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  • 1.
    Astvaldsdottir, Alfheiour
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Naimi-Akbar, Aron
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Davidson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brolund, Agneta
    Swedish Agency Health Technology Assessment and Assessment, Sweden.
    Lintamo, Laura
    Swedish Agency Health Technology Assessment and Assessment, Sweden.
    Attergren Granath, Anna
    Swedish Agency Health Technology Assessment and Assessment, Sweden.
    Tranaeus, Sofia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Swedish Agency Health Technology Assessment and Assessment, Sweden; Malmt University, Sweden.
    Ostlund, Pernilla
    Swedish Agency Health Technology Assessment and Assessment, Sweden; Malmt University, Sweden.
    Arginine and Caries Prevention: A Systematic Review2016In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 383-393Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate the available evidence that the use of arginine-containing dental care products prevents the development of new caries lesions and the progression of existing lesions. Search Methods: We performed a systematic literature search of databases including PubMed, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE. Selection Criteria: We selected randomized controlled trials of treatment with arginine in fluoride-containing dental products measuring dental caries incidence or progression in children, adults and elderly subjects. Data Collection and Analysis: Two review authors independently assessed trials for risk of bias and evaluated overall study quality using the GRADE classification. Main Results: Due to conflicts of interest and weak transferability to Swedish conditions, no conclusions can be drawn from studies on the effects of arginine-fluoride toothpaste in children. Arginine-containing toothpaste costs about 40% more than basic fluoride toothpaste; to determine whether it is more cost-effective, the higher cost must be considered in relation to any additional caries-preventive effect. The literature review also disclosed some questionable research ethics: in several of the studies, the children in the control group used non-fluoride toothpaste. Toothpaste without fluoride is not as effective against dental caries as the standard treatment - fluoride toothpaste - which has a well -documented effect. This contravenes the fundamental principles of research ethics. Conclusion: At present there is insufficient evidence in support of a caries-preventive effect for the inclusion of arginine in toothpastes. More rigorous studies, and studies which are less dependent on commercial interests, are required. (C) 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 2.
    Bergstrom, Eva-Karin
    et al.
    Vastra Gotaland Reg, Sweden.
    Davidson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Moberg Sköld, Ulla
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cost-Effectiveness through the Dental-Health FRAMM Guideline for Caries Prevention among 12-to 15-Year-Olds in Sweden2019In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 339-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2008, FRAMM has been a guideline for caries prevention for all 3- to 15-year-olds in the Vastra Gotaland Region in Sweden and a predominant part is school-based fluoride varnish applications for all 12- to 15-year-olds. The aims were to evaluate dental health-economic data among 12- to 15-year-olds, based on the approximal caries prevalence at the age of 12, and to evaluate cost-effectiveness. Caries data for 13,490 adolescents born in 1993 who did not take part and 11,321 adolescents born in 1998 who followed this guideline were extracted from dental records. Those with no dentin and/or enamel caries lesions and/or fillings on the approximal surfaces were pooled into the "low" subgroup, those with 1-3 into the "moderate" subgroup and those with amp;gt;= 4 into the "high" subgroup. The results revealed that the low subgroup had a low approximal caries increment compared with the moderate and high subgroups during the 4-year study period. In all groups, there were statistically significant differences between those who took part in the guideline and those who did not. The analysis of cost-effectiveness revealed the lowest incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for the high subgroup for decayed and/or filled approximal surfaces (DFSa) and approximal enamel lesions together and the highest ICER for the low subgroup for DFSa alone. To conclude, the FRAMM Guideline reduced the caries increment for adolescents with low, moderate and high approximal caries prevalence. The subgroup with the most favourable cost-effectiveness comprised those with a high caries prevalence at the age of 12. (C) 2019 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 3.
    Stensson, M.
    et al.
    Center of Oral Health, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping.
    Koch, G.
    Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping.
    Coric, S.
    Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Birkhed, D.
    Department of Cariology, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wendt, L.-W.
    Center of Oral Health, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping.
    Oral Administration of Lactobacillus reuteri during the First Year of Life Reduces Caries Prevalence in the Primary Dentition at 9 Years of Age2014In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 111-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect on oral health, at age 9 years, of daily oral supplementation with the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri, strain ATCC 55730, to mothers during the last month of gestation and to children through the first year of life. The study was a single-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial involving 113 children: 60 in the probiotic and 53 in the placebo group. The subjects underwent clinical and radiographic examination of the primary dentition and carious lesions, plaque and gingivitis were recorded. Saliva and plaque were sampled for determination of mutans streptococci (MS) and lactobacilli (LB) in saliva and plaque as well as salivary secretory IgA (SIgA). Forty-nine (82%) children in the probiotic group and 31 (58%) in the placebo group were caries-free (p < 0.01). The prevalence of approximal caries lesions was lower in the probiotic group (0.67 ± 1.61 vs. 1.53 ± 2.64; p < 0.05) and there were fewer sites with gingivitis compared to the placebo group (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to frequency of toothbrushing, plaque and dietary habits, but to intake of fluoride supplements (p < 0.05). There were no intergroup differences with respect to L. reuteri, MS, LB or SIgA in saliva. Within the limitation of this study it seems that daily supplementation with L. reuteri from birth and during the first year of life is associated with reduced caries prevalence and gingivitis score in the primary dentition at 9 years of age.

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