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  • 1. Andersson, P
    et al.
    Hallberg, I R
    Lorefält, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Renvert, S
    Oral health problems in elderly rehabiliation patients2004In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 2, p. 70-77Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Astrom, A. N.
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Gulcan, F.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Ekback, G.
    Örebro County Council, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Ordell, Sven
    Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care. Linköping University.
    Long-term healthy lifestyle patterns and tooth loss studied in a Swedish cohort of middle-aged and older people2015In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 292-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The promotion of a healthy lifestyle has become an issue of public health importance in the context of ageing populations and increasing prevalence of chronic diseases. Objective(i) To estimate changes in use of fluoridated tooth paste, use of tooth picks, smoking and alcohol consumption and (ii) to examine whether experience with incident or prevalent tooth loss predict healthy lifestyle transitions from age 50 to 70. MethodIn 1992, 6346 individuals born in 1942 agreed to participate in a prospective cohort study and 3585 completed follow-up questionnaires in 1997, 2002, 2007 and 2012. Statistical analyses were conducted by chi-square statistics, Cochrans Q and logistic regression. ResultsIn total, 15.7% and 74.0% reported incident (tooth loss only in 2012) and prevalent tooth loss (tooth loss in 1992 and 2012). Significant differences occurred between the 1992 and 2012 prevalence of using toothpicks (from 48.3% to 69.1%), smoking (from 26.9% to 10.1%) and alcohol consumption (from 41.5% to 50.5%), 29% and 15.6% increased use of toothpicks and alcohol consumption, whereas 15.5% stopped daily smoking. Increased use of fluoridated tooth paste, smoking cessation and failure to increase use of toothpicks was associated with prevalent tooth loss between age 50 and 70. ConclusionThis study revealed positive and negative trends in oral health behaviours over a 20-year period in persons aged 50 at baseline. Mixed support was obtained for the assumption that oral health promoting lifestyle transitions follow experience with tooth loss. Older people with tooth loss experience could benefit from targeted counselling aimed at coping with oral diseases.

  • 3.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Intervention and Implementation Research Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Workplace health in dental care: a salutogenic approach2018In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 103-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose was to explore self-reported psychosocial health and work environments among different dental occupations and workplaces from a salutogenic perspective. A further purpose was to analyse possible associations between three salutogenic measurements: The Sense of Coherence questionnaire (SOC), the Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale (SHIS) and the Work Experience Measurement Scale (WEMS).

    METHODS: Employees in the Public Dental Service in a Swedish county council (n = 486) were invited to respond to a self-reported web survey including demographics, work-related factors, the SOC, the SHIS and the WEMS.

    RESULTS: This study showed positive associations between employee characteristics and self-reported overall psychosocial health as well as experienced work environment. Autonomy was reported more among men than women (P < 0.000) and to a higher degree by dentists and dental hygienists than dental nurses (P < 0.000). Meaningfulness, happiness, job satisfaction, autonomy and positive to reorganization were reported by personnels aged less than 40 years (P ≤ 0.047). Clinical coordinators reported significant better health (SOC, SHIS) and experienced more autonomy, better management and more positive to reorganization than other dental professions. Dental hygienists and nurses experienced less time pressure than dentists (P ≤ 0.007). Better health and positive work experiences were also seen in smaller clinics (P ≤ 0.29).

    CONCLUSION: Dental professionals reported a high degree of overall psychosocial health as well as a positive work experience. Some variations could be seen between employee characteristics such as gender, years in dental care, professionals, managing position and workplace size. Identify resources and processes at each workplace are important and should be included in the employee's/employers dialogue.

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