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  • 1.
    Arvidsson, A.
    et al.
    Dept. of Biomaterials/Handicap Res., Institute for Surgical Sciences, Göteborg University, 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Moller, K.
    Möller, K., Dept. of Chem. and Mat. Technology, Swed. Natl. Test. and Res. Institute, Borås, Sweden.
    Lyven, B.
    Lyvén, B., Dept. of Chem. and Mat. Technology, Swed. Natl. Test. and Res. Institute, Borås, Sweden.
    Sellen, A.
    Sellén, A., MediTeam Dental AB, Sävedalen, Sweden.
    Wennerberg, A.
    Prosthet. Dent. and Dent. Mat. Sci., Faculty of Odontology, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Chemical and topographical analyses of dentine surfaces after Carisolv™ treatment2002In: Journal of Dentistry, ISSN 0300-5712, E-ISSN 1879-176X, Vol. 30, no 2-3, 67-75 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to characterise the surface chemistry of cavities after chemomechanical caries excavation, and also to measure the surface topography after caries removal with Carisolv™ or burs, followed by acid etching. Methods. Fourier transform (FT)-Raman spectroscopy was used to study the relative amounts of organic material and minerals of sound enamel, dentine, and cavities, after caries excavation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) were used for detection of Carisolv™ substances (i.e. mainly sodium hypochlorite, amino acids, and the gelling agent carboxymethyl cellulose). In total, 19 carious and 11 sound extracted teeth were used for the chemical analyses. Topographic examination of 30 carious extracted teeth was performed with a contact profilometer. Results. The relative amounts of organic material and minerals did not significantly differ between sound dentine and the cavities after caries removal with burs or Carisolv™. The FTIR analyses indicated extremely small amounts of Carisolv™ substances at the cavity surface, but the LA-ICP-MS analyses did not confirm those findings. Furthermore, the topographical parameters did not significantly differ between etched cavities after caries removal using burs or Carisolv™. Conclusions. The chemical and topographical analyses in the present study imply that any differences between the cavities after caries excavation with burs or with Carisolv™ are insignificant. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    John, Mike T.
    et al.
    Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences, University of Minnesota, 7-536 Moos Tower 515 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.
    Reissmann, Daniel R.
    Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Center for Dental and Oral Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
    Čelebić, Asja
    Department of Prosthodontics, University of Zagreb, and School of Dental Medicine and Clinical Hospital Centre, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Baba, Kazuyoshi
    Department of Prosthodontics, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Kende, Dóra
    Department of Prosthodontics, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.
    Larsson, Pernilla
    Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care.
    Rener-Sitar, Ksenija
    Department of Prosthodontics, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Department of Prosthodontics, University Dental Clinics, University Medical Center Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Integration of oral health-related quality of life instruments.2016In: Journal of Dentistry, ISSN 0300-5712, E-ISSN 1879-176X, Vol. 53, 38-43 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To integrate items from two widely used oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) questionnaires, the General Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) and the Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP), as well as culturally-specific items of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) into a four-dimensional OHRQoL model consisting of Oral Function, Orofacial Pain, Orofacial Appearance, and Psychosocial Impact.

    METHODS: Subjects came from an ancillary study of the Dimensions of Oral Health-Related Quality of Life Project (N=267 patients, mean age±SD: 54.0±17.2years, 58% women.) Patients filled in the original 49 items of OHIP and 22 additional OHRQoL items in a cross-sectional study. These additional items consisted of 7 culturally specific OHIP items and 15 GOHAI or OIDP items with unique content not covered in OHIP-49. Before data collection, three experts hypothesized to which of the four OHRQoL dimensions these items belong. Hypotheses were tested in correlation analyses between the 22 items and the four dimension scores that were derived from OHIP-49.

    RESULTS: Five of the 22 items did not provide sufficient information to which dimension they belong. In 16 of the remaining 17 items, the pattern of correlation coefficients fitted experts' a priori hypotheses. Acceptance of 16 of the 17 hypotheses was interpreted as evidence that additional (not in OHIP-49 contained) OHRQoL items can be assigned to Oral Function, Orofacial Pain, Orofacial Appearance, and Psychosocial Impact.

    CONCLUSION: Items of three OHRQoL instruments can be integrated into a dimensional OHRQoL model consisting of Oral Function, Orofacial Pain, Orofacial Appearance, and Psychosocial Impact.

    CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Oral Function, Orofacial Pain, Orofacial Appearance, and Psychosocial Impact can serve as a simple and clinically appealing set of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) dimensions and therefore provide an opportunity for simpler, but psychometrically improved OHRQoL measurement in the future.

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