liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Gunne, J
    et al.
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Lindh, T
    Borg, K
    Olsson, M
    Tooth-implant and implant supported fixed partial dentures: A 10-year report.1999In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 12, p. 216-221Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Hultin, Margareta
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Davidson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gynther, Goran
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Visby Hospital, Sweden .
    Helgesson, Gert
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Jemt, Torsten
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden Public Dent Health Serv, Sweden .
    Lekholm, Ulf
    Public Dent Health Serv, Sweden .
    Nilner, Krister
    Malmö University, Sweden .
    Nordenram, Gunilla
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Norlund, Anders
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Swedish Council Health Technology Assessment, Sweden .
    Rohlin, Madeleine
    Malmö University, Sweden .
    Sunnegardh-Gronberg, Karin
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Tranaeus, Sofia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Swedish Council Health Technology Assessment, Sweden .
    Oral Rehabilitation of Tooth Loss: A Systematic Review of Quantitative Studies of OHRQoL2012In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 543-552Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aimed to review published quantitative studies for evidence regarding the influence of oral rehabilitation following total or partial tooth loss on self-perceived oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Materials and Methods: Three databases were searched using specified indexing terms. The reference lists of relevant publications were also searched manually. Quality of evidence was classified according to GRADE guidelines as high, moderate, low, or very low. Results: The search yielded 2,138 titles and abstracts, 2,102 of which were of a quantitative study design. Based on pre-established criteria, the full-text versions of 322 articles were obtained. After data extraction and interpretation, 5 publications of high or moderate study quality remained. The results of these 5 studies showed positive effects of oral rehabilitation on OHRQoL. Two studies showed substantial improvements. Conclusions: This is a relatively new field of research; there are very few quantitative studies of how patients perceive OHRQoL following tooth loss and subsequent rehabilitation. While this review indicates that treatment has positive effects on quality of life, the scientific basis is insufficient to support general conclusions about the influence of various interventions on the OHRQoL of patients who have experienced total or partial tooth loss. To achieve a more comprehensive analysis, it is recommended that future studies be based on a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods, ie, questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The follow-up period must also be appropriate for the specific intervention studied.

  • 3.
    Larsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    John, Mike T.
    University of Minnesota.
    Nilner, Krister
    Malmö University.
    Bondemark, Lars
    Malmö University.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University.
    Development of an Orofacial Esthetic Scale in Prosthodontic Patients2010In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 249-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Despite the interest and need to assess orofacial esthetics in prosthodontic patients, few self-reporting instruments are available to measure this construct, and none describe how prosthodontic patients perceive the appearance of their face, mouth, teeth, and dentures. The development of the Orofacial Esthetic Scale (DES) is reported in this article, in particular its conceptual framework, how questionnaire items were generated, and the scales measurement model. Materials and Methods: After test conceptualization, the authors solicited esthetic concerns from 17 prosthodontic patients by asking them to evaluate their own photographs. A focus group of 8 dental professionals reduced the initial number of concerns/items and decided on an item response format. Pilot testing in 9 subjects generated the final instrument, the DES. Exploratory factor analysis was performed to investigate DES dimensionality and item analysis to investigate item difficulty and discrimination in 119 subjects. Results: Prosthodontic patients generated an initial 28 esthetic concerns. These items were reduced to 8 preliminary representative items that were subsequently confirmed during pilot testing. Analysis supported 8 items assessing appearance: face, profile, mouth, tooth alignment, tooth shape, tooth color, gums, and overall impression, measured on an 11-point numeric rating scale (0 = very dissatisfied, 10 = very satisfied). Exploratory factor analysis found only 1 factor and high positive loadings for all items (.73 to .94) on the first factor, supporting the unidimensionality of the DES. Conclusions: The OES, developed especially for prosthodontic patients, is a brief questionnaire that assesses orofacial esthetic impacts.

  • 4.
    Larsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    John, Mike T.
    University of Minnesota.
    Nilner, Krister
    Malmö University.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University.
    Reliability and Validity of the Orofacial Esthetic Scale in Prosthodontic Patients2010In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 257-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study evaluated the reliability and validity of the Orofacial Esthetic Scale (OES) an instrument assessing self-reported orofacial esthetics in prosthodontic patients. Materials and Methods: The OES has seven items addressing direct esthetic impacts in the orofacial region, as well as an eighth global assessment item. The response format was a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale (very dissatisfied to very satisfied with appearance, respectively). OES summary scores ranged from 0 (worst score) to 70 (best score). Test-retest reliability (n = 27) and internal consistency (n = 119) were assessed. Content validation (asking patients about their satisfaction with the questionnaire content, n = 119) and discriminative validation (comparing OES scores between patients and healthy controls, n = 119) were performed. Convergent validity was assessed by correlating patients own OES scores (n = 29) with ratings from a consensus expert group (n = 4) and with the Oral Health Impact Profile (CHIP) esthetic-item summary score (n = 119). Results: Test-retest reliability was excellent for the OES scores (intraclass correlation coefficient = .96). Internal consistency was satisfactory for esthetically impaired patients (n = 27, Cronbach alpha = .86). Patients rated their satisfaction with the questionnaire content as 7.8 +/- 1.3 units on a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale (0 = very dissatisfied, 10 = very satisfied). OES scores discriminated esthetically impaired patients (31.4 units) from healthy controls (45.9 units, P less than .001). OES scores correlated well with other measures of the same construct (r = .43 for patients own assessment with an assessment by experts using the OES, r = -.72 for a correlation with the OHIPs three esthetic-related items). Conclusions: The OES, developed especially for prosthodontic patients, exhibited good score reliability and validity.

  • 5.
    Lindh, T
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Fac Med & Odontol, Dept Prosthodont, S-90187 Umea, Sweden Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, Dept Prosthodont, Linkoping, Sweden Natl Dent Serv, Lycksele, Sweden Natl Dent Serv, Dept Prosthodont, Lulea, Sweden.
    Dahlgren, S
    Gunnarsson, K
    Umea Univ, Fac Med & Odontol, Dept Prosthodont, S-90187 Umea, Sweden Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, Dept Prosthodont, Linkoping, Sweden Natl Dent Serv, Lycksele, Sweden Natl Dent Serv, Dept Prosthodont, Lulea, Sweden.
    Josefsson, T
    Umea Univ, Fac Med & Odontol, Dept Prosthodont, S-90187 Umea, Sweden Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, Dept Prosthodont, Linkoping, Sweden Natl Dent Serv, Lycksele, Sweden Natl Dent Serv, Dept Prosthodont, Lulea, Sweden.
    Nilson, H
    Umea Univ, Fac Med & Odontol, Dept Prosthodont, S-90187 Umea, Sweden Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, Dept Prosthodont, Linkoping, Sweden Natl Dent Serv, Lycksele, Sweden Natl Dent Serv, Dept Prosthodont, Lulea, Sweden.
    Wilhelmsson, P
    Gunne, J
    Umea Univ, Fac Med & Odontol, Dept Prosthodont, S-90187 Umea, Sweden Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, Dept Prosthodont, Linkoping, Sweden Natl Dent Serv, Lycksele, Sweden Natl Dent Serv, Dept Prosthodont, Lulea, Sweden.
    Tooth-implant supported fixed prostheses: A retrospective multicenter study2001In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 321-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective multicenter study on implants combined with natural teeth was to investigate the implant survival rate and loss of marginal bone, as well as indications and complications pertinent to this form of implant therapy. Materials and Methods: The study comprised 185 implants in 111 patients from six different clinics in Sweden. Gathering of data, which were taken from patient records, followed a strict protocol. The registrations included indications for treatment, failure of implants, radiographs from baseline and follow-up, and information on complications. Results: The cumulative implant survival was found to be 95.4% (standard error 4.5%) up to 3 years of follow-up. The marginal bone level at baseline was lower in the maxilla compared with the mandible (P = .015), but any further loss did not differ between the jaws. The most severe complication other than loss of osseointegration (6/185) or periimplant infections (4/183) was intrusion of the abutment teeth, which occurred in 5% of the cases. In all instances, the intrusion was seen in constructions with nonrigid forms of connection between the implants and teeth. Conclusion: The tooth-implant supported prosthesis using the Branemark system is in the short term an equally predictable treatment as the completely implant-supported prosthesis concerning implant survival and loss of marginal bone. When combining implants and teeth, a rigid form of connection should be used to prevent tooth intrusion.

  • 6.
    Ockert-Eriksson, G
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Dent Biomat Sci, Huddinge, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Math, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, A
    Lockowandt, P
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Dent Biomat Sci, Huddinge, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Math, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, O
    Materials for interocclusal records and their ability to reproduce a 3-dimensional jaw relationship2000In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 152-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if accuracy and dimensional stability of vinyl polysiloxanes and irreversible hydrocolloids stabilized by a tray used for fixed prosthodontics, removable partial, and complete denture cases are comparable to those of waxes and record rims and if storage time (24 hours or 6 days) affects dimensional stability of the tested materials. Materials and Methods: Two waxes, two record rims, three vinyl polysiloxanes, and one irreversible hydrocolloid (alginate) were examined. Three pairs of master casts with measuring steel rods were mounted on an articulator (initial position). Five records were made of each material, and the upper cast was remounted after 24 hours or 6 days so that deviations from the initial position could be measured. Results: Vinyl polysiloxanes reinforced by a stabilization tray were the most accurate materials able to reproduce a settled interocclusal position. Mounting casts (fixed prosthodontics cases) without records gave accuracy similar to wax records. Record rims used for removable partial and complete denture cases produced lesser accuracy than vinyl polysiloxanes and irreversible hydrocolloid stabilized by a tray. Accuracy was not significantly affected by storage time. Conclusion: The results show that accuracy of vinyl polysiloxanes and irreversible hydrocolloids reinforced by a tray is superior to that of record rims with regard to the complete denture case and is among the most accurate with regard to the removable partial denture case. For fixed prosthodontics, however, reinforcement is unnecessary.

  • 7.
    Rohlin, Madeleine
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden .
    Nilner, Krister
    Malmö University, Sweden .
    Davidson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gynther, Goran
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Visby Hospital, Sweden .
    Hultin, Margareta
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Jemt, Torsten
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden Public Dent Health Serv, Sweden .
    Lekholm, Ulf
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden Public Dent Health Serv, Sweden .
    Nordenram, Gunilla
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Norlund, Anders
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Swedish Council Health Technology Assessment, Sweden .
    Sunnegardh-Gronberg, Karin
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Tranaeus, Sofia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Swedish Council Health Technology Assessment, Sweden .
    Treatment of Adult Patients with Edentulous Arches: A Systematic Review2012In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 553-567Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of treatment methods used to rehabilitate adult patients with maxillary and/or mandibular edentulism after at least 5 years of follow-up. The risks, adverse effects, and cost effectiveness of these methods were also evaluated. Materials and Methods: Three databases as well as the reference lists of included publications were searched using specified indexing terms. Publications that met the inclusion criteria were read and interpreted using pre-established protocols. Quality of evidence was classified according to the GRADE system (high, moderate, low, or very low). Results: The search yielded 2,130 titles and abstracts. Of these, the full-text versions of 488 publications were obtained. After data extraction and interpretation, 10 studies with moderate study quality of evidence and 1 study with low quality of evidence regarding outcomes, risks, and adverse effects remained. Three studies on the economic aspects of treatment were also included (1 with moderate quality and 2 with low quality). Low-quality evidence showed that the survival rate of implant-supported fixed prostheses is 95% after 5 years in patients with maxillary edentulism and 97% after 10 years in patients with mandibular edentulism. The survival rate of implant-supported overdentures is 93% after 5 years (low-quality evidence). In implant-supported fixed prostheses, 70 of every 1,000 implants are at risk of failing in the maxilla after 5 years and 17 of every 1,000 implants in the mandible are at risk after 10 years. Regarding economic aspects, the evidence was insufficient to provide reliable results. Conclusions: Due to the low quality of evidence found in the included studies, further research with a higher quality of evidence is recommended to better understand the outcomes of treatment for patients with maxillary and/or mandibular edentulism.

  • 8.
    Sunnegardh-Gronberg, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Davidson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gynther, Goran
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Visby Hospital, Sweden .
    Jemt, Torsten
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden Public Dent Health Serv, Sweden .
    Lekholm, Ulf
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden Public Dent Health Serv, Sweden .
    Nilner, Krister
    Malmö University, Sweden .
    Nordenram, Gunilla
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Norlund, Anders
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Swedish Council Health Technology Assessment, Sweden .
    Rohlin, Madeleine
    Malmö University, Sweden .
    Tranaeus, Sofia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Swedish Council Health Technology Assessment, Sweden .
    Hultin, Margareta
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Treatment of Adult Patients with Partial Edentulism: A Systematic Review2012In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 568-581Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review was to identify and critically appraise published studies of treatment methods used in general practice to rehabilitate adult patients with single tooth loss or partial edentulism, with special emphasis on outcomes reported after at least 5 years of follow-up. Materials and Methods: Three databases were searched using specified indexing terms. Publications were included if the study design, research questions, and sample size satisfied pre-established criteria. Reference lists of relevant publications and systematic reviews were also searched. The quality of evidence was classified according to the GRADE system as high, moderate, low, or very low. Results: The search yielded 7,675 titles, of which 1,130 were read in full text. A final total of 15 publications were deemed eligible for inclusion: 5 of moderate quality and 10 of low quality. The five studies of moderate quality were all related to implant-based treatment. The 5-year survival rates for implant-supported single crowns and prostheses were 91% and 94.7%, respectively (implant survival rates: 98.5% and 94.9%, respectively). The underlying scientific evidence was low in quality. No relevant publications were identified regarding the economic aspects of treatment. Conclusion: Due to the low scientific evidence of the included studies, it was not possible to compare various treatment methods used for rehabilitation of single tooth loss or partial edentulism.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf