies. We therefore suggest that research on green city branding should be more sensitive to the particular context of cities and efforts should be made to unveil theunderlying motives for the communication of green policies.

  • 4.
    Cadorin, Eduardo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Future developments for Science Parks: Attracting and developing talent2017In: Industry and Higher Education, ISSN 2043-6858, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 156-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the years, science parks have developed and improved their processes to offer better support to their tenants and promote the growth of the region in which they are located. Since regional growth is closely associated with groups of talented people, science parks carry out various activities at the company or individual level to attract and recruit talent. In order to understand how such activities have been and are being performed at Mja¨rdevi Science Park in Sweden, the authors highlight and analyse four talent-related cases. Their aim is to identify how talent can be attracted or recruited and to consider the stakeholders, their relationships and their motivations. The results confirm the importance to a science park of being close to a student community and of being connected to an international network with a well-recognized brand.

  • 5.
    Cadorin, Eduardo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Sten Gunnar
    Science parks - recruitment and development of talents2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Science parks have from the very beginning been important and valuable tools for the development of knowledge intensive economies. Most science parks have also strongly attracted talents, ideas, capital, R&D and firms. During the past decades we have witnessed a number of other structures and organisations being established, i.e. innovation hubs, clusters and so forth. We have also seen a very clear trend that the science parks abandon the idea of being strict geographical locations and become more of a function in the city. One issue that quite recently has been recognised, connected to science park development, is the potential they have as attracters of talented individuals. The starting point is, which goes in line with Richard Florida and his thoughts about the “Creative class”, that regions´ ability to attract firms and human capital is a key in their economical development. Talent individuals will undertake entrepreneurial activities and building values for the environment in which they are operating. This paper will describe and analyse the role that science parks could have when it comes to recruiting and developing talents within the region they are operating. More precisely we are interested in the following research questions: 1) What strategies are science parks using to stimulate the attraction of talents in order to enhance innovation and entrepreneurship for their stakeholders? 2) How are these strategies implemented? 3) Why (if so) and in what way have the strategies been successful?

  • 6.
    de Almeida Cadorin, Eduardo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sten Gunnar, Johansson
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Future Challenges for Science Parks: Attractiveness and Recruitment of Talents2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Science parks have from the very beginning been important and valuable tools for the development of knowledge intensive economies. Most science parks have also strongly attracted talents, ideas, capital, R&D and firms. During the past decades we have witnessed a number of other structures and organizations being established, i.e. innovation hubs, clusters and so forth. We have also seen a very clear trend that the science parks abandon the idea of being strict geographical locations and become more of a function in the city. One issue that quite recently has been recognized, connected to science park development, is the potential they have as attracters of talented individuals. The starting point is, which goes in line with Richard Florida and his thoughts about the “Creative class”, that regions´ ability to attract firms and human capital is a key in their economic development. Talent individuals will undertake entrepreneurial activities and building values for the environment in which they are operating.

  • 7.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eawag, Switzerland.
    Binz, Christian
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Regional benefits of servitization processes: evidence from the wind-to-energy industry2019In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 366-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By studying servitization processes and service competencies in the wind-to-energy industry in European regions, this paper provides a framework for territorial servitization. The framework resonates with the concepts of knowledge-intensive business services (KIBS) and industry life cycles, and its elements can be embedded into concepts of regional development (e.g., lead-market models, sustainability transitions, territorial innovation models). The framework suggests that regions benefit from servitization processes via the interplay of generating employment opportunities, enabling an efficient allocation of technology resources, opening up new markets, strengthening territorial competitiveness, raising the odds of securing employment in the consolidation period and enabling technological leaps.

  • 8.
    Germain-Alamartine, Eloïse
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre. HELIX Competence Centre.
    Doctoral education and employment in the regions: the case of Catalonia2019In: Regional Studies, Regional Science, ISSN 0080-0694, E-ISSN 2168-1376, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 299-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though the doctoral degree was originally designed for an academic career, there is an increasingly important labour market for doctorate holders outside academia, mainly because of a shortage of job opportunities within it. Doctoral degrees are granted only by universities; thus, universities are the only suppliers of the doctoral workforce to the labour market. Understanding the needs of non-academic employers is thus crucial if universities are to adapt their doctoral education curriculum. Many studies have analyzed labour markets for doctorate holders at national and transnational scales, but few studies focus on the regional scale. The present study explores regional data for Catalonia in Spain on the employment situation of doctorate holders in order to define the characteristics of the regional, non-academic labour market for doctorate holders. Descriptive statistics suggest a high retention rate of doctorate holders within the region and a large part of doctorate holders (two-thirds) having a job that does not require a doctoral degree. This study highlights the existence of a skills mismatch that might be linked to the preference for a better paid or more stable job, or to the lack of development of skills that represent added value in the eyes of employers. These characteristics can be formulated as hypotheses to be tested in further qualitative or quantitative studies. They have several implications for universities, non-academic employers and regional policy-makers, such as the need to work on the valorization of the doctoral degree in the non-academic labour market.

  • 9.
    Germain-Alamartine, Eloïse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Moghadam-Saman, Saeed
    Univ Stavanger, Norway.
    Aligning doctoral education with local industrial employers needs: a comparative case study2019In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Doctoral education was primarily designed to answer the human resources needs of academia. However, nowadays, increasing numbers of doctorate holders seek employment outside academia. Accordingly, doctoral education can be one of the means by which universities take part in the development of industry in their regions. This study explores whether and how doctoral-level skills are being adapted to the needs of local industrial employers in two different contexts. Two research and science parks situated next to research-intensive universities in Sweden and Spain were chosen as cases for an exploratory and comparative study. In these parks, local industrial employers conduct Ramp;D activities that make them potentially attractive destinations for doctoral graduates. Similarities in the cases were found regarding the process of adaptation of doctoral education at the adjacent universities to meet the industrial employers needs in the parks. Discrepancies are also highlighted regarding stages of development, institutional settings, geography and culture. Implications for several stakeholders are formulated to improve the process analysed in the study concerning better alignment of doctoral education with industrial employers need for generic skills.

  • 10.
    Haikola, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Anshelm, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Evolutionary governance in mining: Boom and bust in peripheral communities in Sweden2019In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, article id 104056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the consequences of dramatic price fluctuations on the global iron ore market between boom and bust for the Swedish communities Kiruna and Pajala, located above the polar circle, in the years 2006-2018. It focuses on the impact of the Swedish state’s reorientation towards neoliberal policies that have entailed reduced state involvement in peripheral communities still dependant on heavy industry. This reorientation was manifested in the Mineral Strategy presented by the liberal-conservative government in 2013, in which the state was prescribed a role as facilitator of investment of foreign and private capital in the Swedish mining sector, but not as an active owner or developer of mining enterprises. The neoliberalisation of Swedish mining has established a fundamental conflict of interests between communities whose economic, social and cultural wellbeing depends on long-term state commitment, and the state whose main interests are aimed at global capital flows rather than the maintenance of industrial production in peripheral regions. This conflict remained latent as long as global mineral prices were high, but as boom turned to bust around 2012, it was activated in a way that highlighted asymmetric relations of power and economic development between the sparsely populated and resource-rich northern parts of the country and the densely populated south.

  • 11.
    Haikola, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Anshelm, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Swedish mineral policy at a crossroads?: Critical reflections on the challenges with expanding Sweden’s mining sector2016In: The Extractive Industries and Society, ISSN 2214-790X, E-ISSN 2214-7918, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 508-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we analyse the critique that has accompanied sustained efforts made in recent years by the Government of Sweden to facilitate global investment in the country's mining sector. The minerals market in the 21st century has been characterized by increasing global prices. In Sweden, the largest mining nation within the EU, this has led to what has been identified as a mining boom. The governmental mining policy, aimed at attracting an increasing part of the global venture capital seeking to profit from the volatile but lucrative minerals market, has been met with growing domestic resistance, fuelled by what has been perceived as dangers and side effects of a rapidly expanding Swedish mining industry. This resistance has largely focused on the mineral strategy launched by the government in 2013, as it crystallized the neoliberal ideas judged by critics to severely jeopardize social, cultural, economic and environmental values. After a critical analysis of the mineral strategy, we go on to analyse the mining-critical discourse, concluding with a discussion where we highlight the main implications of the analysis and identify a possible path for compromise between proponents and opponents of the mineral strategy.

  • 12.
    Hermelin, Brita
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies – CKS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Book Review: Asian Inward and Outward FDI. New Challenges ind the Global Economy.2015In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Hermelin, Brita
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies – CKS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lokal utveckling efter de-industrialiseringen2017In: Att äga framtiden: Perspektiv på kommunal utveckling / [ed] Joserfina Syssner, Sören Häggroth och Ulf Ramberg, Linköping: Centrum för kommunstrategiska studier, Linköpings universitet , 2017, p. 185-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Näringslivet och arbetsmarknaden är under ständig förändring. Ett dominerande inslag i strukturomvandlingen under det senaste halvseklet har varit de-industrialisering, det vill säga en minskning av tillverkningsindustrin. Denna minskning är en generell trend för länder i västvärlden. I Sverige år 2016 var 12 procent av arbetskraften sysselsatt inom tillverkningsindustrin. Globalisering, ökad automatisering, produktivitet och specialisering (med växande företagsamhet inom industrinära tjänster) omfattar de viktigaste orsakerna. Det här avsnittet ger emellertid inte utrymme till att vidare fördjupa frågan om orsaker till varför industrisysselsättningen minskar i Sverige. Här är i stället fokus riktat mot de-industrialiseringens geografiskt ojämna effekter och hur dess effekter skiljer sig åt mellan kommunerna i Sverige.

  • 14.
    Hermelin, Brita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Department of Geography, Media and Communication, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Lukas, Smas
    Nordregio, Nordic Centre for Spatial Development, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Geographies of knowledge and learning: The example of medical technology2014In: Growth and Change, ISSN 0017-4815, E-ISSN 1468-2257, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 450-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper brings a geographical perspective to debates in research on knowledge and learning for the innovation of products and firms. The importance of understanding the development of “composite knowledge,” which should be understood as knowledge developed through the bridging of different knowledge fields, is stressed. The empirical focus of the study is medical technology. The arguments in this paper are based on a literature review, secondary data, and a “knowledge biography” case study of a firm located in Stockholm, Sweden. The discussion describes how knowledge networks may be multilocal, thus connecting partners in local, national, and international geographical settings. This paper shows that synergies and complementary relations between regional, network, and corporate spaces are focal points for the processes of knowledge dynamics. It also illustrates how “soft” factors in innovations (in addition to important and “hard” factors of technology and functionality improvements, for instance) are important. “Soft” factors include market, process and input innovations, and aesthetic expressions.

  • 15.
    Hermelin, Brita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies – CKS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hinchcliffe, Gabriela
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Stenbacka, Susanne
    Uppsala Universitet.
    The making of the gourmet restaurateur-masculine ideology, identity and performance2017In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 48-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, there has been growing interest in renowned gourmet restaurants, and increased awareness about how food is prepared, presented and served. A small and select group of chefs have thereby gained prestigious positions and high-profile images as restaurateurs. Most of these restaurateurs are men. The research question this article sets out to study is: How is the identity and ideology of masculinity imbued into the subjectivity and representations of gourmet restaurateurs? The selection of data sources means that our geographical focus is on Stockholm, Sweden’s main urban region. The methodological approach of this article to employ empirical material from interviews and media articles reveals how this masculine discourse is attained through a particular interplay of subjects (the chefs and entrepreneurs) and representations (the media). The focus of this article has included a quite exclusive category of a few restaurants and restaurateurs, which may have implications on the findings pointing to a homogenous profile of the ideals of the gourmet chefs. The results point out that the micro-spaces of gourmet restaurants’ kitchens and dining rooms can be understood as nurseries for ‘nostalgic and conservative masculinities’.

  • 16.
    Hermelin, Brita
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Kulturgeografiska institutionen.
    Trygg, Kristina
    Stockholms universitet, Kulturgeografiska institutionen.
    New geographies of work: a case study from Sweden2012In: Urbani Izziv, ISSN 0353-6483, E-ISSN 1855-8399, Vol. 23, no suppl. 1, p. S126-S134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and analyses the geography of work, i.e., the spatial patterns in where paid work is done. The geography of work may diverge from the geography of employment when paid work is done at the premises of client organizations, during commuting, on business trips, on external meetings, at home or at other places. The particular patterns in the geography of work depend on a number of factors, possibilities and constraints. The paper takes its point of departure from the debate about how structural economic changes resulting from evolving service industries and the development of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) entail new forms for the organization of paid work. Flexibility, reflexivity, flows and places are key concepts. The paper presents a case study from Stockholm that takes a workplace perspective and looks at knowledge-intensive work in a public sector organization. The empirical study analyses data from interviews, time diaries and a questionnaire. We analyse how the geography of work is the result of negotiations between different parties and in different arenas, and how this spatial pattern is the result of the character of work tasks and accessibility of ICT support. The discussion illustrates a complex picture of the coexistence of spatial fix and spatial flexibility, and how this may cause tensions but also convenient solutions for organizing and conducting paid work.

  • 17.
    Huo, Huan
    et al.
    University of Shanghai Science and technol, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Shangye
    Northwest University, Peoples R China.
    Song, Liang
    University of Shanghai Science and technol, Peoples R China.
    Ban, Leiyu
    University of Shanghai Science and technol, Peoples R China.
    Wu, Zonghan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Liang
    University of Shanghai Science and technol, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Liping
    University of Shanghai Science and technol, Peoples R China.
    Anomalous Region Detection on the Mobility Data2015In: CIT/IUCC/DASC/PICOM 2015 IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPUTER AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY - UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING AND COMMUNICATIONS - DEPENDABLE, AUTONOMIC AND SECURE COMPUTING - PERVASIVE INTELLIGENCE AND COMPUTING, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2015, p. 1669-1674Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobility data records the change of location and time about the crowd activities, reflecting a large amount of semantic knowledge about human mobility and hot regions. From the perspective of regional semantic knowledge, mining anomalous regions of overcrowded area is essential for disaster-aware resilience system scheme. This paper studies how to discover anomalous regions of moving crowds over the mobility data. From the perspective of spatial information analysis about the location sequence of moving crowds, the paper introduces grid structure to index activity space and proposes a density calculation method of grid cells based on kernel function. By adopting Top-k sorting method, the algorithm determines the density thresholds to detect the anomalous regions. Finally, experimental results validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the above method on practical data sets.

  • 18.
    Kanda, Wisdom
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Clausen, Jens
    Hannover, Germany.
    Hjelm, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bienkowska, Dzamila
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Functions of intermediaries in eco-innovation: a study of business development organizations and cluster initiatives in a Swedish and a German region2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Eco-innovation continues to gain support as a driving force for sustainable development. In this regard, pressing questions include how to stimulate the development, diffusion and use of eco-innovations. Often, firms engaged with eco-innovation need to connect to intermediary organizations (e.g. business development organizations, regional clusters, universities, financers, incubators) to get hold of necessary resources to tackle the challenges in the innovation process. This article analyses the functions of such intermediary organizations for eco-innovation by focusing on public–owned business development organizations and cluster initiatives in the Region Scania, Sweden and North Rhine Westphalia, Germany.  We synthesise at least eight functions of intermediaries for eco-innovation as: (i) forecasting and road mapping (ii) resource mobilization (iii) networking and partnerships (iv) commercialization (v) technical consulting (vi) information scanning and distribution (vii) sector branding and legitimation (viii) prototyping and piloting.  The support functions often take a “one-size-fits-all” approach with few initiatives particularly tailored for eco-innovations. This can be explained by the market complementarity roles of public intermediaries, their resource constraints and the cross-sectoral nature of eco-innovation. Even though, intermediary functions are often appreciated by clients and financers, it is often difficult to establish a causal relation between the support and eco-innovation outcomes, a challenge which undermines the existence of intermediaries themselves. Despite these challenges, potential good practices point to a mix between general “one-size-fits-all” and tailored support activities for different types of eco-innovations and firms. Furthermore, interaction between various types of intermediaries is important since there are often numerous actors and initiatives working with eco-innovation which can confuse firms. When it comes to stimulating radical eco-innovations, a proactive approach to intermediation is particularly important. 

  • 19.
    Krifors, Karin
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Managing Migrant Workers: moral economies of temporary labour in the Swedish IT and wild berry industries2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporary migrant workers and circular migration constitute a growing global phenomenon as the management of migration becomes increasingly important to policymakers. This thesis takes academic discussions on citizenship and migration as its starting point, and examines the role of employers in terms of defining temporary migrant workers and their role in the Swedish labour market. The concept of moral economy is applied in particular to analyse the justifications and negotiations through which working conditions of migrant workers, and their role in local and transnational economies, are established and contested.

    The role of capital in migration management is studied through ethnographic fieldwork and through interviews with managers in the Swedish wild berry and IT industries; two very different industries that are, however, both shaped by particular structures of seasonal labour and international outsourcing and that increasingly rely on temporary foreign workers from Thailand and India respectively. The conceptualisation of supply chains in these industries offers a particular framework through which relations, as well as management discourses, can be analysed.

    The study explores how notions of circularity, nation, cultural difference, and transnational economic difference, are managed by private sector actors. It also explores how managers relate to public discourse and emotions in the face of global economic restructuring and changing citizenship, which situates temporary migrants as part of, yet different from, Swedish labour.

  • 20.
    Köhler, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Trygg, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A time-geographical mixed-methods approach: studying the complexities of energy and water use in households2019In: Fennia, ISSN 0015-0010, Vol. 197, no 1, p. 108-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study is to describe and assess a methodology based on a time geographical approach for studying energy and water use in households. Energy and water resources are often used in routinized activities, and in activities considered as private, normal and ordinary, which makes them difficult to explore in research. In this article, we give an account of a mixed-methods approach using time diaries, metering data, interviews and simple observations, and analyse and discuss its methodological and empirical implications from two Swedish case studies. We conclude that the suggested combination of methods, despite some complications, provides a comprehensive account of household energy and water use to which various theoretical perspectives could apply. Energy and water using activities are defined in terms of time, place, quantity, material and social context, and are related to user perspectives on resource use and usage data. Such knowledge provides important input for information campaigns, technological retrofitting and other systemic changes in striving towards sustainability.

  • 21.
    Liang, Huiqiao
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Qin, Yuehua
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Analysis of effects of socioeconomic status on adolescents’ living experiences in Västerås2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis targets students aged 16 to 19years old in Västerås. Based on a survey about sustainable lifestyle and health, this study examines if there are associations between affluence/income level and students’ living experiences. This study also investigates what effect affluence/income level have on adolescents’ living experiences in Västerås.

    In this thesis, chi-square and kruskal-wallis tests are used to find response variables that can be used in logistic regression models with the aim of calculating the effect of affluence/income level on youth living experience. Furthermore, we also created Index and calculated the index value for 4categories of questions. Linear regression is then used to examine if affluence/income level is associated with these 4 indexes.

    We find that most variables that are associated with income level are also associated with affluence level. There are a few variables that are associated with only income level, for example education in school. Affluence/income level has no clear association with the category indexes.

  • 22.
    Magnusson, Dick
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ägarförändringar på den svenska fjärrvärmemarknaden: en översikt över förvärv och avyttringar 1990-20142015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie behandlar ägarförändringar på den svenska fjärrvärmemarknaden. Avregleringen av den svenska elmarknaden, och tillika kommersialiseringen av fjärrvärmemarknaden (denna period av omregleringar kallas sammantaget i rapporten för liberaliseringar) medförde en rad försäljningar av kommunala energibolag men även förvärv och avyttringar av energirörelser i privat regi. Tidigare har ingen fullständig genomgång gjorts över hur liberaliseringen påverkade fjärrvärmemarknaden och denna rapport ämnar bidra till den kunskapen.

    Syftet med rapporten är att beskriva och analysera hur ägandeförhållanden på den svenska fjärrvärmemarknaden förändrats sedan 1990. Frågeställningarna är följande: Vilka år har fjärrvärmerörelserna sålts? Hur har ägarformerna och ägarförhållandena för svenska fjärrvärmerörelser förändrats till en följd av liberaliseringen? Vilka politiska majoriteter har styrt i kommunerna vid försäljningen? Vilka mönster kring ägarförändringar går att urskönja?

    Studien har genomförts genom en systematisk genomgång av de 290 svenska kommunerna och sammanställning har då gjorts för vilka energibolag som bedriver fjärrvärmeverksamhet idag, hur ägandet ser ut, när eventuella ägarförändringar ägt rum samt vilka politiska majoriteter som rått vid försäljningen. Materialet har inhämtats via kommuners hemsidor, energibolags hemsidor och årsredovisningar, genom sökningar i mediedatabasen Retriever samt via kontakter med kommuner och energibolag. Insamlingen avslutades 31 maj 2014 och ägarförändringar därefter är således inte med i rapporten.

    Resultatet från studien visar att det kommunala ägandet fortsatt dominerar men att det var en stor mängd kommunala fjärrvärmerörelser som avyttrats, totalt 83 stycken. Särskilt många avyttringar gjordes perioden från 1995 och framåt och efter 2005 har enbart åtta kommunala bolag avyttrats. De politiska majoriteterna vid avyttringarna visar på att den politiska färgen varierat, då det i 45 kommuner var rött styre vid tidpunkten för försäljning, i 26 kommuner var det blått och i 12 blocköverskridande styre. Tidigare studier har visat att ideologi inte varit viktigaste skäl till försäljning utan snarare ofta ansträngd kommunal ekonomi.

    Sammanställningen visar även att det kommunala ägandet fortsatt dominerar, då det i 148 kommuner (52 % av de 283 kommuner som har fjärrvärme) är helägda kommunala bolag som bedriver fjärrvärmeverksamhet, i ytterligare 20 är det bolag som samägs av kommuner och i 58 kommuner (20 %) är det helägt privata. I ytterligare 29 kommuner är bolaget delägt kommunalt, tillsammans med antingen privata eller statliga ägare. Största ägaren är numera tyskägda privata bolaget E.ON som bedriver fjärrvärmeverksamhet i 22 kommuner, som antingen ensam ägare eller delägare.

    Det utländska ägandet har ökat det senaste åren men det svenska dominerar fortsatt, genom ägande i 201 kommuner. I 27 kommuner är det norskt ägande, i 20 helägt tyskt, i 19 delat svenskt och utländskt och i 16 kommuner är ägaren utländsk (ej inkluderat Tyskland och Norge).

    De senaste åren har visat på fortsatt rörlighet på marknaden, särskilt genom kommunala återköp av fjärrvärmerörelser. Detta har skett i 21 kommuner, antingen genom återköp av tidigare privatiserat bolag eller att bolag som de etablerat bolaget tillsammans med köpts ut.

    De tre stora ägarna, E.ON, Fortum och Vattenfall, har de senaste åren gjort strategiska storskaliga avyttringar av mindre fjärrvärmerörelser, varav flertalet av avyttringarna gjordes på ett bräde till ett och samma bolag. Det var på detta sätt som Solør, Neova och Värmevärden snabbt etablerade sig som ägare i många kommuner, men med begränsade sammanlagda värmeleveranser.

  • 23.
    Onufrey, Ksenia
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Enabled by the past: understanding endogenous innovation in mature industries2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mature industries have played and still play a crucial role in national and world economies. To survive and retain competitiveness, they need to innovate, as innovation is the driver of economics growth and industrial transformation. However, existing research does not provide sufficient explanation of how innovation in mature industries can be enabled based on resources and internal development logic of those industries, i.e. endogenously. Some previous studies focused on incremental innovation patterns, which led to an underestimation of innovation potential of mature industries. Other studies acknowledged a high innovation potential of mature industries, but failed to explain how, through what mechanisms, industry-endogenous logic can bring about major innovations.

    Therefore, the purpose of this thesis is to systematically address, explain and conceptualize endogenous industry- innovation and its driving mechanisms in mature industries. To achieve this purpose, three main issues are addressed. First, the thesis investigates and conceptualizes the notion of industry endogenous innovation mechanisms based on the path dependency theory. Second, the thesis addresses strategic choices and actions by established companies that are rooted in the industry endogenous mechanisms and result in highly innovative outcomes. Third, the thesis systematically analyses different aspects of radicalness of innovations resulting from industry endogenous mechanisms.

    The thesis represents a qualitative, embedded case study with two main industry cases, i.e. the global lighting industry and the Swedish pulp and paper industry. The lighting industry and its sub-cases in the form of specific lighting technologies have been studied via the analysis of patents of leading lighting manufacturers, archival and secondary data sources as well as interviews with different types of actors in the industry. The pulp and paper industry and its sub-cases in the form of innovation initiatives have been studied with the help of interviews with leading manufacturers and research institutes, as well the analysis of annual reports and secondary data sources. The outcomes of the study are presented in the form of the thesis cover paper and five appended papers.

    The results show that innovations of any magnitude can be endogenously developed in mature industries. At the industry level, endogenous innovation is driven by innovation mechanisms that can be conceptualized as reactive sequences and self-reinforcing mechanisms. At the level of individual companies, the exploitation strategy corresponds to the logic of endogenous innovation mechanisms by enabling highly innovative outcomes and building on a wide range of resources available in the industry. The endogenous character of innovation mechanisms imposes certain limitations on the radicalness of the outcomes in the form of trade-offs in terms of how many and what particular aspects can be radically new at once.

    With these results, the thesis contributes to a more balanced overall understanding of innovation potential of mature industries and allows shifting the focus of discussion from whether mature industries can develop radical innovation to when and under what conditions they can succeed in this process. The results of the thesis also suggest several recommendations for managers in established companies with regard to how they can they can take advantage of industry endogenous innovation mechanisms.

    List of papers
    1. Is one path enough? Multiple paths and path interaction as an extension of path dependency theory
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is one path enough? Multiple paths and path interaction as an extension of path dependency theory
    2014 (English)In: Industrial and Corporate Change, ISSN 0960-6491, E-ISSN 1464-3650, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 1261-1297Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    To explain the development of multi-technology companies and industries where several alternative technologies co-exist and interact over long periods, this article suggests an extension of path dependency theory by providing a conceptualization of the path notion that incorporates the theoretical possibility of multiple paths and path interaction. The conceptualization is applied to a patent study of three leading companies in the lighting industry: General Electric, Osram/Siemens, and Philips. The study shows technology development patterns that are characterized by strong persistence, both within each path and across the whole technology field. These results demonstrate that multiple technological paths can co-exist in companies and industries, characterized by simultaneous long-term presence of several technologies. In such cases, path interaction takes place both between co-existing paths and when new, radically different paths are created. Although further studies are needed to identify the underlying self-reinforcing mechanisms, there is a clear indication that technological path dependency is not restricted to unitary progression patterns, as implied by previous conceptualizations.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford University Press, 2014
    National Category
    Economics and Business Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102614 (URN)10.1093/icc/dtt040 (DOI)000343321100005 ()
    Available from: 2013-12-17 Created: 2013-12-17 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Endogenous sources of path generation in a path dependent industry
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Endogenous sources of path generation in a path dependent industry
    2017 (English)In: Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, ISSN 0953-7325, E-ISSN 1465-3990, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1062-1075Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates and conceptualises industry endogenous sources of innovation in a context of path dependency. With an embedded case study of the mature multi-technology lighting industry, it considers two cases of technology generation (fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes) that have occurred under the dominance of established incandescent technology. The results demonstrate the existence of common driving forces (variety of performance criteria and variety of lighting applications) behind the development of the existing path and the generation of two new paths. Such common driving forces indicate the existence of a reactive sequence or a logical causal relationship between the existing and the new paths, which serve as an enabling mechanism in endogenous path generation.

    Keywords
    industry endogenous innovation, lighting industry, Path dependency, path generation, reactive sequences
    National Category
    Computer Sciences Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Computer Systems Computer Engineering Information Systems, Social aspects
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136098 (URN)10.1080/09537325.2016.1268683 (DOI)000411495400007 ()
    Available from: 2017-03-27 Created: 2017-03-27 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Self-reinforcing Mechanisms in a Multi-technology Industry: Understanding Sustained Technological Variety in a Context of Path Dependency
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-reinforcing Mechanisms in a Multi-technology Industry: Understanding Sustained Technological Variety in a Context of Path Dependency
    2015 (English)In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 523-551Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies self-reinforcing mechanisms in multi-technology industries, i.e. industries in which technological lock-in does not occur and several technologies continue to coexist. The purpose of this paper is to investigate what kind of self-reinforcing mechanisms can be present in such industries and explain how multiple paths can coexist and interact in a context of self-reinforcement and, ultimately, path dependency. Building on the empirical example of the lighting industry, the paper shows that all previously recognized types of self-reinforcing mechanisms can be present in a multi-technology industry. However, in addition to the path-internal positive feedbacks and cross-path negative externalities identified in single-path settings, multi-technology industries also experience positive cross-path externalities that create a symbiotic relationship between alternatives and allow for the reproduction of the same development pattern across technologies. Due to the existence of such non-negative technology interactions, multi-technology industries can be path dependent while still retaining technological variety.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR and FRANCIS LTD, 2015
    Keywords
    Self-reinforcing mechanisms; path dependency; multi-technology industries; lighting industry
    National Category
    Economics and Business
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123163 (URN)10.1080/13662716.2015.1100532 (DOI)000364722200004 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Riksbankens Jubileumsfond via the KITE research program [M2006-0231]

    Available from: 2015-12-06 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2017-12-01
  • 24.
    Pauw, W. P.
    et al.
    Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik/ German Development Institute (DIE), Bonn, Germany / Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden / Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Klein, Richard J T
    Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vellinga, P.
    Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Biermann, F.
    Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Private finance for adaptation: do private realities meet public ambitions?2016In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 134, no 4, p. 489-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The private sector’s role in climate finance is increasingly subject to political and scientific debate. Yet there is poor empirical evidence of private engagement in adaptation and its potential contribution to the industrialised countries’ mobilisation of USD 100 billion of annual climate finance from 2020 onwards to support developing countries to address climate change. This paper analysed 101 case studies of private sector adaptation under the Private Sector Initiative (PSI) of the UNFCCC Nairobi work programme, and examined these against ten ‘adaptation finance criteria’ that were distilled from UN climate negotiation outcomes. Results show that private adaptation interventions complement public adaptation activities. Yet the ten adaptation finance criteria are not met, which demonstrates that the diplomatic UNFCCC conceptualisation of financing adaptation is dissonant from the private sector reality. For example, while the case studies’ investments are ‘new and additional’ to Official Development Assistance (ODA), their ‘predictability’ remains unclear. And despite some commitment for ‘up-scaling’, plans and associated costs for doing so remain undisclosed. Developed countries’ role in ‘mobilising’ private financial resources under the PSI seems limited. It is unrealistic to expect that the UNFCCC alters existing criteria to suit private initiatives, or that the private sector aligns its initiatives to meet existing criteria. This paper advocates monitoring and reporting only of those private investments that principally finance adaptation. This practical way forward would allow private finance to meet criteria such as predictability, transparency, and mobilisation, but would drastically reduce the amount of private investment that could contribute to reaching the USD 100 billion climate finance target.

  • 25.
    Refslund, Bjarke
    et al.
    Center for Industrial Production, Department of Business and Management, Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Thörnquist, Annette
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Intra-European labour migration and low-wage competition - comparing the Danish and Swedish experiences across three sectors2016In: Industrial relations journal, ISSN 0019-8692, E-ISSN 1468-2338, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 62-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article compares how low-wage competition and labour migration from EU11 Member States affect industrial relations and working conditions for natives and migrants in three sectors (transport, cleaning and agriculture) in Denmark and Sweden. The analysis shows how already vulnerable sectors with below-average union density and collective agreements-especially geographical dispersed sectors-are strongly affected.

  • 26.
    Rohracher, Harald
    et al.
    University of Klagenfurt, Austria.
    Späth, Philipp
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Transitions towards sustainability - learning from Graz and Freiburg?2012In: Serbian Architectural Journal, ISSN 1821-3952, Vol. 4, p. 75-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation policies in the European Union increasingly address so-called ‘grand challenges’ such as climate change, resource depletion or aging societies. Such transformations go far beyond conventional product or process innovations and require a restructuring of broad socio-technical regimes, e.g. the built environment, systems of mobility, the energy system or the way we organize processes of production and consumption.

    The distributed nature and specific socio-technical dynamics of large-scale transition processes towards greater sustainability makes cities an important arena of infrastructure transformation and a crucial nexus between different levels of governance and strands of socio-political discourse. The article is based on an analysis of the cases of Graz and Freiburg which since at least two decades have been regarded as ‘eco-cities’ and particularly advanced in their environmental policies and actions. We will investigate to which extent these cities were indeed capable of system innovations and fundamental shifts towards the aim of a “sustainable city“ and we will then draw some conclusions about the ‘room for manoeuvring’ of cities within broader sustainability transitions.

  • 27.
    Saeedi, Mohammad Reza
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pluripotent Dynamic Capabilities in the Internationalization of Firms: Focus on Learning, Innovating and Networking in SMEs from Sweden2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Internationalization of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) has been a considerable concern for international business (IB) scholars. Particularly, for those economies such as Sweden with small local markets, internationalization of SMEs could be fundamental. The firm-specific advantages (FSAs), including what the firm has and does, are crucial for SMEs to overcome in the face of their numerous different obstacles such as liability of smallness (LOS) and liability of foreignness (LOF).

    Examining the extant literature on the evolution of IB theories indicates that over time, IB scholars have been reaching to dynamic-based FSAs (what the firm does) as the source of developing and protecting sustainable competitive advantages (SCA) across national borders in a changing business environment. The nature of dynamic-based FSAs could be similar to dynamic capabilities. But, when it comes to determining specific component factors  of dynamic-based  FSAs  (as dynamic  capabilities),  there has been little agreement between IB researchers. In other words, the room of the dynamic capabilities is still dark. In this respect, shedding light into this room, particularly in the area of IB studies, is crucial. In addition, after determining the component factors of the dynamic-based FSAs, it is also critical to know the likely relationships between the identified component factors as well as their impact on the SMEs’ international performance (IP) as an important outcome of the internationalization. This means that there is a potential theoretical gap associated with the conceptualization of the component factors of the dynamic-based FSAs on one hand, and a potential empirical gap on the other. Given both theoretical and empirical research gaps, the purpose of this study is to examine, from a theoretical perspective, the nature of the dynamic-based FSA and its related component factors in the IB context, as well as empirically explore how SMEs’ IP is influenced by the identified component factors of the dynamic-based FSAs.

    To perform this study, first of all, based on lenses of the resource-based view (RBV) and dynamic capability view (DCV), the literature on organizational capability in the context of the IB studies was systematically reviewed to fill the theoretical gap. Consequently, three component factors of dynamic-based FSAs including networking capability (NC) as a relational-based FSA, innovative capability (IC) as an innovative-based FSA and absorptive capacity (ACAP) as a learning-based FSA were identified, all of which are pluripotent and dynamic in nature. Then, a deductive approach was followed to develop several hypotheses and the associated conceptual model. Furthermore, a survey strategy, collecting data from 330 Swedish internationalized manufacturing SMEs, was applied to accomplish the purpose of the study. Then, the Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) as a quantitative method was used to analyze the collected data.

    The results of the PLS-SEM analysis show that the SMEs’ international performance (IP) is positively influenced by the three identified component factors, whether directly or indirectly. In this regard, ACAP and NC are the two reliable predictors (directly) of the SMEs’ IP. The results indicate that innovative capability (IC) does not have direct impact on the SMEs’ IP, and that its effect is fully transmitted on IP only by the mediating effect of the networking capability (NC). Further analysis showed that ACAP, as an endogenous latent variable, additionally has a positive indirect association with SMEs’ international performance (IP). Moreover, the results also indicate that innovative capability is directly and positively affected by ACAP (innovating-by-learning effect). It was also empirically revealed that ACAP is a very strong predictor for networking capability, which is labeled as the networking-by-learning effect. Another major finding was that in internationalized SMEs, NC is strongly, directly and positively affected by IC; this effect also is termed as the networking-by-innovating effect. The overall picture resulting from the PLS- SEM analysis indicates that ACAP in internationalized SMEs is a wellspring to develop both innovative capability and networking capability, as well as influence SMEs’ IP. Furthermore, these results suggest that the networking capability is a vital gateway to transmit the effect of the other two component factors on IP and, at the same time, directly influence IP.

  • 28.
    Scarpa, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Looking beyond the neighbourhood: income inequality and residential segregation in Swedish metropolitan areas, 1991–20102016In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 37, no 7, p. 963-984Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, residential segregation has become a major issue in the Swedish policy debate. The prevailing view is that residential segregation is a crucial contributing factor to the development of income inequality, since individual income prospects are thought to be influenced by the population characteristics of their neighbourhoods. This study takes the opposite approach and analyses the extent to which, in the period 1991–2010, rising income inequality contributed to the development of residential segregation by income in Swedish metropolitan areas. The period was characterized by unprecedented growth in income inequality, which was associated with a decline in the redistributive power of the welfare state. Residential segregation by income mirrored locally the general trend in income inequality. Another factor was the change in income dispersion in neighbourhoods, relative to the metropolitan areas as a whole, which indicates a tendency towards increased population homogeneity in neighbourhoods with respect to income.

  • 29.
    Sietz, Diana
    et al.
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, P.O. Box 60 12 03, 14412 Potsdam, Germany.
    Boschütz, Maria
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, P.O. Box 60 12 03, 14412 Potsdam, Germany.
    Klein, Richard J T
    Stockholm Environment Institute, Kräftriket 2B, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mainstreaming climate adaptation into development assistance: rationale, institutional barriers and opportunities in Mozambique2011In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 493-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Mozambique, weather extremes threaten development progress, while pronounced poverty aggravates the climate vulnerability of the population. With the country being a major recipient of official development assistance, Mozambique’s development strongly depends on donor investments. Against this background, we aim to encourage the mainstreaming of climate adaptation into development assistance. An analysis of donor investments at a sub-national level showed that a significant proportion of development assistance was invested in climate-sensitive sectors in regions highly exposed to extreme weather conditions. Major damage caused by weather extremes motivates a stronger integration of climate policies into development assistance. Although Mozambique has a supportive legislative environment and climate awareness among donors was found to be high, the limited institutional capacity restricted mainstreaming initiatives. Given major barriers at the national level, bilateral and multilateral donors are able to play a key role in fostering mainstreaming in Mozambique.

  • 30.
    Späth, Philipp
    et al.
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Rohracher, Harald
    University of Klagenfurt, Austria.
    Local Demonstrations for Global Transitions—Dynamics across Governance Levels Fostering Socio-Technical Regime Change Towards Sustainability2012In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 461-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Which role do spatial dimensions play in the transformation of socio-technical regimes, in particular the energy system, towards more sustainable configurations? Concepts such as the multi-level perspective on socio-technical change have not given sufficient attention to space and place so far.

    We develop our considerations around the case of an ‘Energy Region’ in Austria where people try to bring about a substantive shift in their local energy supply structure and have the ambition to contribute to a general transition towards sustainable energy systems. However, if this ambition is to stand the test of reality, what are the mechanisms and processes through which regional governance can have a broader impact on the transition of the energy system? What are the resources it can draw upon? What are the linkages with other governance levels?

    We investigate in detail how one regional showcase for the feasibility of a non-fossil, sustainable energy system was set up in Murau, a remote, alpine district of Austria. Starting from the multi-level framework for the modelling of niche-regime interaction we put particular emphasis on the formation of discourse coalitions and dynamics of multi-level governance. Our findings support the view to pay considerably more attention to the interplay of local and non-local discourses and the dynamic relations between local initiatives and non-local networks which can provide specific opportunities for the legitimization and entrenchment of alternative socio-technical configurations. 

  • 31.
    Späth, Philipp
    et al.
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Rohracher, Harald
    University of Klagenfurt, Austria.
    The ‘eco-cities’ Freiburg and Graz: the social dynamics of pioneering urban energy and climate governance2010In: Cities and Low Carbon Transitions / [ed] H. Bulkeley, V. Castán Broto, M. Hodson and S. Marvin, London: Routledge , 2010, p. 88-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Späth, Philipp
    et al.
    University of Freiburg.
    Rohracher, Harald
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    von Radecki, Alanus
    Stuttgart, Germany .
    Incumbent Actors as Niche Agents: The German Car Industry and the Taming of the “Stuttgart E-Mobility Region”2016In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 252-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The system of mobility currently faces severe challenges. Particularly in cities, strategic interventions are made to support a transition towards sustainable mobility. Incumbent actors from the car industry are often invited to play a key role in such initiatives. The Stuttgart region is supported with public money to become a model region of sustainable mobility because it is base to key actors of the German car industry. This paper examines the locus of agency in such a “transition arena”. How do key actors frame the challenge of sustainable mobility? What role is attributed to public policy at various governance levels and to the “local” industry, respectively? In the case of the Stuttgart region, we find a high ability of key industry actors to reframe transition initiatives for sustainable mobility and align public policy with their interests—particularly in local, i.e., place-bound contexts. This underlines the need for transition studies to pay more attention to the agency of incumbent actors and their capacity to absorb sustainable alternatives without changing dominant industry structures.

  • 33.
    Syssner, Josefina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies – CKS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Olausson, Albin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Att främja utveckling inom besöksnäringen2019In: Entreprenörskap för en levande landsbygd: 15 texter om landsbygdsutveckling och entreprenörskap i Norrland / [ed] Karl Wennberg, Familjen Kamprads stiftelse , 2019, p. 279-294Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Besöksnäringen lyfts fram som allt viktigare för utveckling och tillväxt på den svenska landsbygden. Besöksnäringen har ett antal särskilda karaktärsdrag som är viktiga att känna till om branschen ska kunna nå den potential den ofta tillskrivs.

    Besöksnäringen är platsspecifik och måste därför utvecklas i relation till platsens natur, kultur och sociala karaktärsdrag.

    En destination utgörs ofta av ett stort antal, små och stora, kommersiella och icke-kommersiella aktörer, vilket skapar utmaningar när det kommer till styrning av besöksnäringens utveckling.

    Besöksnäringens utveckling kantas av att olika intressen möts och ibland hamnar i konflikt med varandra. För att besöksnäringens utveckling ändå ska kunna styras krävs ett aktivt ledarskap och forum för strategisk styrning.

  • 34.
    Trygg, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Understanding collaboration and local development: a Swedish case study on different actors’ roles and perspectives2018In: Scottish Geographical Journal, ISSN 1470-2541, E-ISSN 1751-665X, Vol. 134, no 3-4, p. 172-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ten years ago, the concept of retirement homes ceased to exist in Sweden. This was a result of the Delegation on Elderly Living’s suggestion whereby the terminology for and characteristics of accommodation for the elderly changed. This makes it hard to plan and change how the elderly live in Sweden. When it comes to renovating housing for the elderly, the municipalities and property owners do not know how to deal with the situation. This is despite the fact that the situation in Sweden is the same as many other countries around the world: the population is ageing and there is a clear need for housing for the elderly. This case study examines a project to renovate a building complex which has failed to get started. The analytical framework of collaborative governance has been adapted and used as inspiration for understanding this at a local level. From a narrative perspective, mixed methods were used. Two conclusions are drawn. Firstly, the concept of drivers for collaborative governance helps to explain why the project was difficult to realise. Secondly, both the categorisation and concept of housing for the elderly have changed with policy implications.

  • 35.
    Voltes-Dorta, Augusto
    et al.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Rodriguez Deniz, Hector
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Suau-Sanchez, Pere
    Cranfield University, England.
    Passenger recovery after an airport closure at tourist destinations: A case study of Palma de Mallorca airport2017In: TOURISM MANAGEMENT, ISSN 0261-5177, Vol. 59, p. 449-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of increased concern about the resilience of critical transport infrastructure to external events and the impact of such events on local tourism industries, this paper analyzes the ability of tourism-oriented airports to relocate departing passengers in the event of an unexpected airport closure. A case study of Palma de Mallorca airport is presented. Using an MIDT dataset on passenger itineraries in August 2014, several closure scenarios are simulated, and disrupted passengers are relocated to minimum-delay itineraries. Aggregate delays and relocation rates are used to assess the impact of each scenario, with a particular focus on UK and Germany markets. The results provide useful benchmarks for the development of policies aimed at minimizing the impact on stranded tourists, such as allowing for passenger connections, establishing a protocol for interline cooperation, and improving intermodal transfers. These measures will help mitigate the negative impacts on airline loyalty and destination image. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 36.
    Watkiss, Paul
    et al.
    Paul Watkiss Associates, Oxford, UK.
    Benzie, Magnus
    Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klein, Richard J T
    Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The complementarity and comparability of climate change adaptation and mitigation2015In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, ISSN 1757-7780, E-ISSN 1757-7799, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 541-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both mitigation and adaptation can reduce the risks of climate change. This study reviews the complementarity and comparability between the two, looking first at the global level and then at the national-to-local domain. At the global level, the review finds differing definitions and viewpoints exist in the literature. Much of the economic literature reports that global mitigation and adaptation are substitutes (in economic terms). In contrast, the scientific literature considers them to be complementary (in policy terms), as they address different risks that vary temporally and spatially. The degree of complementarity and comparability therefore depends on the perspective taken, although there is a policy space where the two can overlap. However, the governance, institutional, and policy-based literature identifies that even if a global mitigation and adaptation mix could be defined, it would be highly contentious and extremely difficult to deliver in practice. The review then considers the complementarity and comparability of mitigation and adaptation at the national-to-local domain, in national policy and at sector level. The review finds there is greater potential for complementarity at this scale, although possible conflicts can also exist. However, the institutional, governance, and policy literature identifies a number of barriers to practical implementation, and as a result, complementary mitigation and adaptation action is unlikely to happen autonomously. Finally, the lessons from the review are drawn together to highlight policy relevant issues and identify research gaps. WIREs Clim Change 2015, 6:541–557. doi: 10.1002/wcc.368This article is categorized under: * Integrated Assessment of Climate Change > Methods of Integrated Assessment of Climate Change * The Carbon Economy and Climate Mitigation > Benefits of Mitigation * Climate and Development > Sustainability and Human Well-Being

  • 37.
    Webster, Juliet
    et al.
    Employment Research Centre, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Wickham, James
    Employment Research Centre, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Collins, Gráinne
    Employment Research Centre, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Shapiro, Hanne
    Centre for Competence and IT, Danish Technological Institute, Denmark.
    Thomaesen, Louise
    Centre for Competence and IT, Danish Technological Institute, Denmark.
    Iversen, Jonas
    Centre for Competence and IT, Danish Technological Institute, Denmark.
    Jacobsen, Heike
    Landesinstitut Sozialforschungsstelle Dortmund, Germany.
    de Renzy, Elisabeth
    Landesinstitut Sozialforschungsstelle Dortmund, Germany.
    Gherardi, Silvia
    Associazione Ricerche sulle Organizzazione Complesse, Trento, Italy.
    Poggio, Barbara
    Associazione Ricerche sulle Organizzazione Complesse, Trento, Italy.
    Vidal, Isabel
    Centro de Iniciativas de la Economia Social, Barcelona, Spain.
    Fernández Mostaza, Esther
    Centro de Iniciativas de la Economia Social, Barcelona, Spain.
    Sundin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rapp, Gunilla
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Innovations in Information Society Sectors: Implicatons for Women's Work, Expertise and Opportunities in European Workplaces : SERVEMPLOI: Final Report of project SOE1-CT98-11192001Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall objective of project SERVEMPLOI was to examine, in the context of considerable technological and organisational innovations and uphe avals, the prospects for women working in low-grade service jobs to develop skills and knowledges which would allow them to move out of low-grade work and into better work, or ‘good work’. A literature survey and a contextual analysis of retailing and fin ancial services sectors was undertaken. Fieldwork was conducted in eight countries (Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Sweden and the UK. Case studies of workplaces in the two sectors were carried out. In addition, qualitative panel studie s followed the employment trajectories of female employees in the two sectors through the duration of the project.

    Women working in junior positions in these two service sectors are experiencing significant organisational and technological changes. Both sectors are becoming more highly concentrated in ownership terms, and competition is becoming fiercer between companies. Deregulation at member state and European level has had a major effect on the market and consequently on the strategic behaviour of co mpanies in both sectors. There has been an overall trend towards increasing commercialisation, de -bureaucratisation, and an intensive struggle for market share through increases in opening and operating hours. Customer service has become the watchword of their competitive strategies. The development and application of information and communications technologies (ICTs) has been done in pursuit of these objectives. Company - and supply-chain-wide information systems allow companies to maintain logistical c ontrol and reach into new markets. Customer information and customer relationship management systems are now key tools in the capture of markets and the delivery of customer service.

    Although knowledge and information, particularly concerning markets and customers, are assuming increasing importance in retail and financial services companies, these resources and their attendant benefits are not filtering down to women working in junior positions in the two sectors. At the level of workplaces in which wom en perform the routine functions of selling, checkout work, clerical and cashiering work, skill development is more concerned with providing customer service than with fostering substantive knowledge or encouraging the use of SERVEMPLOI final report information. Training opportu nities and progression prospects for women to move out of these jobs are variable, and highly contingent upon national training régimes and local company practices. Lengthening and unpredictable working hours also act as a major obstacle to women’s progression. Where women do enter managerial positions, this coincides with a removal of authority from these jobs. Our conclusion is the Knowledge Economy has not strongly benefited these women, nor are they able to harness its potential for their own develop ment. The potential of many women is being wasted.

  • 38.
    Wächter, Petra
    et al.
    Institute of Technology Assessment of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Austria.
    Ornetzeder, Michael
    Institute of Technology Assessment of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Austria.
    Rohracher, Harald
    University of Klagenfurt, Austria .
    Schreuer, Anna
    Inter-University Research Centre for Technology, Work and Culture, Austria.
    Knoflacher, Markus
    Austrian Institute of Technology, Austria.
    Towards a Sustainable Spatial Organization of the Energy System: Backcasting Experiences from Austria2012In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 193-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition to a sustainable energy system faces more challenges than a simple replacement of fossil energy carriers by renewable sources. Since current structures do not favour sustainable energy generation and use it is indispensable to change the existing infrastructure. A fundamental change of the energy system also requires re-organizing spatial structures and their according institutions and governance structures. Especially in Austria, urban sprawl and unsustainable settlement structures are regarded as one of the main developments leading to increased energy demand. One of the aims within the project E-Trans 2050 was to identify socio-economic constellations that are central to the further transformation of the energy system and to focus on actors and their socio-technical framework conditions. Based on a sustainable future vision for the year 2050 a backcasting workshop was conducted to identify necessary steps for the envisaged transition to a more sustainable energy system. The results shed light on the necessary changes for a transformation towards sustainability in the specific Austrian situation. Critical issues are region-specific production of energy and its use, settlement and regional structures and values and role models, which all have a determining influence on energy demand. Combining the knowledge of extensive energy use with available energy resources in spatial planning decisions is a main challenge towards a long term sustainable energy system.

  • 39.
    Wächter, Petra
    et al.
    Institute of Technology Assessment of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Austria.
    Schreuer, Anna
    Inter-University Research Centre for Technology, Work and Culture, Austria.
    Rohracher, Harald
    University of Klagenfurt, Austria.
    Ornetzeder, Michael
    Institute of Technology Assessment of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Austria.
    Räumliche Aspekte eines nachhaltigen Energiesystems: Backcasting als Methode für Systeminnovation2012In: Der Systemblick auf Innovation: Technikfolgenabschätzung in der Technikgestaltung / [ed] M. Decker, A. Grunwald, M. Knapp, Berlin: Edition Sigma, 2012, p. 351-358Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 39 of 39
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