liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Alstergren, P
    et al.
    Ernberg, M
    Kopp, S
    Lundeberg, T
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    TMJ pain in relation to circulating neuropeptide Y, serotonin, and interleukin-1 beta in rheumatoid arthritis.1999In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 13, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Baad-Hansen, L
    et al.
    List, T
    Jensen, TS
    Leijon, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Svensson, P
    Blink reflexes in patients with atypical odontalgia2005In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 239-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To use the human blink reflex (BR) to explore possible neuropathic pain mechanisms in patients with atypical odontalgia (AO). Methods: In 13 AO patients, the BR was elicited using a concentric electrode and recorded bilaterally with surface electromyographic (EMG) electrodes on both orbicularis oculi muscles. Electrical stimuli were applied to the skin above branches of the V1, V2, and V3 nerves and to the V branch contralateral to the painful branch. Sensory and pain thresholds were determined. The BR examination of the painful V branch was repeated during a capsaicin pain-provocation test. The data were analyzed with nonparametric statistics. Results: The BR responses (R2 and R3) evoked by stimulation of V3 were significantly smaller than the BR responses evoked by stimulation of V1 and V2 (P < .004). There were no differences in BR (R2 or R3) between the painful and nonpainful sides (P > .569), and the BR (R2 and R3) was not significantly modulated by experimental pain (P > .080). The sensory thresholds were significantly lower on the painful side compared to the nonpainful side (P = .014). The pain thresholds were not different between sides (P > .910). Conclusion: No major differences between the V nociceptive pathways on the right and left sides were found in a relatively small group of AO patients. Future studies that compare BRs in AO patients and healthy volunteers are needed to provide further knowledge on the pain mechanisms in AO.

  • 3.
    Baad-Hansen, Lene
    et al.
    University of Aarhus.
    Leijon, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology .
    Svensson, Peter
    University of Aarhus.
    List, Thomas
    University of Aarhus.
    Comparison of clinical findings and psychosocial factors in patients with atypical odontalgia and temporomandibular disorders2008In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 22, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To systematically compare clinical findings and psychosocial factors between patients suffering from atypical odontalgia (AO) and an age- and gender-matched group of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD).Methods: Forty-six AO patients (7 men and 39 women, mean age, 56 years) were compared with 41 TMD patients (8 men and 33 women, mean age, 58 years). Results: Mean pain intensity at the time of inclusion in the study was similar between the groups (TMD: 5.3 ± 0.4, AO: 5.0 ± 0.3), but pain duration was longer in AO patients (AO: 7.7 ± 1.1 years, TMD: 4.5 ± 0.1 years). Eighty-three percent of the AO patients and 15% of TMD patients reported pain onset in relation to dental/surgical procedures. Episodic tension-type headache (TTH) occurred equally in both groups (TMD: 46%, AO: 46%), but TMD patients more frequently experienced chronic TTH (TMD: 35%, AO: 18%), myofascial TMD (TMD: 93%, AO: 50%), and temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD: 66%, AO: 2%). Overall, TMD patients had lower pressure pain thresholds and poorer jaw function than AO patients. Mean depression and somatization scores were moderate to severe in both groups, and widespread pain was most common in TMD patients.Conclusion: AO and TMD share some characteristics but differ significantly in report of dental trauma, jaw function, pain duration, and pain site.

  • 4.
    Dawson, Andreas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Svensson, Peter
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Pain and intramuscular release of algesic substances in the masseter muscle after experimental tooth-clenching exercises in healthy subjects2013In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 350-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS:

    To investigate whether experimental tooth clenching leads to a release of algesic substances in the masseter muscle.

    METHODS:

    Thirty healthy subjects (16 females, 14 males) participated. During two sessions, separated by at least 1 week, intramuscular microdialysis was performed to collect masseter muscle 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and glutamate as well as the metabolic markers pyruvate and lactate. Two hours after the start of microdialysis, participants were randomized to a 20-min repetitive experimental tooth-clenching task (50% of maximal voluntary contraction) or a control session (no clenching). Pain and fatigue were measured throughout. The Friedman and Wilcoxon tests were used for statistical analyses.

    RESULTS:

    No alterations were observed in the concentrations of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate over time in the clenching or control session, or between sessions at various time points. Pain (P < .01) and fatigue (P < .01) increased significantly over time in the clenching session and were significantly higher after clenching than in the control session (P < .01).

    CONCLUSION:

    Low levels of pain and fatigue developed with this experimental tooth-clenching model, but they were not associated with an altered release of 5-HT, glutamate, lactate, or pyruvate. More research is required to elucidate the peripheral release of algesic substances in response to tooth clenching.

  • 5. List, T
    et al.
    Stenström, B
    Dworkin, SF
    Lundström, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    TMD in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome: A comparison with temporomandibular clinic cases and controls.1999In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 13, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    List, T
    et al.
    Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, TMD Unit, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Sect Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wahlund, K
    Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, TMD Unit, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Sect Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, B
    Psychosocial functioning and dental factors in adolescents with temporomandibular disorders: A case-control study2001In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 218-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To examine the influence of psychosocial functioning and dental factors in adolescents with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) versus healthy, subjects. Methods: The TMD sample comprised 63 patients (21 boys and 42 girls, 33% and 67%, respectively, with a mean age of 14.9 years, range 12 to 18 years) and was compared with 64 healthy control subjects (17 boys and 47 girls, 27% and 73%, respectively, with a mean age of 14.8 years). Subjects in the TMD group had to report pain once a week or more and to have a TMD pain diagnosis according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD. Participants were clinically examined and filled out a questionnaire in which self-reported psychosocial functioning was assessed on standardized measures, including the Youth Self-Report (YSR), somatic complaints, and stress. Results: No significant differences were found in dental factors among adolescents in the TMD group compared with those in the control group. Multiple pains in the body and fatigue were significantly more common in the TMD group compared with the control group. Adolescents with TMD also reported significantly higher levels of stress, somatic complaints, and aggressive behavior than their counterparts in the control group. In particular, young adolescents with TMD reported high levels of psychosocial problems. Conclusion: In adolescents with TMD, psychosocial factors such as increased levels of stress, somatic complaints, and emotional problems seem to play a more prominent role than dental factors.

  • 7. List, Thomas
    et al.
    Axelsson, Susanna
    Leijon, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Pharmacologic interventions in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders, atypical facial pain, and burning mouth syndrome. A qualitative systematic review2003In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 17, p. 301-310Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. List, Thomas
    et al.
    Leijon, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Helkimo, Martti
    Oster, Anders
    Dworkin, Samuel F.
    Svensson, Peter
    Clinical findings and psychosocial factors in patients with atypical odontalgia: A case-control study2007In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 89-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To provide a systematic description of clinical findings and psychosocial factors in patients suffering from atypical odontalgia (AO). Methods: Forty-six consecutive AO patients (7 men and 39 women, mean age, 56 years, range, 31 to 81 years) were compared with 35 control subjects (11 men and 24 women, mean age, 59 years, range, 31 to 79 years). Results: The pain of the AO patients was characterized by persistent, moderate pain intensity (mean, 5.6 +/- 1.9) with long pain duration (mean, 7.7 +/- 7.8 years). Eighty-three percent reported that onset of pain occurred in conjunction with dental treatment. No significant difference was found between the groups in number of remaining teeth or number of root fillings. Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain (P < .001), tension-type headache (P < .002), and widespread pain (P < .001) were significantly more common among AO patients than controls. Significantly higher scores for somatization (P < .01) and depression (P < .01) and limitations in jaw function (P < .001) were found for the AO group compared with the control group. Significant differences between groups were found in 4 general health domains: role-physical (P < .001), bodily pain (P < .001), vitality (P < .004), and social functioning (P < .001). Conclusion: A majority of the AO patients reported persistent, moderately intense intraoral pain that in most cases had an onset in conjunction with dental treatment. AO patients had more comorbid pain conditions and higher scores for depression and somatization. Significant limitation in jaw function and significantly lower scores on quality of life measures were found for AO patients compared with controls.

  • 9.
    Nilsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Public Dental Service, Centre for Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry.
    Drangsholt, Mark
    University of Washington.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University.
    Impact of Temporomandibular Disorder Pain in Adolescents: Differences by Age and Gender2009In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 115-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To evaluate the impact of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain by age and gender in adolescents, with assessments of this impact specifically on school absence, medication consumption, perceived need for treatment, jaw function limitation, depressive symptoms scores and somatic complaints, and graded chronic pain scale. Methods: In a population-based sample, a mailed questionnaire was sent to 350 patients with self-reported TMD pain (group 1) and 350 healthy age- and sex-matched individuals (group 2) aged 12 to 19 years 2 to 4 weeks after their annual dental examination. The groups were divided into younger (age 12 to 15) and older (age 16 to 19) groups. Descriptive statistics and 95% confidence intervals were used, and chi-square and t-tests were calculated for analyzing group differences. Odds ratios were estimated using logistic regression. Results: As expected, groups I and 2 differed significantly in most variables related to psychosocial and behavioral factors. For adolescents reporting TMD pain once a week or more, no gender or age differences in pain intensity were seen. Jaw function limitation, depressive symptoms scores, somatic complaints, graded chronic pain, and perceived need for TMD treatment were all significantly higher in girls than in boys. Older girls reported higher analgesic consumption and school absences than older boys. Conclusion: Girls reporting TMD pain had significantly greater impact on behavioral and psychosocial factors than boys. Almost one third of older girls, compared to one out of 10 older boys, reported school absences and analgesic consumption because of their TMD pain. J OROFAC PAIN 2009;23; 115-122

  • 10.
    Ohrbach, Richard
    et al.
    SUNY Buffalo, Dept Oral Diagnost Sci, Buffalo, NY 14214 USA .
    Larsson, Pernilla
    List, Thomas
    Malmo Univ, Dept Stomatognath Physiol, Malmo, Sweden.
    The jaw functional limitation scale: Development, reliability, and validity of 8-item and 20-item versions2008In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 219-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To develop the Jaw Functional Limitation Scale (JFLS), comprising 3 constructs and a global scale, based on a preliminary instrument, and to investigate content validity of the overall functional limitation construct, reliability, and generalizability. A temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patient group, compared to other diagnostic groups, was hypothesized to report further limitation in each of the 3 new proposed constructs. Methods: One hundred thirty-two consecutive patients from 5 diagnostic groups (TMD, primary Sjogren syndrome, burning mouth syndrome, skeletal malocclusion, and healthy controls) participated in a known-groups validity design. Fifty-two jaw functional limitation items were identified by an expert panel for content validity. Rasch methodology was used for item reduction and assessment of model fit. The instrument was retested 1 to 2 weeks later. Results: Three constructs (mastication, vertical jaw mobility, and emotional and verbal expression) comprising a total of 20 items were identified along with a global scale (the JFLS-20), and each exhibited excellent psychometric properties with respect to modeled variance, item fit, reliability, and internal consistency. The psychometric properties of each construct remained satisfactory when analyzed separately among the 5 diagnostic groups. Temporal stability was satisfactory. A shorter 8-item form (JFLS-8) also proved useful for assessing global functional jaw limitation. Conclusion: The JFLS-20 is an organ-specific instrument comprising 3 constructs for assessing functional status of the masticatory system, the 3 scales exhibit properties that are ideal for both research and patient evaluation in patient groups with a range of functional limitations of the jaw. The JFLS-8 emerged as a short form for measuring global functional limitation of the jaw.

  • 11.
    Yap, AUJ
    et al.
    Natl Dent Ctr, Dept Restorat Dent, Singapore, Singapore Natl Univ Singapore, Fac Dent, Dept Restorat Dent, Singapore 119074, Singapore Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, TMD Unit, Linkoping, Sweden Natl Dent Ctr, Dept Restorat Dent, Singapore, Singapore Univ Washington, Sch Dent, Dept Oral Med, Seattle, WA 98195 USA Univ Washington, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat & Behav Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Dworkin, SF
    Natl Dent Ctr, Dept Restorat Dent, Singapore, Singapore Natl Univ Singapore, Fac Dent, Dept Restorat Dent, Singapore 119074, Singapore Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, TMD Unit, Linkoping, Sweden Natl Dent Ctr, Dept Restorat Dent, Singapore, Singapore Univ Washington, Sch Dent, Dept Oral Med, Seattle, WA 98195 USA Univ Washington, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat & Behav Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Chua, EK
    Natl Dent Ctr, Dept Restorat Dent, Singapore, Singapore Natl Univ Singapore, Fac Dent, Dept Restorat Dent, Singapore 119074, Singapore Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, TMD Unit, Linkoping, Sweden Natl Dent Ctr, Dept Restorat Dent, Singapore, Singapore Univ Washington, Sch Dent, Dept Oral Med, Seattle, WA 98195 USA Univ Washington, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat & Behav Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    List, T
    Natl Dent Ctr, Dept Restorat Dent, Singapore, Singapore Natl Univ Singapore, Fac Dent, Dept Restorat Dent, Singapore 119074, Singapore Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, TMD Unit, Linkoping, Sweden Natl Dent Ctr, Dept Restorat Dent, Singapore, Singapore Univ Washington, Sch Dent, Dept Oral Med, Seattle, WA 98195 USA Univ Washington, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat & Behav Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Tan, KBC
    Natl Dent Ctr, Dept Restorat Dent, Singapore, Singapore Natl Univ Singapore, Fac Dent, Dept Restorat Dent, Singapore 119074, Singapore Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, TMD Unit, Linkoping, Sweden Natl Dent Ctr, Dept Restorat Dent, Singapore, Singapore Univ Washington, Sch Dent, Dept Oral Med, Seattle, WA 98195 USA Univ Washington, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat & Behav Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Tan, HH
    Prevalence of temporomandibular disorder subtypes, psychologic distress, and psychosocial dysfunction in Asian patients2003In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To use the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) to investigate the physical diagnoses, psychologic distress, and psychosocial dysfunction in Asian TMD patients. The RDC/TMD Axis I and II findings were compared to those of Swedish and American TMD patients. Methods: One hundred ninety-one patients (53 male and 138 female) referred to 2 institutionalized TMD clinics in Singapore were enrolled in the study. The mean age of the predominantly Chinese population (83.2%) was 33.6 +/- 9.3 years. Data from a RDC/TMD history questionnaire and clinical examination were fed directly by patients and clinicians into a computerized diagnostic system (NUS TMDv1.1). Axis I and II findings were generated on-line, based on RDC/TMD rule engines. Data were automatically exported to SPSS for statistical analysis. Results: Group I (muscle) disorders were found in 31.4% of the patients, Group II (disc displacement) disorders were found in 15.1 % and 15.7% of the patients in the left and right temporomandibular joints, respectively, and Group III (arthralgia, arthritis, and arthrosis) disorders were found in 12.6% and 13.0% of the patients in the left and right joints, respectively. Axis II assessment of psychologic status showed that 39.8% of patients experienced moderate to severe depression and 47.6% had moderate to severe nonspecific physical symptom scores. Psychosocial dysfunction was observed in only 4.2% of patients based on graded chronic pain scores. Conclusion: Axis I and II findings of Asian TMD patients were generally similar to their Swedish and American cohorts. In all 3 populations, women of child-bearing age represented the majority of patients. Muscle disorders were the most prevalent type of TMD. A substantial portion of TMD patients were depressed and experienced moderate to severe somatization.

1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf