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  • 1.
    Alfredsson Ågren, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Internet activities and social and community participation among young people with learning disabilities2023In: British Journal of Learning Disabilities, ISSN 1354-4187, E-ISSN 1468-3156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundA digital lag has been reported on access to the internet and performing internet activities for young people with learning disabilities in everyday life. AimThe aim of this study is to explore environmental opportunities and challenges when performing internet activities and how internet use influences social and community participation for young people with learning disabilities from the perspectives of the target group. MethodsAn inductive design was applied, with focused observations and follow-up interviews of 15 internet-using young persons with learning disabilities in their everyday settings. The data was analysed interpretatively using open coding. FindingsThe environment offered both opportunities and challenges in terms of the design of digital devices and digital support. Support from peers was often preferred. All participants performed internet activities related to social participation although not all used social media. Searching for information was performed, however, finding the information or understanding it was challenging and led to restricted participation in the community. ConclusionMore examples of internet use positively influencing social participation were found, contrary to community participation. It is indicated that concrete learning situations when using the internet for social participation were more adapted to the participants and promoted this type of participation, contrary to situations of internet use influencing community participation.

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  • 2.
    Alkusaibati, Wael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pilemalm, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Agder, Norway.
    Digitalized Co-production and Volunteerism in Emergency Response: a Literature Review2023In: Proceedings of the 20th International ISCRAM Conference / [ed] Jaziar Radianti; Ioannis Dokas; Nicolas Lalone; Deepak Khazanchi, Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM , 2023, p. 738-750Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ICT-enabled or digitalized co-production of public services has become increasingly relevant to emergency response and crisis management. This study provides a literature review on this phenomenon, exploring both large-scale crises and frequent emergencies. We found that research in the domain is scarce and focuses mainly on the phenomenon in terms of digital volunteerism. In large-scale crises, they mostly refer to spontaneous forms of volunteering, and in smaller emergencies, to more organized volunteers that collaborate with a response organization over time. Similarities to digitalized co-production in the public sector generally include financial, administrative, ICT, and demographic factors. Differences include, e.g., aspects of coordination, support, and processing by formal actors. We argue that there are benefits of adding a theoretical co-production perspective to digital volunteerism in emergency response and that our literature review can guide future research on models and (the double) use of volunteers in both kinds of emergencies.   

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  • 3. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Allemann, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Online support for informal carers of persons with heart failure: Focus on perceptions, development and experiences2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heart failure (HF) is a common condition, and its prevalence is expected to increase. The illness trajectory is unpredictable, and its effects will include a potential impact on informal carers, i.e., family, friends, and significant others. Sometimes these persons are affected by the help and care they provide in such a way that they might themselves need support. However, they may be unrecognised in their endeavours, and might also experience a lack of support, especially from healthcare. Online solutions are considered to have the potential to provide accessible support to carers that is also anticipated to be cost-effective.   

    Aim: This thesis focuses on support to informal carers to persons living with HF, but also take the viewpoint of the person with HF by exploring social supports associations with their health and well-being. The overall aim was to explore perceptions, development, and experiences of online support for informal carers.  

    Method: This thesis comprises four studies. Study I had a cross-sectional design using self-reported data and data from the Swedish Pace-maker and ICD Registry. Data from 1,550 persons with HF who were living with an ICD and who had complete data on the outcome variable were utilised for both descriptive analysis and logistic regression. The outcome variable, perceived social support, was measured using the questionnaire Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), which includes measuring support from significant others, family, and friends. The logistic regression was conducted to compare those dichotomised as having low/medium perceived social support to those having high levels of support. Study II had a qualitative design, and data were collected through 8 focus groups with 23 informal carers of persons with HF to explore their perceptions of how online solutions could be of value for support. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Study III had a descriptive design. It describes the co-design process of an online support pro-gramme for carers through three phases. In phase I, topics and content that reflected carers needs and preferences were identified. In phase II, the content for the support programme was developed and through phase III the content was refined and finalised. Informal carers participated in every phase, and the co-design process also involved professionals with expertise in, for example, HF and caregiving, for the development of content. It was an iterative process, moving back and forth between phases, and the re-search group acted as coordinators and ensured that carers’ voices were kept central to the process. Study IV had a qualitative design, and data were collected through individual semi-structured interviews with 15 carers. Interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The study focused on informal carers' experiences of online, co-designed support pro-gramme while being participants in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) that has the aim of studying the effects of engaging with the programme.  

    Results: The findings show that one in five diagnosed with HF and living with an ICD reported low/medium levels of social support and that these persons had higher odds of negative psychosocial outcomes. This un-derscores the value and importance of support from informal carers for the well-being of those with HF. The thesis focused on perceptions, development, and experiences of online support for informal carers. The findings suggest that a co-designed support programme has the potential to be usable and useful for carers considering the online format and its content. It may provide insights, preparedness, and validation in relation to being a carer of a person with HF. However, carers may have an ‘ambiguous stance’ towards the online format and going online for support may not be the preferred form of support for all carers.   

    Conclusion: A co-designed online support programme, when built on a trusted platform within a healthcare context, may be considered both usable and useful for carers. The online format and content also provide the potential to offer timely and adaptable support. The content, developed in a collaboration between carers and professionals, offers evidence-based, relevant information, thereby possibly avoiding seeming impersonal, which can also be beneficial. The programme acknowledges the intertwined lives of carers and those with HF, and its content reflects this, potentially also enhancing its perception as usable and useful for carers. Still, the potential of the support programme depends on carers being aware of its existence, or being made aware, and can further recognise its value. The support programme is considered to have the capacity to be relevant for a broad group of carers, and therefore efforts may be of importance to ensure it is accessed and utilised. However, it is also important to take into account that not everyone may be willing or able to go online for support, or may wish to stay in a caring role. Healthcare also needs to recognise this when offering support to carers and the online support may be regarded an option among several. 

    List of papers
    1. Perceived Social Support in Persons With Heart Failure Living With an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator: A Cross-sectional Explorative Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceived Social Support in Persons With Heart Failure Living With an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator: A Cross-sectional Explorative Study
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 6, p. E1-E8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The links between chronic illness, psychological well-being, and social support have previously been established. Social isolation and loneliness have shown an increased mortality risk for those with heart failure (HF). Increasingly more people with HF are living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), but only a few small-scale studies have focused on social support in this population.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore factors related to perceived social support in a large cohort of individuals with HF living with an ICD.

    METHODS: All eligible adult ICD recipients in the Swedish ICD registry were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. For this analysis, those with HF and complete data on perceived social support were included (N = 1550; age, 67.3 (SD, 9.8) years; 19.5% female).

    RESULTS: Most reported a high level of social support, but 18% did not. In logistic regression, living alone was the greatest predictor of low/medium support. Lower social support for those living alone was associated with poorer perceived health status, having symptoms of depression, and experiencing low perceived control. For those living with someone, lower support was associated with female gender, symptoms of depression and anxiety, and less control. Heart failure status and perceived symptom severity were not related to the outcome.

    CONCLUSION: One in five participants reported low/medium social support. Our study underlines the complex relationships between perceived social support, psychological well-being and perceived control over the heart condition. Multiple aspects need to be taken into account when developing interventions to provide psychosocial support and optimize outcomes in this patient group.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154035 (URN)10.1097/JCN.0000000000000523 (DOI)000457866800001 ()30063538 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2023-11-14
    2. Perceptions of Information and Communication Technology as Support for Family Members of Persons With Heart Failure: Qualitative Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of Information and Communication Technology as Support for Family Members of Persons With Heart Failure: Qualitative Study
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    2019 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 21, no 7, article id e13521Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heart failure (HF) affects not only the person diagnosed with the syndrome but also family members, who often have the role of informal carers. The needs of these carers are not always met, and information and communications technology (ICT) could have the potential to support them in their everyday life. However, knowledge is lacking about how family members perceive ICT and see opportunities for this technology to support them. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of ICT solutions as supportive aids among family members of persons with HF. Methods: A qualitative design was applied. A total of 8 focus groups, comprising 23 family members of persons affected by HF, were conducted between March 2015 and January 2017. Participants were recruited from 1 hospital in Sweden. A purposeful sampling strategy was used to find family members of persons with symptomatic HF from diverse backgrounds. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The analysis revealed 4 categories and 9 subcategories. The first category, about how ICT could provide relevant support, included descriptions of how ICT could be used for communication with health care personnel, for information and communication retrieval, plus opportunities to interact with persons in similar life situations and to share support with peers and extended family. The second category, about how ICT could provide access, entailed how ICT could offer solutions not bound by time or place and how it could be both timely and adaptable to different life situations. ICT could also provide an arena for family members to which they might not otherwise have had access. The third category concerned how ICT could be too impersonal and how it could entail limited personal interaction and individualization, which could lead to concerns about usability. It was emphasized that ICT could not replace physical meetings. The fourth category considered how ICT could be out of scope, reflecting the fact that some family members were generally uninterested in ICT and had difficulties envisioning how it could be used for support. It was also discussed as more of a solution for the future. Conclusions: Family members described multiple uses for ICT and agreed that ICT could provide access to relevant sources of information from which family members could potentially exchange support. ICT was also considered to have its limitations and was out of scope for some but with expected use in the future. Even though some family members seemed hesitant about ICT solutions in general, this might not mean they are unreceptive to suggestions about their usage in, for example, health care. Thus, a variety of factors should be considered to facilitate future implementations of ICT tools in clinical practice.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    JMIR PUBLICATIONS, INC, 2019
    Keywords
    family; caregivers; telemedicine; perception; heart failure; social support; focus groups; qualitative research
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159249 (URN)10.2196/13521 (DOI)000476841200001 ()31313662 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden [FORSS-665001]; Swedish National Science Council (VR) [K2015-99X -22124-04-4]; Swedish National Science Council/Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare (VR-FORTE) [2014-4100]

    Available from: 2019-08-07 Created: 2019-08-07 Last updated: 2024-01-17
    3. The co-design of an online support programme with and for informal carers of people with heart failure: A methodological paper
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The co-design of an online support programme with and for informal carers of people with heart failure: A methodological paper
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    2023 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 32, no 19-20, p. 7589-7604Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe the co-designing process of an online support programme with and for informal carers of people with heart failure.Design A co-design process built on core concepts and ideas embedded in co-design methodology.Data sources Our co-design process included three phases involving 32 informal caregivers and 25 content creators; (1) Identification of topics and content through literature searches, focus group interviews and user group sessions; (2) Development of the online support programme and; (3) Refinement and finalization which included testing a paper prototype followed by testing the online version and testing and approval of the final version of the support programme.Outcomes The co-design process resulted in a support programme consisting of 15 different modules relevant to informal carers, delivered on a National Health Portal.Conclusion Co-design is an explorative process where researchers need to balance a range of potentially conflicting factors and to ensure that the end users are genuinely included in the process.Relevance to clinical practice Emphasizing equal involvement of end users (e.g. carers or patients) in the design and development of healthcare interventions aligns with contemporary ideas of person-centred care and provides a valuable learning opportunity for those involved. Furthermore, a co-designed online support programme has the capacity to be both accessible and meet end users information and support needs, thereby optimizing their self-care abilities. Additionally, an online support programme provides the opportunity to address current challenges regarding scarce resources and the lack of healthcare personnel.Reporting methods Consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ).Patient or public contribution Both informal carers and content creators were involved in developing the support programme.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY, 2023
    Keywords
    heart diseases; informal caregiving; information and communication technology; participatory design; web-based support
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-197420 (URN)10.1111/jocn.16856 (DOI)001052348700001 ()37605222 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare [dnr 2014-4100]; Swedish Research Council; Familjen Kamprads stiftelse [2014-34016-113474-48]; [20210130]

    Available from: 2023-09-05 Created: 2023-09-05 Last updated: 2024-02-01
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  • 4.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karsvall, Arvid
    Södertörns Högskola, Institutionen för kommunikation, medier och IT, Medieteknik.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholms universitet, Mobile Life.
    Values and qualities in interaction design meetings2011In: The Endless End: The 9th International European Academy of Design Conference. Porto, Portugal, May 4-7, 2011., 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How are values and qualities expressed in interaction design? Previous research into this topic has largely been conceptual. How interaction designers and clients actually reason has only been touched upon in empirical studies. The research question for this paper is how interaction designers, as a collective and in an unfolding design process, concretize values and qualities in meetings with clients. By way of video recordings, we have analyzed two interaction design workshops. The analysis indicated that values were concretized top-down, from general conceptions and the design brief given, while also explored bottom-up. Several kinds of communicative means (e.g. talk, gestures, whiteboards, post-it notes) were used to animate values and design visions. Mixing a top-down and bottom-up approach allowed the designers to be both prescriptive and sensitive the uniqueness of the design situation. Thedifferences in communicative means did not really matter for how values and qualities weremade concrete. What mattered was that people really started talking with each other.

  • 5.
    Axell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Boström, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Växjö, Sweden.
    Preschoolers’ Conceptions of Technological Artefacts and Gender in Picture Books2016In: PATT-32 Proceedings Technology Education for 21st Century Skills / [ed] J. de Vries, Arien Bekker-Holtland and Gerald van Dijk, ITEEA , 2016, p. 57-64Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Picture books are a frequent element of daily preschool activities (Damber, Nilsson & Ohlsson, 2013; Simonsson, 2004; SOU 2006:75). They are important pedagogical tools that can help children acquire an understanding of the everyday technology they come in contact with, as well as the human application of technology (Axell, 2015; Axell & Boström, 2015). These are skills that are emphasised in the Swedish preschool curriculum. In the curriculum it is also stated that the preschool should counteract traditional gender patterns and gender roles (Skolverket, 2010). However, an investigation of a selection of picture books aimed at preschool children shows that the books content is somewhat problematic. Many of the picture books provide a focus on the function of separate artefacts without any sort of context or explanation of their implications in a societal context. There also tends to be an emphasis on traditional masculine-coded technology in the books. Building and making and working with machines is depicted as a male activity. The male stereotype is essentially connected with different kinds of vehicles like cars, airplanes, motorbikes, tractors etc. (Axell & Boström, 2015; See also Holbrok, 2008). Based on these previous findings, the aim of this pilot study was to obtain an initial concept about how children’s literature may influence preschool children’s view on technological artefacts. The study was conducted through semi-structured interviews with four five-year-olds, two girls and two boys. Through a thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006) three overarching themes were identified: The relationship between design and function, anthropomorphic animals as users of artefacts, and gender and artefacts. Some of the key findings were that the 5-year-olds did not know what “technology” is, but had good knowledge about tools. Additionally, they did not genderise any of the artefacts included in the study.

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    Preschoolers’ Conceptions of Technological Artefacts and Gender in Picture Books
  • 6.
    Bergqvist, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems.
    Designing for Empathy in Elderly Care: Exploration of Opportunities to Deliver Behaviour Change Interventions through mHealth Applications, to Promote Empathic Behaviour in Elderly Home Care Nursing Assistants2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The Swedish population is ageing quickly and the system for elderly home care is under increasing pressure. Staff turnover is high, nursing assistants are reporting stress, and employers have to recruit staff lacking sufficient experience. These factors are barriers to empathic care, considered essential to patient health outcomes. Elderly care should rely on cognitive empathy, be other-oriented and improve the client’s situation based on contextual understanding. There is a need for education and support for nursing assistants, so that they can provide empathic care.

    Purpose

    The thesis explores empathy as a skill in elderly home care to identify opportunities of promoting empathy in the client-nursing assistant interaction, by means of behaviour change interventions delivered through an mHealth application that nursing assistants already use at work.

    Method

    A group interview was conducted with six nursing assistants from four elderly home care organisations in a Swedish municipality, to learn about their experience of empathy at work, and factors affecting their ability to give empathic care. The respondents were using the same mHealth application to get and provide information about client visits. The Behaviour Change Wheel framework was used to analyze behavioural drivers of empathic care in elderly home care.

    Results

    Influences on empathic behaviour was identified in all 14 domains in the Theoretical Domains Framework. 13 target behaviours, 7 Intervention Functions and 45 Behaviour Change Techniques were suggested as suitable candidates to investigate for intervention development.

    Conclusion

    Empathy seems possible to promote through resource-efficient digital behaviour change interventions. Future studies may use this work as a starting point for development of interventions to promote empathic behaviour in elderly care.

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  • 7.
    Bergqvist, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    ​Ökad mobilitet, delaktighet och frihet ― IKT-stöd som fyller verkliga behov inom äldreomsorg: Behovskartläggning för kommunikation och information mellan omsorgstagare, närstående och utförare som grund till en gemensam kontaktyta2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden’s population is steadily growing older and while the demand for care of senior citizens is increasing, care givers are forced to cope with diminishing resources in terms of money and qualified staff. Many put hope in new eHealth technology, as a means of raising efficiency and quality in the every day working situation. This thesis aims to study needs regarding communication, information and interaction between care takers, dependants and caregivers in geriatric care, in order to create a foundation upon which an ICT system may be built to fulfill those needs. The results presented are part of a research project focusing on future ICT systems in healthcare. Data was collected through an observational study, group discussions with informants related to care takers, and qualitative interviews with 13 informants who have extensive experience of geriatric care. The results imply there are existing problems that may be avoided by facilitating information sharing between the aforementioned groups. The study also presents some important points of discussion regarding usefulness, clashing needs of different users, and the balance between simplicity of use and system size.

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  • 8.
    Bonu, Bruno
    et al.
    Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3, France.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Crozat, Dominique
    Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3, France.
    Fauré, Laurent
    Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3, France.
    Sélimanovski, Catherine
    Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3, France.
    Voir, montrer, dire un ”carnaval de rues” dans un centre de vidéosurveillance2013In: Dire l'événement: Langage, mémoire, société / [ed] Sophie Moirand, Sandrine Reboul-Touré, Danielle Londei, Licia Reggiani, Paris: Presses Sorbonne Nouvelle, 2013, p. 49-59Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Brzeskot Ganning, Eliasz
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Informationsvisualisering av bokningsstatistik över en kontorsmiljö2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta projekt har blivit utfört i samarbete med Senion AB för att ta fram en pappersrapport som presenterar information över bokningsdata för ett kontorsmiljös användning. Projektet har bestått av två övergripande delar. Första delen bestod av att utveckla en metod för att samla och formatera bokningsdata tillhandahållen från en av Senions kunders kontor. Andra delen bestod av att visualisera informationen härledd från den data som blev framtagen från första delen. Den informationsvisualisering som designades testades i användartester för att få djupare insikt i vad som är effektiv presentation av detta projekts bokningsdata. Användartesterna gav insikt i vilka representationer som fungerade bra och hur vissa kan bli korrigerade till det bättre. De kvantitativa mätningarna hade ingen statistisk signifikans så diskussionen av resultatet är huvudsakligen centrerad kring de kvalitativa mätningarna. Baserat på resultat av tänka-högt och semi-strukturerade intervjuer så diskuteras fördelen med några multimodala visualiseringar, stapeldiagram och tilltalande visualiserings estetik. Projektet har också presenterat vikten av att informationsvisualisering gynnas av att vara grundad i kognitionsvetenskapliga principer om perception och uppmärksamhet. Vidare så belyser texten hur användarcentrerad informationsvisualisering kräver starkare empiriska grunder och standardiserade mått för att testa kvalitet och effektivitet.  

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  • 10.
    Börütecene, Ahmet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Designing Human-Automation Collaboration for Predictive Maintenance2020In: Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, p. 251-256Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concerning the maintenance and upkeep of autonomous warehouses, contemporary developments in industrial digitalization and machine learning are currently fueling a shift from preventive maintenance to predictive maintenance (PdM). We report an ongoing co-design project that explores human-automation collaboration in this direction through a future scenario of baggage handling in an airport where human operators oversee and interact with AI-based predictions. The cornerstones of our design concept are the visualizations of current and predicted system performance and the ability for operators to preview consequences of future actions in relation to performance prediction.

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  • 11.
    Chowdhury, Shamsul I.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Statistical expert systems: a special application area for knowledge-based computer methodology1987Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigates the purposes, functions and requirements of statistical expert systems and focuses attention on some unique characteristics of this subcategory of knowledge-based systems. Statistical expert systems have been considered in this thesis as one approach to improve statistical software and extend their safe usability to a broad category of users in different phases of a statistical investigation. Some prototype applications in which the author has been involved are presented and discussed. A special chapter is devoted to the question whether this methodology might be a rare example of an advanced technology that is suitable for application in non-advanced environments, such as in developing countries.

  • 12.
    Crusoe, Jonathan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Information Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Why is it so challenging to cultivate open government data?: Understanding impediments from an ecosystem perspective2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: This compilation licentiate thesis focuses on open government data (OGD). The thesis is based on three papers. OGD is a system that is organized when publishers collect and share data with users, who can unrestrictedly reuse the data. In my research, I have explored why it can be challenging to cultivate OGD. Cultivation is human activities that change, encourage, or guide human organizations towards a higher purpose by changing, introducing, managing, or removing conditions. Here, the higher purpose is OGD to realize believed benefits. Thus, OGD cultivation is an attempt to stimulate actors into organizing as OGD.

    Problem and Purpose: OGD is believed to lead to several benefits. However, the worldwide OGD movement has slowed down, and researchers have noted a lack of use. Publishers and users are experiencing a set of different impediments that are challenging to solve. In previous research, there is a need for more knowledge about what can impede the OGD organization, cause non-valuable organizing, or even collapse the organization. At the same time, there is a lack of knowledge about how impediments shape the organization of OGD. This gap can make it hard to solve and overcome the impediments experienced by publishers and users. The sought-after knowledge can bring some understanding of the current situation of OGD. In this research, I have viewed the organization of OGD as an ecosystem. The purpose of this thesis is to draw lessons about why it can be challenging to cultivate OGD ecosystems by understanding OGD impediments from an ecosystem perspective.

    Research Design: I set out to explore OGD through qualitative research from 2016 to 2018. My research started with a pilot case study that led to three studies. The studies are each reported in a paper and the papers form the base of this thesis. The first paper aims to stimulate the conceptually oriented discussion about actors’ roles in OGD by developing a framework that was tested on a Swedish public agency. The second paper has the purpose of expanding the scope surrounding impediments and was based in a review and systematization of previous research about OGD impediments. The third paper presents an exploration of impediments experienced by publishers, users, and cultivators in the Swedish national OGD ecosystem to identify faults. From the three papers, lessons were drawn in turn and together, that are presented in this thesis.

    Findings: Cultivators when cultivating OGD ecosystems are facing towering challenges. The following three main challenges are identified in this thesis: (1) to cultivate a system that can manage stability by itself without constant involvement, (2) to cultivate a system that is capable of evolving towards a “greater good” by itself, and (3) to have an up-to-date precise vocabulary for a self-evolving system that enables inter-subjective understand for coordinating problem-solving.

    Contribution: The theoretical contribution of this thesis is that OGD ecosystems can be viewed as a public utility. Moreover, I recommend that researchers approach the organizing of OGD as the cultivation of evolution, rather than the construction of a structure; to consider the stability of the system in growth, value, and participation; and to be cautious with how they label and describe OGD actors. For actors that are cultivating OGD, I recommend that they guide the OGD actors to help them organize; view OGD cultivation as the management of evolution (growth) towards a purpose; and view cultivation as a collaborative effort where they can supply ideas, technologies, practices, and expertise.

    List of papers
    1. Investigating open government data barriers: A literature review and conceptualization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating open government data barriers: A literature review and conceptualization
    2018 (English)In: Electronic Government: EGOV 2018 / [ed] Parycek P., Springer Verlag , 2018, p. 169-183Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When focusing on open government data (OGD) publishing and related barriers, there are several complexities present. Largely, current research is focused on publishing and usage of OGD; and we argue that there are a need to investigate and to systematise OGD barrier research in order to understand and outline an expanded scope of the phenomenon. We expand by clarifying barriers linked to the release decision and the data’s organisational context. To investigate the OGD barriers, we conduct a systematic literature review, identifying 34 articles as a point of departure for our analysis. From these articles we create, present and discuss illustrations on historical development, barrier types, and different research focuses on OGD. When analysing the articles, we identify a focus on technical, organisational, and legal barrier types, while studies on open data usage and systems are less frequent. Our analysis also identifies some possible open data research barriers. In the article we also relate barriers to an expanded OGD process (Suitability, Release, Publish, Use, and Evaluation), identifying 46 barriers with possible linkages. The results is an expanded scope and a conceptual illustration of OGD barriers. © IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2018.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Verlag, 2018
    Series
    Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349 ; 11020
    Keywords
    Barriers, Challenges, Impediments, Literature review, Myths, OGD, Open data, Open government data, Process, Risks, Government data processing, Processing, Literature reviews, Open datum, Reviews
    National Category
    Information Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151311 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-98690-6_15 (DOI)2-s2.0-85052893750 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-98689-0 (ISBN)978-3-319-98690-6 (ISBN)
    Conference
    EGOV 2018, Electronic Government
    Available from: 2018-09-17 Created: 2018-09-17 Last updated: 2019-04-02
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    Why is it so challenging to cultivate open government data?: Understanding impediments from an ecosystem perspective
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  • 13.
    Daza-Caicedo, Sandra
    et al.
    Observ Colombiano Ciencia and Tecnol, Colombia.
    Maldonado Castaneda, Oscar
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Arboleda-Castrillon, Tania
    Pontificia University of Javeriana, Colombia.
    Falla, Sigrid
    Corp Maloka Ciencia Tecnol and Innovac, Colombia.
    Moreno, Pablo
    Observ Colombiano Ciencia and Tecnol, Colombia.
    Tafur-Sequera, Mayali
    Corp Maloka Ciencia Tecnol and Innovac, Colombia.
    Papagayo, Diana
    Observ Colombiano Ciencia and Tecnol, Colombia.
    Measuring the impact of practices of social appropriation of science and technology: a proposal for a set of indicators2017In: História, Ciências, Saúde-Manguinhos, ISSN 0104-5970, E-ISSN 1678-4758, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 145-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a set of qualitative indicators for monitoring practices of social appropriation of science and technology. The design of this set is based on the Maloka case, but it can be of use to multiple actors involved in the social appropriation of science and technology (referred to by its Spanish acronym, ASCyT). The introduction discusses the concept of ASCyT. The first section provides a review of the literature about measuring activities that link science and society. The second section explains why it is important to develop this type of measurement. The third section lays out the methodology used in designing the indicators. The fourth section explains the set of indicators and the fifth reflects on that process.

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  • 14. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Elmi, Nimmo Osman
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Digitalising Tax, The Kenyan Way: The Travels and Translations of ITax in Kenya2021Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Kenya, as with other developing countries, has joined the global bandwagon of using digital technologies to increase domestic revenues. Within the new strategies, lie great potential in achieving sustainable development, however, the shift is happening quite rapidly and has been made mandatory within a short period of time. The implications of this shift have prompted this research to analyse how it has shaped tax practices in Kenya. This study addresses the implementation strategies of an e-filings system, ITax in Kenya that was piloted, adopted and made mandatory in a short period of time. ITax as demonstrated in this dissertation has led to complexities including shifting tax expertise from tax consultants to information and communication technology (ICT) experts. I analyse what is at stake for all actors involved from those who commission its use to the taxpayers. I also ana-lyse whether Kenya was prepared economically or infrastructurally for this shift. The outset for this dissertation is models like ITax interface with the different interests of social/institutional worlds as it travels and gets translated generating complex and unintended effects. This study therefore combines postcolonial and technoscientific approaches in order to understand how the current implementation of ITax is connected to colonial development and fiscal rationale. Methodologically, this dissertation contributes to the socio-cultural perspectives to studying tax.

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  • 15.
    Flint, Jennifer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Investigating an Immersive Virtual Nanoscience Simulation for Learning: Students' Interaction, Understanding, Attitudes and System Usability2014In: AERA Online Paper Repository, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid nanoscientific development in a myriad of applied fields compels educational structures to develop curricular nanoknowledge for a future citizenry capable of contributing skills to a nano-workforce and in acquiring a nano-literacy. This study investigated ten Swedish upper-secondary students' interactions with a virtual reality nanoworld and sought to illuminate: 1) how students link to and support their understanding of prior science knowledge, 2) students' attitudes towards the benefits and risks of nanotechnology, and 3) the usability of the system. Analyzed videotaped and written data elicited cognitive mechanisms underlying interaction with the virtual reality environment for promoting understanding, the influence of the interactive experience on students' attitudes to nanophenomena, and system features that could be applied in real science classrooms.

  • 16.
    Friberg, Anneli
    Linköping University, University Library.
    Continuous Usability Testing: The importance of Being Iterative When it Comes to Assessment and Development of the Library’s Digital Services2017In: Proceeding so fthe 2016 Library assessment conference buiLding effective, sustainabLe, PracticaL assessment, october 31–november 2, 2016 Arlington, USA / [ed] Sue Baughman, Steve Hiller, Katie Monroe and Angela Pappalardo, Washington, DC: Association of Research Libraries , 2017, p. 188-194Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The interest for user experience (UX) and usability in libraries has grown rapidly over the past years and has now become an essential tool for developing and assessing a library’s digital services and physical spaces. It is necessary, though, to recognize that UX incorporates much more than just usability. Norman and Nielsen summarize user experience as something that “encompasses all aspects of the end-user’s interaction with the company, its services, and its products” and continues:

    “The first requirement for an exemplary user experience is to meet the exact needs of the customer, without fuss or bother. Next comes simplicity and elegance that produce products that are a joy to own, a joy to use. True user experience goes far beyond giving customers what they say they want, or providing checklist features. In order to achieve high-quality user experience in a company’s offerings there must be a seamless merging of the services of multiple disciplines, including engineering, marketing, graphical and industrial design, and interface design.

    Furthermore, they state that it is important to separate the overall user experience from usability, since the latter “is a quality attribute of the UI [user interface], covering whether the system is easy to learn, efficient to use, pleasant, and so forth.”

    At Linköping University Library (LiUB) we are slowly moving towards a “culture of usability” where users are being observed interacting with both physical and virtual spaces, the way Godfrey advocates, but this paper will only focus on the library’s online presence. The main objective with this paper is to argue for continuous usability testing, as a part of regular library activity.

    Usability testing within the library sector is nothing new per se, but it is usually done in the process of launching a new or redesigned website/UI or implementing a new library system. Most often it has a distinct focus on web development, and is not so much used to develop other services or physical spaces. This is confirmed in numerous articles and UX-blog posts and articles by e.g. Gasparini, Godfrey, Broadwater, and Dominguez, Hamill and Brillat. Sometimes the tests are not conducted by library staff, but by external consultants. Our approach, however, is to use an in-house, continuous process which is applied not only to the library’s website structure, but also to other digital services such as the search box on the library start page and link resolver user interface and the link resolver icon in the discovery tool.

    Rettig asks whether such a thing as “grassroots UX” exists in libraries. She wonders if “the UX hopeful, [who] do not have the mandate or team or job title”, can find “ways to apply UX methods to smaller-scale, day-to-day work in the library?” I am inclined to say that it is possible. A UX perspective can and should be integrated in any development project, big or small. The UX philosophy does not have to be initiated as a top-down initiative, and in a sense LiUB’s systematic way of doing usability testing started out as a grassroots initiative.

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  • 17.
    Gammelgaard Ballantyne, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Business Development and Technology, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Images of climate change: A pilot study of young people’s perceptions of ICT-based climate visualization2016In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 134, no 1, p. 73-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change can be difficult for laypeople to make sense of, because of its complexity, the uncertainties involved and its distant impacts. Research has identified the potentials of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) for visualizing and communicating climate change to lay audiences and thus addressing these communication challenges.However, little research has focused on how ICT-based visualization affects audiences’ understandings of climate change. Employing a semiotic framework and through a combination of focus group interviews and mindmap exercises, we investigated how Swedish students make sense of climate messages presented through an ICT-based visualisation medium; a dome theatre movie. The paper concludes that visualization in immersive environments works well to concretize aspects of climate change and provide a starting point for reflection, but we argue that the potential to add interactive elements should be further explored, as interaction has the potential to influence meaning-making processes. In addition, audiences’ preconceptions of climate change influence their interpretations of climate messages, which may function as a constraint to climate communication.

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  • 18.
    Goldkuhl, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Information Systems and Digitalization. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linguistic and Ontological Concept Formation: The LION Method2022In: Qualitative Report, ISSN 1052-0147, Vol. 27, no 12, p. 2715-2743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concept formation is a demanding task in social research. A methodological approach (called LION) is presented that emphasizes the clarification of concepts based on linguistic and ontological views. This method originates from a qualitative-pragmatist tradition of studies of work-practices in organizational settings and it is explicitly based on the linguistic turn and the practice turn in social research. It is also based on the articulation of seven conceptualization maxims. Its aim is to bring rigor to the conceptualizing process and clarity to resulting conceptualizations. The method is illustrated through an analysis example from service management. The concepts of "value-in-use" and "value generation" are critically analyzed using linguistically and ontologically oriented questions. The application of the LION method in qualitative research is discussed concerning research question formulation, collection, and analysis of data, review of extant theory, and final articulation of theoretical contribution.

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  • 19.
    Gonzalez, Oscar
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Information visualization design forPerformance Outcome ScoringTemplate: Based on data from Athens Olympics 20042022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 20.
    Gulz, Agneta
    et al.
    Cognitive Science, Lund Unversity, Lund, Sweden.
    Magnusson, CharlotteCertec - Rehabilitation Engineering and Design, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.Malmborg, LoneIT - University of Copenhagen, Denmark.Eftring, HåkanCertec - Rehabilitation Engineering and Design, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.Jönsson, BodilLund University, Sweden.Tollmar, KonradLund University, Sweden .
    Proceedings of the 5th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - Using Bridges2008Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    NordiCHI is the main forum for human-computer interaction research in the Nordic countries. It is a biannual event. The first four were held in Stockholm (2000), Aarhus (2002), Tampere (2004) and Oslo (2006). This year's conference in Lund is hosted by Lund University in affiliation with Malmö University and IT University of Copenhagen.

    The theme is Using Bridges: A key challenge that our everyday culture raises is to find better ways to combine theory and practice. Bridging needs to take place on many levels: individual-to- individual, many-to-many, culture-to-culture, region-to-region, human-to-artefact, mankind-to- technology, and artefact-to-artefact. The vision is that the conference will enable the meeting of cultures within HCI --- geographically distinct ones as well as those of academia, industry and public life.

    The broad call for participation elicited an excellent response, and we are happy to offer a high-quality technical programme that combines the best of the NordiCHI tradition with emerging trends in interaction design. The technical programme combines five different categories of submissions: full papers, short papers, design cases, industrial experience reports and interactive events (demonstrations). The industrial experience report category follows the initiative from NordiCHI 2006, whereas the design case category is new this year. The intention of design cases is twofold: to open a venue for the growing community of design researchers in HCI, interaction design and related fields, and to experiment with a format for knowledge production in which the significance of critics and criticism is acknowledged.

    We received 139 full papers, 112 short papers, 3 design cases and 9 industrial experience reports. An international committee comprising 161 reviewers helped in the selection process. In the end we accepted 42 full papers, 39 short papers (12 for plenum presentation and 27 as poster presentations), 2 design cases each with two critiques, and 8 industrial experience reports. The acceptance rate for full papers was 30.2% and 34.8% for short papers. The submitted full papers represent 20 countries, with the accepted ones representing 9, whereof 5 are outside the Nordic region.

  • 21.
    Guyader, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    No One Rides for Free!: Three Styles of Collaborative Consumption2018In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 692-714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper focuses on collaborative consumption; that is, the peer-to-peer (P2P)exchange of goods and services facilitated by online platforms. Anchored in the access paradigm,collaborative consumption (e.g., accommodation rental, ridesharing services) differs fromcommercial services offered by firms (e.g., B2C carsharing). The aim of this study is to examine thenuanced styles of collaborative consumption in relation to market-mediated access practices andsocially mediated sharing practices.Design/methodology/approach – Following the general research trend on mobility services, thecontext of long-distance ridesharing is chosen. Data collection was conducted using participantobservation as peer service provider, 11 ethnographic interviews of consumers, and a netnographicstudy of digital artefacts.Findings – Using practice theory, 10 ridesharing activities were identified. These activities and thenuances in the procedures, understandings, and engagements in the ridesharing practice led to thedistinction of three styles of collaborative consumption: (1) Communal collaborative consumption,which is when participants seek pro-social relationships in belonging to a community; (2)Consumerist collaborative consumption, performed by participants who seek status andconvenience in the access lifestyle; and (3) Opportunistic collaborative consumption, whenparticipants seek to achieve monetary gain or personal benefits from abusive activities.Originality/value – By taking a phenomenological approach on collaborative consumption, thisstudy adds to the understanding of the sharing economy as embedded in both autilitarian/commercial economic system, and a non-market/communal social system. The threestyles of collaborative consumption propose a framework for future studies differentiating P2Pexchanges from other practices (i.e., B2C access-based services, sharing).

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  • 22. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Henriksen, Line
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    In the Company of Ghosts: Hauntology, Ethics, Digital Monsters2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores French philosopher Jacques Derrida’s ’hauntology’ through the lens of digital monsters and feminist theory.

    Hauntology – a pun on ‘ontology’ and ‘haunting’ – offers an ethics based on responsibility towards that which cannot be said to fully exist, yet has an effect on our everyday lives nonetheless. Like the figure of the ghost, such undecidable existences are neither absent nor present, here nor gone, of the past or the future. In other words: they haunt.

    By engaging with hauntology through contemporary stories of digital monsters – such as The Curious Case of Smile.jpg, Welcome to Night Vale and Mushroom Land TV - the thesis discusses how such troubling hauntings might be imagined, and what it means to think an ethics based on responsibility towards the undecidable. In this way, the thesis brings together hauntology and digital media, arguing that thinking with and through the figure of the ghost as well as the digital monster may lead to different and critical ways of imagining both the world and ethics.

    In short, drawing upon feminist theory and creative writing, the thesis maps out a relational ethics of hauntings and internet story-telling.

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  • 23.
    Holgersson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, VITS - Development of Informations Systems and Work Context. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Röstlinger, Annie
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, VITS - Development of Informations Systems and Work Context. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Goldkuhl, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, VITS - Development of Informations Systems and Work Context. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Askenäs, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, VITS - Development of Informations Systems and Work Context. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson, Ulf
    IHH Jönköping.
    En studie av användning av datorer i kommunala gymnasieskolor i Jönköping. Redovisning av etapp 1 (1:1-projektet):  2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Data till denna delstudie av 1:1-­‐projektet har samlats in av forskare genom intervjuer, enkäter och deltagande observation. Jönköpings kommun har lyckats utveckla 1:1-­‐projektet   sedan pilotprojektet genomfördes på Bäckadalsgymnasiet respektive på Sandagymnasiet.

    I huvudsak uppfattar både elever och lärare att tekniken numera fungerar tillfredsställande.  

    På Sandagymnasiet anser nästan 60 procent av lärarna att 1:1-­‐projektet medfört att eleverna presterar bättre resultat jämfört med tidigare år. Huvuddelen av lärarna på de    andra skolorna har dock uppfattningen att 1:1-­‐projektet ännu inte medfört att eleverna presterar bättre resultat. Främst har datorerna använts för administration och inte varit en  naturlig del av den pedagogiska processen. Genomgående i intervjuerna med lärare och elever framgår att det saknas goda exempel på hur man på ett mera innovativt eller  annorlunda sätt kan stödja lärandeprocesserna genom att använda dator i undervisningen.

    Här finns det mycket att göra.

     

  • 24.
    Johansson, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Arne
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Consider Clojure: A modern Lisp that runs on Java and Javascript hosts2016In: Proceedings of the 12'th SweCog Conference / [ed] [ed] Alexander Almér, Robert Lowe, Erik Billing, Skövde: University of Skövde , 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing software is a key methodology in cognitive science. Lisp is a family of programming languages that historically has been very influential in cognitive science in general and in the field of artificial intelligence in particular. Scientists and practitioners alike were drawn to Lisp due to its intelligent design and elegance. However, for various reasons it has become more and more uncommon to use Lisp in cognitive science and AI research.

    Clojure is a modern Lisp language that compiles both to the Java virtual machine and to Javascript. This enables us to write fast, stand-alone applications in Lisp that runs on computers, smartphones and in web browsers - everything written in the same language. Clojure encourages functional programming – an approach to software development in where we model our application in terms of data flowing through the system. The design and implementation of an application then become a process where the developer writes modular parts that transforms data. Such workflow open up for very elegant solutions to some of today's problems in software development in general and in the field of web applications in particular.

    Clojure can be used for everything from resource-intensive server-side applications to lightweight applications that runs in the browser or as a smartphone application. In addition, Clojure has a rich eco-system of freely available libraries to make development become like building things with LEGO.

    In this talk, we will give a technical demonstration of the language in where we demonstrate various aspects of the language that is relevant for cognitive science researchers and practitioners. We will also demonstrate an e- Health application that has been written in Clojure. It enables clinical practitioners to use the Internet to provide psychological treatment to individuals with for example depression and anxiety. Our experiences with Clojure in developing this application will be described. We have also made efforts to teach software development with Clojure to clinical psychologists to enable them to write e-Health web applications without any background in software development. This project will also be described in the talk.

    We believe that Clojure combines the best of both worlds – elegance and performance. With this talk, we hope to demonstrate why we believe Clojure is a perfect fit for both research and practice in the field of cognitive science.

    References

    Johansson, R. (in preparation). Functional programming with Clojure.

    Johansson, R. (in preparation). Writing the code for ICBT web applications.

  • 25.
    Kottorp, Anders
    et al.
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden / Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.
    Nygård, Louise
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hedman, Annicka
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Öhman, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Rosenberg, Lena
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Eva
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Ryd, Charlotta
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Access to and use of everyday technology among older people: An occupational justice issue – but for whom?2016In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 382-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research into older people’s use of remote controls, mobile phones, digital home appliances, and computerized communication systems reveals that many have difficulty accessing and using these everyday technologies. By using occupational justice theory as a lens onto this technological development, we argue in this commentary that critical analysis of the findings from an occupational perspective reveals systematic injustices that disadvantage certain sectors of the older population. In particular we propose that, contrary to what might be expected, diagnosis or disability is not the sole marker for a vulnerable population at high risk of occupational injustices. Rather, the empirical findings support that other aspects (e.g., economic, educational) may also be influencing both everyday technology access and use among the older population. In light of these concerns, we argue that (a) occupation-centred outcome measures are needed to target everyday technology populations at risk of occupational injustices, and (b) future studies evaluating the access and use of everyday technology among older people must also monitor and target socio-demographic diversities.

  • 26.
    Lind, Tova
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Framtidens UX-design: En empirisk och explorativ studie om yrkesverksammas inställning till generativa AI-verktyg inom UX-design2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 27.
    Lindberg, Carl
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship.
    Birgersson, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship.
    På kontor och distans - framtidens arbetssätt i balans: En jämförande fallstudie om vilka arbetssätt företag i finans- och advokatbranschen förväntas ha efter covid-192021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    During 2020-21, covid-19 has forced Swedish organizations to relocate large numbers of their employees from their offices. This has brought an introduction of teleworking in organizations, that has made it possible to work outside the office. When the pandemic is no longer considered a threat to society and national guidelines are taken out of use, parts of the new working methods are expected to be implemented for new work situations. Which in the report is referred to as “the new normal”.

    This report is based on a case study on qualitative interviews from companies in the financial and legal industry. The collected data is analyzed through an analysis model with a focus on: overall changes & organizational culture; communication; knowledge; and needs & motivation. The purpose is to examine Swedish organizations in the two industries and what their working methods are expected to be after the pandemic. The report examines this purpose by answering the following two research questions:

    • RQ1: What changes, regarding the selected focus areas [overall changes & organizational culture; communication; knowledge; and needs & motivation], that have occurred because of covid-19 are expected to be integrated into the new normal, and which are expected to disappear?

    • RQ2: What are the similarities and differences based on selected focus areas between the expected new normal for companies in the finance and law industry?

    The results show that the new normal is expected to differ between organizations and partly between industries. What is general for all the organizations surveyed is that teleworking is expected to be a significant part of the new normal, where employees want to be able to work more flexibly. Law firms and finance companies have some differences in how well their work can be moved outside the company's premises. At the same time, law firms seem to have an organizational culture that is better suited to having a large proportion of telework. However, the industries have more in common than they have differences when it comes to how they should implement teleworking in a new normal way of working.

    The new normal should consist of a balance between different ways of working. A lasting implementation of teleworking in the new normal will therefore need to be assessed specifically, case by case. Where different factors are weighed against eachother, such as: the interest of individuals and organizations; integration of junior roles versus senior workflow efficiency; short-term versus long-term benefits; flexibility versus structure; and spontaneity versus efficiency.

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  • 28.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    An Analysis of the Influence of a Pseudo-haptic Cue on the Haptic Perception of Weight2014In: Haptics: Neuroscience, Devices, Modeling, and Applications: 9th International Conference, EuroHaptics 2014, Versailles, France, June 24-26, 2014, Proceedings, Part I, Springer, 2014, Vol. 8618/8619, p. 117-125Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Haptics provides powerful cues about forces but cannot easily be integrated in all relevant applications, such as education. Pseudo-haptic cues, visual information that simulate haptic sensations, have been raised as an alternative. It is, however, largely unknown how (or even if) pseudo-haptic cues are perceived by the haptic sensory modality. In this paper we present an approach that applies theories on multimodal integration to testing if a pseudo-haptic cue is triggering haptic perception. This approach is subsequently applied in designing an experiment that tests a pseudo-haptic cue based on a visual force-causes-displacement metaphor, similar to a rubber band.

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  • 29.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The collective novice: A designer's reflections on emergent complexity in collaborative media2016In: Ubiquitous computing, complexity and culture / [ed] Ulrik Ekman, Jay David Bolter, Lily Díaz, Morten Söndergaard, Maria Engberg, Oxford: Routledge, 2016, p. 364-374Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The RTD Community and the Big Picture2015In: Constructivist Foundations, ISSN 1782-348X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 28-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Research Through Design (RTD) conferences represent important steps towards more meaningful academic practices, not only within the field of research through design but potentially for many related academic fields. In order to realize this potential, I would like to take a step back and look at the RTD community in the context of a larger academic landscape.

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  • 31.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    et al.
    Department of Education Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sitting down on a chair: Directives and embodied organizationof joint activities involving persons with dementia2021In: Gesprächsforschung, ISSN 1617-1837, Vol. 22, p. 569-590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with directive sequences in mobility practices when people with dementia are assisted to sit at the dinner table. By using multimodal analysis of interaction, we highlight how caregivers, often in encounter with more debilitated residents, may deconstruct the entire activity of sitting down on a chair into smaller practical projects and move from mitigated directives with indirect forms to more imperative formats which are shorter, clearer and more lucid in their turn design. In our data set, directives in both downgraded or upgraded forms are accompanied by embodied linguistic and haptic resources and are hardly ever used to claim authority over the residents, but as communicative resources to help people with dementia to perform an instructed action.

  • 32.
    Manker, Jon
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för kommunikation, medier och IT, Medieteknik.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Prototyping in game design: Externalization and internalization of game ideas2011In: HCI 2011: Health, Wealth & Happiness: The 25th BCS Conference on Human-Computer Interaction. Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK, July 4-8, 2011., 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prototyping is a well-studied activity for interaction designers, but its role in computer game design is relatively unexplored. The aim of this study is to shed light on prototyping in game design. Interviews were conducted with 27 game designers. The empirical data was structured using qualitative content analysis and analysed using the design version of The Activity Checklist. The analysis indicated that six categories of the checklist were significant for the data obtained. Thesecategories are presented in relation to the data. The roles of externalization and internalization are specifically highlighted.

  • 33.
    Matinaro, Ville
    et al.
    Department of Production, University of Vaasa, Finland.
    Liu, Yang
    Department of Production, University of Vaasa, Finland.
    Virtual design and construction: innovation process and diffusion in Finnish construction business2015In: International Journal of Innovation and Learning, ISSN 1471-8197, E-ISSN 1741-8089, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 133-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In construction business, implementation of innovations seems to be difficult especially when high-technology is involved. There are some observed barriers such as its cyclical nature and project-based working which are not ideal for implementing processes. This paper highlights leadership skills instead of traditional skills from the management and suggests that there is a need to change some human resource management practices. In projects-based industry, learning processes must happen in the projects themselves and cooperation between projects is highly important. Also good communication skills and channels are essential. Innovations and leadership have a crucial role in this process.

  • 34.
    Mcintyre, Sarah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hauser, Steven C.
    Univ Virginia, VA 22903 USA.
    Kusztor, Anikó
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Böhme, Rebecca
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Moungou, Athanasia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Isager, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Homman, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Novembre, Giovanni
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nagi, Saad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Israr, Ali
    Facebook, WA USA.
    Lumpkin, Ellen A.
    Columbia Univ, NY 10027 USA.
    Abnousi, Freddy
    Facebook, WA USA.
    Gerling, Gregory J.
    Univ Virginia, VA 22903 USA.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    The Language of Social Touch Is Intuitive and Quantifiable2022In: Psychological Science, ISSN 0956-7976, E-ISSN 1467-9280, Vol. 33, no 9, p. 1477-1494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Touch is a powerful communication tool, but we have a limited understanding of the role played by particular physical features of interpersonal touch communication. In this study, adults living in Sweden performed a task in which messages (attention, love, happiness, calming, sadness, and gratitude) were conveyed by a sender touching the forearm of a receiver, who interpreted the messages. Two experiments (N = 32, N = 20) showed that within close relationships, receivers could identify the intuitive touch expressions of the senders, and we characterized the physical features of the touches associated with successful communication. Facial expressions measured with electromyography varied by message but were uncorrelated with communication performance. We developed standardized touch expressions and quantified the physical features with 3D hand tracking. In two further experiments (N = 20, N = 16), these standardized expressions were conveyed by trained senders and were readily understood by strangers unacquainted with the senders. Thus, the possibility emerges of a standardized, intuitively understood language of social touch.

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  • 35.
    Mora Gamez, Fredy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Brown, Steven D.
    Nottingham Trent Univ, England.
    The psychosocial management of rights restitution: Tracing technologies for reparation in post-conflict Colombia2019In: Theory & psychology, ISSN 0959-3543, E-ISSN 1461-7447, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 521-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychosocial assistance is a crucial aspect of recent state reparation and human rights restitution policies in post-conflict Colombia. Drawing on the methodological tools offered by Science and Technology Studies (STS), we follow the trajectories of a psychosocial protocol for emotional recovery as a technology of reparation deployed in rural communities between 2013 and 2017. We ethnographically describe how psychological and administrative projects are merged in practice and come to shape practices and emotional self-valuations. Building on Serres concept of betrayal, we reflect on the potential contours of quantifications embedded in psychosocial assistance as opportunities for different forms of reparation to emerge. These forms of reparation coexist in intertwined epistemic practices of psychosocial assistance. We claim that a potentially alternative form of reparation arises despite the predominance of an administrative design mainly concerned with quantification and efficient policy management.

  • 36.
    Nordgren, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Arts and Humanities. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Emerging technologies and vulnerable people: The case of assistive technologies for persons with dementia2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dementia has emerged as a problem to be tackled by various assistive technologies, for example, mobile safety alarms with GPS positioning, fall detectors and adapted internet for social contact. However, persons with dementia are vulnerable, suggesting that such technologies should be used with caution. It is a common experience among care professionals that persons with dementia often show resistiveness to care. This resistiveness is an indication of their vulnerable condition. They are sometimes not aware of what is in their best interest. In this paper I discuss how to handle resistiveness to assistive technologies among these patients. Some assistive technologies for persons with dementia can be beneficial provided that they are used with special consideration of their vulnerable condition. However, it can be a delicate task to overcome resistiveness while at the same time respecting their autonomy. I suggest how this can be done in a stepwise manner. Special attention is given to the concept of nudging. I also indicate under which circumstances some form of coercion might be justified.

  • 37.
    Ouvrier, Gustaf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Laterman, Michel
    SAP, Germany.
    Arlitt, Martin
    University of Calgary, Canada.
    Carlsson, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Characterizing the HTTPS Trust Landscape: A Passive View from the Edge2017In: IEEE Communications Magazine, ISSN 0163-6804, E-ISSN 1558-1896, Vol. 55, no 7, p. 36-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our society increasingly relies on web-based services like online banking, shopping, and socializing. Many of these services heavily depend on secure end-to-end transactions to transfer personal, financial, and other sensitive information. At the core of ensuring secure transactions are the HTTPS protocol and the trust relationships between many involved parties, including users, browsers, servers, domain owners, and the third-party CAs that issue certificates binding ownership of public keys with servers and domains. This article presents an overview of the current trust landscape and provides statistics to illustrate and quantify some of the risks facing typical users. Using measurement results obtained through passive monitoring of the HTTPS traffic between a campus network and the Internet, we provide concrete examples and characterize the certificate usage and trust relationships in this complex landscape. By comparing our observations against known vulnerabilities and problems, we highlight and discuss the actual security that typical Internet users (e.g., the people on campus) experience. Our measurements cover both mobile and stationary users, consider the involved trust relationships, and provide insights into how the HTTPS protocol is used and the weaknesses observed in practice. While the security properties vary significantly between sessions, out of the 232 million HTTPS sessions we observed, more than 25 percent had weak security properties.

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  • 38.
    Pilemalm, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Information Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Participatory Design in Emerging Civic Engagement Initiatives in the New Public Sector: Applying PD Concepts in Resource-Scarce Organizations2018In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 5:1-5:26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we address the role of Participatory Design (PD) in emerging public sector governance forms and, more specifically, civic engagement and we-government initiatives. We achieve this by first providing a research overview of the development of PD approaches since they originated in the 1970s, identifying different PD generations and associated concepts, contexts, and challenges, and then relating them to current public sector trends. Next, we link the overview to a practical example by presenting a case of applying PD to a civic engagement project that takes place in the Swedish emergency response system. Our example findings sustain previously identified needs to return to broad change processes and balance this with ICT re-configuration and structuration of the collaborative processes, the related stakeholders, and their needs, this time in a context where work tasks and responsibilities are not yet defined, known or experienced among stakeholders. We then suggest methodological ways to handle this by (1) applying an interdisciplinary PD approach, (2) replacing the traditional design group with a combination of various qualitative methods and PD techniques, e.g., focus groups, modified scenario-based future workshops, exercises, and after-action-reviews, and (3) support PD activities with context-specific frameworks. We argue that applying PD concepts to the governance forms that are emerging in resource-constrained public sector organizations poses a number of challenges, many of them relating directly to the unknown character of the work setting and the practical difficulties of involving civil citizens as end-users. However, if they are addressed and handled adequately, making civic engagement initiatives work processes and ICT support to work smoothly, this can contribute to a re-politicization of PD in terms of space, action, and the empowerment of citizens both by enhancing their skills and by having them represented in design activities.

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    Participatory Design in Emerging Civic Engagement Initiatives in the New Public Sector: Applying PD Concepts in Resource-Scarce Organizations
  • 39.
    Radianti, Jaziar
    et al.
    University of Agder, Norway.
    Pilemalm, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Agder, Norway.
    Steen-Tveit, Kristine
    University of Agder, Norway.
    Rustenberg, Kjetil
    University of Agder, Norway.
    Enhancing Learning from Incidents by Reconstruction of Events: Using the SQUARE Tool for Evaluation2023In: Proceedings of the 20th International ISCRAM Conference / [ed] Jaziar Radianti; Ioannis Dokas; Nicolas Lalone; Deepak Khazanchi, Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM , 2023, p. 663-675Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ICT-enabled or digitalized co-production of public services has become increasingly relevant to emergency response and crisis management. This study provides a literature review on this phenomenon, exploring both large-scale crises and frequent emergencies. We found that research in the domain is scarce and focuses mainly on the phenomenon in terms of digital volunteerism. In large-scale crises, they mostly refer to spontaneous forms of volunteering, and in smaller emergencies, to more organized volunteers that collaborate with a response organization over time. Similarities to digitalized co-production in the public sector generally include financial, administrative, ICT, and demographic factors. Differences include, e.g., aspects of coordination, support, and processing by formal actors. We argue that there are benefits of adding a theoretical co-production perspective to digital volunteerism in emergency response and that our literature review can guide future research on models and (the double) use of volunteers in both kinds of emergencies.   

  • 40.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Educational imaginaries: a genealogy of the digital citizen2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis makes use of a genealogical approach to map out and explainhow and why computers and citizenship have become so closely connected.It examines the historical continuities and disruptions, and the role thatpopular education has played in this interrelation. Drawing on previousresearch in the overlap between Swedish popular education history andhistorical computer politics, this thesis adds knowledge about howimaginaries of popular education, operating as silver bullet solutions toproblems with computerization, have had important functions as governingtools for at least 70 years. That is, Swedish popular education has since the1950s been imagined as a central solution to problems with computerization,but also to realize the societal potentials associated with computers.

    Specifically, this thesis makes two contributions: 1) Empirically, the thesisunearths archived, and in many ways forgotten, discourses around thehistorical enactment of the digital citizen, and the role of popular education,questioning assumptions that are taken for granted in current times; 2)Theoretically, the thesis proposes a conceptual model of educationalimaginaries, and specifically introduces the notion (and method) of‘problematizations’ into these imaginaries.

    List of papers
    1. Ubiquitous computing, digital failure and citizenship learning in Swedish popular education
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ubiquitous computing, digital failure and citizenship learning in Swedish popular education
    2015 (English)In: Citizenship Teaching and Learning, ISSN 1751-1917, E-ISSN 1751-1925, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 127-141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    How do adult students enact citizenship, and what discursive and material conditions make certain enactments more or less possible? This article draws on 37 interviews with adult students at Swedish Folk High Schools and focuses on the everyday material-discursive enactments of interactive media in adult students’ statements about citizenship. Drawing on a post-constructional perspective, the analysis illustrates how students’ statements about citizenship are made possible by ever-present media technologies and the associated practices of ‘living in media’. Students’ statements continuously reiterate how notions of citizenship are entangled with the Internet (and other new media). However, while new media are deeply embedded in the everyday lives of citizens and enables important citizenship enactments, they are also a source of discomfort, giving rise to ambiguous statements. These double-edged statements refer on the one hand to negative implications on physical health, distraction from important tasks and an over-reliance on the Internet as an everyday need, and on the other hand to improved access to information, convivial communities and empowered citizenship.

    Keywords
    citizenship, citizenship education, adult learning, new media, folk high schools, popular education
    National Category
    Educational Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115923 (URN)10.1386/ctl.10.2.123_1 (DOI)
    Projects
    Adult students citizenship discourses within and beyond the curriculum
    Available from: 2015-03-24 Created: 2015-03-24 Last updated: 2019-09-16Bibliographically approved
    2. Popular education and the digital citizen: a genealogical analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Popular education and the digital citizen: a genealogical analysis
    2017 (English)In: European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, ISSN 2000-7426, E-ISSN 2000-7426, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 21-36, article id rela9113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper historicises and problematises the concept of the digital citizen and how it is constructed in Sweden today. Specifically, it examines the role of popular education in such an entanglement. It makes use of a genealogical analysis to produce a critical ‘history of the present’ by mapping out the debates and controversies around the emergence of the digital citizen in the 1970s and 1980s, and following to its manifestations in contemporary debates. This article argues that free and voluntary adult education (popular education) is and has been fundamental in efforts to construe the digital citizen. A central argument of the paper is that popular education aiming for digital inclusion is not a 21st century phenomenon; it actually commenced in the 1970s. However, this digitisation of citizens has also changed focus dramatically since the 1970s. During the 1970s, computers and computerisation were described as disconcerting, and as requiring popular education in order to counter the risk of the technology “running wild”. In current discourses, digitalisation is constructed in a non-ideological and post-political way. These post-political tendencies of today can be referred to as a post-digital present where computers have become so ordinary, domesticized and ubiquitous in everyday life that they are thereby also beyond criticism

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017
    Keywords
    digitalisation; computerisation; adult education; popular education; genealogy; data politics; algorithmic politics
    National Category
    Pedagogy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136289 (URN)10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela9113 (DOI)000406456200002 ()
    Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2020-02-21Bibliographically approved
    3. Computing the Nordic Way: The Swedish Labour Movement, Computers and Educational Imaginaries from the Post-War Period to the Turn of the Millennium
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computing the Nordic Way: The Swedish Labour Movement, Computers and Educational Imaginaries from the Post-War Period to the Turn of the Millennium
    2021 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Educational History, ISSN 2001-7766, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 31-58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Based on empirical material from Swedish reformist labour movement associations, this article illustrates how digital technology has been described as a problem (and sometimes a solution) at different points in time. Most significant, for this article, is the role that non-formal adult education has played in solving these problems. Computer education has repeatedly been described as a measure not only to increase technical knowledge, but also to construe desirable (digital) citizens for the future. Problematisations of the digital have changed over time, and these discursive reconceptualisations can be described as existing on a spectrum between techno-utopian visions, where adaptation of the human is seen as a task for education, and techno-dystopian forecasts, where education is needed to mobilise democratic control over threatening machines. As such, the goal for education has been one of political control—either to adapt people to machines, or to adapt machines to people.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Umeå: Idé- och samhällsstudier Umeå universitet, 2014-, 2021
    Keywords
    educational imaginaries, popular education, history, labour movement history, computer history, workers' education history
    National Category
    Pedagogy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-173241 (URN)10.36368/njedh.v8i1.157 (DOI)
    Available from: 2021-02-10 Created: 2021-02-10 Last updated: 2021-02-10Bibliographically approved
    4. The Ironies of Digital Citizenship: Educational Imaginaries and Digital Losers AcrossThree Decades
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Ironies of Digital Citizenship: Educational Imaginaries and Digital Losers AcrossThree Decades
    2018 (English)In: Digital Culture & Society, ISSN 2364-2114, E-ISSN 2364-2122, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 39-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Our everyday use of digital technologies, platforms and infrastructures is often portrayed as an autonomous technical development, guided by clever and independent innovations, rather than broad sociotechnical imaginaries that inspire parliamentary support and governance. This article will consequently shed the light on the often-overlooked structural and societal efforts that have historically shaped the digital citizen of today. For the past 70 years or so, non-formal adult education about computers and computing has been a key part of political ambitions to create a desirable future. Over time, digital technologies have also become a precondition for the enactment of citizenship. That is, ‘digital citizenship’ is increasingly positioned as a fundamental requirement for democratic participation. The purpose of this paper is to trace how the digital citizen, and its accompanying problems, has been construed over time, particularly through educational imaginaries. What problems is the digital citizen a solution to? Who has been presented as problematic, and who, subsequently, has become the primary target for educational solutions? What skills have been described as indispensable for the digital citizen during different periods in history? By using Sweden as a vantage point this paper provides both concrete examples as well as perspectives on transnational discourses. In focus for the study are discourses concerning non-formal adult education, in the form of awareness campaigns, social programmes and adult liberal education about computers aimed at the general citizenry, during three periods in time: the 1950s, the 1980s, and today. The contribution is a critical take on how the citizen has increasingly become connected to digital technologies, and how this convergence has at the same time created digital exclusion.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Transcript Verlag, 2018
    Keywords
    digital citizenship; popular education; participatory engagement; algorithmic governance; computer history; computer policies; educational imaginaries.
    National Category
    Social Sciences Media Studies Educational Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160740 (URN)10.14361/dcs-2018-0204 (DOI)
    Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2021-09-29Bibliographically approved
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  • 41. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Ramsell, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Information Systems and Digitalization. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Toward ICT-enabled Co-production for Effective Crisis and Emergency Response2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In contemporary society, public services struggle to maintain a high quality of service if the authority responsible for the service delivery experiences resource deficit and increased uncertainties and vulnerabilities. This thesis explores how information and communication technology (ICT) can enable new types of network collaborations – co-production – between government (municipalities) and citizens, for a more effective crisis and emergency response. This is explored in the light of digitalization and taking an end-user perspective. 

    The thesis’s first objective is to describe the transformation toward ICT-enabled co-production. The second objective is to identify opportunities and challenges involved in ICT-enabled co-production. The thesis’s method includes two case studies supported by various theories and approaches: network collaboration (including co-production), sociotechnical systems, and end-user involvement. The data collection is conducted using semi-structured interviews, focus groups, user participation techniques, and document reviews. The intended audience is practitioners (local government and national agencies) and researchers within crisis and emergency response, information systems (IS), and public administration research disciplines and domains (e.g. co-production). 

    The description of the transformation toward ICT-enabled coproduction in crisis and emergency response is a result in its own right. Here, the citizen volunteers become involved in the actual delivery of the response, despite non-specific competence and non-organizational affiliation. In relation to the transformation toward co-production, the thesis concludes that digitalization facilitates end-user involvement in the ICT development process and increases their influence. If open systems as mobile technologies are used, end-users can adapt the technology on their own and add technologies, without the support of the formal developer or local government. The thesis also identifies opportunities and challenges of ICT-enabled co-production. Examples of opportunities include citizen volunteers having a high degree of engagement, being an effective complement to professional responders, and increasing perceived safety in the community. This informal structure of co-production enabled by ICT minimizes the need for local governments to spend resources on managing collaboration. Examples of challenges include the lack of organizational affiliation of volunteers (e.g. integration of citizen volunteers, i.e. end-users with non-organizational affiliation in the technology of the ICT system) and aspects of formal and social control (regulation, and moral and privacy issues). 

    The thesis’s contributions include enriched knowledge of essential aspects to consider when developing ICT-enabled co-production with an end-user perspective, and an understanding of the transformation of the application domain over time and the implications of ICT-enabled coproduction. This makes it easier to comprehend and develop contemporary and future co-productions. 

    The thesis is perceived to have high originality and value since it studies time periods in which local government, technology, and crisis and emergency response have undergone dramatic changes, and explores one of the first Swedish empirical initiatives involving citizen volunteers as responders. 

    List of papers
    1. Developing Local Emergency Management by Co-Ordination Between Municipalities in Policy Networks: Experiences from Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing Local Emergency Management by Co-Ordination Between Municipalities in Policy Networks: Experiences from Sweden
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, ISSN 0966-0879, E-ISSN 1468-5973, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 173-182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to increase our understanding of how co-operation in inter-municipality policy networks in a Swedish region is established and maintained regarding emergency management. We discuss how a network of five municipalities emerged and took shape. Overall, we conclude that co-ordination and co-operation in municipal emergency management are probably relatively easy to develop, because it is easy for the involved actors to see the benefits. Sharing resources is seen as crucial when establishing and, not least, financing efficient, high-quality emergency management. The municipalities' lack of resources to provide effective emergency services, as required by law, makes them dependent on each other. Limits for co-ordination were connected to distance and other geographical factors. Other limits of equal importance were linked to factors such as culture/tradition, mutual understanding, size of partners, and unwillingness to give up authority as well as a prior barrier for co-operation between small and bigger municipalities.

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16682 (URN)10.1111/j.1468-5973.2007.00525.x (DOI)
    Note
    The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com: Jenny Palm and Elina Ramsell, Developing Local Emergency Management by Co-Ordination Between Municipalities in Policy Networks: Experiences from Sweden, 2007, Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, (15), 4, 173-182. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-5973.2007.00525.x Copyright: Blackwell Publishing Ltd http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/ Available from: 2009-02-12 Created: 2009-02-10 Last updated: 2020-12-29Bibliographically approved
    2. Governing Technical Information Systems in Local Crisis Management
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Governing Technical Information Systems in Local Crisis Management
    2012 (English)In: Public Works Management & Policy, ISSN 1087-724X, E-ISSN 1552-7549, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 303-318Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    There are increased demands to prepare for and coordinate of crisis management in public administrative bodies. Governmental organizations and authorities have responsibility for providing systems and structures of coordination before, during, and after crises. Among these are the technical information systems which create the structuring arena for coordination and integration that is analyzed here. There are several technical information systems to choose from for municipalities, which are responsible for local crisis management in Sweden. One technical information system, known as web-based information system (WIS), was a national initiative, but due to the local autonomy mandated in the Swedish constitution it was complicated to get municipalities to choose the national system and alternative local technical information systems were developed. The study builds on a bottom-up analysis of how municipalities choose technical information systems within crisis management. The main conclusion points out the importance of organizational structure in governance and the demand of flexibility in technology.

    National Category
    Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-79080 (URN)10.1177/1087724X11422568 (DOI)
    Available from: 2012-06-28 Created: 2012-06-28 Last updated: 2020-12-29
    3. Using Volunteers for Emergency Response in Rural Areas: Network Collaboration Factors and IT support in the Case of Enhanced Neighbors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using Volunteers for Emergency Response in Rural Areas: Network Collaboration Factors and IT support in the Case of Enhanced Neighbors
    2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management / [ed] Tina Comes, Frédérick Bénaben, Chihab Hanachi, Matthieu Lauras and Aurélie Montarnal, Albi: ISCRAM Association, 2017, Vol. 14, p. 985-995Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In public services, there is a trend to increasingly utilize collaborations with non-professional volunteers for certain tasks, one example being emergency response. In many of these collaborations, information technology (IT) is an essential tool, and inadequate IT support can have far-reaching consequences—including even the loss of lives. Since a volunteer is a different type of actor, and may have different technical requirements, compared to professionals, there is a need to explore how collaborations between professionals and volunteers can be successfully developed. This paper is based on a case study of the Enhanced Neighbor project, which uses volunteers as first responders in emergency response. The study highlights important factors to consider when involving volunteers, including how IT can foster the collaboration, and the volunteers’ needs for IT support.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Albi: ISCRAM Association, 2017
    Series
    Proceedings of the International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISSN 2411-3387 ; 14
    Keywords
    Emergency response, IT support, volunteers, policy network collaboration
    National Category
    Information Systems, Social aspects Computer and Information Sciences Communication Studies Public Administration Studies Human Aspects of ICT
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141904 (URN)
    Conference
    The 14th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response And Management, May 21-24, Albi, Occitanie Pyrénées-Méditerranée, France
    Available from: 2017-10-12 Created: 2017-10-12 Last updated: 2020-12-29Bibliographically approved
    4. Emerging forms of inter-organizational and cross-sector collaborations in e-government initiatives: Implications for participative development of information systems
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emerging forms of inter-organizational and cross-sector collaborations in e-government initiatives: Implications for participative development of information systems
    2016 (English)In: Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, ISSN 1750-6166, E-ISSN 1750-6174, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 605-636Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study aims to explore recent public sector trends, inter-organizational and cross-sector

    collaborations, and analyzes these in terms of implications for participative development of information

    systems (IS). These trends are understood as being part of emerging forms of e-government. Initial

    suggestions for how to develop IS in the new contexts are provided.

    Design/methodology/approach – Three cases involving the trends described above, taking place in

    the Swedish emergency response system, are studied and used as basis for identified participative IS

    development challenges and suggested adaptation needs. Data collection involves semi-structured

    interviews, focus groups and future workshops.

    Findings – The identified challenges concern balancing ideological versus practical needs, lack of

    resources, lack of know-how and design techniques and tool challenges. Some practical implications for

    participative IS development include more extensive focus on stakeholder and legal analysis, need for

    interdisciplinary design teams, merging of task and needs analysis for yet-undefined user tasks and

    using on-line alternatives for interacting with users.

    Research implications/limitations – The study is exploratory where the three cases are in

    different, but at the same time interrelated, collaboration contexts. The identified implications and

    challenges provide proposals that in future research can be applied, formalized and integrated when

    developing practically feasible participative IS development approaches.

    Originality/value – It is argued that the results point toward a current emerging form of

    e-government initiatives directed toward certain demarcated groups of citizens actually carrying out

    certain tasks for their co-citizens and society rather than the broad masses, having far-reaching

    practical implications and complicating the issue of IS development.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016
    Keywords
    e-government, cross-sector collaboration, partcipatory design
    National Category
    Information Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-134408 (URN)10.1108/TG-12-2015-0055 (DOI)000392195700007 ()
    Available from: 2017-02-09 Created: 2017-02-09 Last updated: 2020-12-29Bibliographically approved
    5. Identifying functions for smartphone basedapplications in volunteer emergency response
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identifying functions for smartphone basedapplications in volunteer emergency response
    2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response And Management / [ed] Zeno Franco, José J. González, José H. Canós, Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management , 2019, p. 1044-1056Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emergency response organisations struggle with resource constraints and thereby faces challenges in providing high-quality public services. Utilising voluntary first responders is one way to address these challenges. There are different types of volunteers who can help at an emergency site, e.g. citizen volunteers or voluntary professionals from other occupations. To successfully engage with and utilise these resources, adequate information and communication technology (ICT) is necessary. In this meta-study, combining and further exploring two previous studies, the aim is to identify, analyse and evaluate suitable functions for smartphone applications that can be used to dispatch and support volunteers. The results show that the functions can be divided into essential ones that are necessary for the response to work at all, and others that might contribute to a more effective response. The study also shows that the same functions can be used for different volunteer groups.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, 2019
    Series
    ISCRAM Conference proceedings, ISSN 2411-3387
    Keywords
    Voluntary emergency response, ICT, smartphone application, end users, co-production
    National Category
    Information Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157031 (URN)978-84-09-10498-7 (ISBN)
    Conference
    16th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and ManagementValencia (Spain), May 19-22, 2019
    Available from: 2019-05-23 Created: 2019-05-23 Last updated: 2020-12-29
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  • 42.
    Ramsell, Elina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Information Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pilemalm, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Information Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson Granberg, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Using Volunteers for Emergency Response in Rural Areas: Network Collaboration Factors and IT support in the Case of Enhanced Neighbors2017In: Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management / [ed] Tina Comes, Frédérick Bénaben, Chihab Hanachi, Matthieu Lauras and Aurélie Montarnal, Albi: ISCRAM Association, 2017, Vol. 14, p. 985-995Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In public services, there is a trend to increasingly utilize collaborations with non-professional volunteers for certain tasks, one example being emergency response. In many of these collaborations, information technology (IT) is an essential tool, and inadequate IT support can have far-reaching consequences—including even the loss of lives. Since a volunteer is a different type of actor, and may have different technical requirements, compared to professionals, there is a need to explore how collaborations between professionals and volunteers can be successfully developed. This paper is based on a case study of the Enhanced Neighbor project, which uses volunteers as first responders in emergency response. The study highlights important factors to consider when involving volunteers, including how IT can foster the collaboration, and the volunteers’ needs for IT support.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Using Volunteers for Emergency Response in Rural Areas: Network Collaboration Factors and IT support in the Case of Enhanced Neighbors
  • 43.
    Robinson, Stephen Cory
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    iDisclose: applications of privacy management theory to children, adolescents and emerging adults2016In: Youth 2.0: social media and adolescence: connecting, sharing and empowering. Part II / [ed] Michel Walrave, Koen Ponnet, Ellen Vanderhoven, Jacques Haers and Barbara Segaert, Cham: Springer, 2016, p. 139-157Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protecting personal information in online environments is vital to most individuals, including those in the three distinct age groups of children, adolescents and emerging adults. As each group interacts online, they use different disclosure practices and protection mechanisms to manage and distribute their personal information. After describing self-disclosure and communication privacy management theory (CPM), this chapter examines how privacy management strategies and self-disclosure practices in online environments differ between children, adolescents and emerging adults. The chapter considers theoretical strengths and weaknesses of CPM and also explores the applicability of the tenets of CPM to online communication in self-disclosure. In concluding, the text argues that a greater understanding of the privacy protection mechanisms employed by children, adolescents and emerging adults will help to strengthen privacy regulation and protection of personal information for each of these specific groups. Implications for media literacy, privacy protection practices, online marketing and advertising are presented.

  • 44.
    Ross, Cody
    et al.
    Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, NM, USA.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ericksen, Karen Paige
    University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique
    University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA.
    The Origins and Maintenance of Female Genital Modification across Africa.: Bayesian Phylogenetic Modeling of Cultural Evolution under the Influence of Selection2016In: Human Nature, ISSN 1045-6767, E-ISSN 1936-4776, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 173-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    We present formal evolutionary models for the origins and persistence of the practice of Female Genital Modification (FGMo). We then test the implications of these models using normative cross-cultural data on FGMo in Africa and Bayesian phylogenetic methods that explicitly model adaptive evolution. Empirical evidence provides some support for the findings of our evolutionary models that the de novo origins of the FGMo practice should be associated with social stratification, and that social stratification should place selective pressures on the adoption of FGMo; these results, however, are tempered by the finding that FGMo has arisen in many cultures that have no social stratification, and that forces operating orthogonally to stratification appear to play a more important role in the cross-cultural distribution of FGMo. To explain these cases, one must consider cultural evolutionary explanations in conjunction with behavioral ecological ones. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of our study for policies designed to end the practice of FGMo.

  • 45.
    Ryczer-Dumas, Malgorzata
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris, France.
    Users' agencies: juxtaposing public portrayals and users' accounts of app-mediated cardiac arrest volunteer work in Sweden2022Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis embraces a social science research perspective to examine uses of the app SMSlivräddare (eng. SMSlifesaving), now Heartrunner, dedicated to alert volunteers nearby to assist people suspected to suffer from a cardiac arrest outside hospital. This case study of the uses of the health and medical app juxtaposes the public portrayals of the app, its prospective users, their agencies and use practices with the volunteer users’ own accounts. The analysis explores dimensions of the app’s and its users’ agencies as delegated by the technology’s portrayals and perceived by its users. It renders visible also possibly obscured aspects of the volunteer users’ agencies and practices at the time of the technology’s implementation in the two first regions, before its subsequent adoption in other Swedish regions and in Denmark. A medical research perspective has so far dominated the studies of lifesaving apps. Such research evaluates the patients’ health outcomes resulting from the app use by the volunteers and concentrates on the examination of the efficiency aspects of the app, such as how many users arrived and how many engaged in resuscitating the patients. At the same time, it contributes to the promissory discourses and instrumental approaches applied to understand the meanings and uses of health and medical apps. In contrast, building on the discourse and thematic analysis of the qualitative research material, this thesis seeks to highlight the users’ perspectives in their co-constructing of the SMSlifesaving technology through their app use practices; it embraces a socio-material theoretical approach and critically explores the users’ agencies as delegated by the discourses of the project developers, managers and evaluators of the medical technology and as negotiated by the users in their daily practices. This thesis, first, investigates the public portrayals of the app, its users and their agencies published online, in the user-recruiting practices, and in a medical research publication evaluating the SMSlifesaving technology. Next, it examines how the volunteers’ accounts describe the rationales of their entry into their SMSlifesaving app use practices, the social context embedding their entry and the meanings which they ascribe to their practices. Third, the study investigates how the volunteers’ accounts in juxtaposition to the online portrayals of the SMSlifesaving technology represent the volunteers’ app use before their receptions of the app’s notifications which inform them about cardiac-arrest cases nearby, at the time of reception of such notifications, and following acceptance of such notifications.Contributing to the field of critical social research on health and medical apps, the thesis identifies that both the SMSlifesaving app users and the technologies they co-construct have agencies. It illustrates the users’ agencies delegated and negotiated; the latter when they overcome the app everyday dependencies and judge the app-mediated volunteer work importance versus their paid work and private life commitments, develop dutiful engagement with the app and re-define the app’s medical promises for the patients and their families

  • 46.
    Rönnberg, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Design Probes: A Good Method for Designing with Children2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Design probes are a User-centered Design method with focus on close involvement of users in design. This is done by creating a package of artefacts that participants can complete wherever and whenever the individual sees fit. Further, children are a user group that differentiate from other user groups having other needs and attributes within design. This study investigated how design probes motivate children in the design process. A focus of the study is also to compare the applicability of thematic and non-thematic design probes with children. 

    The study was conducted with a qualitative approach where the empirical data was in the shape of four different design probes that were created and tested by students from Linköping University from the program of Design and Product Development. The tests they carried out were performed on children at the age of 10 to 13. Data analysis were made through coding and thematic analysis. 

    The study concludes that design probes is an adequate method for designing with children. Although, there are additional challenges in terms of playfulness, motivation, language, rewards, time-sense, creativity, influences and reflection. If design probes with children are managed correctly, they will yield results of great value to design. Also, having a theme in the design probe might help to motivate children. Although, themes are no guarantee for success since it will not solve challenges that are independent of themes.

    Keywords: Design probe, children, designing with children, User-centered Design, motivation

    Download full text (pdf)
    Rönnberg_DesignProbesChildren
  • 47.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Wilk, Julie
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Cruz, S.
    Univ Porto, Portugal.
    Graca, M.
    Univ Porto, Portugal.
    Rod, J. K.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Norway.
    Maarse, M. J.
    Deltares, Netherlands.
    Wallin, P.
    Swedish Meteorol & Hydrol Inst SMHI, Sweden.
    Andersson, L.
    Swedish Meteorol & Hydrol Inst SMHI, Sweden.
    Co-designing a citizen science climate service2021In: Climate Services, E-ISSN 2405-8807, Vol. 24, article id 100273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactive mobile technologies provide an emerging opportunity for citizens to engage with and enhance urban climate resilience, both as providers of locally situated data on climate variables, impacts and climate adaptation measures as well as to obtain information on local conditions and recommendations. This paper examines the process of co-designing a citizen science application for urban climate resilience in four European cities. Further, the paper studies if and how the system enables knowledge co-production to increase urban resilience following process principles for co-production of climate services and discusses the legitimacy, transparency, credibility, and relevance of the process. We further assess the role that a citizen science climate service could play as a boundary object in knowledge co-production. We draw on experiences from a co-design process that included municipal stakeholders from different sectors as well as municipal employees and civil society end-users involved in campaigns. This study identified a set of barriers and enablers for the co-design process and concludes that the CitizenSensing application can fulfil the role of a boundary object, but that the co-design process is a balancing act between navigating time constraints, including stakeholders different and changing demands and perspectives while retaining a high level of flexibility and reflexivity.

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    fulltext
  • 48.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Flint, Jennifer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Development of an Interactive Immersion Environment for Engendering Understanding about Nanotechnology: Concept, Construction, and Implementation2014In: International Journal of Virtual and Personal Learning Environments, ISSN 1947-8518, E-ISSN 1947-8526, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 40-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of nanoscientific applications in modern life is swiftly in progress. Nanoscale innovation comes with the pressing need to provide citizens and learners with scientific knowledge for judging the societal impact of nanotechnology. In rising to the challenge, this paper reports the developmental phase of a research agenda concerned with building and investigating a virtual environment for communicating nano-ideas. Methods involved elucidating core nano-principles through two purposefully contrasting nano “risk” and “benefit” scenarios for incorporation into an immersive system. The authors implemented the resulting 3D virtual architecture through an exploration of citizens’ and school students’ interaction with the virtual nanoworld. Findings suggest that users’ interactive experiences of conducting the two tasks based on gestural interaction with the system serve as a cognitive gateway for engendering nano-related understanding underpinning perceived hopes and fears and as a stimulating pedagogical basis from which to teach complex science concepts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 49.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Flint, Jennifer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Developing an Interactive Virtual Environment for Engendering Public Understanding About Nanotechnology: From Concept to Construction2013In: AERA Online Paper Repository, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Infusion of nanotechnology applications into modern life is in progress. Nanoscale innovation comes with the ever-pressing need to provide citizens and learners with scientific knowledge for informing perceptions and attitudes surrounding the societal impact of nanotechnology. In rising to the challenge, this paper reports the first developmental phase of a broader research agenda concerned with building and investigating virtual environments for communicating nano-ideas. Methods involved elucidating core nano-principles upon which two purposefully contrasting nanotechnology “risk” and “benefit” scenario tasks were designed for incorporation into an intended virtual environment. The result was construction of a 3D immersive virtual architecture where users’ multisensory interactive experiences of conducting the two tasks are anticipated as a gateway for engendering nano-related understanding underpinning perceived hopes and fears. In this revised paper, post-acceptance for presentation, initial results from a pilot study are also presented attained from exploring learners’ and citizens’ interaction with the constructed virtual environment.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Schönborn et al. (2013)_AERA
  • 50.
    Sjödén, Björn
    et al.
    Lund University Cognitive Science, Lund, Sweden .
    Gulz, Agneta
    Lund University Cognitive Science, Lund, Sweden .
    From Learning Companions to Testing Companions Experience with a Teachable Agent Motivates Students' Performance on Summative Tests2015In: Artificial Intelligence in Education: Proceedings of the 17th International Conference, AIED 2015, Madrid, Spain, June 22-26, 2015 / [ed] Cristina Conati, Neil Heffernan, Antonija Mitrovic and M. Felisa Verdejo, Springer, 2015, Vol. 9112, p. 459-469Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In three quasi-experimental studies, we investigated the effects of placing a Teachable Agent (TA) from a math game in a digital summative test. We hypothesized that the TA would affect test performance, even without actual "teachability", by social influence on the test situation. In Study 1 (N=47), students did a pretest, played the math game for seven weeks, and did a posttest either with or without the TA. In Study 2 (N=62), students did not play the game but were introduced to a TA directly in the posttest. In Study 3 (N=165), the game included a social chat with the TA, and the posttest offered a choice of more difficult questions. Results showed significant effects of the TA on choice and performance on conceptual math problems, though not on overall test scores. We conclude that experience with a TA can influence performance beyond interaction and informative feedback.

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