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  • 1.
    Ahlvin, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University. Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care.
    Warnberg Gerdin, Elisabeth
    Regional Örebro County, Sweden.
    Bågesund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care.
    Ordell, Sven
    Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care.
    Self-perceived oral health among 19-year-olds in a Swedish County - A comparative study between 2004 and 20112016In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 53-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For decades, Swedish dental professionals have collected clinical epidemiological data from the dental records. To supplement the epidemiology, Ostergotland County Council decided to examine patient perceptions of oral health: self-rated knowledge, self-perceived oral health, and opinions about oral health. The aim was to compare self-perceived oral health among 19-year-olds to determine differences between genders, various municipalities and between 2004 and 2011. This study analysed the responses from two cross-sectional surveys of the entire population of 19-year-olds in Ostergotland County, Sweden, performed in 2004 and 2011. Of the 2,413 (53 %) (50 % men, 50 % women) 19-year-olds who responded to the questionnaire in 2004 and the 3,803 (67 %) (50 % men, 50 % women) in 2011, most 19-year-olds (88.1 % [2004] and 87.5 % [am]) reported satisfaction with their oral health. Around half of the respondents rated their knowledge on periodontitis as low. Boys rated their knowledge about avoiding periodontitis higher than girls (p<0.05 in 2004 and p<0.001 in 2011). In 2004, 84.7 % reported shooting pain. In 2011 that figure was 83.7 %. The respondents expressed some uncertainty about the benefits of fluoride toothpaste (7.5 % in 2004 and 9.3 % in 2011), especially the boys (10.3 % in 2004 and 10.5 % in 2011). Girls reported both a higher social impact and greater concern about aesthetics related to their oral health. They also reported headache (27.5 %) nearly twice as often as boys (14.2 %) (p>0.001). Responses between the municipalities did not differ, with the exception of items regarding periodontitis. Thus, this study found indications that perceptions of oral health and knowledge in Ostergotland County complied with Swedish Dental Act. The study also found patient perceptions of oral health among 19-year-olds to be good.

  • 2.
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    et al.
    Örebro County Council, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ordell, Sven
    Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care. Malmö University, Sweden.
    Palmetun-Ekbäck, Maria
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden; Örebro County Council, Sweden.
    Ekbäck, Gustav
    Örebro County Council, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Unell, Lennart
    Malmö University, Sweden; Örebro County Council, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ann-Katrin
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Reporting dental caries disease in longitudinal studies - a suggestion2016In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 173-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In general, most infectious and/or lifestyle-related diseases are defined as being present when sufficient signs or symptoms occurs in an individual. The term "sufficient" is a relative concept and a disease can therefore be measured with different degrees of certainty. These symptoms are commonly defined in such a way that it is possible to determine the incidence and prevalence of the disease and also the proportion of individuals that are cured from the disease. If dental caries is an individual disease which can be compared to other diseases regarding incidence and prevalence, it is important to determine for how long an individual must be free from new signs of the disease before being considered cured or free from the disease and to define the "sufficient" signs or symptoms needed for a diagnose. Based on these thoughts, the purpose of this study was to calculate caries incidence and prevalence in a group of adolescents from a definition of dental caries based on ICD-10. This study included all 12 year olds in 1990 who attended a clinical dental examination in 1990-1995 in Orebro County, Orebro, Sweden, yearly during these six years. Dental caries disease at the individual level was defined as Ko2.1 (dentinal caries) according to ICD-bo while freedom of caries was defined as the absence of Ko2.1 during a three-year period. In this study the yearly prevalence was 12%, the three year cumulative incidence was 18% and the incidence rate 13%. Results of this study highlight the poor outcomes in curing caries disease in this age-group, according to the criteria in this study, as only 17% of the children with caries at the outset of the study were free from the disease three years later. Defining both a practical level to measure signs of dental caries, and the period an individual must be free from them to be classified as cured from the disease create new opportunities to compare and communicate the disease of dental caries with other diseases. This way of registration is also of advantage for planning purposes as there the centre of interest must be the individual patient and not the tooth or surface.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Anders D
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ockert-Eriksson, Gudrun
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Linden, Las-Åke
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Alginate impressions for fixed prosthodontics: A 20 year follow up study2004In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 53-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to estimate whether the survival ratios after 20 years of fixed prosthodontics made of alginate impressions was higher, equivalent or lower, compared to the survival ratios, shown in studies, where different impression materia Is were used. 151 females and 104 males were screened regarding the condition and age of the restorations at the an nu a I check-up in one of the authors surgeries. Average ages were 55 and 54 years respectively, when the fixed prosthodontics were seated. A total of 1.271 units were produced during the twenty years, 911 abutment teeth and 360 pontics. The type of prosthetic work was divided into three groups: 1) larger fixed prosthodontics 6-14 units (469), 2) smaller fixed prosthodontics 2-5 units (541) and 3) single crowns (261). The results show that alginate impressions can produce fixed prosthodontics with survival ratios similar to those presented in other studies, after 5 years (99%) 10 years (93-96%) and 15 years (74-96%). After 20 years the survival ratio was 61-63%. In conclusion, fixed prosthodontics made according to the syringe-tray alginate impression method may have the same success rates after 20 years compared to that of fixed prosthodontics presented in previous longitudinal clinical studies where other impression materials had been used. In this study, caries and root fractures were the main reasons for removing abutment teeth and pontics.

  • 4.
    Fagrell, Tobias G.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Ullbro, Christer
    Postgrad Dent Educ Centre, Örebro.
    Lundin, Sven-Ake
    Postgrad Dent Educ Centre, Örebro.
    Koch, Goran
    Postgrad Dent Educ Centre, Örebro.
    Aetiology of severe demarcated enamel opacities - an evaluation based on prospective medical and social data from 17,000 children2011In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 57-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 1970s dentists reported an increasing prevalence of a "new" type of enamel disturbance. The disturbance was very specific, with areas of demarcated hypomineralised enamel, and was mostly found in permanent first molars and incisors. Several studies have tried to reveal the aetiology behind the enamel disturbance but so far no clear factors correlated have been found. The aim of the present study was to evaluate aetiological factors to severe demarcated opacities (SDO) in first permanent molars in a large cohort of children enrolled in the "All Babies in Southeast Sweden" (ABIS) project. ABIS is a prospective study of all children in five Swedish counties born between Oct 1,1997 and Oct 1,1999, in all about 17,000 children. They have been followed from birth with recording of a large number of factors on nutrition, diseases, medication, infections, social situation etc. With help from 89 Public Dental Service clinics in the same area preliminary examinations of the children, born between Oct 1,1997 and Oct 1,1999, reported 595 children with severe demarcated opacities (SDO) in first molars. These children and a randomly selected age matched group of 1,200 children were further invited to be examined by specialists in paediatric dentistry. At these examinations 224 severe cases were identified as well as 253 children completely without enamel disturbances among children registered in ABIS. These two groups were analysed according to any correlation between SDO and variables in the ABIS databank. The analyses showed no association between SDO and pre-, peri-, and neonatal data. However, we found a positive association between SDO and breastfeeding for more than 6 months (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-3.2), late introduction of gruel (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-2.9), and late introduction of infant formula (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.2-2.9). A combination of these three variables increased the risk to develop SDO by more than five times (OR 5.1; 95% CI 1.6-15.7). No significant associations were found to other environmental, developmental, or medical factors. We conclude that nutritional conditions during first 6 months of life may influence the risk to develop severe demarcated opacities in first permanent molars.

  • 5.
    Follin, Marie E
    et al.
    Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden..
    Lindvall, Ann-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Detection of lingual root resorptions in the intraoral radiographs - An experimental study2005In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 35-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An experimental study was undertaken in an attempt 1) to describe the possibilities to detect lingual root resorptions of upper incisors in intraoral radiographs and 2) to determine the amount of reduction that is necessary in order to detect resorptions in the radiograph. The upper right central incisor was extracted from a dry skull. In a standardized way, the root was repeatedly reduced by grinding on the lingual side at an angle of 16 degrees measured from apex to the long axis of the tooth. After each reduction the tooth was replaced in the dry skull and radiographed in a standardized manner. The radiographs were placed in two different charts and at random within each chart. On two different occasions three groups of observers, 5 orthodontists, 5 pedodontists and 5 radiologists were asked to register any detected "root resorptions" on the right first and second incisors. The first chart included radiographs with a reduction of 0-3 mm and the second chart 0-6 mm. The orthodontists and pedodontists were not very consistent in their observations and false positive registrations were very frequent. The radiologists were more accurate in their observations and detected resorptions when the reduction incorporated the apex of the root at a 3 mm level. Thus, intraoral radiographs seems to be a very blunt instrument for detecting lingual root resorptions.

  • 6.
    Frisk, Fredrik
    et al.
    nstitute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Kvist, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Axelsson, Susanna
    SBU (Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergenholtz, Gunnar
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Davidson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. SBU (Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mejare, Ingegerd
    SBU (Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Norlund, Anders
    SBU (Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Petersson, Arne
    Malmö University, Sweden .
    Sandberg, Hans
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tranaeus, Sofia
    SBU (Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Pulp exposures in adults - choice of treatment among Swedish dentists2013In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study comprises a survey of Swedish dentists treatment preferences in cases of carious exposure of the dental pulp in adults. The survey was conducted as part of a comprehensive report on methods of diagnosis and treatment in endodontics, published in 2010 by the Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment. A questionnaire was mailed to a random subsample of 2012 dental offices where one dentist at each office was requested to answer all questions. Each questionnaire contained one of three sets of questions about endodontic practice routines. Thus around one-third of the subsample received case-specific questions about treating carious exposure. Only general practitioners aged below 70 years were included. The final study sample comprised 412 participants. The dentists were presented with two case scenarios. In Case a 22-year old patient had a deep carious lesion in tooth 36 and in Case 2 a 50-year old patient had a deep carious lesion in tooth 14. The participants were asked to nominate their treatment of choice: pulp capping, partial pulpotomy or pulpectomy. For Case 1, 17 per cent of the respondents selected pulpectomy; the corresponding rate for Case 2 was 47 per cent. Female gender and age group 25-49 years were predictive of selection of less invasive treatment options. However, according to recent guidelines (2011) from the National Board of Health and Wellfare, Swedish dentists are recommended to elect pulpectomy prior to pulp capping/partial pulpotomy when confronted with a tooth having a cariously exposed pulp in adults.

  • 7.
    Göranson, Emma
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Public Dental Health Care.
    Lundström, Fredrik
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Public Dental Health Care.
    Bågesund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Public Dental Health Care.
    Outcome of orthodontic care and residual treatment need in Swedish 19-year-olds2014In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 133-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to assess the outcome of orthodontic care in Linkoping, Sweden. The dental records of 207 (107 M,100 F) 19-year-olds registered at one public dental health clinic were studied. A clinical examination was performed where malocclusions were registered, where after residual orthodontic treatment need was measured using the Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need (ICON). The 19-year-olds also filled in a questionnaire regarding residual subjective orthodontic treatment demand. Differences between genders were analysed. One hundred and ten (47 M, 63 F) individuals (53.1%) had partaken in orthodontic consultations. Orthodontic appliance treatment had been received by 86 (38 M, 48 F) individuals (41.6%). A residual orthodontic treatment need was registered in 28 (22 M, 6 F) individuals (13.5%). Residual subjective orthodontic treatment demand was expressed by 9 (3 M, 6 F) individuals (4.3%). Eight (2 M, 6 F) of those had no residual treatment need. A higher (p=0.006) rate of females (63.0%) than males (44.0%) had participated in orthodontic consultations. The proportion of males (35.5%) who had experienced orthodontic treatment was not significantly lower (p=0.069) than among the females (48.0%). However, a lower (p=0.009) proportion of treated males (55.3%; n=21 out of 38) than of treated females (81.3%; n=39 out of 48) had received their treatment by orthodontic specialists. At 19 years of age, the proportion of males with residual treatment need (20.6%) was higher (p=0.002) than among the females (6.0%). Every patient with orthodontic treatment need and -demand at 19 years of age had previously been offered orthodontic treatment. The conclusion was drawn that the orthodontic care scheme had successfully diagnosed and treated orthodontic problems in the population. However, notable differences between genders regarding treatment modalities and the amount of residual treatment need at age 19 were found.

  • 8. Halling, A
    et al.
    Ordell, S
    Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Unit Community Dent, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Emergency dental service is still needed - also for regular attenders within a comprehensive insurance system2000In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 24, no 5-6, p. 173-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe types of, and reasons for, emergency visits for regular dental attenders in the Public Dental Health Services (PDHS). The study was based on data from 895 consecutive emergency episodes collected from four PDHS clinics in the county of Ostergotland, Sweden, during a six-month period in 1994/95. Forty per cent of the dental emergency visits included children and adolescents. The most common reasons for attending were material fractures (29%), tooth fractures (19%), pain (19%) and dental traumas (12%). Seventy-three per cent of all patients and 60% of children and adolescents knew the next scheduled revision appointment. In 85% of the cases care-givers and patients were in agreement regarding the urgency of the visit. The care-givers considered 14% of the visits non-urgent, only in 1% they felt that the patient should have come earlier. The results show that emergency visits are common among regular dental care patients, but are dominated nowadays more by answering patients' questions and less by pain relief. Via systematic follow-ups and better learning from the experiences of those who seek emergency dental care, routines could be further developed and considerable benefits achieved concerning both perceived service quality and cost-effectiveness.

  • 9.
    Johansson, Gunvi
    et al.
    Halmstad Univ, Sch Social & Hlth Sci, SE-30118 Halmstad, Sweden .
    Soderfeldt, Bjorn
    Malmo Univ, Dept Oral Publ Hlth, Ctr Oral Hlth Sci, Malmo, Sweden .
    Gerdin, Elisabeth Warnberg
    Halling, Arne
    Kristianstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Kristianstad, Sweden .
    Axtelius, Bjorn
    Malmo Univ, Dept Oral Publ Hlth, Ctr Oral Hlth Sci, Malmo, Sweden .
    Ostberg, Anna-Lena
    Univ Karlstad, Dept Hlth & Environm Sci, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Measuring oral health from a public health perspective2008In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 125-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper aims to analyse measures of oral health-related quality of life (OHOOL) from a Public Health perspective. Twenty-two measures were analysed conceptually as to their mirroring of the Public Health principles: empowerment, participation, holism and equity. Elements of empowerment were found in connection with application of the measures. Participation was found in using lay opinions during development in 12 measures. All measures analysed had elements of a holistic approach so far that they were not wholly biological. Two measures captured positive health effects. Measures were available for all ages, various languages and populations, an element of equity. No measure was wholly compatible with Public Health. They were based on a utilitarian theory not in full accordance with modern health promotion. There is a need to develop measures that more obviously capture the positive aspects of health and health as a process, as well as the personal perspective of oral health.

  • 10.
    Johansson, Karl-Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Starkhammar Johansson, Carin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ravald, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The prevalence and alterations of furcation involvements 13 to 16 years after periodontal treatment2013In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 87-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long term outcome of furcation involved molars in a population treated for periodontal disease. Initially, the study sample was 147 referred periodontal patients. Periodontal treatment consisted of oral hygiene instructions, supra- and subgingival scaling and periodontal surgery. After treatment 99 patients participated in a two year study on root caries. The patients got maintenance treatment every third to fourth month during 2 years. At the end of that study the patients were periodontally healthy and were referred back for supportive treatment to the referring dentist. Thirteen to 16 years after periodontal treatment 81 patients were still alive and 64 accepted a re-examination. At the start of the observation period the remaining 64 patients had in total 1537 teeth. During the 13 to 16 year follow up 217 teeth were lost. The number of molars at baseline was 361. The number of furcation involvement with different degrees were; 267 (0), 67 (I), 25 (II) and 2 (III) respectively. Totally 69 molars were lost during follow up. The proportion of molar loss according to the degree of furcation involvements 0 to III at baseline were 15%, 29%, 40% and 100% respectively. It was a significant greater risk of loosing an initially furcation involved molar than a single rooted tooth (pandlt;0.0001). The risk of loosing an initially furcated molar increased with the degree of furcation involvement (degree I; pandlt;0.05, degree II; pandlt;0.01). I N CONCLUSION: During a long term observation period molars with furcation involvements are more frequently lost than not furcation involved molars. However, two thirds are still in function 13 to 16 years after treatment which indicate that molars with furcation involvements might survive long after periodontal treatment.

  • 11.
    Josefsson, E
    et al.
    Ctr Orthodont Pediat Dent Periodontol, Motala, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Halling, A
    Influence of economic restraints and reduced specialist resources on delivery and quality of orthodontic care2000In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 165-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1993 and 1994, economic restrictions were introduced in the County of Ostergotland. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence on delivery and quality of orthodontic care, i.e. any subsequent change in number of patients receiving orthodontic treatment both by General Public Dental Service (GPDS) and by specialist clinic, the choice of appliance, and treatment outcomes, and also any changes in the total number of appliance treatments by general practitioners. Records were examined for 236 and 213 patients registered in 1994 and 1997, respectively, at an orthodontic clinic in the western district of Ostergotland. The total number of appliance treatments by general practitioners was estimated. The number of patients receiving initial treatment by a general practitioner and subsequently by an orthodontist, was relatively unchanged during the period. Quad helix predominated in both 1994 and 1997. The best treatment outcomes were achieved by quad helix and maxillary removable appliances, and the poorest by activators and headgear. In conclusion the total number of appliance treatments by general practitioners decreased as well as treatments requiring patient compliance over an extended period, findings which might be a consequence of the coincident economic restriction.

  • 12.
    Jälevik, Birgitta
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Public Dental Health Care. University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Klingberg, Gunilla
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Ctr Rare Disorders, Gothenburg, Sweden; Malmö University, Sweden .
    Pain sensation and injection techniques in maxillary dento-alveolar surgery procedures in children - a comparison between conventional and computerized injection techniques (The Wand (R))2014In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 67-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Local anesthesia, especially palatal injection, is often associated with fear and anxiety. The aim was to compare the sensation of pain when using palatal block technique with computerized injection technique (CIT), to conventional infiltration technique with traditional syringe in surgical procedures involving the palate. Patients referred for bilateral minor maxillary surgical treatments were randomized for traditional infiltration anesthesia on one side and palatal block anesthesia with CIT on the other side. AMSA and P-ASA approaches were used with CIT. The sensation of pain was scored by the VAS scale. Twenty-eight patients were included in the study, whereof 17 (61%) were girls. The median age was 14.8 yrs. (12.6 - 17.8). Bilateral exposure of palatal impacted canines was the most common treatment. The injection pain was significantly lower, (p = 0.009), when using the CIT injection compared to conventional injection. However, with time-consuming surgery, additional CIT analgesic solution had to be injected in the buccal gingiva when suturing, in one fourth of the cases. Patients sedated with nitrous oxide seemed to benefit less from CIT. Computerized injection techniques, including P-ASA and AMSA approaches, reduces the sensation of pain when carrying out less time-consuming palatal dental surgery, especially in non-sedated teenagers.

  • 13. Lundström, Åsa
    et al.
    Jendel, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: endomed.
    Stenström, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ravald, Nils
    Periodontal conditions in 70-year-old women with osteoporosis.2001In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 25, p. 89-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Ordell, Sven
    et al.
    Public Dental Service, Motala Sweden.
    Stenström, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL.
    Aspects of the quality of the information contained in radiological referrals2002In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 135-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A referral letter is an important carrier of information, and it is important that it contains what both the recipient and the referrers expect. Based on the concept of perceived quality of service, 126 consecutive referrals from the General Dental Service (GDS) and their associated replies from the Department of Oral Radiology (OR) were mutually evaluated. OR judged that necessary information about the patient was specified in over 80% of the cases, and that information pertinent to the issue and the proposed examination was included in over 90% of the cases. The referrers were very satisfied with the replies they received. Only 1% reported that the information contained in the reply was not satisfactory for the continued care of the patient. Ninety-one per cent reported that they felt the reply to their referral was adequately long. A mutual questionnaire is a practicable tool to ensure quality in the referral process.

  • 15.
    Ordell, Sven
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Unell, Lennart
    Malmö University.
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Public Dental Service.
    An analysis of present dental professions in Sweden2006In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 30, p. 155-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dentistry in Sweden is predicted to have a shortage of dentists in the future and the division of labour within dentistry will be a more debated question. In order to forecast the effects of such a shortage the professional status of the involved groups must be made clearer. The objective of this paper is to analyse the emergence and present professional status of clinical dental professions in Sweden. The study was conducted on the basis of theories on professions, and their roles in organizations was analysed.The results were applied on the historical emergence, establishment and consolidation of clinical dental professions in Sweden. The results show that a large sector of salaried dentists has not diminished the professional status of the Swedish dentists. Professional ambitions such as many clinical subspecialties and a strong element of research have not been restrained by the public health ambitions in the Public Dental Health Service (PDHS). Presently, other dental professions are dental hygienists, dental technicians and dental nurses. Of these the only other licensed group, the dental hygienists, are an emerging profession.They have an uphill struggle to obtain a full professional status, mainly because their knowledge domains are neither specific nor exclusive to their group. Development of a common core curriculum on a clearly academic level would enhance their professional status. Dental technicians and nurses are lacking fundamental traits as professions. There appears to be little need for additional groups of clinical professions besides dentists and dental hygienists in Swedish dentistry. In conclusion,this analysis provided better understanding of the present status of the Swedish dental professions, to prepare for future restructuring of the dental care system. Further work will be needed to understand the impact of professional traits on the management of groups of professionals.

  • 16.
    Rolander, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenström, Ulf
    Växjö University.
    Jonker, Dirk
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Relationships between psychosocial work environmental factors, personality, physical work demands and workload in a group of Swedish dentists2008In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 197-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate, in a group of 77 Swedish dentists (36 males, 41 females) working in dental clinics, possible effects of psychosocial work environmental factors, personality traits, and social desirability tendencies on their reporting of their workload and of the physical demands placed on them.

    Participants were given questionnaires for assessing their workload, the physical and psychosocial demands of their job,their social support at work, and their control over their work situation, using a 10-cm visual analogue scale (V.A.S.). The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPO) was also given to assess neuroticism and extraversion and the Marlowe-Crown SD-scale to measure tendencies to answer questions in a socially desirable manner.

    As in two earlier studies of ours, very high assessments were made of workload, physical work demands and social support. Higher assessments of workload and of physical work demands were found in those assessing the psychosocial work demands placed on them to be higher. Those assessing the work load of their job as higher also considered themselves to have less control over their work situation and were less extraverted.

    Despite these dentists perceiving themselves as being faced with a stressful work situation involving a high workload, strong physical and psychosocial demands being placed on them and their having a low degree of control over their work situation, the high degree of social support they experienced may have made their work situation less stressful.

  • 17.
    Rolander, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenström, Urban
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö.
    Jonker, Dirk
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Relationships between psychosocial work environmental factors, personality, physical work demands and workload in a group of Swedish dentists2008In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 32, p. 197-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate, in a group of 77 Swedish dentists (36 males, 41 females) working in dental clinics, possible effects of psychosocial work environmental factors, personality traits, and social desirability tendencies on their reporting of their workload and of the physical demands placed on them. Participants were given questionnaires for assessing their workload, the physical and psychosocial demands of their job, their social support at work, and their control over their work situation, using a 10-cm visual analogue scale (V.A.S.). The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) was also given to assess neuroticism and extraversion and the Marlowe-Crown SD-scale to measure tendencies to answer questions in a socially desirable manner. As in two earlier studies of ours, very high assessments were made of workload, physical work demands and social support. Higher assessments of workload and of physical work demands were found in those assessing the psychosocial work demands placed on them to be higher. Those assessing the work load of their job as higher also considered themselves to have less control over their work situation and were less extraverted. Despite these dentists perceiving themselves as being faced with a stressful work situation involving a high workload, strong physical and psychosocial demands being placed on them and their having a low degree of control over their work situation, the high degree of social support they experienced may have made their work situation less stressful.

  • 18.
    Schüttert, Eva Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden .
    Alstad, Vera
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Malmö University, Sweden .
    Orthognathic surgery - postoperative clinical and radiographic follow-up routines at Swedish oral and maxillofacial surgery departments2012In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 109-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Orthognathic surgery is a frequent procedure at Swedish Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Departments. The number of clinical and radiographic postoperative follow-up examinations and the choice of radiographic methods seem to vary. The intention with this study was to find out when postoperative clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed following orthognathic surgery and the type of radiographic examinations that were used. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanIn 2009, all Swedish Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Departments in the Public Health Service (25 centres) were given a form containing standardized questions on the time for clinical follow-up after orthognathic surgery and the radiographic examinations used. A pilot study on 49 consecutive patients at one of the centres was performed to determine if the postoperative radiographic examinations added additional information, leading to further procedures compared to the clinical observations only. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA one-year follow-up was the most frequently used clinical control reported by 15 centres, and a six-month follow-up, the next most frequent. At 14 of the 15 centres, radiographic examinations were included at the one-year follow-up. A five-year clinical and radiographic follow-up was reported by two centres. One or, at the most, two postoperative radiographic follow-up sessions were reported by 68% of the centres. Profile and panoramic imaging were most often used. In the evaluation of the postoperative handling of the 49 consecutive patients in the pilot study, a radiolucency around a fixation screw noted radiographically was the only additional postoperative radiological finding that resulted in a surgical procedure. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPostoperative clinical and radiographic follow-up routines following orthognathic surgery vary considerably between the Swedish Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Departments. There appears to be a need for studies on the value of the information, which repeated postoperative clinical and radiographic follow-up controls add in routine medical attendance.

  • 19.
    Sjögren, Petteri
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Public Dental Service. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cost of composite and glass ionomer class II molar restorations and theoretical analyses of cost per year of function at Public Dental Services in Sweden2006In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 99-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to evaluate the cost of direct composite and glass ionomer class II molar restorations, and the theoretical cost per year of function, at Public Dental Services (PDS) in Sweden, years 2000 and 2005. Costs for patients, Social Insurance Offices (SI; Försäkringskassan), and total cost, were calculated based on fee schedules from all PDS in Sweden. Theoretical cost per year calculations were based on the median survival times (MST) of failed direct composite and glass ionomer class II molar restorations, derived from a set of clinical studies conducted in Nordic general practices. Due to lack of national statistics from SI, the number of direct restorations including more than one surface, made in adults, in general dentistry at PDS in the county of Halland were studied. From the year 2000 to year 2005, the total cost of composite class II molar restorations increased by 25 %, whereas the total cost of glass ionomer restorations more than doubled. Theoretical calculations implied a higher cost per year of function for composite restorations in year 2000, whereas in year 2005, glass ionomer restorations had a higher cost per year of function. The cost of direct composite and glass ionomer class II molar restorations increased from year 2000 to 2005, at PDS in Sweden. In the context of planning public health care funding, theoretical models for cost prediction may prove useful.

  • 20.
    Ståhlnacke, Katri
    et al.
    Community Dental Office, Örebro County Council.
    Unell, L.
    Community Dental Office, Örebro County Council.
    Söderfeldt, B.
    Malmö University.
    Ekbäck, G.
    Community Dental Office, Örebro County Council.
    Ordell, Sven
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Public Dental Service, Centre for Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry.
    Self-perceived oral health among 65 and 75 years old in two Swedish counties2010In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 107-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate self-perceived oral health in two elderly populations, ages 65 and 75 years, and its relation to background factors, socioeconomic, individual, and dental health service system factors. Another purpose was to investigate if there were any differences in these respects, between the two age groups, born in 1932 or 1942. In two counties in Sweden, Örebro and Östergötland, all persons born in 1942 have been surveyed by mail every fifth year since 1992. In the year 2007 all persons born in 1932 were also surveyed using the same questionnaire. Those born in 1932 consisted of 3735 persons and those born in 1942 6078 persons. From an outline of a general model of inequalities in oral health data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and contingency tables with ?2 analysis. Multivariable analysis was performed by using multiple regression analysis. Factors related to self-perceived oral health were age group, social network, ethnicity, education, general health, tobacco habits, oral hygiene routines, dental visit habits and cost for care. The self-perceived oral health was overall rather high, especially in view of the studied ages, although it was worse for those of age 75. Socio-economic factors, dental health service system as well as individual lifestyle factors affected self-perceived oral health. To have a satisfying dental appearance, in the aspect of how you are judged by other people, was important for these age groups.This presents a challenge for dental health planners especially since the proportion of older age groups are growing.

  • 21.
    Svanberg, Christina
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care. County Council Jamtland, Sweden.
    Norevall, Lars-Inge
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekman, Bertil
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Wahlberg Topp, Jeanette
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Bågesund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care.
    Cephalometric analysis of adults with Turner syndrome2016In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder of females with a prevalence of 1/2000-3000 live female births. The aim of this study was to compare cephalometric variables from adult women diagnosed with TS to a standardized reference group of 31-year old healthy women, and to evaluate the possible effects of human growth hormone (hGH) therapy in women with TS. Registered TS subjects in the Southeast region of Sweden were invited to take part in the study. Twenty-one women aged 36 +/- 13(18-57) years accepted participation. Lateral radiographs of the head were analyzed using standard cephalometric methods (Hasund analysis) and with the commercially available soft-ware program FACAD. Comparisons were made with roentgen-cephalometric standards from a reference group of nineteen 31-year old Swedish women. Analysis of the cephalometric radiographs from the TS subjects showed a more retrognathic maxilla (SNA 80.3 +/- 5.4) (p=0.0460) and mandible (SNB 77.0 +/- 5.2) (p=0.0014), and a correspondingly backward position of the chin (SN/Pg 78.9 +/- 5.5) (p=0.0046) as compared to the reference values of 31-year old women (SNA 83.2 +/- 3.0, SNB 81.5 +/- 2.3 and SNPg 83.0 +/- 2.3, respectively). In addition there was an increased posterior inclination of the maxilla (SN/NL 8.6 +/- 4.1), as compared to the reference values (SN/NL 5,3 +/- 2.7) (p=0.0048). There were no significant differences regarding sagittal or vertical jaw relations, mandibular inclination or cranial base angle between the TS-group and the 31-year olds with the reference values. No significant difference was seen in jaw relationship, as measured by the ANB value, however the Wits(index) (3.3 +/- 3.5) was higher (p=0.0001) than the reference values (-0.1 +/- 1.8). Subjects with or without previous hGH administration did not show any significant differences in cephalometric values. In conclusion, women with TS had a significantly more retrognathic maxilla (SNA) and mandible (SNB) and a correspondingly significantly posterior position of the chin (SN/Pg), a significantly increased posterior inclination of the maxilla (SN/NL) and a significantly increased Witsindex as compared to the reference group of 31-year old women. No craniofacial variables differed significantly between previously hGH-treated and not hGH-treated women with TS.

  • 22.
    Tegelberg, A
    et al.
    Cent Hosp Vasteras, Dept Stomatognath Physiol, SE-72189 Vasteras, Sweden Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, TMD Unit, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Gothenburg, Fac Odontol, Dept Stomatognath Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    List, T
    Cent Hosp Vasteras, Dept Stomatognath Physiol, SE-72189 Vasteras, Sweden Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, TMD Unit, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Gothenburg, Fac Odontol, Dept Stomatognath Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wahlund, K
    Cent Hosp Vasteras, Dept Stomatognath Physiol, SE-72189 Vasteras, Sweden Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, TMD Unit, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Gothenburg, Fac Odontol, Dept Stomatognath Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wenneberg, B
    Cent Hosp Vasteras, Dept Stomatognath Physiol, SE-72189 Vasteras, Sweden Specialist Ctr Oral Rehabil, TMD Unit, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Gothenburg, Fac Odontol, Dept Stomatognath Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Temporomandibular disorders in children and adolescents: A survey of dentists' attitudes, routine and experience2001In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 119-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to survey the experience and routine of, attitudes toward, and need for specialist resources in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in children and adolescents among public dentists. A questionnaire study was conducted in three counties in Sweden: Ostergotland, Vastmanland, and Goteborg. The questionnaire was sent to 286 Public Dental Service dentists. It contained questions on demographic issues, quality assurance, clinical experience and expertise, attitudes, and the need for specialist resources. Eighty-seven per cent (250) of the dentists answered the questionnaire. The dentists in the three areas reported good routine and safety in occlusal splint treatments (74%-81%), occlusal equilibration (28%-55%), jaw exercise (25%-29%), and medication treatments (3%-55%). Good experience concerning diagnostics and therapy decision was reported by 25%-50% of the dentists. A significantly greater portion of the dentists in Vastmanland had attended courses in TMD compared with the two other counties (p=0.001). Registrations of quality variables such as verbal and/or written case histories with questions on facial pain and tension-type headache (1%-39%) and measurements of jaw openings were performed less frequently in the three counties (0%-5%). Fifty-five per cent of the dentists had a positive attitude toward the care of children and adolescents with TMD. A large need for specialist resources with the possibility to send referrals or to consult was reported by 98%-100% of the respondents, to participate in continuing education by 97%-98%, and to do auscultation by 61%-82%. In conclusion, many of the dentists lacked routines for making diagnoses, deciding therapy, and judging treatment results. Good routines were reported only in occlusal splint therapy. The majority of the dentists had a positive attitude toward the care of children and adolescents with TMD-related symptoms. The majority of the dentists reported a great need for TMD specialists.

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